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Found 7 results

  1. The final table for the PokerStars NL Hold’em Players Championship is set. On Thursday, the final eight players will take their seats to play for a massive $5.1 million first-place prize in what is the largest $25,000 tournament of all time. New York tournament professional Scott Baumstein once again finished the day as the overnight chip leader with 10,725,000 chips. Baumstein, had a roller coaster ride on Day 4, even finding himself all in, at risk and behind only to survive and go on an incredible heater. “It’s a little surreal at the moment, with all of the chips, getting lucky,” said Baumstein in an interview with PocketFives. Two Platinum Pass winners have made the final table including Marc Rivera, who sits right behind Baumstein in terms of chips (10,350,000). Rivera won his Platinum Pass by winning the APPT Manila National in August 2018 and is representing the Philippines at the final table. Rivera and Baumstein are the only two players of the final eight to have more than 10 million in chips which equates to more than 40 big blinds. France’s Julien Martini (8,600,000) continues to find himself towards the top of the end of day chip counts as he has since the completion of Day 2. Colombian pro Farid Jattin (8,525,000), the Day 2 chip leader, also had a very swingy day. He started Day 3 with his chip stack 36th out of 38. However, and with his well-timed aggression and plenty of rungood he, at one point, soared into the chip lead. Jattin finishes the day fourth in chips. The second of the Platinum Pass winners, Ramon Colillas (8,300,000) along with the U.S's Jason Koonce (7,125,000), Day 1 chip leader Talal Shakerchi and Canada’s Marc Perrault (2,275,000) fill out what looks to be an entertaining final table. Those players that were unable to make it through the day but still secured very healthy paydays by making the final two tables include Florian Duta (9th for $405,000), PocketFiver Pedro ‘PaDiLhA SP’ Padilha (10th, $328,500), Kristen ‘krissyb24’ Bicknell (11th, $328,500), Jake Schwartz (12th, $261,750) and Former PocketFives #1-ranked Griffin ‘Flush_Entity’ Benger (14th, $229,700). Other notable names who made it to Day 4 but were knocked out throughout the day include Scott Stewart ($202,400), Platinum Pass winner Michael Robionek ($150,600), Marvin Rettenmaier ($126,000), Dan O’Brien ($105,000), Mikita Badziakouski ($88,600), Tony Gregg ($86,400) and Platinum Pass winner from Boring, Oregon Jackie Burkhart who finished in 38th place for a career-high score of $86,400. There is still $15.4 million of the over $26.4 million prize pool to be fought over. Six of the top eight will earn themselves no less than $1 million. The final day of play in the PSPC resumes on Thursday a noon ET. 2019 PSPC Final Table Chip Counts 1. Scott Baumstein - 10,725,000 2. Marc Rivera - 10,350,000 3. Julien Martini - 8,600,000 4. Farid Jattin - 8,525,000 5. Ramon Colillas - 8,3000,000 6. Jason Koonce - 7,125,000 7. Talal Shakerchi - 5,500,000 8. Marc Perrault - 2,275,000
  2. August is the time to go 'Big' or go home. The 2019 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open takes place at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, FL and will run from August 1-13 with a 27-event schedule culminating in the return of their four featured tournaments, dubbed ‘The Big 4’. The schedule gets off to a fast start with a multi-flight $1 million guaranteed $600 DeepStack and is followed by a full slate of tournaments with wide-ranging variants and buy-ins that will attract every level of player, leading up to the starting dates of The Big 4. The Big 4 Since 2015, the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open has hosted The Big 4, four individual tournaments that all play down to a final table together so they can be live-streamed on the same day at the same time. This year the Big 4 include: $5,250 SHRPO Championship - $3 million guarantee $2,650 NLHE - $1 million guarantee $1,100 NLHE - $500,000 guarantee $25,500 High Rollers - $2 million guarantee. Since 2013, SHRPO has been a favorite destination for poker pros from all over the world. Headed into their fifth year of the The Big 4 promotion, organizers are looking forward to making 2019 the biggest Big 4 yet with all eyes on the $5,250 Main Event. $5,250 SHRPO Championship In 2014, the year before SHRPO Championship was a part of The Big 4, Daniel Colman took down the $5,300 tournament for $1.44 million. The $5 million guaranteed SHRPO Championship event drew 907 runners in 2015 and the big story was that Colman returned to the final table, looking to go back-to-back and defend his 2014 SHRPO Championship title. In the end Colman couldn’t get there, falling in third place for $310,000 as Omar Zazay went on to win the $1,000,000 first-place prize for a career-high score. Pennsylvania’s Paul Volpe also made an appearance at this final table, but he ended up hitting the rail in eighth place for $100,000. Even though registration dipped in 2016, the tournament still held a $5 million guarantee. That meant there was a healthy overlay for the field of top-tier players who made the trip. Ryan Fair and Joe Serock joined regular high rollers Seth Davies and Jason Koon at the final table where Koon ended up taking home the title and his very first seven-figure score of $1 million. In 2017, the tournament reduced the guarantee to $3 million when Australia’s Martin Kozlov picked up the largest cash of his career by winning the $754,083 first-place prize. Matt Berkey finished in third place this year while Aaron Mermelstein, Adam Levy, and Joe Kuether all also had a seat at the final table. Then, just last year, Brandon Eisen denied Jeremy Ausmus the title in 2018, taking home $771,444 for the win. Familiar faces Joseph Cheong, Jared Griener and Ryan D’Angelo also made the final table in what was the largest SHRPO Championship field in The Big 4 era with 914 runners. Big Buy-In, Big Moments The Big 4 have had plenty of standout performances outside of the Main Event over the years. As one might expect, the $25K High Roller has always been flush with big-name pros looking to take home six-figure scores. In 2015, Florida’s All-Time Money List leader, Jason Mercier, took down the $25K High Roller for over $517K in his own backyard, surviving an all-star final table that included runner-up Ian O’Hara, Sean Winter, Ankush Mandavia, Barry Hutter, David ‘Doc’ Sands, and Phil Laak. One year later, Marvin Rettenmaier denied Daniel Colman another SHRPO title by taking first place and over $787K. John Andress took home the High Roller title in 2017 and then in 2018, Jake Schindler topped the 123 player field for a score of over $800K after defeating Shaun Deeb heads up. Another amazing Big 4 feat has been the performance of the GPI #1-ranked player Alex Foxen who, in 2017 took down the $2,650 NLHE for $204,600 and then followed that up by defending his title in that even in 2018 for another $208,452. All the action from the 2019 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open begins on August 1 with all four of the Big 4 set to be live-streamed on August 13. 2019 SHRPO Schedule of Events DATE EVENT # EVENT TIME BUY-IN 8/1 1A Deep Stack NLH Flight A (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 11:00 AM $600 8/1 1B Deep Stack NLH Flight B (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 6:00 PM $600 8/2 1C Deep Stack NLH Flight C (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 11:00 AM $600 8/2 1D Deep Stack NLH Flight D (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 6:00 PM $600 8/3 1E Deep Stack NLH Flight E (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 11:00 AM $600 8/3 1F Deep Stack NLH Flight F (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 6:00 PM $600 8/4 1 Day 2 1:00 PM -- 8/1 2 Omaha 8 Or Better (Re-Entry) - $30,000 GTD - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/2 3 H.O.R.S.E. (Re-Entry) - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/3 4 PLO 8 (Re-Entry) - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/4 5 Deep Stack NLH (Re-Entry) - $50,000 GTD - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/4 6 Purple Chip Bounty (Single Re-Entry) - $100,000 GTD 3:00 PM $1,700 8/5 6 Day 2 2:00 PM -- 8/5 7 Seniors 50+ (Re-Entry) - One Day Event 11:00 AM $400 8/5 8 Big Stack Black Chip Bounty NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $50,000 GTD - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/5 9 PLO (Re-Entry) - One Day Event 3:00 PM $400 8/5 10 Big Stack NLH (Re-Entry) - $30,000 GTD - $5,250 Championship Seat Added - One Day Event 6:00 PM $150 8/6 11 Six-Max NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $100,000 GTD - One Day Event 11:00 AM $600 8/6 12 Big O (Re-Entry) - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/6 13 Omaha 8/Stud 8 (Single Re-Entry) - One Day Event 3:00 PM $400 8/6 14 Eight-Handed Turbo NLH (Freeze-Out) - One Day Event 5:00 PM $1,100 8/7 15 Eight-Handed NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $200,000 GTD - One Day Event 12:00 PM $2,200 8/7 16 Jeff Conine Celebrity Poker Classic - One Day Charity Event 7:00 PM $300 8/8 17 Six-Max Big Stack NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $100,000 GTD - One Day Event 12:00 PM $1,100 8/8 18 Super High Roller NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD - Held In Salon East 1:00 PM $50,000 8/9 18 Day 2 1:00 PM -- 8/8 19 Six-Max PLO (Single Re-Entry) - One Day Event 3:00 PM $400.00 8/9 20A SHRPO Championship Day 1A (Single Re-Entry) - $3,000,000 GTD 11:00 AM $5,250.00 8/10 20B SHRPO Championship Day 1B (Single Re-Entry) - $3,000,000 GTD 11:00 AM $5,250.00 8/11 20 Day 2 12:00 PM -- 8/12 20 Day 3 12:00 PM -- 8/13 20 Final Table Televised And Live Streamed As Part Of The Big 4 1:00 PM -- 8/11 21 NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 2:00 PM $2,650 8/12 21 Day 2 12:00 PM -- 8/13 21 Final Table Televised And Live Streamed As Part Of The Big 4 1:00 PM -- 8/12 22 NLH (Re-Entry) - $500,000 GTD 11:00 AM $1,100 8/13 22 Final Table Televised And Live Streamed As Part Of The Big 4 1:00 PM -- 8/12 23 High Roller (Re-Entry) - $2,000,000 GTD - Held In Salon East 12:00 PM $25,500 8/13 23 Final Table Televised And Live Streamed As Part Of The Big 4 1:00 PM -- 8/11 24A NLH Day 1A (Re-Entry) - $50,000 GTD 5:00 PM $150 8/12 24B NLH Day 1B (Re-Entry) - $50,000 GTD 5:00 PM $150 8/13 24 Day 2 - Held In The Poker Room 5:00 PM -- 8/12 25 PLO (Re-Entry) 6:00 PM $2,650 8/13 25 Day 2 - Held In The Poker Room 3:00 PM -- 8/13 26 Deep Stack Turbo (Re-Entry) - $30,000 GTD - Held In Salon East - One Day Event 11:00 AM $400 8/13 27 NLH (Re-Entry) - $500,000 GTD - Held In Salon East - One Day Event 12:00 PM $10,000
  3. Somewhere tonight in Berlin, Greek restaurateur Makarios Avramidis (pictured) is likely celebrating the accomplishment of a lifelong goal. Don't be surprised however if there aren't too many locals celebrating with him. Avramidis beat a final table that included three Germans to win the €2,200 Six Max No Limit Hold'em event at WSOP Europe and with it the first ever World Series of Poker bracelet awarded in Germany. Avramidis beat German Frederic Schwarzer heads-up to claim the €105,000 ($119,266 US) first place prize money and that coveted bracelet. His previous best score was for just over $60,000 for an eighth place finish at the Master Classics of Poker in 2011. Schwarzer earned €64,930 for finishing second. The other German players who fell just short of becoming the envy of their countrymen were Paul Michaelis and Marvin Rettenmaier. Michaelis actually sent two players to the rail on his way to being the overwhelming chip leader at one point. First, he busted Rettenmaier in sixth and then PocketFiver Stephen stevie444 Chidwick in fourth place. Sandwiched between those two bustouts was the only American player at the final table. Californian Rick Alvarado, who started the day second in chips, was eliminated by Chidwick in fifth place. Alvarado now has seven WSOP cashes this year, including three final tables. Chidwick, who started the final table with the chip lead, was unable to maintain the momentum he had at the end of Day 2 and scored his eighth 2015 WSOP cash, earning €32,600 in the process. Following Chidwick's bustout, Michaelis found himself with 58% of the chips three-handed. It went downhill from there. The key hand came just a few minutes into Level 24 (10,000/20,000 - 3,000 ante). From the button, Avramidis raised to 50,000, Schwarzer folded the small blind before Michaelis moved all-in from the big blind. Avramidis called with his tournament life on the line and tabled Jh-Js before Michaelis showed Tc-Td. The board ran out Qs-Jd-9d-Ah-4d to double up into the chip lead. Michaelis was eliminated just five minutes later when he again found himself all-in pre-flop with a smaller pocket pair than his opponent. Schwarzer held pocket jacks to Michaelis' pocket tens. Michaelis got no help from the dealer and was out in third place. Heads-up play lasted a little over an hour with the two players swapping the chip lead back and forth a few times before Avramidis finished off Schwarzer to win his first career bracelet. There is one event underway at Spielbank Casino in Berlin, the €550 Oktoberfest No Limit Hold'em, with another eight on the schedule. A new event starts each day this week until the €10,450 Main Event next Sunday. Final Table Payouts Makarios Avramidis - €105,000 Frederic Schwarzer - €64,930 Paul Michaelis - €45,860 Stephen Chidwick - €32,600 Rick Alvarado - €23,310 Marvin Rettenmaier - €16,740
  4. It has been a rough end of 2014 for sponsored pros of some of the largest online poker sites in the world. If you're a regular reader of PocketFives, you'll know last month, PokerStarsparted ways with Marcel Luske and 2009 World Series of Poker Main Event winner jcada99 Joe Cada. In August, it was more of the same, as PokerStars parted wayswith Jose "Nacho" Barbero, Angel Guillen, and longtime pro Humberto Brenes. Around the same time, Ultimate Poker, a regulated US site, trimmed its roster of names like William Reynolds XOReynolds, Jeremy Ausmus, Phil USCphildoCollins, and Brent bhanks11Hanks. Reynolds responded by going on a Twitter tirade against his former employer. Jason JCarver Somerville left Ultimate Poker in recent days. So, yes, being a sponsored pro of an online poker site has been anything but stable recently. Enter Marvin Rettenmaier (pictured above), who had been on the roster of Team PartyPoker for the last two-and-a-half years. On Sunday, he announced via Facebook that he had left the PartyPoker stable: "I would like to thank PartyPoker for the good collaboration and the fun times over the last 2.5 years. Don't worry, just because I won't be with Party anymore doesn't mean that I'll need to decrease the partying in my lifestyle." The German pro added, "I'm playing Day 1 of EPT London today and since I won the first tournament with PartyPoker, it's just common sense that I will win the first one without them as well! Good luck everybody!" As outlined by F5 Poker, Rettenmaier spent two years in the top 10 of the Global Poker Index. And, according to the latter site, he spent 18 weeks at #1. He is #7 on the all-time money list for Germany, according to the Hendon Mob, and has turned in a variety of top-tier wins over the years, including the France Poker Series Main Event in Paris for $332,000 in 2011 and the following year's WPT Championship in Las Vegas for $1.1 million. In late 2012, Rettenmaier won WPT Cyprus for $287,000 and took down the EPT Prague High Roller Event several months later for another $477,000. He has $4.7 million in live winnings and passed $500,000 in winnings from brick-and-mortar tournaments every year since 2010. Rettenmaier was still listed as a PartyPoker Team Pro on the site's blog when we checked it out. Kara Scott and WPT host Mike Sexton round out the squad. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  5. The World Poker Tour was back at Gardens Casino in Southern California for the second time in Season XVII, this time for the WPT Gardens Poker Championship. Six players remain from the 253-entry field, and it was Frank Stepuchin who bagged the chip lead. Stepuchin was joined at the official final table by Shannon Shorr, Steve Sung, Brent Roberts, Ray Qartomy, and Jonathan Abdellatif. The $10,000 buy-in event was the first WPT Main Tour event to feature the delayed TV final table format. After playing down to the final six players on Wednesday, January 16, 2019, the tournament was put on ice for what will be nearly two months before play resumes on Tuesday, March 12 - 55 days, to be exact. That is when the final six will compete for the $548,825 top prize at the HyperX Esports Arena at the Luxor Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. Stepuchin, who hails from Park City, Utah, and entered this event with $354,625 in live tournament earnings, bagged the chip lead in a very large way, with 4.065 million in chips. The next closest was Shorr with 1.71 million. Belgian player Jonathan Abdellatif, who held nearly $1.7 million in live tournament earnings entering the Season XVII WPT Gardens Poker Championship, finished as the short stack with 555,000. WPT Gardens Poker Championship Final Table Seat 1: Shannon Shorr - 1,710,000 Seat 2: Frank Stepuchin - 4,065,000 Seat 3: Brent Roberts - 1,385,000 Seat 4: Jonathan Abdellatif - 555,000 Seat 5: Ray Qartomy - 820,000 Seat 6: Steve Sung - 1,580,000 Road To the Final Table Stepuchin emerged as a big stack right out of the gate. He finished as the Day 1a chip leader and was second in chips entering Day 2. At the time, he was behind another player that reached the final table, Qartomy. Stepuchin finished sixth in chips after Day 2 when Shorr bagged the chip lead, then Stepuchin led the final 19 players after Day 3 before riding that chip lead into the final table. On Day 4, Stepuchin eliminated Toby Lewis in seventh place and Allen Pock in 15th place. Eliminating Lewis in seventh set the official WPT final table, and it came just before 10 p.m. PT on Wednesday when the tournament was in Level 24 with the blinds at 15,000-30,000 with a 30,000 big blind ante, according to WPT coverage. Shorr had opened with a raise from the cutoff seat to 60,000, Lewis called from the button, and Stepuchin called from the small blind. The flop was [poker card="Jc"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2h"] and action checked to Lewis. He bet 75,000 before Stepuchin check-raised to 190,000. Shorr folded, but Lewis made the call to see the [poker card="Kd"] land on the turn. Stepuchin fired 360,000 and Lewis called to see the [poker card="3d"] appear on the river. Stepuchin bet all in, having Lewis and his remaining 360,000 covered. Lewis called with the [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"] but saw the bad news when his two pair was second best to Stepuchin’s pocket fives - [poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"]. For Shorr, Sung, and Roberts, they’re second, third, and fourth in chips, respectively. Shorr ended Day 2 with the chip lead, but it wasn’t without a couple of very eventful hands that saw Shorr with plenty of chips on the line. First, he was all in with pocket kings against the pocket queens of Dan Smith and earned a double up. After that, Shorr took out Mike Eskandari, but did so with an inferior hand when his pocket sevens came from behind against Eskandari’s queens. On that hand, all of the money went in preflop and Shorr flopped a set. Qartomy reached the final table as the second shortest stack remaining, but he could’ve been knocked out by the lowly [poker card="9c"][poker card="4d"] in seventh place had his [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qd"] not held up. Qartomy three-bet jammed for 410,000 over a raise to 60,000 from Stepuchin. Stepuchin called, but Qartomy’s hand held strong to give him the double up. On Day 3 of the WPT Gardens Poker Championship, Qartomy was the player to send everyone into the money, doing so when he knocked out Raul Lozano in 33rd place. Qartomy held the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qs"] and was behind Lozano’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ks"], but a queen flopped and Lozano couldn’t come back from it. Some of the notable players to cash in the event but fall short of the final table were Garrett Greer (8th - $66,955), WPT Champions Club member Marvin Rettenmaier (11th - $43,220), Ricky 'RatedGTO' Guan (13th - $35,550), and Nicole Schwartz (20th - $25,225). Schwartz won her way into the event by winning a $100 charity event. She fired an additional $100 bullet in that event, so her $10,000 seat cost her $200, but she then turned that into more than $25,000 in prize money. Can Shorr, Sung, and Roberts Finally Break Into the WPT Champions Club? Shorr, Sung, and Roberts are no strangers to tournament poker. They’ve been around the game for a long time and have impressive career résumés. Entering this event, Shorr had nearly $6.7 million in live tournament earnings, Sung had more than $5.5 million, and Roberts was just over $2 million. All three have experienced podium finishes in WPT events, but none have won a WPT title. Shorr’s best WPT finish was a second-place result in the Season XII WPT Lucky Hearts Poker Open. In a field of 415 entries, Shorr finished runner-up to James Calderaro and took home $190,039. "I'm on cloud nine after reaching the Gardens final table," Shorr told PocketFives. "I've been putting a ton of work into my poker game and my mind and body lately, so to have a big result like this in a major tournament is really special, personally." Shorr also placed fourth in the Season IX WPT Southern Poker Championship and fifth in the Season VII WPT World Championship for $144,985 and $408,550, respectively. "Winning a WPT title would be incredible," Shorr added. "I've had tons of final tables in big events worldwide but haven't won a 'major.' Maybe this is the one." Sung has three official WPT final tables on record, with his best result coming in the Season VI WPT Bay 101 Shooting Star event when he took second to Brandon Cantu and won $585,000. "It feels amazing to have reached the Gardens final table, to be able to enjoy the next couple months knowing that the final table will always be there," Sung said. "I always wanted to experience making the 'November Nine,' and this is the next best thing, the 'March Six!'" Sung also has a pair of fourth-place finishes on the World Poker Tour, first in the Season VI WPT Spanish Championship for €117,400 ($164,943) and then in the Season VII WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic for $396,205. “Winning a WPT title means that my goal has been finally accomplished,” Sung said when asked what a winning a WPT title would mean to him. “I've expected to win one over a decade ago and had to come back from self-inflicted setbacks in multiple aspects of my being.” Roberts does have a WPTDeepStacks title from back in 2016, but a WPT Main Tour title has eluded him. His best WPT Main Tour finish was in the Season XIV WPT Legends of Poker when he took third in a field of 786 entries to win $251,035. Hublot WPT Player of the Year Implications The final six have locked up 600 points in the Season XVII Hublot WPT Player of the Year race, currently led by Tony Ruberto with 1,850 points, and there are 1,200 points up top. The points could mean the most to Qartomy, who already has 650 points on the season and is in 40th place on the leaderboard. A win would vault him to the same 1,850 points as Ruberto, but Qartomy would hold the tiebreaker of most money won as he’d have $652,474 to Ruberto’s $530,692. Sung also stands to benefit well from the Hublot WPT Player of the Year points earned at this final table. Entering the event, Sung has 450 points and was in 57th place. He’s guaranteed to move to 1,050 points, which would put him in the top 15, and has upside to move into second place in the Hublot WPT Player of the Year race with a victory. Sung now has five WPT Main Tour cashes in Season XVII, including a ninth-place finish in the WPT Gardens Poker Festival that kicked off the season. Stepuchin entered this event with 100 points, Shorr 100 points, Roberts 175 points, and Abdellatif 50 points. Champion To Be Crowned on March 12 The final six competitors have locked up $110,225 for reaching the final table and will be back in action on March 12 in Las Vegas to compete for the $548,825 top prize. First place includes a $15,000 buy-in into the season-ending Baccarat Crystal WPT Tournament of Champions. "It's a bizarre feeling traveling to LA for five days, playing nonstop in a tournament, and to not know my result upon leaving," Shorr said. "I really like the format, though, and am all for anything that helps grow the game." "I'm going to enjoy the next 55 days like no other!" Sung said.
  6. The concept of a shot clock in poker, in which a person would have only a limited amount of time to act, has taken off recently. The World Poker Tour, for example, surveyed its clientele, who voted 80-20 in favorof implementing a maximum amount of time to act. That spurred World Series of Poker officials to comment that we might see a shot clock on the Circuit this year. PartyPokerpro Marvin Rettenmaier (pictured) critiqued the concept in a blog post, saying that 30 seconds, the rumored length for a single decision, was simply not enough time to act. "For instance, at the Aussie Millions, I played a hand against Tom Dwan where I raised, he three-bet, and the dealer then took 20 seconds to count out the chips after he three-bet," the PartyPoker pro said. "It would then give away the strength of my hand if I have to decide within a few seconds what I want to do." Members of our industry like Court Harringtonhave repeatedly said that creating an environment that's warm and welcoming to amateurs will help build poker going forward. According to Rettenmaier, "newcomers are already scared when they have to play in a live setting for the first time" and, with additional restrictions on time, amateurs could be even more intimidated. Rettenmaier offered two alternatives to a shot clock, saying, "Perhaps the real shift needs to be that it becomes more acceptable to call the clock earlier on opponents… An alternative would be an individual time bank as they have it in chess or online poker, but it still makes playing a poker tournament less attractive to an amateur." The latter could also prove to be difficult to implement. If four-fifths of the WPT's clientele are in favor of a shot clock, then would the tour be unwise to implement it? "A huge majority voted in favor of the shot clock," Rettenmaier argued, "but I don't think players have really thought this through and are just thinking, 'Yes, playing faster is awesome, let's play more hands,' but forget the greater spectrum and that it's basically impossible to implement." What do you think? We've had PocketFivers come in on both sides of the fence of the shot clock debate. In a recent interview with our site, Michael Mizrachi said a shot clock would be advantageous to pros more so than amateurs. Where do you stand? Let us know by commenting below. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  7. [caption width="640"] Jason Koon, Marvin Rettenmaier, Bradley Snider and Ruslan Dykshteyn all took down SHRPO Big 4 events on Tuesday[/caption] The 2016 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open was 28 total events but on Tuesday the focus was on the “Big 4” as four final tables, packed with some of the best tournament players in the world, played down to four different winners including Jason Koon and Marvin Rettenmaier. Jason Koon Wins Main Event for Largest Career Cash Jason Koon beat Seth Davies heads-up to win the $5,250 main event and the $1,000,000 first place prize. “I feel fantastic. I mean, it’s a great result, it’s a lot of money, and I got to play heads-up with my buddy. It’s a special moment,” said Koon. The million dollar score is the first seven-figure of Koon’s career and is his second straight first place finish following his win in a $25,000 Bellagio High Roller in July. The main event had 847 entrants which put the event 153 players short of making the $5,000,000 guarantee. The final table also included Tim Burt, Joe Serock, Ryan Fair and Zo Karim. Final Table Payouts Jason Koon - $1,000,000
 Seth Davies - $575,000 
Tim Burt - $310,000 
Roman Valerstein - $220,000 
Tom Midena - $180,000
 Joe Serock - $150,000
 Paul Balzano - $125,000
 Ryan Fair - $100,000
 Zo Karim - $75,000 Marvin Rettenmaier Tops Star-Studded High Roller Final Table Marvin Rettenmaier topped the 105 entries in the $25,500 High Roller event to win $787,497. He beat out Daniel Colman for the title, the $787,497 first place prize money and his first tournament win since September 2013. Colman started heads-up play with a 4-3 lead over Rettenmaier but over the three hours of heads-up play the pair traded the lead back and forth. The final hand saw all the money go in pre-flop with Colman holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="9s"] and dominating Rettenmaier’s [poker card="jd"][poker card="9d"]. The [k4][poker card="4d"][poker card="2d"] flop however changed everything and the turn and river failed to give Colman a full house, eliminating him in second place and giving Rettenmaier the title. "I ran very well on the final table. Three-handed I get queens to jacks and aces to kings,' Rettenmaier said afterwards. The event had 105 entries for a total prize pool of $2,625,000. As is the case with most high roller events, the final table was filled with some of the best players in the world. Along with Rettenmaier and Colman, Nick Petrangelo, Daniel Strelitz, Barry Hutter, Rainer Kempe and Andjelko Andrejevic also found final table success. High Roller Final Table Payouts Marvin Rettenmaier - $787,497 Daniel Colman - $485,625 Ray Qartomy - $291,375 Nick Petrangelo - $190,313 Daniel Strelitz - $147,000 Barry Hutter - $120,750 Rainer Kempe - $102,375 Andjelko Andrejevic - $89,250 Francisco Picasso - $78,750 Ivey Leaguer Bradley Snider Wins $2,650 No Limit Hold’em Event Bradley Snider is a 21-year-old Princeton student who hasn’t had much time to play poker over the last few years as he’s been focused on his education. He made up for lost time on Tuesday taking down the $2,650 No Limit Hold’em event for $246,400. Not only is that the largest cash of his career, it’s his only career cash. Snider only began playing the game recently and learned a lot of from a now very familiar source. "Me and my brother started watching poker on Twitch," said Snider. "And that’s what really got us into it. I wanted to play more and learn the game and study." Snider beat out a final table that included Irish pro Dermot Blain, Koray Aldemir, Dan Heimiller and November Niner Jerry Wong but he’s not ready to declare himself a pro just yet. 'I think poker will continue to just be a serious hobby for me," he said. "I really enjoy playing casually and thinking about the game. And this will let me play a lot more poker in the future.' Final Table Payouts Bradley Snider - $246,400 Dermot Blain - $147,800 Nicholas Immekus - $88,400 Koray Aldemir - $73,900 Jeffrey Chang - $61,600 Alex Wilson - $49,300 Dan Heimiller - $37,000 James Gilbert - $30,800 Jerry Wong - $25,575 Ruslan Dykshteyn Beats Phillip Hui for $1,100 No-Limit Hold’em Win It might have had the smallest buy-in of the Big 4 but that didn’t matter to Florida local Rusland Dykshteyn. He beat out Phillip Hui after the two agreed to a nearly even chop for the first live win of his career. Dykshteyn is originally from New York City but moved to Florida after a rude introduction to the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open a few years ago. “I have a little home field advantage. I moved out here three years ago from New York,” said Dykshteyn. “I came here to play the $5,000 event three years ago. Put seven bullets into it but didn’t make Day 2. I had a couple of friends here and just decided to change my scenery.” Aaron Massey and Daniel Buzgon also made the final table, earning $22,700 and $15,500 respectively. Final Table Payouts Ruslan Dykshteyn - $151,100 Phillip Hui - $87,600
 Marsha Wolak - $52,900 
Jordan Joeckel - $45,300 
Guy Smith - $37,800 
Adam Krach - $30,200
 Aaron Massey - $22,700
 George Boyadjian - $18,900
 Daniel Buzgon - $15,500
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