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Found 13 results

  1. In a controversial ruling, World Series of Poker bracelet winner and two-time Circuit ring holder Ryan Eriquezzo (pictured) was disqualified from an event at the Parx Casino in Pennsylvania for losing his temper and allegedly making threats after a particularly bad beat. The incident went down in a Parx Poker Big Stax $1,600 event when Eriquezzo lost a massive 200 big blind pot after going all in pre-flop with A-A versus his opponent's Q-Q. Apparently unhappy with the outcome, the American pro reportedly crumpled his cards and threw them, shoved his entire stack across the table, spewed verbal abuse toward his opponent, and called the dealer a "fat mfer," according to Parx Poker Room Ambassador Matt Glantz. For the floor supervisor, the insult to the dealer was the last straw and the call was made to disqualify Eriquezzo from the tournament. As he was being ejected, one staff member heard him say that he would "torch this place," but another claimed that he heard the full statement, in which he added, "on Twitter." And that he did. Eriquezzo railed against the casino to his over 2,000 followers, saying, "Think about it... I shelled 11 barrels into one of your events. I would have played here for life. I will never be back." He continued, Tweeting, "Never threatened anything at all. Was swearing, bitching, etc. about the beat. The floor is now likely trying to cover his ass." In his mind, the punishment was "way out of proportion" and many in the poker community agreed. "DQ'd seems beyond excessive," said Matt Salsberg on the forums. "At most they should give him two orbits and a Xanax." Stealthmunk pointed to Phil Hellmuth's (pictured) sometimes-outrageous table manners, saying, "If @phil_hellmuth acted exactly how @RyanEriquezzo did, he wouldn't get tossed. And that discrimination with lots of $ involved is a joke." But while some opposed the ruling, others found Eriquezzo's behavior reprehensible and defended Parx's actions. Pokeraddict had no patience for such behavior and pointed out the fact that while the grinder threw a fit, other players were forced to sit through a delay while the spectacle played out before them. "I support any poker room/TD/series/suit that immediately disqualifies any player that purposely damages cards at a poker table out of anger," he said. "Anyone that does this does not belong or need to be in a casino environment." Others thought that due to Eriquezzo's experience at the tables, he should be afforded no sympathy. "He's been around poker for years, knows how his table etiquette should be, he just lost control," said one P5er. "He totally deserved to be DQ'd. You are supposed to conduct yourself properly at the poker table. He did not, so why should the players and staff have to put up with him?" In a Two Plus Two thread, Glantz(pictured) chimed in to explain the casino's reasoning behind the ruling. "While other venues may tolerate that type of behavior, we will not at Parx," he stated firmly. "I guess we are the exception in the industry that we choose to protect our staff and make sure we maintain an enjoyable environment for all players. I am so very proud of that fact." He then highlighted that the incident might make other players think twice before they acted in same way. "I can tell you one thing for sure... It is much less likely you will see a player rip/throw cards/berate staff in a future Parx tournament." Eriquezzo has been very successful in tournaments throughout his career, winning over $1.2 million on record, according to the Hendon Mob. His biggest cash came when he took first place in the 2012 WSOP National Championship, pocketing $416,051. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  2. [caption width="640"] Matt Glantz will work with Rush Street Gaming and Poker Night in America[/caption] Matt Glantzhas inked a deal with casino operator Rush Street Gaming to develop the company’s portfolio of full-service poker rooms in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and New York. In addition, the Keystone State-native will serve as a producer and talent manager for the brand’s Poker Night in America TV and web series. Glantz, a well-known figure in the northeastern poker scene, previously served as the poker ambassador to Parx Casino, helping to turn the card room there into a nationally known brand in less than three years. He now hopes to leverage his experience as a professional poker player and consultant to do the same for Rush Street’s Sugarhouse Casino in Philadelphia, Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh and the upcoming Rivers Casino in Schenectady, New York, slated to open in 2017. Glantz will focus much of his time on promoting SugarHouse’s new poker room, set to open at the beginning of February. Glantz called Philadelphia “the most competitive poker market in the industry,” noting that players can take their pick from a long list of poker rooms like those at Harrahs, Sands Bethlehem, Parx and Borgata, all within a 60 mile radius. The new poker room will be part of SugarHouse’s $164 million expansion and will feature close to 30 poker tables. Glantz described the soon-to-open card room as “absolutely beautiful,” and said that the venue had several exciting announcements in store for its poker players, some of which will be made soon. Above all, the 44-year-old poker pro wants to ensure that the card rooms under the Rush Street umbrella are as player-friendly as possible. Glantz has achieved great success at the tables throughout his poker career, boasting six major tournament titles and over $6 million in live tournament winnings. With his experience working in different facets of the poker industry, Glantz is in a unique position to bring about changes which will enhance the experience for Rush Street’s poker savvy customers. “Rush Street Gaming strives to offer the best poker experience for every type of player, from casual gamers to high-stakes players like Matt,” said Rush Street CEO Greg Carlin. “We’re excited to have Matt on our team to further improve our poker platform.” Glantz also expressed his excitement in his new role as producer and event manager for Poker Night in America, a CBS Sports Network TV series which features players at tournaments and cash games across the US. One of the goals of the show has been to revive mainstream interest in the game by capturing some of the poker world’s most interesting personalities. “I’m looking forward to joining the Rush Street team and working to enhance the Rush Street Gaming poker experience,” said Glantz.
  3. Don’t look but Jason Mercier is heading to his fourth consecutive Day 3 of a $10,000 Championship event at the 2016 World Series of Poker. The current WSOP Player of the Year front runner is among the final 16 players in the $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo Championship. He’s going to have to overcome a group of talented players, including chip leader Matt Glantz, if he plans to win his third bracelet of the summer on Tuesday. While Mercier was chasing WSOP history, Monday’s action also featured two players winning the first bracelets of their careers, including one player who overcame a record field to win over half a million dollars. Event #27: Johnnie Craig Wins Record-Breaking Seniors Event [caption width="640"] Johnnie Craig is 8,204 richer after winning the Seniors Event (WSOP photo).[/caption] It took an extra day of play, but Johnnie Craig won the largest WSOP Seniors event ever, beating out Jamshid Lofti heads up to win the bracelet, the Golden Eagle trophy and $538,204. “I can’t even describe this feeling. It’s amazing,” Craig said.*“I had the feeling I was going to win, and it worked out.” Craig, who served in both Irag and Afghanistan, finished 140th in this event in 2014. "I felt really good coming into the final table.*I was fourth in chips,” Craig said.*"I lost a pretty big hand off the bat, but I was still in the middle of the pack.*From that point on, I decided I wasn’t going to make any big moves unless I had a really big hand.*I started to chip away and got the chip lead, then once I did that I began to apply pressure.” The 4,499-player field was the largest ever Seniors Event, beating out the 2014 event by 74 players. Final Table Payouts Johnnie Craig - $538,204 Jamshid Lotfi - $332,413 Roger Sippl - $245,389 Joseph Somerville - $182,536 Wesley Chong - $136,829 Paul Runge - $103,366 Eugene Solomon - $78,699 Mike Lisanti $60,392 Alan Cutler - $46,713 Event #29: Two Players Remain in $1,500 No Limit Hold'em Monday was supposed to be the final day of play in the $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event, but Jens Grieme and Alexander Ziskin played 215 hands of heads-up poker before having to bag up for the night. Grieme, who had Ziskin down to one big blind at one point, finished with 7,790,000 chips and a slight lead. Ziskin finished with 5,690,000. Among the 29 players who busted on Monday were Justin Young (18th - $15,490), Matt Stout (14th - $19,457) and WSOP bracelet winner and MasterChef contestant David Williams (12th - $24,718). Grieme and Ziskin resume their heads-up battle at Noon PT. Heads Up Chip Counts Jens Grieme - 7,790,000 Alexander Ziskin - 5,690,000 Event #30: Viatcheslav Ortynskiy Wins $3,000 Six Max Pot Limit Omaha Bracelet [caption width="640"] Viatcheslav Ortynskiy won his first career WSOP bracelet on Monday (WSOP photo).[/caption] Prior to Monday Viatcheslav Ortynskiy had made three WSOP final tables in his career, never finishing better than third. On Monday however, he chased those demons away, beating out Rafael Lebron heads-up to win the $3,000 Six Max Pot Limit Omaha event and the first bracelet of his career. Lebron had to settle for $212,779. Finishing third was Randy Ohel for $141,187. The mixed game specialist now has four cashes at the 2016 WSOP and all are top ten finishes. Final Table Payouts Viatcheslav Ortynskiy - $344,327 Rafael Lebron - $212,779 Randy Ohel - $141,187 Matthew Humphrey - $95,623 George Wolff - $66,134 Joshua Gibson - $46,727 Event #31: Fred Berger Leads Final 14 of Super Seniors Just over 14 years ago Fred Berger beat Chris Ferguson to win the first WSOP bracelet of his career. He’s had a few close calls since, including four final tables, but on Monday he put himself in position to finally grab the second bracelet of his career after bagging up the Day 2 chip lead in the Super Seniors event with just 14 players remaining. Just two days ago Berger finished 45th in the Seniors Event. Right behind Berger is Eugene Spinner. He finished 114th in this event in 2015. The shortest remaining stack belongs to Maureen Feduniak, who has just 112,000 (7 BBs) to work with. Defending Champion Jon Andlovec started Day 2 with the chip lead but eventually busted out in 20th place, earning $6,955. The remaining players return at 11 AM PT. Top Ten Chip Counts Fred Berger1,751,000 Eugene Spinner - 1,175,000 Charles Barker - 806,000 Arthur Loring - 518,000 Charles Rinn - 496,000 James Moore - 477,000 James Parrott - 449,000 James Ciotti - 408,000 Steven Krupnick - 351,000 David Forsberg - 287,000 Event #32: Matt Glantz Leads $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo, Jason Mercier Still in the Hunt Matt Glantz was the only player to finish Day 2 of the $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo event with a seven-figure but, as has been the case for last 10 days, the story really is more about Jason Mercier. Mercier finished Day 2 with 444,000 - slightly below the 509,000 average - with just 16 players remaining. This marks the fourth consecutive $10,000 buy-in event that Mercier has cashed in. For his part, Glantz finished with 1,066,000 which puts him ahead of Grzegorz Trelski (945,000), Daniel Alaei (828,800), Todd Brunson (745,000) and Eli Elezra (715,000). Mercier might have finished with a less-than-average stack, but his confidence remains high. Alaei won this event last summer for his fifth career bracelet. The final 16 players return at 2 PM PT to play down to a winner. Top Ten Chip Counts Matt Glantz - 1,066,000 Grzegorz Trelski - 945,000 Daniel Alaei - 828,800 Todd Brunson - 745,000 Eli Elezra - 715,000 Douglas Lorgeree - 650,000 Benny Glaser - 461,000 Jason Mercier - 444,000 Andrew Brown - 390,000 Robert Campbell - 372,000 Event #33: Bruno Vendramini On Top of Summer Solstice Being indoors playing poker on the longest day of the year was just fine for Bruno Vendramini. The Brazilian finished Day 1 of the $1,500 Summer Solstice event with 105,900 chips, edging out Ronald Lee for the end of day chip lead. Lee bagged up 104,825. The event, which has 90 minutes levels instead of the standard 60, drew 1,840 players, down slightly from the 1,914 that played the event in 2015. Just 445 players advanced to Day 2 including some familiar names and faces. Former November Niner Antoine Saout finished with 84,150 - the fourth biggest stack. Olivier Busquet ended up just behind him with 83,575. 2014 WSOP APAC Main Event winner Scott Davies, Ray Henson, Matt Haugen, Adrian Mateos and Jamie Kerstetter also advanced to Day 2. Top Ten Chip Counts Bruno Vendramini - 105,900 Ronald Lee - 104,825 Jason Helder - 96,025 Antoine Saout - 84,150 Olivier Busquet - 83,575 Idan Raviv - 82,150 Austin Hughes - 81,000 Dmitrii Shchepkin - 80,300 Andrew Moreno - 79,700 Shashank Jain - 79,650 Event #34: Bart Lybaert Leads $1,500 Deuce to Seven Triple Draw Prior to this summer, Belgian poker pro Bart Lybaert had just four WSOP cashes. He’s already recorded seven cashes this year and may be on his way to another one after finishing with the Day 1 chip lead in the $1,500 Deuce to Seven Triple Draw. Lybaert finished with 113,100, putting him just ahead of Lawrence Berg’s 110,200. Just 65 of the 358 entrants advanced to Day 2 including Matt Waxman, Terrence Chan, Vanessa Selbst, Greg Raymer, Chris Klodnicki and arguably the greatest lowball player of all time, Billy Baxter. The top 54 players will get paid with the eventual champion earning $117,947. Top Ten Chip Counts Bart Lybaert - 113,100 Lawrence Berg - 110,200 Christopher Kaltenbach - 105,300 Jameson Painter - 97,500 David Snobl - 96,500 Iakov Onuchin - 82,400 Clemens Manzano - 79,700 Matt Waxman - 78,800 Gleb Kovtunov - 76,200 Patrice Biton - 74,000
  4. [caption width="640"] After three months of waiting, Mike Dentale and Cate Hall are ready to battle at SugarHouse Casino. (PokerNight photo)[/caption] It was the hand heard ’round social media. On Day 3 of theWorld Poker Tour Five Diamond Classic in December, Cate Hallcalled Barry Hutter’s six-bet shove with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ts"] and the hand was soon the talk of Twitter. Hall attempted to get in front of the firestorm that she assumed would follow but could not firmly batten down the hatches against the mob questioning her play. New Yorker Mike Dentale was the loudest and most outspoken of that mob. Well-known on the East Coast as a cash game and tournament regular, along with his brash personality, Dentale is never one to shy away from speaking his mind. Through a series of tweets that grew in animosity with each 140 characters, Dentale and Hall’s feud reached a boiling point and they agreed to play heads up against each other to settle their dispute once and for all. The combatants were in place but they needed an arena. Luckily for Dentale and Hall, Poker Night in America and SugarHouse Casino agreed to host the match and broadcast it live on Twitch starting this Sunday, March 19 starting at 3:00 pm EST. It didn’t take much prodding on Poker Night in America’s part to take on duties as Rush Street Gaming’s Matt Glantz was more than willing to do what was necessary to finalize the details and provide a scene for one of the most anticipated matches in poker history. “Once I saw Cate and Mike going at it on Twitter and challenging each other to heads up, I jumped on the opportunity so that we could make this ‘Grudge Match’ a Poker Night in America production. SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia is the perfect location for the match. It is directly in between where Mike and Cate reside,” said Glantz. The pair have agreed to play a best-of-three series of Sit N Gos freezeouts. Each player start withs $15,000 cash and blinds will be $75/$150 for the duration of each match. Shaun Deeb and Doug Polk are teaming up to provide commentary for the live stream. There have been many “made for TV” confrontations across the sporting world but what separates this match, according to Glantz, is the authentic hostility between the two players. “There is real animosity between these two. This is not manufactured dislike in any way. These are two polar opposites. Cate is a highly-educated, liberal-minded, math-based poker player, who is relatively new to the scene. Mike is an extremely street-smart, conservative-minded, feel-based player, who has been around poker for twenty-plus years.” Dentale and Hall haven’t been shy about hiding their hate for each other. In a recent interview, Dentale went as far as to refer to Hall as a “phony bitch” while Hall described Dentale as a “really bad person [who is] a pathological liar and a cheat,” and noted that there is “nothing redeeming about him.” Both players feel they are superior to the other and are confident about their respective edge. “I think I have an edge because I’m a better poker player than him. I think I will be able to adjust in-game better than him. On both a fundamental level and live level, I feel like I have a big advantage,” said Hall. “I have a hard time believing he is beating tournaments with relatively high buy-ins or $2/$5. Just because someone has been around for a few years doesn’t mean they’re good,” said Hall. When faced with a similar question about his opponent’s playing abilities, Dentale responded with, “Any skilled veteran player can see that she’s a bad player. She always tries to not take responsibility for her bad play. I’ve played with her in three WPTs and found her incredibly novice. She has no clue. I firmly believe in my heart she doesn’t have the experience to beat me. There are certain things you need time to learn.” As for the preparation that each player has gone through prior to the match, both Dentale and Hall have not received formal coaching, but Hall has done the diligence of researching heads up play. Dentale, on the other hand, believes his many years of poker experience will be more than enough to overcome Hall. “No matter what she does, I’m going to put a lot of veteran pressure on her. I have very good hand reading ability,” said Dentale. Hall says she considered coaching but when she weighed the cost of hiring one versus the increase in expected value, she decided studying on her own would suffice. “Given a sample size of a few hundred hands against someone with major holes in their game, I felt I could get myself to 90 percent to where a coach would get me.” Regardless of who wins the match, Dentale and Hall both think that their play will speak volumes in determining who is the better player. They admit the variance in heads up play is too large to where the purest of results will take form, but each player wants to prove to the audience watching of their superiority. “I think that what I’ve tried to focus on and get mentally prepared for is, assuming many people are watching, is I want it to be apparent to people that I am playing better than him, if that is the case, it won’t be hard to acknowledge,” said Hall. The build-up to the match has been like no other and the three months of verbal warfare will be replaced by chips this Sunday inside SugarHouse Casino. Glantz notes that this is “uncharted territory” in the realm of live-streamed poker but he is hoping that the match is able to “capture the interest of the majority of the poker community.” The audience and social media chatter will be abuzz on March 19 and if Dentale and Hall have proved nothing else, the poker world is in for a one of a kind experience.
  5. Hosted by PocketFives President and Editor in Chief Lance Bradley and poker writer Matt Clark, The Fives runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and interview players and industry leaders. DOWNLOAD THIS EPISODE IN ITUNES They're baaaaaaaaaaack! Lance and Matt are back in the studio after a short hiatus and they're talking Zo Karim, Jay Lee, Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open, Barcelona and the Globey?
  6. [caption width="640"] Who are five gaming providers who might be setting up shop in Pennsylvania?[/caption] Last week’s announcement of regulated online poker in Pennsylvania was met with a great cheer from those within the state. The march to clicking buttons in the Keystone State is in its next phase and there are major steps to come. One of the primary parts of the process is for gaming providers to become licensed to operate within the state. Given the size of the Pennsylvania market, there are sure to be plenty of service providers looking to get in on the action with 12 licenses up for grabs. With that in mind, below is a look at five potential companies who are likely to be among the list of potential operators when the first hand of online poker is dealt in the state. 1. PokerStars This one is an obvious choice. The world’s largest online poker site has had a large impact in New Jersey since being licensed there in 2016. The first step for PokerStars to officially be in Pennsylvania is to find a property to partner with. There are a few potential options for PokerStars to partner with and perhaps that news will make itself known in the near future. Additionally, with the recent agreement of New Jersey, Nevada, and Delaware to combine player pools, PokerStars would have a strong financial interest in the having both New Jersey and Pennsylvania players operating on the same network. 2. 888 Poker When Joe McKeehen made his way to the November Nine in 2015, he arrived at the final table wearing an 888 patch. Patching up McKeehen was part of 888’s efforts to gain entry into Pennsylvania when the state first appeared ready to legalize online gambling. With regulation now in place, expect 888 to be a primary place of play once the doors formally open. In addition to its online presence, 888Live has given the company an entry point for live tournaments. Given the location of a Harrah's property in Philadelphia, it would make sense for 888 to join forces there and with WSOP.com. 3. Rush Street Gaming The poker company that is the parent of Poker Night in America has many interests in being a potential gaming provider in Pennsylvania. On opposite sides of the state sit Rivers Pittsburgh and SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia. The sister properties are under the Rush Street umbrella and have been utilized for events such as King of the Hill. Rush Street already has a core audience of consumers and allowing consumers access to virtual poker rooms would provide another stream of revenue for the company. Armed with Matt Glantz already onboard as a brand ambassador, the likelihood of Rush Street tying their live and online market into one seems high. 4. partypoker Like 888, partypoker has grown their live brand immensely in the past year and has the chance to grow even higher in Pennsylvania. partypoker’s shared partnership with the Borgata in Atlantic City allows for them to offer online satellites for their live host. The Borgata runs five major series each calendar year and many of the thousands who enter live in Pennsylvania. Once Pennsylvania jumps into the shared player pool, partypoker is sure to be among the first to want to grab as many players as possible. If enough scenarios break the right way, the first partypoker Millions event in the United States might be in Pennsylvania. 5. Pala Poker One of the newest additions to the New Jersey market might be trying to make moves into another state. Should Pala secure themselves a live partner, there doesn't seem to be anything standing in its way in terms of aggressive expansion into Pennsylvania. A little bit of fresh blood never hurt the waters.
  7. Sunday's action at the 2019 World Series of Poker included the conclusion of the Seniors Event and a two-time bracelet winner picking up his third. Shaun Deeb spend Sunday building up a big chip lead in the $10,000 Dealers Choice and the one-and-only Phil Ivey bagged chips in an event to move on to Day 2. Howard Mash Wins Seniors No-Limit Hold'em Howard Mash turned 50 earlier this year, making him eligible for the WSOP Seniors Event for the first time. He made the most of his debut, winning the bracelet and $662,594 on Sunday night, beating the second-largest field the event has ever attracted. Mash managed to go from the short stack with four players left to champion only after surviving a comeback attempt by his heads-up opponent Jean Fontaine that necessitated an on-the-fly change in Mash's approach. "I changed my strategy, and I was trying to play small pots with him because I felt like I had an advantage. I tried to keep the pots as small as possible and just grind and grind him down," Mash said. "Then I made a couple of mistakes, I got a little too aggressive trying to end it. But I knew that I had an advantage so as long as I had chips I was in good shape." Mash, a financial advisor from Florida, cashed in the 2018 WSOP Main Event for $42,980. Fontaine earned $409,249 for his runner-up finish. Final Table Payouts Howard Mash - $662,594 Jean Fontaine - $409,249 James Mcnurlan - $303,705 Adam Richardson - $226,996 Donald Matusow - $170,887 Farhad Jamasi - $129,582 Samir Husaynue - $98,981 Mike Lisanti - $76,165 Mansour Alipourfard - $59,044 $1,000 Double Stack No Limit Hold'em Roars Into the Money The 2,327 players who made it through Day 1A and 1B of the $1,000 Double Stack No Limit Hold'em event combined on Sunday for Day 2 and after 10 60-minute levels, only 359 survived. Arianna Son leads with 2,363,000 but former #1 PocketFiver Ari Engel bagged up 16,83,000 for the eighth biggest stack. Among the notables moving on to Day 2 include Rex Clinkscales, Joseph Cheong, Steven van Zadelhoff, Jack Sinclair, Tim West, and Dylan Linde. After the bubble burst, there were 573 who made it into the money but not through to Day 3. This includes Chance Kornuth, Matthias Eibinger, Valentin Vornicu, Maria Lampropulos, Jeff Madsen, Dietrich Fast, TJ Cloutier, and Bryan Piccioli. Action resumes at Noon and will include 10 more levels of play. Top 10 Chip Counts Arianna Son - 2,363,000 Radoslav Stoyanov - 2,000,000 Ignacio Molina - 1,997,000 Enrico Rudelitz - 1,855,000 Unknown - 1,800,070 Romain Nussmann - 1,708,000 Eric Cruz - 1,690,000 Ari Engel - 1,683,000 Silvio Costa - 1,555,000 Robert Schmidt - 1,550,000 Shaun Deeb Leads $10K Dealers Choice with Five Left Reigning WSOP Player of the Year Shaun Deeb was hellbent on defending that title before the Series started. He's picked up six cashes so far, but on Sunday he took a giant step towards his fifth bracelet by finishing Day 3 of the $10,000 Dealers Choice event with the chip lead. Just four players stand between Deeb and the $312,417 first place prize money and 1,017 POY points. Deeb bagged 2,601,000 which puts him 703,000 ahead of the next closest competitor, Adam Friedman. Matt Glantz, Michael McKennea, and David Moskowitz round out the five remaining players. There were only six eliminations on Sunday including Jeffrey Lisandro in 10th, Bryce Yockey in eighth, Phillip Hui in seventh, and Nick Schulman in sixth. Final Table Chip Counts Shaun Deeb - 2,601,000 Adam Friedman - 1,898,000 Matt Glantz - 1,401,000 Michael McKenna - 1,038,000 David Moskowitz - 382,000 Justin Bonomo Headlines $3,000 No Limit Hold'em Shootout Final Table The second day of play in the $3,000 No Limit Hold'em Shootout event took the field from 40 players down to 10 after 10 four-handed tables each played down to a winner. The biggest name at the final table is Justin Bonomo, but he'll have to contend with Andrew Lichtenberger, Martin Zamani, and Alexandru Papazian if he wants to add a fourth bracelet to his collection. Players narrowly missing out on the final table included James Obst, Dario Sammartino, Jesse Sylvia, Rainer Kempe, Taylor Paur, and Kristen Bicknell. The final table begins at Noon PT. Final Table Chip Counts Jan Lakota - 623,000 Ben Farrell - 621,000 David Lambard - 621,000 Andrew Lichtenberger - 614,000 Alexandru Papazian - 609,000 Adrien Delmas - 609,000 Martin Zamani - 601,000 Weiyi Zhang - 599,000 Johan Guilbert - 599,000 Justin Bonomo - 591,000 Phil Ivey Moves Onto Day 2 of $800 No Limit Hold'em Deepstack Brazil's Jose Carlos Brito finished with the biggest stack at the end of Day 1 of the $800 No Limit Hold'em Deepstack event, but all eyes on Day 2 will most likely be on Phil Ivey. The 10-time bracelet winner ended Day 1 with 123,000 - 653,000 behind Brito's 776,000. Ivey's not the only big name Phil who bagged and tagged on Day 1. Phil Hellmuth also managed to finish with chips. He enters Day 2 with 231,000. Elio Fox, Manig Loeser, Brock Parker, Ismael Bojang, Kelly Minkin, Chris Moorman, and Kenny Hallaert are just some of the other notables that advanced to Day 2. The event drew 2,808 entries, of which just 671 survived. Play resumes at Noon. Top 10 Chip Counts Jose Carlos Brito - 776,000 Danny Ghobrial - 671,500 Ben Gilbert - 577,500 Dang Toan Nguyen - 555,500 Bruce Rosenberg - 535,000 Carlos Vasconcelos - 525,500 Jimmy D'Ambrosio - 525,500 Brandon Caputo - 514,500 Marco Bognanni - 512,000 Johann Ibanez - 509,000 Upeshka De Silva Wins Third Bracelet in $600 Online NLHE Bounty Event Upeshka De Silva was up late into the night Sunday, but it paid off handsomely when he beat Dave Nodes heads-up to win $600 Online No Limit Hold'em Bounty event for $98,262.73 from the prize pool and the third bracelet of his career. Nodes scored $60,092.28 for his runner-up finish. De Silva's first two bracelets came in 2015 ($1,500 No Limit Hold'em) and 2017 ($3,000 No Limit Hold'em Shootout). Final Table Payouts Upeshka 'gomezhamburg' De Silva - $98,262.72 Dave 'Dave419' Nodes - $60,092.28 davidas777 - $42,962.40 Pretabotones - $31,065.12 Turko - $22,748.04 P. Bateman - $16,854.48 johnsonck - $12,688.40 B3ndTheKnee - $9,583.92 BoatyBoatz8A - $7,380.72 Player of the Year Update Dan Zack now has eight cashes this summer and thanks to the124 points he earned on Sunday after busting the $1,000 Double Stack, he became the first player to move past 2,000 points. The group of three players closely following Zack, Scott Clements, Robert Campbell, and Daniel Strelitz each have between 1,597.26 and 1,642.02 points. RANK PLAYER POINTS 1 Dan Zack 2,093.00 2 Scott Clements 1,642.02 3 Robert Campbell 1,605.08 4 Daniel Strelitz 1,597.26 5 Stephen Song 1,503.76 Monday's WSOP Schedule
  8. Winning a World Series of Poker gold bracelet is widely considered by many to be poker’s ultimate achievement. For some players, it defines his or her career. For others, it’s the one prize eluding some of the game’s best. For years, Stephen Chidwick was considered the best poker player without a WSOP gold bracelet. At the 2019 WSOP, Chidwick bucked that monkey off his back like the most turbulent bull does to a rider at a rodeo when he won the $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller for $1.618 million. Shawn Buchanan was another player in the "best without a bracelet conversation," but, like Chidwick, he broke through at the 2019 WSOP, winning the $800 buy-in WSOP.com Online NL Six-Handed. Now that Chidwick and Buchanan have each won an elusive gold bracelet, let's take a look at who are the best players remaining without a bracelet entering the 2020 WSOP. Patrick Antonius CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 15 2 0 $929,518 Widely considered one of the best all-around players in poker for quite some time, Patrik Antonius is still missing a WSOP gold bracelet from his résumé. He's come close a couple of times, finishing in the top 10 on four occasions and placing at the final table twice, but he's never scored better than third place. Antonius has been known to pass on tournaments for cash games these days, but he's still a threat to win a bracelet in the bigger buy-in WSOP events when he does compete. Niklas Astedt CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 6 0 0 $110,645 Sweden's Niklas Astedt is one of the top-ranked online poker players in the world, but his live success hasn’t been too plentiful, especially at the WSOP. Astedt’s skills should not be overlooked, though. His first WSOP cash came in 2014 and his highest WSOP finish was a 26th-place result in the 2019 WSOP $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller. He's also cashed in the WSOP Main Event on two occasions, with a 182nd-place finish in 2016 and a 899th-place finish in 2019. Mikita Badziakouski CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 4 4 1 $3,161,362 Mikita Badziakouski plays some of the biggest buy-in events around the world, and his career to date includes more than $26.1 million in live tournament earnings. At the WSOP, Badziakouski has four cashes. Each cash has been a final table appearance and each has come at WSOP Europe. If there's a high roller event on the WSOP schedule, Badziakouski will likely be in the field and a threat to win the gold bracelet. Darren Elias CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 28 3 0 $645,659 With four World Poker Tour titles and more than $7.5 million in live tournament earnings, it’s a matter of when, not if, Darren Elias will finally win WSOP gold. His first WSOP cash came in 2009. He has three WSOP final table appearances and two finishes in third place, although he’s never made it to heads-up play. The two times Elias finished in third came from the same event, the $10,000 No Limit Deuce to Seven Championship in 2017 and 2019. Alex Foxen CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 39 4 0 $808,918 Alex Foxen has been around the WSOP for a much shorter time than some of the players on this list, with his first WSOP cash coming in 2015. He has, however, built up quite the reputation as one of the best tournament poker players in the game today and it seems very much just a matter of time before he finds himself in the WSOP winner’s circle with his first gold bracelet. Already, Foxen has racked up 39 WSOP cashes and four final tables ahead of 2020. His highest finish to date was a third-place finish at the 2017 WSOP in a $1,000 No Limit Hold’em event. Matt Glantz CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 61 13 1 $3,232.669 Pennsylvania's Matt Glantz has been around the WSOP block a few times, but he’s still looking for that first gold bracelet. Glantz first cashed in a WSOP in 2000 and he’s been producing everything but wins since, including 13 final table appearances. Glantz has reached heads-up play once and finished third on three occasions. At the 2019 WSOP, Glantz picked up his third WSOP Main Event cash. Mark Gregorich CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 69 11 1 $1,168,497 Mark Gregorich is another player on this list who has been around for quite some time, earning his first WSOP cash back in 1999. He has 69 cashes and 11 final table appearances at the WSOP, with one runner-up finish that came in the 2003 WSOP $5,000 Limit Hold’em event. Gregorich also has a trio of third-place finishes at the WSOP to date. Nick Guagenti CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 37 3 0 $583,181 Ohio's Nick Guagenti has 37 WSOP cashes with the first coming in 2006. He has three final table appearances. Guagenti's highest WSOP result came in 2019 when he took third in the $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. event for $85,265. His best finish in terms of money won came from his 46th-place finish in the 2017 WSOP Main Event, for which Guagenti won $145,733. Guagenti is a regular in mid- and high-stakes cash games in his region, and he also has 15 cashes on the WSOP Circuit. Christian Harder CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 53 2 0 $1,050,784 Christian Harder’s first WSOP cash came in 2009. He’s won titles elsewhere in the poker world, just not at the WSOP just yet. He’s been close before with a pair of fourth-place finishes and is known to put in a high amount of volume in the big bet games of No Limit Hold’em and Pot Limit Omaha. Maurice Hawkins CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 29 3 0 $623,240 Maurice Hawkins has been a longtime grinder of the WSOP and WSOP Circuit, racking up 29 WSOP cashes and 110 WSOP Circuit cashes. He has a whopping 14 WSOP Circuit gold rings, but Hawkins has yet to win a WSOP gold bracelet. Hawkins has three WSOP final tables and they've come in big-field NL tournaments. With as many big-field NL events that are on the WSOP schedule these days, one has to figure that Hawkins is going to break through and win one at some point. Isaac Haxton CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 27 7 1 $2,923,424 Isaac Haxton is widely considered as one of the best minds in poker, and he’s certainly lived up to that with more than $27.6 million in live tournament earnings, millions more won in cash games, and who knows how much won online. The one thing he doesn’t have is a WSOP gold bracelet. Haxton has seven WSOP final table appearances and one runner-up result. The second-place finish came to Vitaly Lunkin in the 2009 WSOP $40,000 No Limit Hold’em. Maria Ho CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 55 5 1 $1,644,554 Maria Ho is another long-time regular at the WSOP, with cashes dating back to 2005. She has five final table appearances and one runner-up finish in WSOP events, and she’s known to mix it up in most of the games. Ho’s runner-up finish came to Allen Bari in the 2011 WSOP $5,000 No Limit Hold’em. Ho has been the last woman standing in the WSOP Main Event on two occasions, 2007 and 2014, and she finished sixth in the 2017 WSOP Europe Main Event. Ali Imsirovic CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 10 3 1 $583,986 Ali Imsirovic is one of the newest kids on the block in all of poker, not just the WSOP, and he’s quickly acquired a reputation of one of the game’s best when it comes to No Limit Hold’em tournaments. Imsirovic’s first WSOP cash came in 2017, so there isn’t a ton of sample to draw from, but he’s already made three WSOP final tables in top-level events and has one runner-up finish. Given his success in his young poker career, Imsirovic is considered one of the favorites any time he enters a high buy-in, No Limit Hold’em event. Rainer Kempe CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 31 3 0 $1,142,997 Rainer Kempe has won more than $21.3 million in his poker career and he’s been in the winner’s circle many times, but he’s yet to win a WSOP gold bracelet. His WSOP career is still pretty young, though. His first WSOP cash came in 2015, but over a short period of time he’s already earned 31 in-the-money finishes and more than $1.1 million in earnings. Kempe has been to a WSOP final table three times to date. Jason Koon CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 42 7 1 $1,789,462 For all of the poker success that Jason Koon has enjoyed over the course of his career, he’s still searching for his first WSOP gold bracelet. Koon has more than $31.1 million in live tournament earnings to date and his first WSOP cash came back in 2009. He has seven WSOP final table appearances and one runner-up result. Koon is similar to Haxton and Imsirovic in the sense that he’ll almost always be one of the favorites any time he enters a high buy-in, No Limit hold’em tournament. Timofey Kuznetsov CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 0 0 0 $0 Timofey Kuznetsov, also known as ‘Trueteller,’ is highly regarded in the poker community as one of the best, especially within the high-stakes community. He has zero WSOP cashes to date, but he simply doesn’t play a lot of tournaments. That said, Kuznetsov is still one of the best players in poker without a WSOP gold bracelet. Maria Lampropulos CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 27 0 0 $136,731 Maria Lampropulos first cashed a WSOP event in 2016 and that first year she walked away with five WSOP cashes in total. She followed that up with six cashes in 2017 and seven cashes in 2018. At the 2019 WSOP and WSOP Europe festivals, she cashed nine time. With partypoker MILLIONS and PCA Main Event wins on her résumé, both for seven-figure paydays, Lampropulos has shown she has the chops to compete in some of the biggest events in the world. Toby Lewis CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 24 0 0 $409,171 Toby Lewis’ first WSOP cash came in 2011 when he took 11th in the $10,000 Pot Limit Hold’em Championship. He’s racked up 24 WSOP cashes to date, but he’s never reached a WSOP final table. Tom Marchese CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 26 4 1 $1,295,638 A player with more than $19.1 million in live tournament earnings, Tom Marchese is often considered one of the better tournament players poker has to offer. He's yet to score a WSOP gold bracelet, though, but he has come close a few times, with four WSOP final tables and one runner-up finish. The time Marchese finished second was at the 2015 WSOP in the $1,500 Pot Limit Hold'em tournament. Steve O‘Dwyer CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 18 2 0 $675,717 Like Haxton and like Koon, Steve O’Dwyer has a ton of live tournament winnings. O’Dwyer has scored more than $30.4 million from the live felt, plus plenty more online, and his first WSOP cash came in 2007. O’Dwyer is a player who put in more WSOP volume at the beginning of his career compared to what he does now, which could be holding him back in terms of winning his first gold bracelet. At this point in his career, it seems that if O'Dwyer does win a gold bracelet, it will come at WSOP Europe or a similar international WSOP stop. Adam Owen CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 34 5 0 $570,961 Adam Owen is another one of the younger guns on this list, but he’s widely regarded as one of the best all-around players in the game these days. Having earned his first WSOP cash in 2014, Owen has racked up 34 WSOP cashes to date, including five final tables and three third-place finishes. Owen has shown a propensity to perform well in the $10,000 buy-in championship events at the WSOP and many think that’s where he’ll earn his first gold bracelet from. Felipe Ramos CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 31 4 0 $526,047 One of best poker players to come out of Brazil is Felipe Ramos, with 31 WSOP cashes dating back to his first in 2009. Ramos is known as a solid player who can compete across all variants, and the more tools you have in your shed, the better when it comes to chasing gold bracelets. Ramos has four WSOP final tables and they've all come in Omaha. Three of those four final tables were in Pot Limit Omaha. Dario Sammartino CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 41 10 0 $9,927,947 Italy’s Dario Sammartino first cashed in a WSOP event in 2011 and he’s been performing very well ever since, except winning a WSOP gold bracelet is something he’s yet to achieve. Sammartino has found the money in WSOP events 41 times to date. Of those, he’s reached the final table on 10 occasions. Sammartino's biggest claim to World Series of Poker fame was a runner-up finish in the 2019 WSOP Main Event for $6 million. He's also one of the few players to have made the final table of both the WSOP Main Event and WSOP Europe Main Event in his career. Sammartino has learned how to play all the games and play them well, so don’t be surprised to see him finally win WSOP gold much sooner than later. Ole Schemion CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 6 1 0 $469,735 Although his WSOP results don’t pop off the page, Ole Schemion is one of the best players out there and an absolute force when it comes to poker tournaments. He’s amassed more than $16.3 million in live tournament earnings, numerous high roller victories, and one World Poker Tour title. He’s still in search of his first WSOP gold bracelet, though. In terms of winning WSOP gold, it’s very likely just a volume game for Schemion. If he puts in the volume, he’ll get it eventually and probably in the near future. It also works to his benefit that WSOP Europe looks as though it will remain at King’s Casino in Rozvadov where Schemion has shown success before, including a sixth-place finish in the 2019 WSOP Europe €100,000 Diamond High Roller for €341,510. Jake Schindler CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 33 4 0 $1,050,644 The first of two players named Jake on this list, Jake Schindler has 33 entries and four final tables at the WSOP entering 2020. His best finish was a third-place result in the 2014 WSOP $3,000 No Limit Hold'em for $212,373. Over his entire poker career, Schindler has more than $25 million in live tournament earnings. Jake Schwartz CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 60 3 1 $658,477 Jake Schwartz earned his first WSOP cash in 2012 and has built up 60 in-the-money finishes since. He was first widely known as a No Limit hold'em player but he's since branched out and has been playing more of the games. In 2013, Schwartz earned the top WSOP finish of his career when he took second in the $1,500 NL Shootout, earning $202,035. To date, he has two other WSOP final table appearances in addition to that one. Shannon Shorr CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 79 9 2 $2,217,846 When is Shannon Shorr going to finally win a WSOP gold bracelet? Shorr first cashed in a WSOP event back in 2006, which seems like ages ago when you consider he’s still very much on the younger side of poker players. Ever since that first WSOP cash, not a year has gone by that Shorr hasn’t racked up multiple WSOP cashes. Plus, he’s been very close on several occasions with nine final table appearances and two runner-up finishes. He also has a pair of third-place finishes. Shorr can play all of the games very well. Before Chidwick winning his bracelet, Shorr was right there at the top of this list with Chidwick. Dan Smith CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 36 10 1 $9,884,615 Another high roller with a knack for all the games, Dan Smith has been close to winning WSOP gold before but it just hasn’t happened for him yet. His first WSOP cash came in 2010. Since then, he’s earned 36 total WSOP cashes and won more than $9.8 million at the WSOP. He has 10 final table appearances, six third-place finishes, and one second-place finish in WSOP events. Like some of the other high rollers on this list, with Smith it feels like more of a volume game than anything. Christoph Vogelsang CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 13 6 0 $8,668,735 Christoph Vogelsang has come close at the WSOP on a handful of occasions, including two third-place finishes in a pair of the biggest events the WSOP has ever offered. In 2014, Vogelsang placed third in the $1 million buy-in Big One for One Drop for $4.48 million. In 2019, he took third in the WSOP Europe €250,000 Super High Roller for more than $1.3 million. If there's a big buy-in event at the WSOP, Vogelsang is considered a threat to win it. Mike Watson CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 63 11 4 $2,917,143 Mike Watson has been knocking at the WSOP gold bracelet door for several years now. His first WSOP cash came in 2007 and he’s put up more than 60 cashes to date since. Of the 11 WSOP final table appearances Watson has on record, four of the times he’s finished runner-up. Interestingly, Watson did win the €50,000 Majestic High Roller at the 2012 WSOP Europe, but it was an added non-bracelet event for the high rollers. Had that event been in a later year, it very likely would have been for a gold bracelet. Watson usually plays a high volume of events and can play all the games, much like Shorr, and it’s only a matter of time before he finally scores a WSOP gold bracelet. Jerry Wong CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 38 7 0 $1,899,225 Jerry Wong may be most well known for reaching the now-defunct WSOP November Nine in 2016, when he finished eighth for more than $1.1 million, but he has plenty of other success at the WSOP. With 38 total WSOP cashes and seven final table appearances, the only thing left for Wong to do is win a gold bracelet. One would think that has to be on the horizon soon for Wong, who has the ability to compete highly in all of the games. His WSOP final table appearances have come in No Limit Deuce to Seven, Pot Limit Omaha, Big Bet Mix, Razz, Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo, H.O.R.S.E., and No Limit Hold'em.
  9. The 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event went from 1,286 players down to 354 on Tuesday Those left are deep in the money and guaranteed $34,845, and it’s Dean Morrone holding the chip lead entering Day 5. Former NFL star Richard Seymour was one of the big stacks to advance. Morrone Leads the Way Morrone is a Canadian player and a qualifier from 888poker. He’s making his first career WSOP cash with his run in this year’s WSOP Main Event and it’s also his largest live tournament score to date as he entered the tournament with just $10,138 in live earnings. Morrone entered Day 4 with 365,000 before he went on to finish with 4.98 million and the lead. Other big stacks in the group behind Morrone on the leaderboard were Lars Bonding (4.04 million), Michael Messick (3.925 million), Warwick Mirzikinian (3.9 million), and Henrik Hecklen (3.862 million) to round out the top five. Morrone’s fellow 888poker qualifier Mihai Manole finished the day with a very healthy 3.781 million. Top 10 Chip Counts Dean Morrone - 4,980,000 Lars Bonding - 4,040,000 Michael Messick - 3,925,000 Warwick Mirzikinian - 3,900,000 Henrik Hecklen - 3,862,000 Mihai Manole - 3,781,000 Robert Heidorn - 3,700,000 Sean Mills - 3,692,000 Christopher Wynkoop - 3,563,000 Andrew Brokos - 3,518,000 Former NFL Star Richard Seymour On the Rush Former NFL star and three-time Super Bowl champion Richard Seymour was among those to advance to Day 5. He spoke with The Fives Poker Podcast at the end of Day 3 about his sixth time playing the WSOP Main Event being a charm and things only got sweeter on Tuesday. Seymour came into the day with 275,000 and quickly got his stack up to 400,000. It wasn’t long before he reached 1 million in chips and then the progression only continued after he was moved to one of the secondary features tables. Seymour bagged up 2.75 million in chips, but he wasn’t the only former NFL player to move on. Eric Stocz, who spent time in the NFL with the Detroit Lions, reached the money in the WSOP Main Event for the second time in his poker career. He’s already outperformed the 402nd-place finish he netted in 2011 that earned him $30,974 and will only be looking for more. Stocz bagged 350,000 for Day 5. Former PocketFives #1 Players Performing Well A handful of former PocketFives #1 players are performing well and have advanced to Day 4 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event. Fabrizio Gonzalez bagged 2.916 million, Chris Hunichen finished with 2.617 million, and Yuri Dzivielevski ended with 1.79 million. Hunichen bagged those chips despite losing one of the biggest pots of the tournament so far. He got involved in a big one with David Guay and Guay flopped a set of tens against Hunichen’s pocket kings. The hand resulted in a full double for Guay and took a dent of about 1.2 million out of Hunichen’s stack. Eight from Pennsylvania Still Alive Pennsylvania online poker has been legalized and the launch date is coming up soon. When sites do go live there will be a handful of players with some extra money to deposit thanks to deep runs in this WSOP Main Event. Eight players from Pennsylvania remain, with Thomas Parkes of Alburtis finishing Day 4 with the most chips at 3.172 million. Pittsburgh’s Chad Power is next with 2.78 million, and then it’s Matthew Sabia (1.81 million), Kenneth Smaron (1.806 million), Edward Pham (1.43 million), Jake Schindler (1.168 million), Donald Dombach (799,000), and Matt Glantz (690,000). Yoon, Esfandiari, Cheong Among Bracelet Winners Remaining In addition to all the names that have been mentioned, Brian Yoon (2.622 million), Antonio Esfandiari (2.583 million), Craig McCorkell (2.5 million), Chris Wallace (1.98 million), and Joseph Cheong (1.958 million) represent some of the WSOP gold bracelet winners still in the field. Yoon and Esfandiari are both three-time gold bracelet winners who have had some deep runs in the WSOP Main Event before. Yoon has finished in the top 60 on three separate occasions (2018, 2016, and 2011), and Esfandiari finished 24th in 2009. McCorkell took 13th in 2014, and Wallace finished 32nd in 2017. We also know very much about Cheong’s third-place finish behind Jonathan Duhamel and John Racener in 2010 that earned him $4.13 million. All Former Main Event Champs Gone Of course, not every player could advance. Three former WSOP Main Event champions began the day, with Johnny Chan, Chris Moneymaker, and Qui Nguyen still in the field, but all three of them busted out on Day 4. Moneymaker finished 687th for $20,200, Chan took 560th for $24,560, and Nguyen went out 455th for $30,780. Nguyen’s bust came when he got the last of his chips in with pocket fives only to lose out to an opponent’s two sixes. With no former WSOP Main Event champions in the field, we will see a brand new winner in 2019. Others to bust on Day 4 were Ricky Guan (362nd - $34,845), Scott Lazar (388th - $34,845), Jean-Robert Bellande (415th - $30,780), Bryan Campanello (435th - $30,780), Josh Arieh (485th - $27,390), Adam Owen (570th - $24,560), and Cliff Josephy (759th - $20,200). Day 5 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event starts at 12 pm PT on Wednesday, July 10 at the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino.
  10. It might have been a day earlier than some were expecting, but the bubble of the World Series of Poker came and went on Monday, leaving 1,286 players in the money just as the day was coming to a close. Preben Stokkan Goes From 93,000 to 2,184,000 Norwegian poker pro Preben Stokkan is the only player with over 2,000,000 chips after bagging up 2,184,000 and the chip lead. Stokkan, who has never previously cashed the Main Event, started the day with 93,000 and trailed 75% of the field. Andrew Brokos had the opposite kind of day after starting third in chips and finishing second. The Baltimore native more than doubled his stack on Monday and ended up with 1,906,000. Ryan Dodge sits third with 1,800,000. The Bubble Burst for Ryan Pochedly The bubble is usually one of the most tension-filled moments of the Main Event. It can be chaotic for players and problematic for tournament staff. Not so much this year. Just as hand-for-hand play was about to start, Pennsylvania's Ryan Pochedly called all-in with ace-king on an [poker card="8d"] [poker card="7h"] [poker card="3s"] [poker card="kd"] [poker card="7c"] board only to be shown 7-6 by his opponent for trip sevens. Pochedly did not leave empty-handed though. He was awarded a seat to the 2020 WSOP Main Event. READ: Pochedly Leans On WSOP Experience, Excited for PA Online Poker Chris Hunichen Bags 6th Best Stack to Lead Former #1s All but two of the 10 former #1-ranked PocketFivers that started Day 3 made it to Day 4 and none made more noise than Chris Hunichen. After starting the day with 307,600, Hunichen finished with 1,618,000 and sits sixth in the chip counts. Two other players worked themselves into the top 50 on Monday. Fabrizio Gonzalez finished with 1,190,000 and Yuri Dzivielevski was right behind him with 1,083,000. The other four members of the #1 fraternity to advance to Day 4 include current #1 'lena900' (693,000), Kevin Saul (633,000), Cliff Josephy (435,000), Paul Volpe (380,000) and Taylor Paur (148,000). The only former #1s to not make it through the day were Calvin Anderson and Tim West. Jean-Robert Bellande One of Many Notables Still Surviving Jean-Robert Bellande leads the group of notable names moving on to Day 4. Bellande, who has twice finished in the top 100 of the Main Event, ended Day 3 with 1,126,000. Not far behind him is recent bracelet Joseph Cheong with 1,068,000. This is Cheong's first cash in the WSOP Main Event since 2012. He cashed in three straight years beginning in 2010 with his third-place result. Eric Baldwin (916,000), Antonio Esfandiari (740,000), Chance Kornuth (535,000), Brian Yoon (532,000), Kelly Minkin (456,000), and Gus Hansen (445,000) also advanced to Day 4. Former World Champions Chris Moneymaker, Qui Nguyen, and Johnny Chan each navigated Day 3 successfully and will be back for Day 4. No Chips, No Money, No More Main Event It wasn't all sunshine and rainbows for some of the game's top players. Igor Kurganov, Nick Schulman, Arseniii Karmatckii, legends TJ Cloutier and Scotty Nguyen, as well as Loni Harwood and 2019 $50K PPC champion Phillip Hui were all part of the 1,594 players who busted on Monday. 21 Pennsylvania Players Make it to Day 4 Just 21 Pennsylvania poker players remain heading into Day 4 with the biggest stack belonging to Matthew Sabia. The Bethlehem, PA resident finished with 1,060,000 and has the only seven-figure stack for Keystone State players. Chad Power (829,000), Matt Glantz (817,000), Jake Schindler (652,000), and Kenneth Smaron (632,000) round out the top five. Top 10 Chip Counts Preben Stokkan - 2,184,000 Andrew Brokos - 1,906,000 Ryan Dodge - 1,800,000 Galen Hall - 1,658,000 Cassio Pisapia - 1,640,000 Chris Hunichen - 1,618,000 Pavlo Veksler - 1,594,000 Duytue Duong - 1,576,000 Jacob Daniels - 1,560,000 John Patgorski - 1,524,000
  11. As the launch of Pennsylvania online poker approaches, PocketFives takes a look at how players from that state did at the 2019 World Series of Poker. Pennsylvania poker players accounted for 2,439 total entries at the 2019 WSOP, ranking the state 15th out of all states to have players participate in the series. Per official numbers sourced from the WSOP, US-player participation made up for 129,154 entries from live tournaments at the 2019 WSOP. With 2,439 of those entries coming from PA poker players, Pennsylvania accounted for nearly 2% of the US participation at the 2019 WSOP. Pennsylvania’s participation wasn’t that far off of what New Jersey’s was, another state with legalized online gambling and online poker. Players from NJ accounted for 3,501 total entries in live events at the 2019 WSOP, which was just more than 2.7% overall. US players accounted for 18,571 cashes at the 2019 WSOP, which was the most for any single country. Players from Pennsylvania accounted for 338 of those cashes, including some of the top performers below. Pennsylvania's Top Performers at the 2019 WSOP Of all the Pennsylvania poker players to compete at the 50th annual WSOP, Garry Gates was the highest earner with $3,006,881 won. The bulk of Gates’ winnings came via his fourth-place finish in the WSOP Main Event, a score worth $3,000,000 that landed Gates in the top 10 of the Pennsylvania all-time money list. Gates also cashed in the $1,500 Monster Stack and $1,000 Mini Main Event at the 2019 WSOP. Thomas Parkes of Alburtis, PA, finished 59th in the 2019 WSOP Main Event and took home $142,215. He was the second-highest finisher from the Keystone State. Chad Power (89th - $82,365) and Kenny Smaron (92nd - $69,636) also placed in the top 100. Jake Schindler, the PA poker all-time money list leader at time of writing, cashed three times at the 2019 WSOP. His first was a fifth-place finish in the $10,000 Heads-Up Championship worth $31,151, his second was in the WSOP.com $500 Turbo Deepstack for $1,113, and his third was a 67th-place result in the WSOP Main Event for $117,710. Joe McKeehen, winner of the 2015 WSOP Main Event and second on the Pennsylvania poker all-time money list, cashed just once at the 2019 WSOP. He finished 65th in the $1,500 Millionaire Maker event. John Hennigan, who is originally from Philadelphia, only cashed one time at the 2019 World Series of Poker, but that cash was a victory in the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship to the tune of $245,451. Hennigan defeated Daniel Negreanu in heads-up play to win that tournament. Matt Glantz, the player who was fourth on the Pennsylvania poker all-time money list at time of writing, finished in the money of seven WSOP events in the summer of 2019. His best finish was a third-place result in the $10,000 Dealer’s Choice Championship for $139,126. He also had a deep run in the WSOP Main Event, finishing 205th for $50,855. PA Players in the WSOP Big 50 In the record-breaking WSOP Big 50, 345 entries came from Pennsylvania poker players. Of the 28,371 entries, PA poker players made up 1.22% of the total field. As it pertains to US participation in the Big 50, US players made up 23,972 entries in this tournament, meaning Pennsylvania players accounted for 1.44% of US participation in the Big 50. The highest finish in the Big 50 for a Pennsylvania player came from Fabio Garofalo. Garofalo, who hails from Mercer, PA, took 66th and turned a $500 entry into $14,958. Pennsylvania’s Gregory Fishberg (90th - $10,233) and James Gilbert (98th - $8,539) also placed in the top 100 of the 2019 WSOP Big 50. PA Online Poker Gives Potential for More WSOP Participation With the launch of PA online poker looming, exciting times are ahead. Legal, regulated online poker platforms in the Keystone State should help grow the game in the region and be a catalyst for increased participation by Pennsylvania players in the WSOP. Although it will take some time for the state to get up to speed with the likes of its neighbor, New Jersey, Pennsylvania's upside is quite large. New Jersey has a growing online poker market in the 11th most populated state in the country with nearly 9 million people to pull from. Pennsylvania will be drawing from the fifth largest population of nearly 13 million people when online poker goes live. The potential is there and it wouldn't be out of the question to see Pennsylvania's WSOP participation meet or surpass that of New Jersey's in 2020 or 2021.
  12. As the launch of Pennsylvania online poker nears, PocketFives takes a look at the top 10 of the Pennsylvania poker all-time money list. The list includes a World Series of Poker Main Event champion, one other WSOP gold bracelet winner, a couple of World Poker Tour winners, and a European Poker Tour champion. The leader falls under none of these categories, though, but he does top the list in a big way with more than $24 million in live tournament earnings. Pennsylvania Poker All-Time Money List Jake Schindler - $24,659,374 Joseph McKeehen - $16,224,026 John Hennigan - $8,472,252 Matt Glantz - $7,110,451 Daniel Ott - $4,726,701 Matt Berkey - $4,152,310 Russell Thomas - $3,770,309 Michael Martin - $3,305,970 Aaron Mermelstein - $3,246,815 Garry Gates - $3,243,129 Jake Schindler Jake Schindler and his career live tournament earnings of more than $24.6 million tops the PA poker all-time money list, and the gap between him and second place is quite large. Schindler is originally from Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, just west of Philadelphia. It’s a suburb of Philadelphia with a population of only few thousand people. Schindler’s largest live tournament score to date comes in at $3.6 million for when he finished second to Christoph Vogelsang in the $300,000 buy-in Super High Roller Bowl in 2017. He also has scores of $1.192 million from winning the 2014 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $25,000 High Roller, $2.151 million for winning the 2018 partypoker MILLIONS Grand Final Barcelona €100,000 Super High Roller, and $1.332 million for winning the WPT Five Diamond $100,000 Super High Roller in 2018. Not only does Schindler’s more than $24.6 million put him on top of Pennsylvania’s all-time money list, but it has him ranked in the top 15 of the United States all-time money list and top 25 of the overall all-time money list. Joseph McKeehen Coming in at #2 on Pennsylvania’s all-time money list is 2015 WSOP Main Event champion Joseph McKeehen with more than $16.2 million in live tournament earnings. Of those winnings, $7.683 million came when McKeehen topped a field of 6,420 entries in poker’s most prestigious event, the WSOP Main Event. McKeehen is originally from North Wales, Pennsylvania. It’s a small town in the southeast corner of the Keystone State. McKeehen proved his wasn’t just a one-hit wonder when, in 2017, he won his second WSOP gold bracelet in the $10,000 Limit Hold’em Championship, scoring $311,817. McKeehen also has a WSOP Circuit Main Event title to his name. McKeehen’s second biggest score came from the 2016 PCA $100,000 Super High Roller. In that event, he finished second to Bryn Kenney for $1.22 million. John Hennigan One of the most well-known poker players in the world, John Hennigan, comes in at #3 on Pennsylvania’s all-time money list. He has $8.472 million in live tournament earnings. Hennigan has loads of big scores and triumphant victories on his résumé, but it’s the six WSOP gold bracelets and one WPT title that really stick out. Hennigan’s largest career score is his World Poker Tour win, coming in 2007 at the WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open when he won $1.606 million. His second biggest score came in 2014 when he won the WSOP $50,000 Poker Players Championship to the tune of $1.517 million. That WSOP $50,000 Poker Players Championship win came just one year after he finished third in the same event for $686,568. In 2018, Hennigan took second in the WSOP $50,000 Poker Players Championship for $765,837. Hennigan is originally from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Matt Glantz Matt Glantz, from Lafayette Hill, Pennsylvania, comes in at #4 on the list with $7.11 million in live tournament earnings. His biggest live tournament score came from the European Poker Tour London £20,500 High Roller. He won that event for what converted to $862,837. In 2008, Glantz took fourth in the WSOP $50,000 H.O.R.S.E. event for $568,320, and in 2014 he finished fifth in the PCA $100,000 Super High Roller for $445,520. Glantz has a handful of WSOP final tables on record, but to date, he’s yet to win a WSOP gold bracelet. His closest was in 2005 when he took second in the WSOP $3,000 No Limit Hold’em tournament for $364,620. Daniel Ott Almost smack dead in the center of Pennsylvania is Altoona, where Daniel Ott is from. Ott comes in at #5 on PA’s all-time money list with $4.726 million in live tournament earnings. Nearly all of that, $4.7 million worth, comes from a single score. In 2017, Ott made the final table of the WSOP Main Event and finished second to Scott Blumstein for $4.7 million. Elsewhere on Ott’s résumé, you’ll find a bunch of WSOP cashes, all for small amounts, and an MSPT cash, but that’s it. Matt Berkey Originally from Leechburg, Pennsylvania, Matt Berkey is one of poker’s most popular players. He has more than $4.15 million in live tournament earnings, but that could change rather quickly for as big as he plays. Berkey is a regular in some of poker’s priciest tournaments, including the $300,000 Super High Roller Bowl, which he took fifth in in 2016 for $1.1 million. That’s Berkey’s only seven-figure score to date, but he has several six-figures cashes and it seems like only a matter of time before he nets another cash of a million dollars or more. Russell Thomas Like Ott, the bulk of Russell Thomas’ career live tournament earnings come from a final table in the WSOP Main Event. Thomas has more than $3.77 million in earnings, which lands him #7 on the Pennsylvania poker all-time money list. More than $2.85 million of that comes from a fourth-place finish in the 2012 WSOP Main Event. Thomas is originally from Wallingford, Pennsylvania, which is located in the southeast corner of the state. Michael Martin You won’t see Michael Martin on the poker circuit much these days, but he did well to amass more than $3.3 million in live tournament earnings. Nearly all of Martin’s live tournament cashes come from 2006 to 2010, with one very small cash coming in each of 2013 and 2019. Martin’s biggest score came when he won the European Poker Tour London Main Event in 2008 for more than $1.8 million. Prior to that, earlier in the same year, he banked $666,171 for a fifth-place finish in the EPT Grand Final in Monte Carlo. Martin is originally from Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania. Aaron Mermelstein Philadelphia’s Aaron Mermelstein is still very much grinding the tournament circuit, and with more than $3.25 million in live earnings, he’s #9 on the Pennsylvania all-time money list. Mermelstein doesn’t have a seven-figure score on record, to date, but he does hold two WPT titles. He won both in 2015, topping the WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open for $712,305, his largest score ever, and then winning the WPT Maryland Live! tournament for $250,222. Another big score for Mermelstein came when he won the WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown $25,000 High Roller event in 2019 for $618,955. Garry Gates Titusville’s Garry Gates is a newcomer to the Pennsylvania poker all-time money list, thanks to his fourth-place finish in the 2019 WSOP Main Event for $3 million. Gates, a longtime member of the poker industry on both the media and corporate side, now has four WSOP Main Event cashes. Gates’ second-biggest score is a fourth-place finish in the 2012 WSOP Circuit Atlantic City Main Event for $64,530. Gates’ hometown of Titusville is home to notable football player and coach, John Heisman.
  13. The Wynn Las Vegas poker room stepped up its holiday game this year with the first-ever Wynn Winter Classic. Anchoring the schedule was the $5,300 Championship and it attracted a field of 557 entries to generate a prize pool of $2.74 million. Taking home the inaugural title was Michael Rocco, who earned $540,800 in first-place prize money. Rocco defeated Michael Dyer in heads-up play to win the title. Dyer gained notoriety from his third-place finish in the 2018 World Series of Poker Main Event, when he took home $3.75 million in prize money. For his runner-up finish in the Wynn Poker Winter Classic Championship, Dyer earned $353,242. Also placing at the final table were Louis Salter (4th - $168,312), Joe Kuether (5th- $124,690), and Adam Hendrix (8th - $63,852). Bubbling the final table was Galen Hall, who took home $45,987 for his 10th-place finish. Right behind him were notables Ankush Mandavia and Kahle Burns in 11th and 12th places, respectively. Mandavia also earned $45,987 and then Burns took home $39,474. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Final Table Results 1st: Michael Rocco - $540,800 2nd: Michael Dyer - $353,242 3rd: Ben Farrell - $239,789 4th: Louis Salter - $168,312 5th: Joe Kuether - $124,690 6th: Matt Yarra - $96,738 7th: Tomas Soderstrom - $77,006 8th: Adam Hendrix - $63,852 9th: Josh Bergman - $53,987 According to live reporting provided by PokerNews, the final hand between Rocco and Dyer saw Dyer open with a raise to 1 million and Rocco call to see the flop come down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3d"]. Both players checked and the dealer landed the [poker card="Td"] on the turn. Rocco led for 2 million, Dyer called, and the river was the [poker card="2h"]. Rocco, having Dyer covered, shoved for effectively 9 million. Dyer called with the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"] for ace high. Rocco had him beat with the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="6h"] for two pair and won the tournament. Others to cash in the event were Shannon Shorr (15th - $34,325), Justin Bonomo (25th - $19,797), Matt Glantz (31st - $17,290), Maria Ho (39th - $15,101), and Cliff Josephy (54th - $11,619). Gerhart and Kamphues Also Score Big at Wynn The $5,300 Championship wasn’t the only big event as part of the 2019 Wynn Winter Classic schedule. Two events that stood out were the $600 NL $250,000 Guarantee and $1,100 NL $500,000 Guarantee tournaments. In the $600 NL $250,000 Guarantee, a field of 727 entries generated a prize pool of $380,366. The top 80 places paid, and it was Kevin Gerhart walking away with the lion’s share of the prize pool. Gerhart won the event for a score of $69,561. In the $1,100 NL $500,000 Guarantee, a field of 1,230 entries created a prize pool of $1.204 million. Germany's Timo Kamphues emerged victorious to win $202,787. After this result, Kamphues went over to Bellagio and finished seventh in the World Poker Tour Five Diamond World Poker Classic for $273,695.
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