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Found 9 results

  1. The high rollers return to the PokerGO Studio in Las Vegas this week for the second annual PokerGO Cup, an eight tournament high-stakes No Limit Hold’em series building to the $100,000 buy-in Main Event. The PokerGO Cup keeps the action of the PokerGO Tour going strong following the success of the recently completed Stairway To Millions, which saw Nick Petrangelo go back-to-back in the final two events and take home the more than $1 million top prize. The PokerGO Cup is PokerGO’s first pure high-roller series of the year, starting out with three $10,000 buy-in events. The rest of the series includes a single $15,000, two $25,000, a $50,000 and the $100,000 finale. The final table of every event will be livestreamed on PokerGO starting at 4 p.m. ET (1 p.m. PT) from February 3-10. Results for every event of the series will accumulate points for the PokerGO Tour and help crown the winner of the PokerGO Cup and take home an additional $50,000 on top. Last year, Alex Foxen, Ali Imsirovic, Jake Schindler, and Jason Koon were among the event winners. However, the series was most notable for when Daniel Negreanu broke through a winless drought and took down the penultimate $50,000 buy-in for a $700,000 score and then followed that up with a deep run in the finale which ultimately locked up the PokerGO Cup title. Negreanu has already stated that he’ll be back in action, looking to defend his title. Plenty of other notable names are expected to try and dethrone Negreanu including current PGT points leader Petrangelo, as well as PokerGO regs Imsirovic, David Peters, Seth Davies, Chris Brewer, and PokerGO founder Cary Katz among others. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1487205995713421313?s=20&t=xI3XDLy_T201LwCwVmBniw Not only can you watch the PokerGO Cup, but you can also pick up a piece of the action with a number of the high-rollers offering action in the PocketFives Staking Marketplace. Daniel Negreanu, Ali Imsirovic, and four-time WPT champion Darren Elias have all offered fans a way to sweat the action from home. Plus, if you are looking for an annual subscription for PokerGO, sign up today and use the promo code “SWEAT” and receive a bonus $20 in your PocketFives Staking account so you can watch the action and have a piece of it too. 2022 PokerGO Cup Schedule [table id=287 /] [stakingupcoming]
  2. It’s another win inside the PokerGO Studio for Nick Petrangelo who bested the 41-entry field of Event #5 ($25,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup to take home the $369,000 first-place prize. Petrangelo has been on a bit of a heater in the PokerGO high-stakes events as of late, having cashed four times, including two victories, in January’s Stairway to Millions series. All of his early 2022 high-roller results have him currently sitting atop the PokerGO Tour leaderboard and, with his latest victory, topping more than $2 million in earnings this year. “Everything has been going really well since even, like, September,” Petrangelo told PokerGO after the win. “A little up and down, but yeah, since then pretty much everything has been working out. I’m running great, winning all-ins, and getting hands at the right times. Sometimes you get around the bubble when you have a lot of chips and you lose a couple of hands, but it’s been the opposite for me when I go deep and everything just goes well.” Darren Elias was at his third PokerGO Cup final table of the 2022 series, however, he started this final table on the short stack and with the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) he held just under 10 big blinds. After Nick Schulman opened from under the gun to 100,000, Elias three-bet shoved his final 485,000 holding [poker card="kh"][poker card="qd"]. When the action folded back to Schulman, he quickly called putting Elias at risk. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="9d"][poker card="9c"] giving Schulman top pair and leaving Elias with needing runner-runner to survive. When the turn came the [poker card="2c"], Elias was officially drawing dead to the river. The four-time WPT champ said his goodbye and went to collect his $51,250 sixth-place prize. With the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante), Schulman and 2021 PokerGO Tour champion Ali Imsirovic were both sitting on just over 10 big blinds, with Imsirovic holding a 40,000 chip edge. From the cutoff, Imsirovic raised to 140,000 holding the [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"] and when it got to Schulman in the small blind, he three-bet shipped all-in with his [poker card="js"][poker card="ts"]. Petrangelo folded his big blind and with Imsirovic going nowhere, he snap-called, and the two short stacks put the cards on their backs. Schulman was slightly covered putting his tournament at risk, but it was Imsirovic who was in trouble when the flop came [poker card="tc"][poker card="8c"][poker card="2c"], giving Schulman top pair. The turn was the [poker card="7d"], leaving Imsirovic looking for an ace or king to take out Schulman. But the river was the [poker card="5c"], giving Schulman the full double and leaving Imsirovic with just over a small blind left. Imsirovic was eliminated in fifth place on the very next hand, losing in a four-way pot. Imsirovic collected $82,000 for his efforts. After the first break, the blinds escalated to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante), and with just over 10 bigs in his stack, Sean Winter raised to 375K from the button with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="th"]. After Schulman folded the small blind, Petrangelo looked down at the [poker card="kc"][poker card="qd"] and jammed all-in for 1 million. Winter, with half his stack in the middle quickly called for it all. Winter playfully picked up the [poker card="th"] and said to Petrangelo “Hey, have you seen these coming today?”. Petrangelo, unfazed said no and Winter continued “Have you been watchin’?” Soon the dealer put out a [poker card="qs"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3c"] flop, giving both top pair, but keeping Petrangelo’s kicker in play. “Ten baby!” Winter rooted. “Four of spades, I have a deck read” Petrangelo replied. Close, the turn came the [poker card="4d"] leaving Winter looking for just three outs to survive. The river was the [poker card="6d"] and the good-natured Winter stood and went to the cage to collect his $112,750 cash for fourth place. Playing three-handed at the same level, Schulman raised to 160,000 with the [poker card="as"][poker card="7d"] and when it was Bill Klein’s turn in the big blind, he three-bet shipped his chip lead with the [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"]. After using a time bank, Schulman said “I don’t know what I’m doing here, Bill.” and eventually made the call, wincing when he saw Klein’s hand. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="jd"][poker card="2s"], and Schulman took the lead hitting top pair. “I’m the captain, now,” Schulman joked having come from behind. The [poker card="7c"] turn brought Schulman two pair, but it didn’t change the situation. However, the [poker card="8s"] on the river did, giving Klein a set of eights and shipping him the pot. Schulman tapped the table and “hugged it out” with Bill Klein before he left in third place for $164,000. Klein took a better than 3:2 lead into heads-up play versus Petrangelo. The duo put on one of the longer heads-up battles of the series so far, playing for the better part of an hour. Eventually, Petrangelo. chipped up and took the lead, reversing the situation. At 50,000/100,000 (100,000 ante) Klein picked up [poker card="qd"][poker card="jd"] on the button and made the call. Petrangelo looked at the [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"] and moved all-in. Klein decided to go for it, flipping in a single chip to make the call. There was little drama as the board ran out [poker card="ks"][poker card="6h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="6s"][poker card="8s"] leaving Petrangelo the winner with his ace. Klein scored $246,000 as the runner-up and Petrangelo, who won the PokerGO Stairway to Millions finale, scored another victory in the PokerGO Studio, winning Event #5 for $369,000. PokerGO Cup Event #5 Final Table Results Nick Petrangelo - $369,000 Bill Klein - $246,000 Nick Schulman - $164,000 Sean Winter - $112,750 Ali Imsirovic - $82,000 Darren Elias - $51,250
  3. Nick Petrangelo touched the final step of PokerGO’s inaugural 2022 Stairway to Millions, going back-to-back in the final two events of the series and winning the $100,000 buy-in NLHE finale for $1,026,000, the fourth seven-figure cash of his career. Petrangelo finished the series with four final tables, three of which came in the final three events. Just after his victory, Petrangelo talked with Maria Ho about the importance of momentum and confidence in his game. “I think when you’re running good and making hands and timing is working well it obviously breeds confidence,” Petrangelo said. “That’s important to play well because you gotta be able to make the right play when you know it’s correct and if you’re running bad and always running into it sometimes it’s hard to do that. Running good helps you be confident and helps you play better” Of the 19 entries in the last event, just three players made the money and returned to play out the final table. Petrangelo started the day with the chip lead, Sean Perry sat in second with nearly half of Petrangelo’s chips, and David Peters a distant third place holding just under 20 big blinds. Both Peters and Perry chipped away at Petrangelo’s lead in the early goings and roughly 40 minutes in, Perry even took over the chip lead. However just before the end of the first hour, Petrangelo took back the lead, and right after the break, Peters won a significant pot off Perry putting himself and Perry essentially even in chips. A pivotal hand took place in the 15,000/30,000 (30,000 ante) level when Petrangelo opened on the button to 60,000 holding the [poker card="ac"][poker card="9c"]. Peters, with roughly 25 big blind in his stack, three-bet to 400,000 with the [poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"]. Perry let go of the big blind and Petrangelo moved all-in for nearly 2 million total and Peters made the call for his remaining 300,000. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4c"] flop kept Peters hand in the lead, but with 15 outs twice Petrangelo was the favorite. The [poker card="kh"] turn was no help to Petrangelo and neither was the [poker card="2h"]. The pot was shipped to Peters and with the double, Peters assumed the chip lead for the first time all day. Petrangelo and Perry were both looking up at Peters when they went to battle. After Peters folded his button, Perry, with a slight chip lead over Petrangelo, put in a raised from the small blind with the [poker card="9d"][poker card="4c"]. Petrangelo made the call with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="td"] and the pair saw a flop of [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"]. Perry continued with a bet of 180,000 and Petrangelo made the call. The turn was the [poker card="8c"], giving Petrangelo and double gutter to go with his second pair. Perry fired again, putting 220,000 in with just 415,000 behind. Once again, Petrangelo called. The river brought the [poker card="ah"], and after a moment Perry moved all-in for his final 415,000 putting Petrangelo to the test. Petrangelo burnt his final time extension and eventually correctly clicked call to drag the 1.7 million chip pot and leave Perry on just 100,000. Perry was eliminated on the very next hand when he put it in with the [poker card="qd"][poker card="9c"] and Peters made the call from the big blind with [poker card="8d"][poker card="5h"] and the board came [poker card="7h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="ks"][poker card="3h"]. Perry picked up $304,000 for third place. The levels dropped to 10 minutes at heads-up and Peters has a 2.1 million to 1.7 million chip advantage over Petrangelo. Petrangelo almost immediately took back the lead and within 10 minutes the pair had all the chips in the middle. Peters, covered, held [poker card="6h"][poker card="6d"] and Petrangelo, once again, was trying to take him out with a suited ace of clubs, the [poker card="ac"][poker card="tc"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="4s"], nearly the same set up as when Peters doubled earlier in the day. However, this time the clubs came in as the [poker card="qc"] hit the turn, leaving Peters drawing dead to the [poker card="5s"] river. As the runner-up, Peters added $570,000 to his more than $38 million in lifetime live earnings, and with that score climbed into 4th on the All-Time Money List surpassing Erik Seidel. With the win, Petrangelo picked up the $1,026,000 first-place prize and became the first Stairway To Millions “Main Event” champion. PokerGO Stairway to Millions $100K Final Table Nick Petrangelo - $1,026,000 David Peters - $570,000 Sean Perry - $304,000 The finale completed the inaugural eight-tournament series which offered players the chance win their way up the escalating buy-ins. Every time a player cashed in a Stairway to Millions tournament, they were given a ticket to the next event, along with their payout. As long as they continued to cash, they’d continue to play - of course, direct buy-ins were also available. Not unlike the tried-and-true online poker satellite tree where players start at a low buy-in but, as long as they continue to win, they earn a spot in the next event. The series started with a $1,100 event at the Aria that drew 190 entries and saw 28 players advance to Event #2. The next $2,150 buy-in event brought in 129 entries where three-time WSOP bracelet winner Chance Kornuth took down the title. In fact, Kornuth did it again in Event #3 ($4,000 NLHE), earning back-to-back titles (and three cashes in a row) for a series total of just over $136,000. As the buy-in increased, the fields began to narrow with 12 players from Event #3 advancing to Event #4. The $8,000 buy-in drew a total field of 56 entries from which Salim Admon earned his first PokerGO win for $138,880. Just eight players advanced from Event #4 to make up the 43-entry field of Event #5 ($15,800 NLHE). In the end, Michael Wang walked away with the $219,300 first-place prize. Jake Schindler, who is no stranger to winning in the Aria, scored the victory in Event #6 ($25,000 NLHE) where just seven of the 25 entries were from the previous tournament. The foursome of Schindler, Nick Petrangelo, Alex Foxen, and Sean Winter earned entry into Event #7 ($50,000 NLHE). Petrangelo topped the 21-entry field, coming back from a single big blind, and walked away with another $567,000 in his bankroll prior to his win in Event #8. Next up for PokerGO is the PokerGO Cup taking place from February 2-10.
  4. David Mock was riding the wave. Mock, the 33-year-old Boston-based semi-pro, decided he wanted to take a rare shot in a Bellagio Five Diamond $10,000 No Limit Hold'm High Roller and after selling a little action, buy-in in, and grinding all day, he found himself sitting at a final table surrounded by some of the biggest names in the game. The field was packed with some of the biggest stars of the high roller scene, including the likes of Dominik Nitsche and Nick Petrangelo - both of whom made the final six. And then there was Mock, a largely unknown player to these fields, battling for the biggest score of his life. “In my opinion, anytime you’re playing poker, you can’t worry about anything,” Mock said. “You just have to feel like you’re the best player at all times. I always say I don’t go over hands in my head in the middle of playing, I don’t think about anything other than what’s in front of me. But after it was over, I was like ‘Damn...I was literally the least accomplished player at that final table.’” Mock was in a good spot, playing not only for himself but for and a few supportive backers that joined him after picking up a piece on PocketFives as well. The momentum he had after a deep run in the 2021 World Series of Poker Main Event carried over, and, in the end, Mock finished the night as the runner-up and picked up a $100,800 score, the largest of his career. “You see these guys play all these big tournaments all the time and they’re studs. Obviously, their results speak for themselves…but in the moment you’ve got to feel confident in yourself as well. I’ve played four or five $10k’s and a $25K [the PSPC in 2019] and I’m four-for-five. I’m doing really well when I play big for some reason.” Mock may not be known to the greater poker public, but the Boston resident is a mainstay of the Northeast poker scene. From the time he got started in the New Hampshire charity poker games in his late teens, he found a love for poker. Primarily a tournament player, Mock has a number of healthy scores including a final table in the 2018 Borgata Spring Poker Open Main Event for more than $70K, and an outright win in a Parx Big Stax for his previous high score of $95K. But like many pros, Mock had his ups and downs, including busting a couple of six-figure rolls, something to which he said, “I don’t plan on ever doing that again.” At the start of the pandemic, when the live games dried up, Mock stopped playing full time and took over running a small construction company with a silent partner. Still, he was playing cash games on the side, keeping sharp. But during the fall/winter, his company traditionally takes time off. This left Mock with the opportunity to head to Las Vegas for the WSOP to play in the Main Event. He had a stellar run, finding himself near the top of the chip counts on Day 2 and ultimately finishing on Day 5 in 193rd for a $44,200 payday. “It was really cool, I’m just very lucky with the poker community that I grew up with. It’s all very tight. So, to make a deep run in the Main and waking up to all the hundreds of messages from friends and family…half of them think I could cash out the $600K stack that I had because they don’t know,” he said laughing. [caption id="attachment_637511" align="aligncenter" width="400"] David Mock at the WSOP (photo: WSOP/PokerNews)[/caption] But it was that deep run that give him the idea of taking a shot in a Five Diamond High Roller. He was already planning on playing the WPT Five Diamond Main Event, but Mock, who normally plays in the $500-$3,000 range, thought maybe it was time to “strike while the iron’s hot.” At least in terms of perception. Mock knew that since he had just made a deep run in the biggest tournament of the year, selling extra action to help him take his shot would be easier. He reached out to PocketFives, posted 10%, and watched it sell out quickly allowing him to register for one of the biggest tournaments of his career. “I just figured out of all the ones [during the Bellagio’s Five Diamond], this seemed like it would be the ‘softest one’, just because it’s so close to the Main Event…even though it wasn’t. It was definitely not, but it is what is, I have confidence in myself. “I knew I’d be a dog in it, and I told people that. I don’t think I’m a dog in the Main obviously, but in this one I definitely was,” he said. “And obviously luck is a big part of it, so I ran good.” Mock did run good and so did his investors. Those who were able to grab a piece made 10x on their stake, turning a $100 investment into roughly $1K. So when Mock posted additional action for his Main Event, it sold out lightning fast with investors looking to ride the same wave Mock is on. But despite his recent success, Mock said this isn’t him stepping back into poker’s spotlight full time. He’s definitely “not mad” about his back-to-back $10K results, but he’s happy in his construction business and, he says he’s even working towards becoming a firefighter. Another profession that would afford him time to play on the side. “I love poker and I'll never not play poker,” he said. “But I don’t think I’ll ever play full-time again. There is no crossroads for me, I’m never going to be the full-time high-stakes guy. I just think taking shots when I can but I think I’m just in a good spot in life where when poker’s fun and I’m not counting on it, it’s made things a lot easier.”
  5. The latest action in the 2021 WSOP Main Event saw several big names make dramatic exits on Day 6 as the 96 players who started the day were whittled down to just 36 survivors by the close of play. On a day where Japanese player Motoyoshi Okamura won his first-ever WSOP bracelet, the Main Event was the main attraction at the Rio in Las Vegas. Park Takes Main Event Lead, Kornuth and Aldemir Still Crushing It didn’t take long for there to be big drama on Day 6 of the WSOP Main Event, with players like Stephen Chidwick heading to the rail. Dragana Lim was the final female player sitting, but her chances ended when her [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kh"] was overtaken on a cruel river by Mikiya Kudo’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qs"] when the board played out [poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Qh"] after all the chip had gone in pre-flop. Nicholas Rigby continued to grab headlines and baffle his fellow players as time and again he played the hand he referred to as the ‘dirty diaper’, deuce-three. It was good enough to take down a massive pot with a bluff right here: https://twitter.com/PokerGO/status/1460094277027917829 Other big names fell, such as British pro Alex Goulder, whose pocket eights weren’t enough to hold against Spanish player David Cabrera’s pocket jacks. Goulder was the last player of the night to depart, cashing for $163,900 in 37th place. Other big names, however, thrived on a day where over half the remaining field was trimmed. With 36 players still in the hunt for the $8 million top prize and the WSOP Main Event bracelet worth $500,000 alone, it is Hye Park who leads the Main Event after six days at the felt with stack of 29,500,000 chips. He’s some way ahead of Demosthenes Kiriopoulos (24,905,000) and Joshua Remitio (21,490,000), who are second and third in chips respectively. Elsewhere, there are some very big players with chipstacks, as Chase Bianchi 920,765,000) and Koray Aldemir (18,905,000) round out the top five, PokerStars players Ramon Colillas (18,200,000) and Alejandro Lococo (17,950,000) both make the top ten and both David Cabrera (14,530,000) and Chance Kornuth (13.6 million) remain in with a great chance of victory. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Top 10 Chipcounts: Hye Park - 29,500,000 Demosthenes Kiriopoulos - 24,905,000 Joshua Remitio - 21,490,000 Chase Bianchi - 20,765,000 Koray Aldemir - 18,905,000 George Holmes - 18,425,000 Ramon Colillas - 18,200,000 Alejandro Lococo - 17,950,000 Ozgur Secilmis - 14,700,000 David Cabrera - 14,530,000 Okamura Wins First Ever Gold In Event #72, the only bracelet of the day was won by Japanese player Motoyoshi Okamura as he triumphed against the overnight chip leader Rafael Mota of Brazil. With eight players kicking off the $1,500 Mixed NLHE / PLO action, Tim Grau of Austria busted first for $20,737 in PLO, before Marc Lange went out in seventh just a few minutes later for $27,088. Lange was all-in with [poker card="As"][poker card="2s"] but lost out to Leonid Yanovski’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qs"] after the ace-high board provided no hope for the unfortunate Lange. He was joined on the rail by Jordan Spurlin when the American’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qh"] couldn’t hit against Nick Yunis’ [poker card="8s"][poker card="8h"] on a seven-high board after all the chips had gone into the middle pre-flop. Spurlin had won $35,942 with his run to the top six and it was Mike Takayama who went one step higher up the ladder as he busted in fifth for $48,428. Takayama was all-in with [poker card="As"][poker card="7c"], but couldn’t catch an ace to overtake Yunis, who this time had [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"] and held on the paired board of [poker card="Js"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jh"]. Yanovski ran short to bust in fourth place for $66,249 before Yunis himself found himself on the rail. Moving all-in for his last six big blinds, Yunis needed help as his [poker card="3h"][poker card="3c"] was some way behind Okamura’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kd"] in no limit hold’em. He couldn’t find it on the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8d"][poker card="9c"][poker card="2h"] board and cashed for $91,989 in third place. Heads-up, Okamura had a strong chip lead, playing over 12 million to Mota’s 8 million and sealed the deal when he won in PLO with a full house of queens over tens to beat Mota’s pocket kings. WSOP 2021 Event #72 $1,500 Mixed NLHE / PLO Final Table Results: Motoyoshi Okamura - $209,716 Rafael Mota - $129,621 Nick Yunis - $91,989 Leonid Yanovski - $66,249 Mike Takayama - $48,428 Jordan Spurlin - $35,942 Marc Lange - $27,088 Tim Grau - $20,737 A huge final Day 1 flight in Event #70 saw the Crazy Eights field final reach Day 2 after a cancelled Day 1a and three Day 1 flights thereafter. Day 1d saw a massive 2,241 players take part, with only 337 of them making the money. When the dust settled at the end of the day, Farhad Davoudzadeh (2,410,000) had the chip lead, with a slight lead over both Miklos Zsuffa (2,405,000) and Cole Ferraro (2,290,000), who has already won a WSOP bracelet this Autumn in Las Vegas. Others to make the cut included Jason Wheeler (2,100,000), Philip Tom (1,045,000), Kenny Hallaert (590,000) and Cate Hall (310,000), while others such as Barny Boatman, Ryan Depaulo, Bruno Lopes, Pamela Balzano, Chris Moorman, David ‘Bakes’ Baker, Blair Hinkle and Jeremy Ausmus all fell short of the next day’s play. WSOP 2021 Event #70 $888 Crazy Eights Day 1d Top 10 Chipcounts: Farhad Davoudzadeh - 2,410,000 Miklos Zsuffa - 2,405,000 Cole Ferraro - 2,290,000 Leonid Yanovski - 2,205,000 Jason Wheeler - 2,100,000 Timo Kamphues - 2,055,000 Lipei Xu - 1,975,000 John Simonian - 1,850,000 Pierre Merlin - 1,850,000 Joseph Liberta - 1,835,000 Erik Seidel Plays For Bracelet #10, Another Deep Run for Arieh In the $10,000-entry Seven Card Stud Championship, there are a number of different narratives lining up to play out on the final day of the event. Event #73 has some big, big players still in the hunt for the bracelet and $352 958 top prize, with Marco Johnson (1,400,000) top of the shop and in line for his third WSOP bracelet. Further down the final 11 players, Erik Seidel (994,000) will shoot for the 10th WSOP bracelet of his career tomorrow, which would put him second on the all-time bracelet winners list with Doyle Brunson, Phil Ivey and Johnny Chan. Josh Arieh (535,000) seeks another deep run to the podium places in order to further stretch his WSOP Player of the Year lead after an amazing 2021 World Series of Poker so far. WSOP 2021 Event #73 $888 Seven Card Stud Championship Final Day Chipcounts: Marco Johnson - 1,400,000 Yuval Bronshtein - 1,332,000 Brian Hastings - 1,093,000 Erik Seidel - 994,000 Ian O'Hara - 975,000 Scott Seiver - 783,000 John Monnette - 657,000 Josh Arieh - 535,000 Gary Benson - 351,000 Ahmed Mohamed - 273,000 Brett Richey - 192,000 Finally, in Event #74, the $2,500-entry Big Bet Mix event, 212 entries led to 10 hours of poker reducing the field to just 92 in the mix for Day 2. Of the survivors, Jarryd Godena (1,400,000) has the lead with the Australian bagging slightly more than Brazilian player Yuri Dzivielevski (1,332,000) and Ismael Bojang (1,093,000). With players such as Chris Brewer, Yueqi Zhu, Mike Matusow, David ‘Bakes’ Baker, Benny Glaser, Jake Daniels, Paul Volpe and Ben Yu all departing on the first day’s play, players will likely battle down to a final table and one step closer to the $117,898 top prize on tomorrow’s Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #74 $2,500 Big Bet Mix Top 10 Chipcounts: Jarryd Godena - 1,400,000 Yuri Dzivielevski - 1,332,000 Ismael Bojang - 1,093,000 Asher Lower - 994,000 Yik Chiu - 975,000 Richard Bai - 783,000 Anthony Ribeiro - 657,000 Scott Bohlman - 535,000 Jon Turner - 351,000 Maury Barrett - 273,000
  6. A busy day on both Day 1f and Day 2abd of the WSOP Main Event saw a wizard take his seat, several huge names power to the top of the leaderboard and the biggest single day of action in the Main for over two years. It was an incredible day of action as the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas played host to some of the world’s best poker players. Hellmuth Arrives in Style on Day 1f, Chips Up Before Close It’s impossible to start anywhere other than the grandest of entrances from the man famed for his exuberance at the World Series. Phil Hellmuth, a.k.a. The Poker Brat. Waiting until the end of the day, and playing only the final two levels, Hellmuth arrived shortly before the dinner break as, dressed head to toe in white as ‘Gandalf the White’, the 16-time bracelet winner was accompanied by 16 models - one for each bracelet, natch - two fighting characters from the Lord of the Rings trilogy and Dan ‘Jungleman’ Cates, who appeared to be Saruman from the Oscar-winning films. https://twitter.com/PokerGO/status/1458296604536967178 With the hoopla to one side, once Hellmuth sat down, he improved on his starting stack in no time at all, bagging up 94,500 with which to attack tomorrow’s Day 2cef. He wasn’t the only one taking part in Day 1f, with some legends of the felt playing the flight, such as Fedor Holz (161,600), Scotty Nguyen (52,200), Michael Mizrachi (212,300), and Chris Moneymaker (75,800), the 2003 WSOP Main Event winner who finally couldn’t resist the clarion call any longer. Elsewhere, players such as Liv Boeree played for the first time in a while, bagging up 90,000 after claiming not to ‘remember how to play’ after such a long time away from the felt. https://twitter.com/Liv_Boeree/status/1458166021412376578 The chip leader at the close of Day 1f was Adam Walton with a massive stack of 334,000 chips, but he had stellar company in the upper echelons of the leaderboard, with Michael Mizrachi (212,300), Henrik Hecklen (210,000) and Cate Hall (197,000) all bagging top 10 stacks. Others weren’t so fortunate, with players such as Justin Lapka, David Benyamine and Robert McMillan all falling by the wayside during the day’s play. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Day 1f Top 10 Chipcounts: Adam Walton - 334,000 Tung Nguyen - 328,200 Hannes Speiser - 282,100 Arkadi Onikoul - 266,300 Ryan Hartmann - 243,200 Young Ko - 240,300 Jung Woo - 231,900 John Bagosy - 224,700 Christopher Fischer - 219,000 Terence Clee - 218,700 Day 2abd Sees Doyle Brunson Bust but Jason Koon Crush One of the biggest clashes on Day 2abd of the Main Event was the match-up between Doyle Brunson and Jason Koon. One is a classic poker legend and 10-time bracelet winner, the other has just signed for GGPoker and won his first-ever bracelet this series. Sadly for ‘Texas Dolly’ fans, only one would prevail and it was not to be the man in the cowboy hat, as fellow player Kyna England tweeted of her shock at a bizarre first Main Event experience. https://twitter.com/Kyna_CooL/status/1458222692767703046 Rameez Shahid (731,700) led the field after Day 2, but plenty of others with experience are chasing him down, with David Coleman (613,000), Johan Schumacher (597,000), Robert Cowen (596,400), Nick Petrangelo (490,200), Anton Wigg (490,000), Mustapha Kanit (473,300), Brittney Stout (394,900), and Kathy Liebert (285,500) amongst them. With 145 players choosing a Day 2 entry for the first time in the tournament’s half-century of history, that led to the field topping 6,500 with Day 2cef the last possible opportunity for players to put down $10,000 and battle for the legendary world champion’s WSOP bracelet. Plenty of big names were unsuccessful in their bid for poker immortality, with players such as Asi Moshe, Sam Grafton, Adam Friedman, Rep Porter, Maria Konnikova, Melanie Weisner, Kelly Minkin, Mikita Badziakouski, Jeff Gross and Kevin Martin all departing on Day 2abd. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Day 2abd Top 10 Chipcounts: Shahid Rameez - 731,700 David Mock - 679,700 Damien Steel - 649,000 Farhad Jamasi - 635,000 Raul Martinez - 628,100 Steve Foutty - 620,000 Mitchell Halverson - 617,600 Scott Davies - 615,100 David Coleman - 613,500 Kayvon Shahbaz - 599,200 Shaun Deeb on the Hunt in Little One for One Drop Finally, on Day 1b of the $1,111-entry Little One for One Drop, 901 total entries were whittled down to just 297 survivors. The chip leader at the close of the second opening flight was Trent Wilt, who bagged up 516,200, but Wilt was followed by some big names armed with plenty of chips like David Tran (501,600), Seongmin Lee (461,700), Evgeni Toureusk (401,400), Quirin Heinz (386,100), Sam Cohen (270,000), Michael Acevedo (252,000), Shaun Deeb (85,000), and Bill Klein (68,000). Deeb is a particular player to watch as he goes for the Player of the Year title with a deep run in this event possibly crucial to that aim. With Day 1c being the final flight to take part in if players want to advance to Day 2, the total of 1,389 entries so far in this event could well be doubled. Players who busted on Day 1b included Pamela Balzano, Natalie Bromley, DJ Alexander, Asi Moshe and Kyna England WSOP 2021 Event #68 $1,111 Little One for One Drop Top 10 Chipcounts: Trent Wilt - 516,200 David Tran - 501,600 Seongmin Lee - 461,700 Evgeni Tourevski - 401,400 Quirin Heinz - 386,100 Jaspal Brar - 379,100 Ari Oxman - 376,400 Blerim Imeri - 332,400 Marco Damico - 316,000 Jonathan Ingalls - 312,800 Finally, he may have busted the Main Event, but for a while there, Landon Tice felt the same as the rest of us and achieved the peace of mind only grinding a short stack can inspire. https://twitter.com/LandonTice/status/1458332577811427328
  7. In back-to-back final tables, going wire-to-wire with the chip lead in both, Michael Addamo took down the finale of the 2021 Poker Masters, Event #12 ($100,000 NLH), for a career-high live score of $1,160,000 as well as the Purple Jacket and $50,000 leaderboard prize. Addamo somehow makes taking on some of the toughest competition in the world look easy. The Australian came in late to the series, played in just the final three events, and in 48 hours won two of them. He earned $1.84 million, was rewarded as the player of the series, and on this particular day, wrapped up the final table in a little under an hour. “It’s insane, I’m incredibly tired, I’m looking forward to getting some sleep,” Addamo said right after the win. “It’s been an amazing run and I’m grateful the cards turned my way I guess.” In the early action of the final table, Addamo continually leveraged his enormous chip lead to apply constant pressure on his opponents as Mikita Badziakouski, Alex Foxen, and Stanly Tang all had stacks of less than 15 big blinds and with significant pay jumps ahead. Twenty-five minutes in, with the blinds at 15,000/30,000 (30,000 bb ante), Addamo raised from the button to 265,000 holding the [poker card="jc"][poker card="ts"]. After Tang released his small blind, Badziakouski looked down at the [poker card="6s"][poker card="6d"] and called off the rest of his short stack. The [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"][poker card="2s"] kept Badziakouski in the lead but offered Addamo gutshot straight outs to go with his overcards. That’s exactly what came in with the [poker card="qc"] turn, giving Addamo a straight and leaving Badziakouski drawing dead to the [poker card="3s"] river. Badziakouski fell in fifth place and picked up a score of $203,000. The very next hand, Addamo was back at it. He raised to 420,000 from the cutoff holding [poker card="js"][poker card="9c"] and Tang, with exactly 420,000 in his stack, quickly pushed all-in on the button with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="qh"]. Foxen and Nick Petrangelo folded in the blinds the two live hands were turned up, with Tang as a two-to-one favorite. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="td"][poker card="8d"] keeping Tang in the lead but bringing Addamo open-ended straight outs to go with his nine. Yet again, Addamo spiked the card he was looking for on the turn when [poker card="9h"] hit. Addamo picked up a pair and then it was Tang looking for help. The [poker card="6c"], however, was a brick, and Addamo sent Tang to the rail in fourth place for $319,000. With the elimination of Tang, Foxen laddered the pay scale for more than $200,000, but his stack continued to slip. Minutes later, it was the two-time GPI Player of the Year’s turn to get it in. And this time, it wasn’t Addamo who he was up against. From the small blind, Foxen shoved his final eight big blinds with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="4d"] and Petrangelo, in the big blind, quickly made the call with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="7d"]. The [poker card="7h"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2d"] put Foxen in jail, leaving him looking for runner-runner outs to a straight or trip fours. When the [poker card="9c"] hit the turn, it was all over. Foxen was already pushing his chips into Petrangelo’s stack when the [poker card="jd"] completed the board. Foxen grabbed his backpack and headed to the cashiers to collect his $464,000 third-place prize. Once Foxen was eliminated, the race for the Poker Masters Purple Jacket was over. Thanks to his victory in Event #11 and the prize money he’d secured in the finale, Addamo had a future date to be fitted for the Poker Masters trophy as well as claim the additional $50,000 that goes along with it. “I’m surprised it fits actually,” Addamo said as a break in the action allowed him to slip on the jacket for the first time. “It’s really amazing. I actually didn’t even there’d be a chance. I only came for three events. I didn’t know the points system would give me a chance, but yea, that’s amazing.” “It definitely gives me a lot of confidence, but I guess there’s also a lot of luck in these tournaments. A lot of the players are very strong players I respect a lot. I’m very fortunate the cards went my way as well.” But before any real celebrating could be done, Addamo and Petrangelo had a heads-up battle to finish. After a short break the two sat back down with Addamo having a four-to-one chip lead. Unlike some of the early final tables of the Poker Masters, where the heads-up portion took an extended time to complete, the finale was over in roughly 15 minutes. The blinds were still at 15,000/30,000 when Petrangelo raised to 70,000 with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="8d"] on the button and Addamo defended the big blind with the [poker card="7h"][poker card="3c"]. The flop came [poker card="7c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="2h"] and Addamo checked it over to Petrangelo who bet 50,000. Addamo then check-raised to 165,000 and Petrangelo opted for a call. The turn was the [poker card="th"] and Addamo checked it to Petrangelo who made it 250,000 to go, leaving himself with roughly 15 bigs behind. Addamo made the call and the river came the [poker card="5c"]. Addamo checked it again and Petrangelo stuck the rest of his chips in the middle with his king-high. Addamo instantly looked uncomfortable, uttered an audible expletive, and went into the tank. “I know I’m supposed to fold but I don’t like it.” He tossed in a time extension and then, suddenly, tossed in a single chip and called for it all. Petrangelo finished up in second place, good for $754,000 while Michael Addamo won a career-high live cash of $1,160,000 and the aforementioned Poker Masters Purple Jacket. 2021 Poker Masters Event #12 Final Table Results Michael Addamo - $1,160,000 Nick Petrangelo - $754,000 Alex Foxen - $464,000 Stanley Tang - $319,000 Mikita Badziakouski - $203,000
  8. If it wasn’t over with his PokerGO Cup title, the narrative that Daniel Negreanu cannot close is officially done as he took down Event #5 ($10,000 NLHE) of the 2021 Poker Masters for $178,200, his second victory in the past 60 days. Just two months ago, articles were written and videos were made about how Negreanu had a multi-year long streak of finishing as the runner-up (rather than the winner) in big-time tournaments and heads-up battles. But almost as soon as the conversation hit its high point, Negreanu broke that streak in Event #7 of the 2021 PokerGO cup, a $50K in which he walked away with the win and $700,000. Now it appears he’s in no hurry to going back to runner-up status as he locked up his second victory of the year in the PokerGO studio for another six-figure score. Entering the final table as the short stack, Jeff Trudeau was going to need to make something happen early in order to stick around. With just five players returning for Day 2, everything seemed to take place a little faster, giving him less time to find a spot. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Trudeau had just six big blinds. Negreanu, who started the day with a healthy chip lead, opened to 125,000 from the cutoff with his [poker card="qd"][poker card="th"]. On the button, Trudeau found his spot and moved all-in for 300,000 holding [poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"]. The action folded back to Negreanu and he made the call. Negreanu jumped out to the lead with the [poker card="td"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2c"] flop. His pair of tens held through the [poker card="4d"] turn and [poker card="7s"] river and Trudeau was eliminated in fifth place for $52,800. Twenty minutes later it was Jake Daniels' turn to try and double. With just over ten big blinds, Daniels moved all-in from the button with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="jd"] and Nick Petrangelo looked down at [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"] in the small blind. Petrangelo made the call and after Negreanu folded his big blind, the cards were on their backs. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="th"][poker card="7d"] keeping Petrangelo’s pocket kings in the lead and leaving Daniels looking to spike an ace or one of the last two kings in the deck. The turn came the [poker card="9s"], giving Daniels some additional outs. However, the river came the [poker card="qh"] and Daniels exited in fourth place for $66,000, his second cash of the series. After the knockout, Petrangelo took over the chip lead and had nearly ten times the amount of chips as Vikenty Shegal, the short stack at three-handed. Forty-five minutes later, with the blinds up to 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante), Shegal looked like he was on the cusp of a critical double. Petrangelo, holding [poker card="tc"][poker card="7s"], folded the button. Negreanu, holding the same hand, [poker card="ts"][poker card="7h"], applied max pressure to Shegal by moving all-in. With 10 big blinds left, Shegal decided to make the call holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="td"]. Dominated with the ten and with a seven in the muck, the flop came [poker card="qc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="5c"] giving Negreanu the lead. The turn was the [poker card="3h"] and Shegal was left looking for a king. The river came the [poker card="jc"] leaving Shegal to say his goodbyes before he went to collect his $85,800 for third place. Heads-up play started with Petrangelo holding a 1.5-to-1 chip lead however both players had plenty of play with the shorter stack of Negreanu being 50 big blinds deep. Even so, the match didn’t take long. After a short break, Negreanu dragged a pot that put him in the chip lead and five minutes later, the pair played the most critical hand of the final table. At 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante), Petrangelo raised the button to 180,000 with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="7c"] and Negreanu quickly three-bet to 610,000 with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="qc"]. Petrangelo called and the pair took a flop of [poker card="as"][poker card="qd"][poker card="jh"] giving Negreanu two pair but giving Petrangelo top pair as well. Negreanu led out for 725,000 and Petrangelo made the call. The pot swelled to more than 2.7 million, slightly more than Petrangelo had left in his stack. The turn was the [poker card="4h"] and Negreanu opted to check it over to Petrangelo who checked it back. The river came the [poker card="4s"] and Negreanu took a few moments and made it 1.8 million to go. Petrangelo didn’t take much time to make the call and was shown the winner by Negreanu. Petrangelo was left with just under 10 big blinds and the very next hand Negreanu picked up [poker card="as"][poker card="ad"] and made the call on the button. Petrangelo looked at the [poker card="qs"][poker card="ts"] and moved all-in. Negreanu snap-called and the board ran out [poker card="kd"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="kc"], providing little drama for Negreanu’s aces. Petrangelo finished as the runner-up for 132,000 and Daniel Negreanu scored his first Poker Masters win of his career and the $178,200 first-place prize. 2021 Poker Mastrers Event #5 Final Table Results Daniel Negreanu - $178,200 Nick Petrangelo - $132,000 Vikenty Shegal - $85,800 Jake Daniels - $66,000 Jeffrey Trudeau - $52,800
  9. After starting the final table of 2021 Poker Masters Event #4 (10,000 No Limit Hold’em) dead last in chips, Brock Wilson willed himself to the top of the chip counts and found a way to take down the first Poker Masters event of his career, earning $189,800 and the top spot on the Poker Masters Purple Jacket leaderboard. For a relatively new face on the high roller scene, Wilson has been making quite the impression. Tor the better part of two years, the Las Vegas resident has been firing in some of the biggest live tournaments on the circuit. While he’d come close on numerous occasions to bringing home a win in the PokerGO studio, it had yet to materialize. On Saturday night, however, the win that felt inevitable finally came to pass. His victory in Event #4 is not only his most high-profile official victory, but the cash also ranks as a top-5 career score of over $3.5 million in earnings. READ: Empire State to Sin City: Brock Wilson Ready for Breakout Moment It took nearly an hour and a half before the final table had its first elimination. Wilson started the day as the short stack, and right behind him was Elio Fox. However, both players navigated the early levels to give themselves a little breathing room. The opposite was true for Nick Petrangelo who went from third in chips to the bottom of the chip counts. With blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Petrangelo, with just 10 big blinds, raised to 100,000 holding [poker card="qh"][poker card="qc"]. It folded around to Chad Eveslage in the big blind who defended with his [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"]. The flop came [poker card="7h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2h"], giving Eveslage bottom set and offering Petrangelo a flush draw to go with his overpair. When checked to, Petrangelo min-bet 50,000. Eveslage check-raised all-in, and Petrangelo, covered, made the call. The turn was the [poker card="js"] and the river came the [poker card="2c"], improving Eveslage to quads and sending Petrangelo out in sixth for $43,800. Five-handed play took place for over an hour more. The blinds increased to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) when Wilson raised to 175,000 from the cutoff holding [poker card="as"][poker card="ah"]. In the small blind, Brekstyn Schutten, who started the day with the chip lead, flatted with his [poker card="7h"][poker card="7c"]. Then, Sam Soverel, with just under ten big blinds came along holding the [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"]. The flop came [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"][poker card="3h"] and it checked through to Wilson who bet 150,000. Schutten let his pocket sevens go but Soverel didn’t follow suit, he made the call. The turn was the [poker card="9d"], bringing Soverel two pair. Soverel checked it to Wilson again, and Wilson moved all-in. Soverel snapped called, his hand ahead and just one card from a double. However, the river was the [poker card="ac"], bringing a set for Wilson and sending the 2019 Poker Masters champion to the rail in fifth place for $58,400. As Wilson climbed to second in chips, Eveslage found himself slipping. At 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante), Eveslage had just eight big blinds. From the small blind, he moved all in with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="jc"] and, in the big blind, Wilson made the call holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="8s"]. The board ran out [poker card="7c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="kd"] leaving Wilson’s ace high as the best hand and finishing Eveslage in fourth place for $73,000. At three-handed, Wilson, Schutten, and Elio Fox were all roughly even in stacks. After Elio took a big pot to put a dent into Schutten’s stack, the former chip leader was looking for a spot to double up. At 50,000/125,000 (125,000 bb ante), Fox was applying pressure to Schutten’s big blind when he moved all-in from the small blind with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="qd"]. Schutten woke up with [poker card="ad"][poker card="7s"] and called for his final 8 bigs. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5h"], putting Fox in the lead with top pair. That held through the [poker card="jd"] turn and the [poker card="3d"] river. Schutten settled for third place and collected $94,900 for his efforts. After a short break, Wilson and Fox sat down to play heads-up with Fox holding a better than two-to-one chip lead. Unlike some of the recent heads-up matches in the Poker Masters, these two didn’t take long to determine a winner. Wilson picked up a big pot, assumed the chip lead, and closed it out in roughly thirty minutes. On the final hand, Fox called on the button with the [poker card="8c"][poker card="5d"] and Wilson checked his option in the big blind holding [poker card="8s"][poker card="7c"]. The flop came [poker card="kd"][poker card="td"][poker card="8d"] and Wilson checked it to Fox who checked it back. The [poker card="8h"] hit the turn, giving both players trips. Wilson checked again and Fox put out 175,000. Wilson check-raised to 600,000 and Fox made the call. The river was the [poker card="7h"], eliminating the chop by giving Wilson a full house. After letting the shot clock wind down, Wilson shoved and after thinking it over, Fox decided to call and was shown the winner. Fox laddered from fifth in chips at the start of the day to finishing in second for $138,700. Brock Wilson won Event #4 for $189,800 and surged to the lead in the Poker Masters leaderboard. Poker Masters Event #4 Final Table Results Brock Wilson - $189,800 Elio Fox - $138,700 Brekstyn Schutten - $94,900 Chad Eveslage - $73,000 Sam Soverel - $58,400 Nick Petrangelo - $43,800
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