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Found 2 results

  1. Entering Day Six of the 2014 World Series of Poker Main Event, then-29-year-old poker pro Matt Waxman was in the middle of the pack of the 79 remaining players with 3.125 million in chips. Unlike some of his remaining competition, this wasn't the pride of Parkland, Florida's first time at the rodeo. Inspired by the success of Robert Varkonyi and his victory at the 2002 WSOP Main Event, the athletic Waxman and his friends decided to pick up the game. Throughout high school, Waxman took on his friends for money, keeping score on a notebook rather than actually betting for money at school, and, once he turned 18, Waxman was able to take those winnings into the Seminole Indian casinos of Florida. Once he turned 21 and was able to enter all casinos in the United States, Waxman's career took off. Waxman earned his first career tournament cash in 2008, but his first taste of success was earning the championship of a WSOP Circuit stop in Atlantic City back in 2010. In 2011, Waxman took the championship of the World Poker Tour's Grand Prix de Paris for his largest ever tournament score at the time ($721,178) and in 2013, he collected his first WSOP bracelet in besting Eric basebaldy Baldwin in a $1,000 No Limit Hold'em event. All totaled, entering the 2014 WSOP Main Event, Waxman had 28 WSOP cashes, six WPT cashes, and over $2.8 million in career winnings. Waxman was facing a few challenges as he entered Day Six of the WSOP Main Event. Even though he had a comfortable stack, he had top pro Luis Velador(3.78 million) two seats to his left, which could be an obstacle. Those two weren't even the top chip counts at the table, as Jorryt van Hoof(3.9 million) and the second place stack of Kyle Keranen (6.67 million) also looked to make their drive toward the November Nine. He busted on the second-to-last day of the July play in the 2014 Main Event in 45th place for $186,000.
  2. Darren Elias was the headliner Saturday night in Las Vegas as the World Poker Tour Tournament of Champions played down to a winner. Just days after winning his record-setting fourth WPT title, Elias entered the TOC final table with the chip lead and a chance at going back-to-back against some of the toughest fields in WPT history. Matthew Waxman wasn't thinking about that narrative though and after eliminating Elias in third place, had little trouble cruising to victory to capture the TOC and the $463,375 first-place prize money at the Esports Arena at the Luxor Las Vegas. After a double-elimination on the final hand of Day 2, only five players returned for Saturday. With blinds at 8,000/16,000 (8,000) Elias raised to 35,000 from the cutoff before Nick Schulman moved all in for 438,000 from the small blind. Elias called and turned over [poker card="7c"][poker card="7s"] which put him ahead of Schulman's [poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"]. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4d"] flop put Schulman in the lead but only briefly as the [poker card="7d"] hit the turn. The river was the [poker card="jd"] sending Schulman out in fifth place. Another 22 hands later and Elias, who began the day with the chip lead, was picking up another elimination thanks to fortuitous turn card. David Benyamine moved all in for 370,000 from the small blind and Elias called from the big. Benyamine showed [poker card="7c"][poker card="7s"] while Elias found he was behind with [poker card="5c"][poker card="5s"]. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="jh"][poker card="ts"] flop changed nothing but the [poker card="5h"] turn moved Elias ahead. The river was the [poker card="4s"] and Benyamine was out in fourth place. Any momentum that Elias had built up was erased in hand with Waxman that saw Elias queens outrun by Waxman's jacks, doubling up Waxman and leaving Elias reeling. It wasn't long before Elias' run at back-to-back victories was snuffed out. Matas Cimbolas raised to 50,000 from the button and Elias moved all in the small blind for 645,000. Cimbolas called and showed [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"] while Elias was drawing live with [poker card="tc"][poker card="8c"]. The board ran out [poker card="ah"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="9c"] to give Matas top pair and eliminate four-time WPT champion Elias in third place. Waxman began heads-up play with a 2-1 lead over Cimbolas and he never surrendered it, eliminating his Lithuanian opponent after 38 hands of play. Cimbolas completed from the small blind and Waxman checked to see a flop of [poker card="kd"][poker card="qs"][poker card="2h"]. Waxman check-called Cimbolas' bet of 40,000. The turn was the [poker card="4s"] and Waxman check-called again, this time for 125,000. The river was the [poker card="8h"] and Waxman checked again. Cimbolas moved all in for 425,000. Waxman used one of this time extension before announcing a call. Cimbolas showed [poker card="th"][poker card="3s"] and Waxman happily tabled [poker card="qc"][poker card="7d"] for second pair, good enough to win the pot and eliminate Cimbolas. The event, which allows champions from previous seasons to buy-in for $15,000 while Season XVI earned their entry by winning a WPT title, attracted a record-setting 80 players. This was the first year the event was played in Las Vegas after spending the previous two years at the Seminole Hard Rock in Hollywood, Florida. Final Table Payouts Matthew Waxman - $463,375 Matas Cimbolas - $265,590 Darren Elias - $177,060 David Benyamine - $123,045 Nick Schulman - $89,290 J.C. Tran - $67,800
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