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Found 6 results

  1. Most poker players would consider finishing 11th in the World Series of Poker Main Event to be an amazing accomplishment. Maybe not in the moments following their elimination, but eventually they’d accept what they did as something special. For the last two years, John Cynn has allowed his 2016 11th place finish to be his career-best score. Sunday morning, however, following an epic heads-up battle with Tony Miles, Cynn changed all of that by winning the 2018 WSOP Main Event and walking away with $8.8 million. “Different. Feels very different,” Cynn said when asked to compare his emotions from each event. “I mean, neither of these are supposed to happen, right? To make 11th was insane on its own and to win, that's literally something that you dream but you never expect to happen. I think last time, when I got knocked out in 11th, I was really happy. Right now I do feel pretty overwhelmed, all of the emotions times ten.” Winning the fifth largest Main Event prize in the 49-year history of the WSOP, Cynn is well aware of how that money is going to change his life. “I don't know what people's impression of me was, but I'm not doing bad but I'm not rich, so the money is very significant, but I do like to think that I don't need the money to be happy,” Cynn said. “At the same time, practically, it's going to make things a lot easier, things I want to do in life, things for my family and parents.” He did have some more immediate plans for spending some of his winnings though. “I might use some of it to party with my friends, but other than that I think I'm going to let my emotions die down before I decide to do anything crazy, probably just get away, disappear somewhere for a while sounds nice,” Cynn said. For his part, Miles recognized what the 10-day run in poker’s most prestigious event showed him about himself as a person and a poker player. “You can do anything you put your mind to,” Dyer said. “Well in poker, you just want to be prepared and be in the best state of mind and you want to be able to execute all the time because you don't know when you're going to get the run of cards. You don't know when you're going to have an opportunity to strike, so you just have to be prepared all the time.” When the final three players returned to action Saturday night, Miles held the chip lead, Cynn had the second biggest stack and former chip leader Michael Dyer was working with the shortest stack of the three. Michael Dyer Eliminated in Third Place Michael Dyer came into the final day with just 16 big blinds and built his strategy around finding a spot to double or steal the blinds and ante. He was all in without a call on five of the first 180 hands of play, but it was the sixth all in on the 19th hand that ended Dyer’s night. Miles raised to 4,400,000 from the button with [poker card="as"][poker card="jh"] and Dyer responded by moving all in for 22,200,000. Cynn folded and Miles called. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3d"] flop didn’t offer Dyer much help, but the [poker card="jc"] turn actually increased his available outs. The [poker card="qh"] river didn’t fill Dyer’s Broadway draw and he was eliminated in third place. “I wanted a little more, but it was pretty good. I can’t complain. Third place, that’s more than you can dream from when you start the tournament,” Dyer said. That had allowed Miles to reclaim the chip lead he had lost just two hands prior and was now sitting on a stack of 203,500,000 to Cynn’s 190,300,000. The Heads Up Marathon In the modern era of the WSOP Main Event, the longest final table belonged to 2012 when Greg Merson needed 399 hands to win. Dyer was eliminated on hand #243 and over the next 10 hours and 23 minutes, Cynn and Miles played 199 hands on their own, put the total for the final table at 442. The lead changed over a dozen times during the course of heads-up action. Tony Miles Eliminated in Second Place With blinds of 2,000,000/4,000,000 (500,000), Cynn raised to 9,000,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="jc"] and Miles responded 34,000,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="8h"]. The flop came [poker card="kd"][poker card="kh"][poker card="5h"] and Cynn called Miles’ bet of 32,000,000. The turn was the [poker card="8d"] and Miles moved all in for 114,000,000. Cynn thought the hand through and called, giving Miles the bad news that he was drawing dead. The [poker card="4s"] river completed the board, eliminated Miles in second place and crowned Cynn as the new Main Event champion. Final Table Payouts John Cynn - $8,800,000 Tony Miles - $5,000,000 Michael Dyer - $3,750,000 Nicolas Manion - $2,825,000 Joe Cada - $2,150,000 Aram Zobian - $1,800,000 Alex Lynskey - $1,500,000 Artem Metalidi - $1,250,000 Antoine Labat - $1,000,000
  2. Somehow, Wednesday night at the 2018 World Series of Poker will probably go down as one of the most surreal in the 49-year history of the event. Not only did the Main Event reach a final table in a dramatic fashion, but the most decorated player in WSOP history, Phil Hellmuth, added to his legend with yet another bracelet. This is the Main Event There were 26 players at the start of Day 7 of the WSOP Main Event but over a 12-hour span, 17 players were eliminated leaving just the nine players to make up the final table. Shortstacks Jeffrey Trudeau, Barry Hutter and Bart Lybaert all fell early with Eric Froehlich, who started Day 6 with the 10th biggest stack, getting coolered with pocket queens against Alex Lynskey's pocket kings to join them on the rail. Ivan Luca, former November Niner Sylvain Loosli, Frederik Brink and Ryan Phan all busted to leave the unofficial final table of 10 players waiting for one more elimination before stopping play for the night. The final hand was one for the ages. Nicolas Manion raised to 1,500,000 from UTG. Antoine Labat called from middle before Yueqi Zhu came over the top, moving all in for 24,700,000 from late position. Manion responded by moving all in for 43,100,000. Labat, the biggest stack of the three, took some time before eventually calling. Zhu revealed [kh][ks], Manion tabled [ah][as] and Labata turned over [kc][kd]. The board ran out [jd][7c][4c][3s][jc] to eliminate Zhu in tenth place, leaving Labata with just 8,050,000 and boosting Manion into the chip lead with a nearly full triple up. "Somehow this is real life," said Manion, who finished with 112,775,000. "When I got both calls, I flipped over my hand, I went straight to my rail and looked up at the TV and saw they both had pocket kings to my aces." Michael Dyer, who spent most of the day Wednesday in the chip lead, finished just behind Manion with 112,775,000. Remarkably, the final table includes repeat appearance from a Main Event champion from the November Nine era for the first time in history. Joe Cada, who won the 2009 WSOP Main Event, finished with 23,675,000, good enough for the sixth biggest stack. "It was a lot more of a grind this time. I respect the tournament more," said Cada, who was down to 9,000 on Day 1 before rebuilding his stack. " The final table resumes at 5:30 pm PT with the ESPN broadcast starting at 6:00 pm PT. The current schedule calls for play to continue Thursday until six players remain. Final Table Chip Counts Nicolas Manion - 112,775,000 Michael Dyer - 109,175,000 Tony Miles - 42,750,000 John Cynn - 37,075,000 Alex Lynskey - 25,925,000 Joe Cada - 23,675,000 Aram Zobian - 18,875,000 Artem Metalidi - 15,475,000 Antoine Labat - 8,050,000 Phil Hellmuth Wins Bracelet #15 [caption id="attachment_619988" align="alignleft" width="1024"] Phil Hellmuth continues to silence his critics, winning a 15 WSOP bracelet on Wednesday night.[/caption] It's been an interesting summer for Phil Hellmuth. Seemingly mired in some sort of controversy from the very first week, Hellmuth spent two days earlier this week defending, and eventually apologizing for, his actions late on Day 2 of the Main Event that may have cost another player their tournament life. On Thursday night, with the Main Event playing down to a final table in another room, Hellmuth overcame the 2.5-1 chip lead of Steven Wolansky to win the 15th bracelet of his career. Faced with the possibility of yet another runner-up finish, Hellmuth gave himself a little pep talk. "I said, ... 'When's the next time you're going to have an opportunity like this where you're heads up for a bracelet? You just need to hang in there and stay strong', and I stayed strong and then luckily hit some cards," said Hellmuth. Hellmuth, who holds the WSOP records for wins and cashes, gave Wolansky credit for making the final table a difficult one for him. "He wouldn't give an inch, so I had to start thinking about, okay how do I want to handle this? And I thought alright, I'm going to have to try to steal more pots against him, to give myself a chance because he's just not giving a chip away, he's making it really tough, and I can't blink first either," said Hellmuth. "I just have to like just keep playing my best poker until the end and maybe something great will happen." Hellmuth's last bracelet came in 2015, when he won the $10,000 Razz Championship event.
  3. The final table of the 2018 World Series of Poker Main Event started with Michael Dyer sitting with the second biggest stack and through just over four hours of play on Thursday night, the 32-year-old from Houston moved into control of the final table and finished with more than double the stack of any of his five remaining opponents. Dyer finished Day 8 with 156,500,000 without being responsible for any of the night’s three eliminations. Being able to wield a big stack against some shorter-stacked opponents has allowed Dyer to push the table around. “I’ve had dynamic separation from everybody so it makes it kind of simpler for me to play. I’m able to play differently than they are,” said Dyer. “It was a pretty solid final table. I didn’t see any horrible mistakes or anything egregious.” Dyer added 47,325,000 to his chips on Thursday and how has 39.74% of the chips in play. Nicolas Manion, who began play Thursday with the chip lead, went in the opposite direction, finishing with 72,250,000. Tony Miles finished with 57,500,000 with Joe Cada and Aram Zobian holding onto short stacks of 29,275,000 and 16,700,000 respectively. Cada, who won the 2009 Main Event, felt relieved to be moving onto Day 9 after a rough day Thursday. “I’m just happy to be here. It’s been a grueling tournament. I’ve been lucky to even be in the spot where I’m at. I’ve had low chips the entire tournament. I feel like I’ve just been hanging in there,” said Cada. Antoine Labat Eliminated in Ninth Place Thanks to the crazy hand that ended play on Wednesday night, France’s Antoine Labat knew he’d have to make a move early on Thursday if he had any hopes of winning the tournament. That opportunity seemed to present itself on the 16th hand of play. Action folded to Labat on the button and he raised to 1,200,000 holding [poker card="kd"][poker card="kh"]. Artem Metalidi moved all in from the small blind holding [poker card="qc"][poker card="qh"] and after John Cynn folded the big blind, Labat called with his tournament on the line. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="qd"][poker card="5s"] to give Metalidi middle set. Neither the [poker card="9s"] turn or [poker card="ad"] river were any help for the Frenchman and he was eliminated in ninth. While “With 60 left I got kings against aces and nines for my tournament life, I put in all my chips there and the king came door cards,” said Labat. “So I’m not complaining about kings. They won me $950,000 and it has to end like that. All my tournaments have been around kings, I had them many times and sometimes they were good and sometimes they were not good. It’s alright, I don’t blame them.” Despite losing twice with pocket kings in two big spots inside of a 17-hand span on Wednesday and Thursday, Sabat is leaving Las Vegas with a new appreciation for poker. “I had an amazing experience. I haven’t played tournaments for a long time. I played a lot before. It’s been three years and I didn’t do any,” said Labat. “I decided to come to Vegas and change my daily routine and do new stuff and I think the Main Event brought me a real new experience. I feel like I have a lot of energy to play tournaments” Artem Metalidi Eliminated in Eighth Place Metalidi came into the final table with the second smallest stack and found himself flipping for his Main Event life in a hand that turned out to be one of the more dramatic of the last few days. Metalidi open-shoved for 6,225,000 with [poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"], Zobian move all in over the top 24,000,000 from the small blind with [poker card="kd"][poker card="qd"] and Dyer folded the big blind. The [poker card="6d"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2d"] flop gave Metalidi middle set but opened a flush draw for Zobian.The [poker card="kc"] turn was good for Metalidi, but the [poker card="4d"] river gave Zobian the flush and sent the Ukrainian poker pro home in eighth place. “I couldn’t even dream of it. I started this tournament winning bottom set against top set and I was felt like I was freerolling the tournament. Then I made the money with a really short stack and it wasn’t even considering I could make it here, but here I am and I’m really, really happy,” Metalidi said about his deep run. “It’s been surreal. I don’t think I fully grasp it yet. It’s probably going to hit me later.” Alex Lynskey Eliminated in Seventh Place Dyer raised to 1,600,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="jh"][poker card="8h"] and John Cynn called from the small blind with [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"]. Alex Lynskey moved all in for 11,525,000 from the big blind with [poker card="6c"][poker card="6d"]. Dyer folded but Cynn called. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="3s"] kept Lynskey in front but gave Cynn four extra outs with a gutshot straight draw. The [poker card="td"] turn gave Cynn more outs to make a two overpair. The river was the [poker card="jc"] completing the straight draw and sending Lynskey out in seventh place. The English-born, Australian poker pro managed to win exactly zero of the 47 hands that he was dealt into at the final table. “It was a fantastic run. I can’t really complain. I came in middle of the pack and laddered a couple of spots and lost a flip. I was pretty card dead on the final table, there’s not much I could have done,” said Lynskey. “I was dealt 10-2 off every hand for like two hours and then had to raise-fold ace-queen and he said had ace-king and then got dealt sixes the next hand.” The final six players will return to action on Friday at 5:30 pm PT with ESPN broadcasting from 6:00 pm PT. The current Friday schedule calls for play to run until just three players remain. Final Table Chip Counts Michael Dyer - 156,500,000 Nicolas Manion - 72,250,000 John Cynn - 61,550,000 Tony Miles - 57,500,000 Joe Cada - 29,275,000 Aram Zobian - 16,700,000
  4. Michael Dyer started Day 9 of the World Series of Poker Main Event with nearly 40% of the chips in play with just five opponents standing between him and $8.8 million and the title of World Champion. After six hours of play on Friday night, just three players remain but Dyer is suddenly staring up from the bottom of the chip counts after a day that saw Florida-based poker pro Tony Miles take control. Miles went 57,500,000 and the fourth biggest stack at the start of play to 238,900,000 and the chip lead after eliminating a former world champ and putting a major dent in Dyer’s stack. Aram Zobian Eliminated in Sixth Place The shortest stack at the start of Day 9, Aram Zobian was still guaranteed at least $1.8 million but cem in hoping for more. A blind versus blind battle, however, ended any hope he had of laddering up on Friday night. With blinds of 500,000/1,000,000 (150,000), action folded to Zobian in the small blind and he moved all in for 1,735,000 with [poker card="8d"][poker card="6d"] and Dyer called from the big blind with [poker card="ah"][poker card="8c"]. The board ran out [poker card="kc"][poker card="qd"][poker card="2h"][poker card="7h"][poker card="th"] to eliminate Zobian from the tournament in sixth place. Following his bustout, Zobian talked about what the overall experience of making the final table of the Main Event and how a score that big will change things for him. “I would say it was intense, fun and amazing. I met a lot of people, I played a shit ton of hands, considering it was Level 38, 76 hours in the last few days,” said Zobian. “It will change my life significantly. I don't think I'll go too crazy, but I'll definitely do a lot of traveling, buy a nice new car, help out family, donate some to charity and just improve my overall quality of life.” Joe Cada Eliminated in Fifth Place In the modern era of the WSOP Main Event, a repeat winner seems almost impossible. Navigating through 7,000+ player fields once is difficult enough and doing it a second time didn’t seem possible until 2009 Main Event champ Joe Cada made this year’s final table. All of that came to a halt though thanks to a coin flip situation. From UTG, Cada raised to 2,200,000 with [poker card="th"][poker card="ts"] before Miles three-bet to 6,900,000 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="kc"]. Cada responded by moving all in for 47,650,000 and after spending several minutes contemplating his decision, Miles called. The [poker card="ks"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8d"] flop put Miles ahead with a pair of kings, but the [poker card="qd"] turn gave Cada straight outs. The river [poker card="9s"] paired the board and left Cada pondering what could have been and a fifth-place finish. Tony Miles Takes the Chip Lead from Michael Dyer About 45 minutes after eliminating Cada, Miles put his newfound chips to work against Dyer. John Cynn raised to 2,100,000 from UTG with, Miles called from the button with [poker card="3d"][poker card="3h"] and Dyer called from the big blind with [poker card="4c"][poker card="3c"]. After the [poker card="ks"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3s"] flop, Dyer and Cynn checked and Miles bet 4,300,000. Dyer check-raised to 14,300,000, Cynn folded and Miles called. The turn was the [poker card="5c"] and Dyer bet 21,400,000 and Miles called again. Dyer then checked after the [poker card="kc"] river and Miles be 27,400,000 and Dyer called instantly. That put pushed Miles into the chip lead with 182,625,000 to Dyer’s 129,950,000 and dramatically changed the dynamic of the table. Nicolas Manion Eliminated in Fourth Place At one point on Friday, Nicolas Manion started to make a valiant charge towards Michael Dyer’s chip lead but after losing 25% of his stack in a hand with Dyer and another 50% of his remaining stack to John Cynn, Manion was left scrambling. A final confrontation with Cynn would end up being the end of his tournament. Cynn opened from the button to 3,800,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"] before Manion moved all in from the big blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="td"] and Cynn called. Manion found no double-up on the [poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2d"][poker card="6h"] run out and he was eliminated in fourth place, ending play for the night. “What a long day. Had some good hands, had some bad hands here we are we ran out of luck,” Canion said. “I have no regret on how I played my hands. I picked my spots and chose the hands that I felt were the right place to get all in and this is what happens when you run ace-ten into kings. Sometimes you can't just run like god anymore.” Final Three Chip Counts Tony Miles - 238,900,000 John Cynn - 128,700,000 Michael Dyer - 26,200,000 Action resumes Saturday at 5:30 pm PT with the ESPN broadcast beginning at 6 pm PT.
  5. In what might go down as one of the strangest endings to a day in World Series of Poker Main Event history, play was halted nearly 90 minutes early on Monday night as a Las Vegas storm caused a power outage inside the Rio Hotel & Convention center. The lights in the Amazon Room went dark at 11:20 pm PT, forcing tournament staff to reach WSOP Tournament Director Jack Effel by phone to discuss options. Players were sent on an unscheduled break that lasted until 11:40 pm when they were told they'd be bagging up to return to play on Tuesday. The biggest stack heading into Day 6 is Houston's Michael Dyer with 12,180,000. Dyer is the only player to end up with eight-figure stack. Dyer was responsible for the elimination of former November Niner and #1-ranked PocketFiver in 123rd when his ace-king outran Josephy's pocket kings. Three-time WSOP bracelet winner Brian Yoon bagged up the second biggest stack with 8,395,000. While he might be almost four million behind Dyer, he leads the third biggest stack, belonging to Jeff Trudeau, by just 95,000. Isreal's Hari Bercovici sits fourth and Belgium's Bart Lybaert ended up fifth. There were 201 players eliminated on Day 5 including the likes of Antonio Esfandiari, Scott Davies, Ivan Demidov, Paul Volpe, Ben Yu, Rocco Palumbo, Jonathan Hilton, Kyle Julius, Ema Zajmovic, Chino Rheem, Jake Schwartz and Daniel Alaei. Action resumes at 11 am PT Tuesday. Top 10 Chip Counts Michael Dyer - 12,180,000 Brian Yoon - 8,395,000 Jeffery Trudeau - 8,305,000 Hari Bercovici - 7,650,000 Bart Lybaert - 7,530,000 Karen Goncalves - 6,940,000 Peter Campo - 6,935,000 Konstantin Beylin - 6,930,000 Alexander Gross - 6,755,000 Artem Metalidi - 6,525,000
  6. The Wynn Las Vegas poker room stepped up its holiday game this year with the first-ever Wynn Winter Classic. Anchoring the schedule was the $5,300 Championship and it attracted a field of 557 entries to generate a prize pool of $2.74 million. Taking home the inaugural title was Michael Rocco, who earned $540,800 in first-place prize money. Rocco defeated Michael Dyer in heads-up play to win the title. Dyer gained notoriety from his third-place finish in the 2018 World Series of Poker Main Event, when he took home $3.75 million in prize money. For his runner-up finish in the Wynn Poker Winter Classic Championship, Dyer earned $353,242. Also placing at the final table were Louis Salter (4th - $168,312), Joe Kuether (5th- $124,690), and Adam Hendrix (8th - $63,852). Bubbling the final table was Galen Hall, who took home $45,987 for his 10th-place finish. Right behind him were notables Ankush Mandavia and Kahle Burns in 11th and 12th places, respectively. Mandavia also earned $45,987 and then Burns took home $39,474. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Final Table Results 1st: Michael Rocco - $540,800 2nd: Michael Dyer - $353,242 3rd: Ben Farrell - $239,789 4th: Louis Salter - $168,312 5th: Joe Kuether - $124,690 6th: Matt Yarra - $96,738 7th: Tomas Soderstrom - $77,006 8th: Adam Hendrix - $63,852 9th: Josh Bergman - $53,987 According to live reporting provided by PokerNews, the final hand between Rocco and Dyer saw Dyer open with a raise to 1 million and Rocco call to see the flop come down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3d"]. Both players checked and the dealer landed the [poker card="Td"] on the turn. Rocco led for 2 million, Dyer called, and the river was the [poker card="2h"]. Rocco, having Dyer covered, shoved for effectively 9 million. Dyer called with the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"] for ace high. Rocco had him beat with the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="6h"] for two pair and won the tournament. Others to cash in the event were Shannon Shorr (15th - $34,325), Justin Bonomo (25th - $19,797), Matt Glantz (31st - $17,290), Maria Ho (39th - $15,101), and Cliff Josephy (54th - $11,619). Gerhart and Kamphues Also Score Big at Wynn The $5,300 Championship wasn’t the only big event as part of the 2019 Wynn Winter Classic schedule. Two events that stood out were the $600 NL $250,000 Guarantee and $1,100 NL $500,000 Guarantee tournaments. In the $600 NL $250,000 Guarantee, a field of 727 entries generated a prize pool of $380,366. The top 80 places paid, and it was Kevin Gerhart walking away with the lion’s share of the prize pool. Gerhart won the event for a score of $69,561. In the $1,100 NL $500,000 Guarantee, a field of 1,230 entries created a prize pool of $1.204 million. Germany's Timo Kamphues emerged victorious to win $202,787. After this result, Kamphues went over to Bellagio and finished seventh in the World Poker Tour Five Diamond World Poker Classic for $273,695.
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