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Found 22 results

  1. Three seperate times Fedor 'CrownUpGuy' Holz has been the number ranked online poker player in the world. Sunday night in Las Vegas he add the biggest live win to his resume when he beat Nick Petrangelo heads-up to win the $100,000 buy-in WPT Alpha8 event at the Bellagio. Holz started the eight-handed final table with the chip lead and needed just 106 hands to claim the title and the nearly $1.6 million first place prize. He only eliminated two players on Sunday; David Peters on the bubble and runner-up Petrangelo. It was Petrangelo that did most of the heavy lifting on Sunday. Daniel Negreanu eliminated Keith Tilston in seventh and Sean Winter busted Kathy Lehne, who was runner-up at the WPT Alpha8 event in St. Kitts last December, in sixth place. That’s when Petrangelo went to work. Just one hand after Lehne exited, Holz raised to 125,000 from under the gun, Petrangelo called from the cutoff before Ankush Mandavia moved all-in from the small blind. Holz got out of the way but Petrangelo called. Mandavia tabled Td Th and was ahead of Petrangelo’s 8c 8d. The flop cam 8h 7h 2d putting Petrangelo ahead. Neither the 5c turn or Qc river were of any relief to Mandavia and he was sent packing in fifth place. Petrangelo wasn’t done flopping sets. From UTG Petrangelo raised to 135,000 before Winter moved all-in for 990,000. Petrangelo called and flipped over 7d 7c while Winter needed help with Ac Ts. The flop came Kd Qh 7s giving Petrangelo bottom set but giving Winter a gutshot Broadway draw. The turn was the 4c and the river was the As and Winter was out in fourth place. His next victim was a little bit more high profile. After Holz folded his button, Negreanu moved all-in for 655,000 from the small blind and Petrangelo called. Negreanu was ahead with Kd 3s against Petrangelo’s Qd Jh. The flop changed everything though as the dealer spread out Js 9c 4s putting Petrangelo ahead. The Qc turn gave him top two and left Negreanu drawing to one of four tens for a straight. The 6s river sealed Negreanu’s third place finish. Petrangelo’s carnage took just 45 minutes. Despite being responsible for three consecutive eliminations to get heads-up with Holz, Petrangelo still trailed the young German by a 2.25-1 margin. Petrangelo closed the gap during heads-up play but ultimately couldn’t overcome Holz. it took just 23 hands before the tournament came to a close. Afte Holz limped from the button, Petrangelo shoved for 3,600,000 and Holz called. Petrangelo turned over Ad Qs while Holz showed 5c 5s. The board ran out Jc 3s 2d 4c 9s and Holz’s pocket fives stayed ahead to eliminate Petrangelo in second place. The win is just the fifth of Holz’s career with the most recent coming in the €770 High Roller event at the Israeli Poker Championships in September. The event, the first of WPT Alpha8 Season III, attracted 45 entrants - down 10 from the Season II turnout. There are currently no other Alpha8 events scheduled. Final Table Payouts Fedor Holz - $1,589,219 Nick Petrangelo - $1,015,335 Daniel Negreanu - $640,103 Sean Winter - $441,450 Ankush Mandavia - $309,015 Kathy Lehne - $242,798 Keith Tilston - $176,580 Photo courtesy Joe Giron/World Poker Tour
  2. [caption width="320" align="alignleft"] Nick Petrangelo grabbed his first win of 2017 in the Aussie Millions 0,000 Challenge.[/caption] You could say that 2017 is treating Nick Petrangelo really well. You could say that "retirement" is treating German phenom Fedor Holz really well too. The pair were front and center at the 2017 Aussie Millions On Saturday at the final table of the ANTON Jewellery $100,000 Challenge. Petrangelo, who finished runner-up to Lucas Greenwood in the PokerStars Championship Bahamas $25,000 High Roller, beat out a final table that included Holz, Sam Trickett, David Peters, David Steicke and Mike Watson to win $882,000 AU ($666,311 US). Holz, who announced following the 2017 World Series of Poker that he was retiring from playing poker professionally finished third for $352,8000 AU. Holz is also at the final table of the Aussie Millions Main Event which resumes Sunday afternoon in Melbourne. Sandwiched between Petrangelo and Holz was Canadian Mike Watson, who earned $529,000 AU for his runner-up finish. The final table began with seven players still in contention. The short-stacked Steicke managed to find a double up on the third hand of play Saturday, only to find himself giving those chips to Watson two hands later before finally being eliminated by Holz on the sixth hand of the night. Watson then found himself on the winning end of an elimination just an hour later. Watson opened from the cutoff to 14,000. Peters called from the big blind and then checked after the [poker card="td"][poker card="7s"][poker card="2c"] flop. Watson bet 15,000 and Peters called again. TThe turn was the [poker card="js"] and Peters check-called as Watson bet 45,000. Peters checked again after the [poker card="kc"] river, allowing Watson to bet enough for Peters' tournament life to be at stake. After using his time bank chip, Peters called and tabled [poker card="qh"][poker card="ts"] for a pair of queens but got bad news as Watson tabled [poker card="qs"][poker card="9s"] for a rivered straight and Peters was out in sixth. Watson and Holz then took turns holding the chip lead for over an hour before Watson picked up another elimination. Steffen Sontheimer raised to 20,000 from the button and Watson responded with a three-bet from the small blind to 54,000. Sontheimer called to see the [poker card="8d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5s"] flop. Watson bet 40,000 before Sontheimer moved all in for 171,000. Watson called and tabled [poker card="tc"][poker card="th"] for an overpair and Sontheimer showed [poker card="7c"][poker card="7h"] and needed one of 10 outs to improve and stay alive. The [poker card="5d"] and [poker card="qd"] river were complete blanks and the German was out in fifth. With four players remaining, Watson didn't take long to burst the bubble. Sam Trickett, who won this event in 2011, moved his short stack of 120,000 into the middle from early position and Watson defended his small blind. Trickett showed [poker card="qh"][poker card="9c"] while Watson was ahead with [poker card="ah"][poker card="js"]. The [poker card="7c"][poker card="6h"][poker card="4s"] flop was no help for Trickett and the [poker card="jd"] turn left him drawing to just three outs. The river was the [poker card="ks"] and Watson eliminated Trickett in fourth place. While Watson did almost all of the work to get the final three players into the money, this is where Petrangelo took over. From the button Petrangelo raised to 18,000 and Holz moved all in from the small blind. Petrangelo called and showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="8c"] while Holz showed [poker card="4c"][poker card="4h"]. The board ran out [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"][poker card="7d"][poker card="as"][poker card="6c"] to send Holz out in third place. Heads-up action lasted just 90 minutes before Petrangelo finally finished off Watson. Watson threw in a button raise to 30,000 and Petrangelo called. The [poker card="8h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2d"] flop got both players to check. After the [poker card="7d"] turn Petrangelo bet 45,000 and Watson called. The river was the [poker card="jd"] and Petrangelo lead out for 150,000 before Watson moved all in for 562,000. Petrangelo called and after Watson showed [poker card="as"][poker card="4c"] for ace-high, turned over [poker card="jh"][poker card="8d"] for top two pair. Watson was eliminated in second place, leaving Petrangelo to collect his second six-figure score of 2017 and first tiel. Payouts Nick Petrangelo - $882,000 Mike Watson - $529,200 Fedor Holz - $352,800
  3. [caption width="640"] Luc Greenwood outlasted a tough field in the PokerStars Championship Bahamas ,000 High Roller (PokerStars Photo)[/caption] The final day of the 2017 PokerStars Championship Bahamas included the conclusion of two of the marquee events on the schedule. While Christian Harder and Cliff Josephy were headlining the Main Event final table, the $25,000 High Roller final table included some of the biggest names in the game - including possibly the biggest, Daniel Negreanu. Following Bryn Kenney’s elimination in the ninth place, it took just another five minutes for the first elimination at the official eight-handed final table. Nick Petrangelo raised to 50,000 from UTG before Mark Radoja move all in from the small blind for 385,000. Petrangelo called and tabled [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"] while Radoja showed [poker card="as"][poker card="qs"]. The [poker card="7h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="2h"] flop was a bad one for Radoja and neither the [poker card="4d"] turn or [poker card="7d"] river were any help, eliminating Radjoa in eighth. The next player to hit the rail was Stephen Chidwick. The British pro raise to 40,000 before Michael Rocco made it 120,000 to go. Chidwick announced he was all in for 6667,000 and Rocco snap-called and showed [poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"]. Chidwick flipped over [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"] and watched the dealer run a [poker card="9s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2s"][poker card="8s"][poker card="3c"] board to eliminate him in seventh. It took just 30 minutes for the next elimination and once again it was Petrangelo putting his big stack to work. Nacho Barbero defended his big blind after Petrangelo raised to 60,000 from the hijack. Barbero then check-raised all in on the [poker card="js"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3c"] flop and Petrangelo called. Barbero showed [poker card="8c"][poker card="7c"] for middle pair but was behind Petrangelo’s [poker card="qd"][poker card="jh"] that gave him top pair. The [poker card="as"] turn and [poker card="ts"] river were both bricks and the popular Argentinian was out in sixth. Despite starting the final table with the shortest stack, Negreanu managed to hang around through the first three eliminations thanks to a few timely double-ups. That good run all ended thanks to Petrangelo. Negreanu opened to 60,000 and after Michael Rocco called, Petrangelo raised it up allowing Negreanu to move all in. Rocco folded and Petrangelo called. Negreanu tabled [poker card="ad"][poker card="jc"] and found himself dominated by Petrangelo’s [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="qh"][poker card="3d"] flop was a terrible one for Negreanu and when the [poker card="3s"] hit the turn, he was out in fifth place. The meaningless river was the [poker card="9d"]. Just a half hour later, play was suddenly three-handed. Luc Greenwood made it 70,000 from UTG before Byron Kaverman moved all in for 835,000 from the small blind. Greenwood called and tabled [poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"] and was behind Kaverman’s [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="jd"][poker card="4c"] flop was harmless as was the [poker card="2d"] turn but the [poker card="8h"] river gave Greenwood the suckout and busted Kaverman in fourth. The final three players went at it for another hour and fifteen minutes before the next bustout. Rocco raised from the to 90,000 and Petrangelo came along for the ride from the big blind. After the [poker card="as"][poker card="th"][poker card="3h"] flop, Petrangelo checked, Rocco raised to 75,000 and Petrangelo called. The turn was the [poker card="2h"], Petrangelo checked again and Rocco bet 200,000. Petrangelo announced he was all in and Rocco called. Petrangelo showed [poker card="5h"][poker card="4h"] for a flush while Rocco had [poker card="ad"][poker card="jh"] for top pair with a flush draw but the [poker card="qc"] river ended Rocco’s run in third place. When heads-up play began Greenwood had a slight lead over Petrangelo and they quickly began discussing a deal. After a few minutes they agreed to a chop that paid Greenwood $749,268 and Petrangelo $740,032 with $30,000 and the trophy to play for. It took just 10 minutes for Greenwood to finish off Petrangelo. From the button Greenwood raised to 200,000 and Petrangelo responded with a re-raise to 700,000. Greenwood called and after the [poker card="kc"][poker card="8s"][poker card="3h"] flop, Petrangelo bet 420,000 and Greenwood called again. The turn was the [poker card="ks"] and Petrangelo moved all in. Greenwood quickly called and showed [poker card="kd"][poker card="qc"] for trip kings while Petrangelo tabled [poker card="jd"][poker card="jh"]. The [poker card="7c"] river was no help for Petrangelo and he was eliminated in second place. Final Table Payouts Luc Greenwood - $779,268 Nick Petrangelo - $740,032 Michael Rocco - $409,020 Byron Kaverman - $335,020 Daniel Negreanu - $268,780 Nacho Barbero - $208,400 Stephen Chidwick - $154,260 Mark Radoja - $113,360
  4. [caption width="640"] Nick Petrangelo scored a six-figure payday and a WCOOP title on Friday (WPT photo)[/caption] The final high roller event on the PokerStars World Championship of Online Poker schedule wrapped up on Friday night with Nick Petrangelo beating out a talented final table to win over $600,000 after chopping things up with Bryn Kenney and 'bartek901'. Along with Kenney, Petrangelo outlasted the likes of Viktor Blom, former #1-ranked Patrick Leonard, Charlie Carrell and Henrik Hecklen to win Event #66 High ($25,000 High Roller) for his first WCOOP title. The final three players agreed to a deal that saw Petrangelo end up with $624,676.53 for the win, Kenney got $559,694.73 as runner-up and 'bartek901' getting more than everybody, $636,113.64. Outside of the High Roller, the biggest score went to Russian 'prebz' after taking down Event #65 High ($2,100 Thursday Thrill Special Edition) for $160,824.57 plus another $93,552.70 in bounties. Sweden's '42ayay' finished as runner-up for $117,684.22 and $50,802.73 in bounties. Jens 'Fresh_oO_D' Lakemeier became the first player to win two WCOOP titles this year when he beat out 104 other players in Event #67 High ($1,050 Seven Card Stud). He earned $25,725 for the win. Lakemeier's first 2017 WCOOP title came in Event #23 High ($1,050 Six Max No Limit Hold'em) on September 11. Canada's Mike 'WalmartCNXN' Farrow won Event #68 High ($215 Eight Max No Limit Hold'em) for $45,031.47. All told there were eight WCOOP titles won on Friday inlcuding 'ghost crab' (Event #64 High: $1,050 Six Max Pot Limit Omaha), 'Mordnilap' (Event #69 High: $1,050 Six Max Limit Hold'em), '84BUKTOP84' (Event #70 High: $530 Six Max No Limit Hold'em), and 'gugom' (Event #72 High: $215 ZOOM Heads-Up Pot Limit Omaha (Progressive KO)). Event #64 (High): $1,050 Six Max Pot Limit Omaha Entries: 698 Prize pool: $698,000 ghost crab - $107,869.46* Turtza - $97,414.61* DonkPredator - $60,517.08 Lex 'L. Veldhuis' Veldhuis - $42,967.34 komarolo22 - $30,506.92 WRUUUUM - $21,660.05 SP3WMONKEY - $17,399.18 * Heads-up deal Event #65 (High): $2,100 Thursday Thrill Special Edition Entries: 976 Prize pool: $1,952,000 ($976,000 + $976,000 in bounties) prebz - $160,824.57 + $93,552.70 in bounties 42ayay - $117,684.22 + $50,802.73 in bounties samooth - $86,116.48 + $20,027.35 in bounties NCSU2012 - $63,016.51 + $27,453.13 in bounties Simon 'IgorKarkarof' Pedersen - $46,112.87 + $2,000 in bounties n3xD - $33,743.54 + $9,093.75 in bounties salfshb - $24,692.21 + $37,687.51 in bounties KissMyAcePlz - $18,068.78 + $13,515.63 in bounties Poeira4 - $13,221.96 + $7,968.75 in bounties Event #66 (High): $25,000 High Roller Entries: 149 (120 entries + 29 re-entries) Prize pool: $3,654,225 Nick 'caecilius' Petrangelo - $624,676.53* Bryn 'BrynKenney' Kenney - $559,694.73* bartek901 - $636,113.64* Viktor 'Isildur1' Blom - $355,846.60 Patrick 'pads1161' Leonard - $275,473.38 Henrik 'hhecklen' Hecklen - $213,253.62 Linus 'LLinusLlove' Loeliger - $165,087.28 Charlie 'Epiphany77' Carrel - $127,799.94 * Three-way deal Event #67 (High): $1,050 Seven Card Stud Entries: 105 (71 entries + 34 re-entries) Prize pool: $105,000 Jens 'Fresh_oO_D' Lakemeier - $25,725 hotmark777 - $17,850 Iteopepe88 - $13,650 Christian 'CMoosepower' Elgstrøm - $9,450 Richard 'CHUFTY' Ashby - $6,825 krakukra - $5,250 secky0222 - $4,200 Vladimir 'vovtroy' Troyanovskiy - $3,150 Event #68 (High): $215 Eight Max No Limit Hold'em Entries: 1,476 Prize pool: $295,200 Mike 'WalmartCNXN' Farrow - $45,031.47 Ted 'pseftis' Doukas - $32,256.56 dartazzzz - $23,106.16 Daniel 'deoxyribo' Strelitz - $16,551.50 allinrusty - $11,856.23 Aziz.Mancha - $8,492.93 IAmSoSo - $6,083.68 chickensssss - $4,357.89 David 'DonkCommited' Miscikowski - $3,464.93 Event #69 (High): $1,050 Six Max Limit Hold'em Entries: 179 Prize pool: 179,000 Mordnilap - $35,702.52 St1ckman - $26,987.34 merla888 - $20,399.68 coman567 - $15,420.06 Perumov - $11,655.99 Connor 'blanconegro' Drinan - $8,810.73 Naza114 - $7,027.59 Event #70 (High): $530 Six Max No Limit Hold'em Entries: 1,101 Prize pool: $550,500 84BUKTOP84 - $89,798.88 LEN1234980 - $62,568.89 langace66 - $43,596.24 Jon 'PearlJammer' Turner - $30,376.64 thegr8str8 - $21,165.56 Charlie 'JIZOINT' Combes - $14,747.56 thehushpuppy - $11,156.04 Event #72 (High): $215 ZOOM Heads-Up Pot Limit Omaha (Progressive KO) Entries: 976 Prize pool: $1,952,000 gugom - $25,505.62 nogrenadez - $12,758.78 maxb1818 - $7,375.01 ShipitFTW911 - $8,052.72
  5. [CAPTION=98%] It might only be two weeks old, but the PokerStars Sunday High Roller is already drawing the biggest names. This week two of them rose to the top to chop up just over $125,000.Nick 'caecilius' Petrangelo beat out #10-ranked Connor 'blanconegro' Drinan to take home $65,977. Drinan had to settle for $59,795 for his runner-up performance. Participation was up across the board in major online poker tournaments this weekend, as 'WATnlos' took down the PokerStars Sunday Million for $145,896 following a heads-up chop with 'Zumi10' who walked away with $122,471 in second place. Third place went to 'Triple20' of Zimbabwe for $77,662 while 100th-ranked 'joppiesaus' of Malta scored $54,501 in fourth place and '¿¿toneecho??' finished fifth for $38,247. 'WATnlos' also happened to final table the Sunday High Roller with a sixth place effort. 'NY17PATS14' was the winner in the Sunday Warm-Up and received $47,745. In the Sunday 500, 'surprisefirm' came out on top for $44,845 (two-way deal), with 'anti-durrr' winning the Omania High Roller for $18,923. Vitali 'Witalii' Pankov of the Russian Federation captured an outright victory in the six-max Sunday Supersonic for a cash payment of $32,089. The prestigious $2,600 buy-in partypoker Super High Roller was won by 'helicopterben82' who took home $58,940 followed by 'Chelsea72' in the runner-up position for $43,354. 'Ad_Finem' finished third in that event and collected $31,890. The "High Roller Warm-Up" tourament was won by 'Dreamlivewsop' for $33,046. The $1,050 buy-in Whale tournament at 888poker saw 'B.Mitchell' atop the final leader board with a $36,159 cash haul for first place. 'pappadogg' of the Czech Republic (ranked #108 worldwide) finished second and received $32,721 in a heads-up deal. The Mega Deep event was won by 'plomaha' for $22,306. PokerStars Sunday Million $200 + $15 NLHE 5,840 entrants $1,168,000 paid out to 1,052 spots WATnlos - $145,895.91 Zumi10 - $122,471.00 *2-way deal Tr!pleeeee - $77,662.18 (Triple20) PIPI tapis! - $54,500.98 (joppiesaus) ¿¿toneecho?? - $38,247.21 IFIBETIMGOOD - $26,840.75 Rodrigo 'rodrigobmz' Borges - $18,836.10 Iamapoopie - $13,218.72 John-F69 - $9,276.60 PokerStars Sunday High Roller $2,000 + $100 NLHE 180 entrants $360,000 paid out to 26 spots caecilius - $65,977.10 Connor 'blanconegro' Drinan - $59,795.32 *2-way deal daisymiyuki - $41,269.21 Palmero92 - $31,361.22 Johannes 'Greenstone25' Korsar - $23,831.96 WATnlos - $18,110.34 Negriin - $13,762.36 Sphinx87 - $10,458.28 Turko_man - $7,947.43 PokerStars Sunday Warm-Up $200 + $15 NLHE 1,571 entrants $314,200 paid out to 269 spots NY17PATS14 - $47,744.64 Graftekkel - $34,327.85 Kashmiri - $24,682.01 r0ckyd0nky - $17,746.58 Leqenden - $12,759.94 mamamamama70 - $9,174.51 Miltos14 - $6,596.56 68ioweyou1 - $4,742.97 Jerry 'Perrymejsen' Ödeen - $3,410.23 PokerStars Sunday 500 $500 + $30 NLHE 547 entrants $273,500 paid out to 80 spots surprisefirm - $44,845.42 SFisch4 - $38,846.90 *2-way deal M.nosbocaJ - $25,947.21 WushuTM - $19,019.24 (Dattebayo) fish2013 - $13,941.03 JIZOINT - $10,218.75 (Charlie 'chaz_man_chaz' Combes) ciruelita222 - $7,490.31 ekziter - $5,490.37 dragonwarior - $4,024.44 PokerStars Omania High Roller $500 + $30 PLO Six Max 214 entrants $107,000 paid out to 23 spots anti-durrr - $18,922.71 31PokerGod31 - $14,965.65 jutrack - $11,836.13 Slavik_Krs - $9,361.05 chorizo72 - $7,403.53 TiltMeBig - $5,855.36 PokerStars Sunday Supersonic $200 + $15 NLHE Six Max Hyper Turbo 949 entrants $194,317 paid out to 131 spots Vitali 'Witalii' Pankov - $32,088.95 apoelhinio - $22,839.85 Vinkyy - $16,256.81 Tinas21 - $11,571.16 (kanaris9) PalomoBuchón - $8,236.05 Sergio 'zcedrick' Aido - $5,862.20 partypoker Super High Roller $2,500 + $100 102 entrants $255,000 paid out to 17 spots helicopterben82 - $58,940 Chelsea72 - $43,354 Ad_Finem - $31,890 thebattler33 - $23,457 (Chris 'Big Huni' Hunichen) SamTrickett - $17,254 SchelampigaUhu - $12,691 TullaMoreFan12 - $9,335 mgentili - $6,867 partypoker $530 High Roller Warm-Up $500 + $30 354 entrants $177,000 paid out to 55 spots Dreamlivewsop - $33,046 Swagg3r123 - $23,981 ZeKick - $17,403 (ronaldbauer) gmurrr - $12,629 (veeea) InthisCity - $9,165 Algorhytm - $6,650 (Ariados) Gl4diat0r - $4,827 (pappadogg) Kristen 'Krissyb24' Bicknell - $3,503 888poker Whale $1,000 + $50 NLHE 111 entrants $164,000 paid out to 15 spots B.Mitchell - $36,159 Pimmelspeck - $32,721 (pappadogg) *2-way deal M4zlTov - $21,320 MisterN411 - $15,170 SalsaFiesta - $10,660 purestluck - $8,610 Rodrigo 'sonmonedass' Perez - $6,970 pachanga32 - $5,740 888poker MEGA DEEP $200 + $15 NLHE 443 entrants $117,400 paid out to 56 spots plomaha - $22,306 noqqx - $16,436 Ronan 'Sw33ney' Sweeney - $12,327 pekojizonno - $8,805 MortenVM_ - $5,870 vpedote - $4,109 (Victor 'vitinhorrn15' Pedote Dos Santos) Imyurfriend - $2,935 sweet_dr34ms - $2,348 (papan9_p$)
  6. The opening day butterflies are officially behind us as the 2018 World Series of Poker picks up steam headed into week #2. There is plenty to look forward to, including a long list of upcoming bracelet events as well as plenty of opportunities for fans to tune in to Twitch or PokerGo to rail the action. Welcome Weekend Warriors, Value Hunters This week is rife with tournaments for those looking to play some of the lower buy-in events with hopes to bink a bracelet. The week starts off with the final two flights of the mammoth Colossus event. Monday is the final day for players to find a bag and win a spot in the Day 2 field. The end of the week is just as plentiful for those looking to spend under $1K. Friday brings both flights of the $565 Pot Limit Omaha Event. The $565 PLO Giant will field its second flight on Sunday. Add to those, another flight of the $365 NL Giant and there will be no shortage of players spinning up the prize pools all weekend long. For the recreational player, perhaps one of the most anticipated events on the calendar is Event #21 - The $1,500 Millionaire Maker. The cornerstone event gets underway on Saturday, June 9 and offers two flights, with a single re-entry per flight. The winner is guaranteed a minimum payday of $1,000,000. Last year, Canada’s Pable Mariz, outlasted the 7,761 entries for a $1,221,407 payday. 2018 WSOP Week 2 Schedule Day Event # Event Defending Champion Monday 7E $565 Colossus Thomas Pomponio Monday 12 $1,500 Dealers Choice 6-Handed David Bach Monday 7F $565 Colossus - Tuesday 13 $1,500 NL Big Blind Ante NONE Tuesday 14 $1,500 NL 2-7 Lowball Draw Frank Kassela Wednesday 15 $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. David Singer Wednesday 16 $10,000 Heads Up NL Championship Adrian Mateos Thursday 17 $1,500 No Limit Hold'em 6-Handed Anthony Marquez Thursday 18 $10,000 Dealers Choice 6-Handed John Racener Friday 19 $565 PLO Tyler Smith Friday 20 $5,000 NL Big Blind Ante NONE Friday 19B $565 PLO -- Friday 6B $365 NL Giant Dieter Dechant Saturday 21 $1,500 NL Millionaire Maker Pablo Mariz Saturday 22 $1,500 8-Game Mix Ronald Ware Sunday 21B $1,500 NL Millionaire Maker -- Sunday 23 $10,000 NL 2-7 Lowball Draw Championship John Monnette Sunday 11B $565 PLO Giant --   Big Money Broadcasts There are no days off this week when it comes to the streaming schedule. Big money is on the line right off the bat as PokerGo streams the final table of the $100,000 NL High Roller on June 4. Some of the game’s biggest names, including Bryn Kenney, Stephen Chidwick, and final table chip leader Nick Petrangelo will be vying for the first million-dollar payouts of the summer. There’s so much streaming action this week that on June 4, 7, and 8 there are multiple streams, giving players the non-stop action they crave. Date Time Event Outlet June 4 6:00 PM $100,000 High Roller FT PokerGO June 4 6:00 PM $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo Day 2 Twitch June 5 6:00 PM $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo FT PokerGO June 6 3:00 PM $1,500 NL Day 2 Twitch June 7 4:00 PM $1,500 NL Final Table PokerGO June 7 6:00 PM $10,000 NL Heads-Up Day 2 Twitch June 8 4:00 PM $10,000 NL Heads-Up FT PokerGO June 8 6:00 PM $565 Colossus FT Twitch June 9 4:00 PM $1,500 NL 6-Max FT PokerGO June 10 6:00 PM $565 PLO FT Twitch News & Notes Elio Fox, another one of the big names sitting at the final table of the $100,000 NL High Roller, will have the opportunity to become the first double bracelet winner of the young summer. Headed into the final table, he's currently third in chips. The first of the four online bracelet events to be held on WSOP.com, which includes players from New Jersey for the first time, closed registration with 2,972 runners. The $365 tournament saw a 16% increase in players from the $333 online bracelet event held in 2017 which attracted 2,509 players. Will the Colossus live up to its name in 2018? Keep an eye on Monday's numbers for players registering for the final two flights of the $565 Colossus. In 2017, the field exceeded 18,000, generating a prize pool of over $9 million. Through four flights, the total number of runners ended up right around 7K, leaving only two flights (on a Monday) to make up a massive difference to even get close to those 2017 numbers.
  7. Headed into the second weekend of the 49th Annual World Series of Poker, Elio Fox continues to hold the lead in points in the early race for the 2018 Player of the Year. Elio Fox, the 2011 World Series of Poker Europe Main Event winner, captured his second career in Event #2: $10,000 NLHE Super Turbo Bounty. After collecting his $393,693 for the win, the New York native then jumped right into Event #5: $100,000 NLHE High Roller. He navigated a tough final table that included the Stephen Chidwick, Jason Koon, Adrian Mateos, Bryn Kenney, and eventual winner Nick Petrangelo. Fox nabbed another official payday of 1,798,658 for his runner-up finish (although rumors of a chop with Petrangelo were circulating). In total Fox has amassed 1743.65 POY Points to lead the pack. Right behind him is Philadelphia, PA’s Paul Volpe. Volpe has been ever-present early at the WSOP, registering three cashes within the first week. Most notably, Volpe captured his third career bracelet and $417,921 by winning Event #9: $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship. Volpe also appeared at the final table of the aforementioned Event #2 finishing in third place for over $169,000. The run good continued as Volpe had a profitable showing in the $100,000 NLHE High Roller, making the final two tables and over $155,00. Currently, Volpe only sits 121.65 points behind Fox with a total of 1,622 POY Points. 2009 World Series of Poker Main Event winner Joe Cada presently sits third in the Player of the Year race with 1,527.57 points. Like Volpe, Cada also has put together a string of results early, bolstered by the winning of his third career bracelet. Cada outgunned all three of his tables in Event #3: $3,000 NLHE Shootout for $226,218. "The Kid" was also seen at the final table of Event #2, pulling down $16,024 for his ninth-place finish. His most recent WSOP cash came in Event #7, the 13,070 player $565 Colossus. He made the top 100 of the massive field and added $4,446 to his bankroll. His cash in the Colossus marks his 31st lifetime cash at the series. The winner of the $100,000 NLHE High Roller, Nick Petrangelo lands in fourth place based solely on his performance in Event #5. A regular on the high roller scene, Petrangelo earned his second career bracelet in this event as well as an official sum of $2,910,227. While it is unlikely that the Massachusetts resident will be jumping in any of the “smaller” buy-in events. he will very likely have an opportunity to accumulate more POY points playing the $10,000 events, as well as the Main Event and the $1 Million One Drop. Petrangelo currently has 1,269.75 points. Julien Martini rounds out the top five, having earned 1,026.20 POY points. Martini bested the 911 player field in Event #4: $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better to earn his first career bracelet and $239, 771. No stranger to big spots in poker, Martini has a live earning career total of $530,764 including a victory in a $5,000 WPT event in late April. After playing in the WSOP for years, the French grinder found this to be a dream come true. "It was a dream when I was 14 years old. What kind of guy can win a $1,500 tournament or a $10,000? I was dreaming about this for seven years, and it is one of the best things in my life. I am very proud and super happy," Martini said. Top 10 2018 WSOP Player Of The Year Points Thru 6/8 Name Points 1 Elio Fox 1,743.65 2 Paul Volpe 1,622.00 3 Joe Cada 1,527.57 4 Nick Petrangelo 1,269.75 5 Julien Martini 1,026.20 6 William Reymond 996.82 7 Johannes Becker 960.14 8 Jeremy Harkin 927.59 9 Daniel Ospina 877.33 10 Shaun Deeb 823.34  
  8. Justin Bonomo is having himself quite a year and that theme continued on Wednesday night as he defeated a final table that included Daniel Negreanu, Jason Koon and Christoph Vogelsang to win the 2018 Super High Roller Bowl for $5,000,000. The win comes just over two months after he won the Super High Roller Bowl China event for $4.8 million. He’s now won $13.9 million in 2018 from 16 cashes, including six victories. Nick Petrangelo started Day 4 with the second smallest stack and any hope of turning that into a long day was taken away on the first hand of play. Petrangelo raised from the cutoff to 50,000 before Jason Koon re-raised to 130,000 from the button. Petrangelo moved all in for 400,000 and Koon called. Petrangelo showed [poker card="tc"][poker card="ts"] but found nothing but bad news when Koon tabled [poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"]. The board ran out [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"][poker card="5s"][poker card="8s"][poker card="qh"] to eliminate Peterangelo in sixth place. It took another two hours before the next player was sent to the rail. Down to just seven big blinds, Christoph Vogelsang moved all in from the small blind and Mikita Badziakouski happily called from the big blind and flipped over [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"] while Vogelsang, the defending champion, wasn’t quite drawing dead with [poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5c"] flop gave Vogelsang all kinds of hope, but the neither the [poker card="9h"] turn or [poker card="8d"] river fulfilled that hope and Vogelsang was out in fifth place. Four-handed play lasted nearly 5.5 hours before Bonomo and Badziakouski clashed in a blind vs. blind battle. Bonomo raised to 140,000 from the small blind and Badziakouski defended his big. The flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="9c"][poker card="3s"] Badziakouski called Bonomo’s bet of 225,000. The turn was the [poker card="4c"] and Bonomo bet 475,000 before Badziakouski moved all in for 1,500,000. Bonomo snap-called and turned over [poker card="kd"][poker card="tc"] while Badziakouski showed [poker card="td"][poker card="8s"] which put him behind. The river was the [poker card="2h"] and Badziakouski, who began the day with the chip lead, was eliminated in fourth place. The final three players had roughly the same stacks before Koon lost 80% of his chips to Bonomo after both players flopped two pair. Koon was unable to spin his stack up and was eliminated by Bonomo just a few hands later. When heads-up play began, Bonomo had 80% of the chips in play and over the next 90 minutes, he never relinquished the lead before finally finishing off Negreanu. Bonomo raised to 200,000 from the button and Negreanu called. The flop came [poker card="9h"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6d"] and Negreanu checked. Bonomo bet 160,000 and Negreanu responded with a raise to 500,000. Bonomo kept the throttle on and made it 1,250,000 to go, forcing Negreanu into the tank. After a minute to consider his options, Negreanu moved all in for 4,400,000 and Bonomo snap-called and turned over [poker card="9d"][poker card="9s"] for top set while Negreanu showed [poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"] for an open-ended straight draw. The turn was the [poker card="ks"] and the river was the [poker card="6c"], giving Bonomo an unneeded full house and his second Super High Roller Bowl title of 2018. Payouts Justin Bonomo - $5,000,000 Daniel Negreanu - $3,000,000 Jason Koon - $2,100,000 Mikita Badziakouski - $1,600,000 Christoph Vogelsang - $1,200,000 Nick Petrangelo - $900,000 Stephen Chidwick - $600,000 Seth Davies - $90,000
  9. Sunday at the 2018 World Series of Poker was a busy one with thousands of players battling on the felt at the Rio as well as the virtual felt of WSOP.com. It ended up being a big day for France, with both bracelets won on Sunday going to French players. Here's a full recap of what went down on Sunday Julien Martini Lives the Dream by Winning $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo Julien Martini used to watch poker on TV in awe of the big names and the even bigger stakes. That was on his mind Sunday afternoon as he beat Kate Hoang to win his first career WSOP bracelet and $239,771. "When I was 14 and I started poker, I was like, ‘Whoa, what kind of guy can win a $1,500 tournament or a $10,000?’," said Martini. "I was dreaming about this for seven years. It’s one of the best things in my life. I’m super proud and very happy." Martini and the other three players who returned to the table on Sunday were supposed to be doing something else. Originally scheduled to end on Saturday, the event needed an extra day to finish thanks to a bigger-than-expected field of 911 players. This is the second time in three years that Hoang finished runner-up in an Omaha Hi-Lo event at the WSOP. In 2016, she finished second to Kyle Bowker in the $3,000 Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo event. Other notables that cashed in the event include Chris Bjorin (17th - $8,296), Daniel Buzgon (18th - $8,296), Mike Leah (30th - $5,605), Jerry Wong (33rd - $5,605), Benny Glaser (63rd - $3,526), John Racener (86th - $2,595). Final Table Payouts Julien Martini - $239,771 Kate Hoang - $148,150 Mack Lee - $104,0164 William Kopp - $74,058 Brandon Ageloff - $53,482 Chad Eveslage - $39,182 Rafael Concepcion - $29,128 Denny Axel - $21,977 Tammer Ilcaffas - $16,832 Nick Petrangelo Leads Final Six into $100,000 Super High Roller Final Table Just five events into the 2018 WSOP, Elio Fox has already won one WSOP bracelet and now he's suddenly at a final table with a chance at a second. But he's not the headliner. Fox sits third in chips at the $100,000 Super High Roller final table behind Nick Petrangelo and Bryn Kenney. Stephen Chidwick, the #1-ranked player on the Global Poker Index, sits sixth. Sunday's play started with 10 players still in contention and Petrangelo was firmly planted at the top and he stayed there as Adrian Mateos, Fedor Holz, Chris Moore and Jason Koon all fell by the wayside. Petrangelo, Kenney and Fox have all won a WSOP bracelet before, while the three players making up the bottom half of the chip counts, Andreas Elier, Aymon Hata, and Chidwick, have not. Play resumes Monday at 6 pm ET and will be streamed on PokerGO. Final Table Chip Counts Nick Petrangelo - 12,200,000 Bryn Kenney - 10,200,000 Elio Fox - 8,620,000 Andreas Eiler - 8,490,000 Aymon Hata - 7,280,000 Stephen Chidwick - 5,740,000 Duta and Alberquerque Have Colossal Days on Sunday Two more starting flights of the $565 Colossus made sure that the tables at the Rio were jam-packed with players of all skill levels taking a shot at a potentially huge return. After 3,495 players played Saturday's two flights, 3,519 more showed up on Sunday. Nobody enjoyed Flight 1C more than Romanian Florian Duta. He bagged up 442,000 - almost twice as much as the next biggest stack from 1C. That stack of 241,000 belongs to WSOP bracelet winner John Racener. While Duta's stack is impressive, Philip Alberquerque did even better later in the day. The American finished Flight 1D with 503,000 and finds himself sitting second overall behind Day 1A leader Anthony Parill, who finished with 607,000. For the 2018 event to reach the 18,054-player field size, Flights 1E and 1F on Monday will need to average 5,520 players each. The final two flights last year had 3,966 and 3,923 players respectively. Day 1C Top 5 Chip Counts Florian Duta - 442,000 John Racener - 241,000 Jong Jin - 238,000 Clayton Maguire - 172,000 Abe Deguzman Jr. - 151,000 Day 1D Top 5 Chip Counts Philip Alberquerque - 503,000 Daniel Cai - 272,000 Alex Foxen - 268,000 Maxime Heroux - 260,000 Ilkin Amirov - 256,000 Chris Vitch in Pole Position For Third Bracelet in Three Years Two years ago, Chris Vitch won his first WSOP bracelet in the $2,500 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball event. He followed that up in 2017 by winning the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo event. Now, he's in position to win his third career bracelet and doing it the event that started his winning trend. Vitch bagged up 493,000 chips to lead the final 12 players in the $2,500 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball event. The group chasing him includes Scott Seiver, Bryce Yockey, Frank Kassela and Mike Leah. The day began with over 90 players still chasing the bracelet. There were 37 players who busted on Sunday who did manage to get into the money before their tournament ended. Included in that group was Chris Ferguson picking up his first cash of 2018 (48th - $3,721). Some of the big names who picked up a result on Sunday included Ismael Bojang (47th - $3,721), Shaun Deeb (37th - $3,937), Jon Turner (32nd - $4,329), John Monnette (21st - $5,847), Billy Baxter (18th - $7,163) and Brian Hastings ($14th - $7,163). Final 12 Chip Counts Chris Vitch - 493,000 Damjan Radanov - 476,000 George Trigeorgis - 462,000 Scott Seiver - 431,000 Alex Simma - 400,000 Luis Velador - 390,000 Jesse Hampton - 350,000 Bryce Yockey - 271,000 Frank Kassela - 268,000 Mike Leah - 174,000 Johannes Becker - 172,000 Michael Wagner - 147,000 Chris Bjorin Bags Biggest Stack After Day 1 of $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo The second $10,000 "Championship" event of the 2018 WSOP started Sunday afternoon as 161 players showed up for the $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo Championship. Through eight levels of play, 86 players were eliminated but Chris Bjorin was most definitely not one of them. Bjorin finished Day 1 of the event with 249,500, good enough for the overnight chip lead. Right behind him is Jesse Martin, Daniel Ratigan, and Steve Chanthabouasy. Another eight levels are scheduled for Monday starting at 5 pm ET. Top 10 Chip Counts Chris Bjorin - 249,500 Jesse Martin - 232,000 Daniel Ratigan - 231,000 Steve Chanthabouasy - 228,000 Tai Nguyen - 211,000 Viacheslav Zhukov - 206,500 Robert Mizrachi - 204,000 Nikolai Yakovenko - 203,000 Rafael Concepcion - 194,500 Larry Kantor - 179,500 William 'Twooopair' Reymond Makes First WSOP Cash a Memorable One For the first time in WSOP history, players in more than one state were playing online for a WSOP bracelet on Sunday. A record-smashing 2,972 entries pushed the total prize pool to $974,816 - well past the $500,000 guarantee. Taking home the winner's share of that and his first career WSOP bracelet was Frenchmen William 'Twooopair' Reymond. At the start of the tournament, Reymond was happy just to be clicking buttons. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Playing the $365 online WSOP event and listening to <a href="https://twitter.com/andrewneeme?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@andrewneeme</a> on twitch. My definition of an almost perfect Sunday <a href="https://t.co/F3OxXRIiA0">pic.twitter.com/F3OxXRIiA0</a></p>&mdash; William Reymond (@WilliamReymond) <a href="https://twitter.com/WilliamReymond/status/1003437120948563968?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 4, 2018</a></blockquote><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> Shawn 'sHaDySTeeM' Stroke took home $94,265 for his runner-up performance. To the surprise of nobody, Anthony 'nowb3athat' Spinella made the final table and eventually finished seventh for $21,251. Spinella won the very first online bracelet in 2015 and earlier this year became the first to win a WSOP Circuit ring playing on WSOP.com. Final Table Payouts William 'Twooopair' Reymond - $154,996 Shawn 'sHaDySTeeM' Stroke - $94,265 Stephen 'SteveSpuell' Buell - $69,017 Ryan 'LoveMy11Cats' Belz - $50,593 Elliott 'Ekampen05' Kampen - $37,530 Josh 'YoelRomero' King - $27,977 Anthony 'nowb3athat' Spinella - $21,251 Michael 'myapologies' Hauptman - $16,279 Jennifer 'moistymire' Miller - $12,478
  10. The World Series of Poker Player of the Year race featured a new leader almost every week for the duration of the series. Elio Fox jumped to an early lead thanks to his bracelet win and runner-up finish in the $100,000 High Roller all within in the first week. By the middle of June, Fox's epic first week was an afterthought. Post-lim events played a large role in how the final leaderboard shook out. The most competitive race in WSOP history ended (for now) with one of the three-multi bracelet winners from 2018 in front. Shaun Deeb played an incredible amount of volume and is 90 percent of the way toward accomplishing one of his major career goals. Deeb shipped the $10,000 Six-Max a few days after making Day 6 of the Main Event and placing 105th. The bracelet is the second for Deeb this summer and the fourth of his career. Deeb's final haul from the 2018 WSOP includes two bracelets, three final tables, and 16 cashes. 2017 Player of the Year Chris Ferguson is the only player who cashed more times than Deeb and he racked up 17 to lead the category for the second straight year. Second in cashes and second in POY is $50,000 High Roller winner Ben Yu. Deeb defeated Yu heads up in the $25,000 PLO and leads him in POY by a little under 600 points. Yu earned a career-best $1.65 million for his third bracelet win. A few days earlier, Yu took fourth in the DoubleStack Turbo and overall, he concluded his WSOP campaign with four top-four finishes. Yu and Deeb finished in 11th and 12th place, respectively, on the overall WSOP earnings list. The only players ahead of them were Main Event final tablists or a player who cashed in the Big One for One Drop with the exception of one Nick Petrangelo, who won the $100,000 High Roller and took third in the $50,000 edition won by Yu. The player of the moment and third on the POY list is Joe Cada. Cada opened the 2018 summer with a win in the $3,000 Shootout and steadily accumulated from there toward a stellar final two weeks. The 2009 Main Event champion took fifth in his bid at a second title. Following the disappointing finish, Cada jumped in the $1,500 Closer and won the title along with his fourth bracelet in only two days of play. Cada earned a combined $2.7 for the two scores and certified himself a place in the annals of WSOP runs. John Hennigan led the POY race midway through the summer. Hennigan's second-place finish in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship and win in the $10,000 H.O.R.S.E was never replicated but he did wind up with 12 cashes in total. Those 12 cashes are 12 more than Hennigan collected in 2017. Hennigan was awarded with a Poker Hall of Fame induction during the Main Event to cap off his best year at the series. Scott Bohlman and Paul Volpe sit in the middle of the 2018 class. Bohlman came close twice to being the first multi-bracelet winner of the summer but settled for second in the $10,000 Stud Hi-Lo and third in the $3,000 PLO Six-Max. Volpe faced off heads up against Deeb in the $10,000 Six-Max and earned silver for his Main Event post-lim. 'The Main Event' made Day 5 of his nicknamed tournament and set a record with eight cashes in events with a $10,000 buy-in or higher. The No Limit players carved out space in the top-10 as done by Eric Baldwin and Justin Liberto. Between the two players, they went to the payout cage 25 times and all but two of their ventures were for events that didn't have NLH in the title. Heavy-hitters Mike Leah and Anthony Zinno round out the important part of the leaderboard. Neither player added a second bracelet despite having five final tables between them to close another victory out. Zinno made up the trophy difference at The Venetian where he won the CardPlayer $5,000 event for $466,670 to wrap up his summer schedule. The race concludes on November 2 at WSOP Europe at King's Casino in Rozvadov, Czech Republic. Deeb confirmed on the Poker Life Podcast he would be in attendance at it remains to be seen who from the top-10 will join him. Top 10 2018 WSOP Player Of The Year Points Position Name Points 1 Shaun Deeb 4,334.06 2 Ben Yu 3,746.04 3 Joe Cada 3,531.86 4 John Hennigan 3,499.91 5 Scott Bohlman 3,155.88 6 Paul Volpe 2,859.76 7 Eric Baldwin 2,516.30 8 Justin Liberto 2,459.84 9 Mike Leah 2,354.13 10 Anthony Zinno 2,330.37
  11. Each of the last five years, Dan Smith has organized a charity drive that pledges to match a portion of what is donated. This year, Smith, along with a group of poker and daily fantasy sports (DFS) pros, pledged to match up to $1.29 million. The drive is officially called the Double Up Drive and benefits 10 different charities, with eight focused on near-term causes and two focused on the long-term. "Poker is an inherently selfish game," Smith said about using his platform in poker to raise awareness and give back. "For me to win, that means somebody else directly has to lose. After a lot of years of it, I thought there was more to life than just playing cards, and I think it's cool that I was able to use my favorite thing to make a difference in the world." Every year, the drive receives a large amount of support from the gambling world, with both the poker and DFS communities heavily participating. Smith works with Tom and Martin Crowley on the drive, and this year Tom pledged half of his winnings from the DraftKings World Championship Final to the Double Up Drive. Known as 'ChipotleAddict' in the DFS world, Tom incredibly went on to win the event for a haul of $2 million and between that event and the FanDuel $2M WFFC Finals, Tom pulled in $2.254 million. That means $1.127 million is being donated to the Double Up Fund. "It's pretty surreal," Smith said of Crowley winning after pledging 50 percent. "When you're playing super high roller (poker tournaments), sometimes you just go completely numb to the value of a dollar. Like, we're playing a $300K tournament, that’s thousands of lives that are going to be literally saved. It's really hard to comprehend. It's a very cool thing, and I couldn’t be happier that it’s been so successful." One of the biggest elements leading to the success of Smith's drive has been the involvement of the poker and DFS communities, and Smith spoke to how much that’s meant to the drive. "Motivating people to do good I think is an unbelievable achievement," Smith said. "Fedor (Holz) last year, Stephen Chidwick this year made very large donations to the drive. It’s just really wonderful to get support. The charity drive is one of the big parts of my life now, and having people whom I respect - I'm great friends with Stevie - getting supported like that means a lot." The seven-figure charity drive is, as he admits, a big part of Smith's life, and with lots of moving parts, people involved, and tons of donations to be handled, both big and small, Smith said he and the group started putting everything together in October, but overall it might not take as much time as one might believe. "It takes a lot less time than you might think," Smith said. "We started brainstorming some charities in October, discussing numbers. We did a handful of one-hour calls. The most challenging thing, I suppose, was getting people to agree on which charities to include, but it makes sense if you’re divvying up what started as $1.3 million. It should take some time. There were a fair bit of logistics, but fortunately, the people at REG Charity were very helpful. They created the website, they’re entering the emails this year. As far as a multi-million dollar fundraiser would go, it takes a lot less time than you might think." Whereas Tom Crowley won more than $2 million from DFS and will be donating more than $1 million of it to the Double Up Drive, Smith hopes he can also make a large contribution from winning an event. Smith is currently in Las Vegas competing in the $300,000 buy-in Super High Roller Bowl. With nearly 40 entries in the field, the prize pool is well north of $10 million. First place is more than $3.6 million. Smith is playing in the event with five percent of his winnings pledged, and he’s not the only one. "Myself and Nick Petrangelo are playing five percent for charity," Smith said. "So that's $15,000, plus hopefully some skill edge, and I am hopeful that it spreads awareness and if people see it on the stream or television then they are encouraged to do good. Even though we talk a lot about the big numbers, I want to clarify that any amount makes a difference. People in Uganda are living off 65 cents a day, an amount we don’t even consider at all." If you're interested in donating to the Double Up Drive, or simply would like to learn more, you can do so at DoubleUpDrive.com. The Super High Roller Bowl Smith is competing in is being aired on PokerGO, and you can get $10 off an annual subscription through using the code "Pocket5s" when signing up.
  12. The record-setting WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic wrapped up at Bellagio in Las Vegas, with the $10,400 Main Event attracting a huge field of 1,001 entries and featuring some of poker's biggest names. In addition to the Main Event, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule featured several events with five-figure buy-ins and one with a six-figure price of entry. Here are the winners from a tremendous week of poker in Sin City. The biggest winners overall from these high buy-in events, excluding the $10,400 Main Event, were Jake Schindler, Jason Koon, Seth Davies, Chris Hunichen, and Dominik Nitsche. Although he didn't earn the most money, it's certainly worth noting that Sam Soverel cashed in four of these events for a total of $314,500. No one else cashed in more than two. Ladines Wins First $10,000 PLO Event The first two high roller events on the schedule were both $10,000 buy-in pot-limit Omaha tournaments. The first one attracted 35 entries for a $350,000 prize pool and saw the top five places make the money. Joshua Ladines took the event’s title and $128,090 top prize, with both Brian Rast and Sam Soverel finishing in the money. Joshua Ladines - $128,090 John Riordan - $102,910 Jonathan Abdellatif - $56,000 Brian Rast - $35,000 Sam Soverel - $28,000 Soverel Takes Second $10,000 PLO Event In the second $10,000 PLO event, a group of familiar faces was back in the money. Soverel topped the field of 29 entries to win the title and $116,000, Ladines finished third for $46,400, and WPT Five Diamond wonder boy Ryan Tosoc scored fifth for $23,200. Tosoc notably finished second in the Season XV WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic for $1.134 million before going on to win the event in Season XVI for $1.958 million. Sam Soverel - $116,000 Jonathan Depa - $75,400 Joshua Ladines- $46,400 Michael Song - $29,000 Ryan Tosoc - $23,200 Hennigan Captures $10,000 8-Game Mixed Title If you know Bellagio, you know it’s home to the most iconic high-stakes poker room in the world, Bobby’s Room. It’s where the game’s elite compete for astronomical cash-game stakes, but during WPT Five Diamond some of those players shifted their focus to tournament play, specifically in the $10,000 buy-in 8-Game Mixed High Roller. The tournament generated 24 entries, and it was none other than five-time World Series of Poker gold bracelet winner and WPT Champions Club member John Hennigan taking home the top prize of $110,400. John Hennigan - $110,400 Ben Yu - $67,200 Randy Ohel - $38,400 John Racener - $24,000 Loeser and Fox Chop First $25,000 High Roller In the first of three $25,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournaments on this year’s WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic slate, 42 entries were generated to create a prize pool of $1.05 million. The top six places paid, and the top two spots went to Manig Loeser and Elio Fox in a chop that earned each player more than $300,000. Loeser scored first place for $321,300, and Fox took second for $308,700. Manig Loeser- $321,300 Elio Fox - $308,700 Jake Schindler - $168,000 Dan Smith - $105,000 Cary Katz - $84,000 Nick Petrangelo - $63,000 Petrangelo Wins Second $25,000 High Roller The second $25,000 buy-in tournament attracted 47 entries and generated a $1.175 million prize pool. The top seven places reached the money, with several notables cashing. None earned more than Nick Petrangelo, though, who chopped the event heads up with Sergio Aido to take home the winning prize of $289,944. Aido scored $287,634 for second. Petrangelo was coming off a sixth-place result for $63,000 in the first $25,000 event of this series. Soverel, who finished in the money of the first two high rollers on the schedule, including winning one for $116,000, finished sixth in this event for $70,500. Nick Petrangelo - $289,944 Sergio Aido - $287,634 Seth Davies - $256,672 Ben Yu - $117,500 Kazuhiko Yotsushika - $94,000 Sam Soverel - $70,500 Rainer Kempe - $58,750 Davies Victorious in Third $25,000 High Roller The third and final $25,000 high roller tournament on the WPT Five Diamond schedule drew 50 entries for a $1.25 million prize pool. The top eight places reached the money, and it was Seth Davies taking the title and $341,920 in first-place prize money. The win came just days after Davies took third in the previous $25,000 high roller event during the series of $256,672, as you can see above. Davies did a deal with Isaac Haxton in second place, who earned $320,580. The money was filled with notable high rollers, including Alex Foxen taking third for $175,000. Foxen has had himself quite a 2018 and is closing it strong both on the live felt and the virtual felt. In the online world, Foxen recently achieved a new all-time high in the top 100 of the PocketFives Online Poker Rankings. You'll also notice Soverel's name appearing in the in-the-money places once again, this time for fifth place, worth $100,000. Seth Davies - $341,920 Isaac Haxton - $320,580 Alex Foxen - $175,000 David Peters - $125,000 Sam Soverel - $100,000 Christoph Vogelsang - $75,000 Rainer Kempe - $62,500 Elio Fox: $50,000 Schindler Defeats Koon for $100,000 Super High Roller Victory The final big buy-in event from the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule this year was the $100,000 Super High Roller. The event drew 37 entries to Bellagio for a $3.7 million prize pool and the top six spots reached the money. Earning the $1.332 million first-place prize was Jake Schindler. Adding that score to the $168,000 he won earlier in the series for taking third place in one of the $25,000 high rollers, Schindler scored $1.5 million in prize money at Bellagio this December. Schindler beat out Jason Koon for the win, and Koon took home $888,000 for his second-place finish. Jake Schindler - $1,332,000 Jason Koon - $888,000 Chris Hunichen - $592,000 Dominik Nitsche - $370,000 Ben Tollerene - $296,000 Talal Shakerchi - $222,000
  13. Inaugural Poker Masters Champion Steffen Sontheimer entered the final day of the partypoker $250,000 Super High Roller Championships with both the chip lead and an eye on taking home a new career-high score. Sontheimer leveraged that chip lead for the entirety of the final table, never relinquishing the chip lead and, in the end, he earned the mammoth $3,685,000 first place prize, besting a table of poker’s elite in the process. At the beginning of play only six players of the original 35 entries remained. Sontheimer was joined by partypoker ambassador Isaac Haxton, Nick Petrangelo, David Peters, Sean Winter, and Mikita Badziakouski. Of the remaining six, only four made the money. After the elimination of Haxton in sixth place, it was time to sweat the massive $710,000 money bubble. After mixing it up with chip leader Sontheimer, Petrangelo was left with a short stack and not many moves left. Sontheimer opened the action with [ah][5s] which prompted a three-bet shove from Petrangelo with [as][ks]. It folded to Peters in the small blind who four-bet shoved holding [js][jd]. Sontheimer folded and Petrangelo was flipping for his tournament life. The board ran out [th][9d][2d][4c][8s] giving Peters the pot and eliminating Petrangelo as the last player to walk without a payday. The final four including Sontheimer, Peters, Winter and Badziakouski battled four-handed for hours as Sontheimer continued put distance between himself and the other three. Winter managed to make a little headway as Peters and Badziakotuski’s stacks drifted downwards. The next elimination occurred when, in a blind on blind confrontation, Winter open shipped from the small blind with [ah][qd]. Badziakouski, with just over ten big blinds left, called with his tournament life on the line with [kd][jc]. The [ac][9h][2h] flop gave Winter a virtual lock on the hand. While the [kh] turn gave Badziakouski some life, the river came the [3d], sending Badziakouski to the rail in fourth place. Badziakouski collected the $710,000 payday and added it to his current $20 million total live earnings. In 2018 alone, Badziakouski has earned over $13.8 million in live tournaments, second only to Justin Bonomo. Peters, who was now left on the bottom of the chip counts, exited next. Facing a raise by Sontheimer, Peters looked down at [kh][qc]. He moved all in over the top from the small blind only to be snap called by Sontheimer and his [ah][kc]. The flop came [9d][5c][5d] keeping Sontheimer in the lead. The [kd] turn paired both players, however, the [6s] sealed Peters fate and he fell in third place for $1,420,000. The sum lifted Peters to over $9 million in earnings for 2018. It also allowed Peters to pass Dan Colman on the All-Time Money List and enter the top-5. At the start of heads-up play Sontheimer held a 2-1 chip lead over Winter. A pre-flop cooler made sure that what could have been a long battle, ended the tournament only 30 minutes into heads-up play. The final hand saw Winter limp the button with [ac][qh]. Sontheimer then raised from the big blind with [ah][kh]. Winter three-bet, Sontheimer shoved and Winter snap called for the rest of his stack. Dominated, Winter was going to need some help. It did not come as the board ran out [ts][5d][3h][4s][9h]. Winter finished the tournament as the runner-up, earning a career-high cash of $2,430,000. It was his second runner-up finish in as many days as he also finished in second place in the partypoker $50,000 Super High Roller for $550,000. With the win, Sontheimer earned himself his third seven-figure live cash and a career-high score of $3,685,000. The victory pushes his total live earnings up over $12.5 million in lifetime earnings. Final Table Results 1. Steffen Sontheimer - $3,685,000 2. Sean Winter - $2,430,000 3. David Peters - $1,420,000 4. Mikita Badziakouski - $710,000
  14. Chalk up another win for Bryn Kenney in 2019. This time, there was no deal to be made as Kenney knocked out four of his final five opponents en route to a lightning-fast victory in the US Poker Open Event #7: $25,000 No Limit Hold’em for $450,000. The 60-entry field was narrowed down to a high-rolling who’s who final table of six. Kenney and Ben Yu were among the chip leaders however, there were four other formidable players in Nick Petrangelo, Keith Tilston, Nick Schulman and, eventual runner-up, Jake Schindler, who were all capable of coming from behind. Final Table Payouts 1. Bryn Kenney - $450,000 2. Jake Schindler - $300,000 3. Ben Yu – $210,000 4. Keith Tilston - $150,000 5. Nick Schulman - $120,000 6. Nick Petrangelo - $90,000 It only took a few hands before the bustouts began. The action folded to Nick Petrangelo in the small blind and he jammed with his remaining 13 big blinds holding [poker card="jc"][poker card="6c"]. Kenney, sitting in the big blind, ended up making the call holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="8h"]. The flop came [poker card="3d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="4s"] giving Petrangelo additional outs with a gutshot straight draw. The [poker card="kh"] on the turn put Kenney even further ahead in the hand. The [poker card="3c"]river ended Petrangelo’s run in Event #7 for $90,000. Roughly ten minutes later, Nick Schulman was all in for his tournament life. From the button, Schulman open-shoved his 12 big blind stack with [poker card="qh"][poker card="td"]. Then, from the small blind, Keith Tilston reshoved over the top with [poker card="ac"][poker card="8d"]. Ben Yu got out of the way and, with the cards on their backs, the duo saw a flop of [poker card="ah"][poker card="qs"][poker card="7h"] providing both players a pair. The [poker card="kd"] turn gave Schulman a few more outs to the straight but the [poker card="8s"] river was no help the PokerGO commentator. Schulman finished in fifth place for $120,000, his second recorded cash of 2019. Even though he had just busted Schulman, Tiltson wasn’t long for this final table. Kenney, having both blinds covered, open-shoved from the button with [poker card="3s"][poker card="3c"]. Tilston, in the big blind, ended up making the call with [poker card="as"][poker card="jc"], putting his tournament at stake. The flop came [poker card="2c"][poker card="ts"][poker card="kc"] providing Tilston some additional gutshot outs but the [poker card="7d"] fell on the turn and the [poker card="td"] on the river, giving the hand to Kenney's pocket threes. Tilston bowed out in fourth place for $150,000. It marks his fifth lifetime cash at the USPO. Ben Yu, who entered the day as the final table chip leader, clashed with Kenney in a huge hand which, in the end, left Yu crippled. Only a few hands after that confrontation, Kenney finished the job. Yu, with less than three big blinds, stuck it in from the small blind with [poker card="td"][poker card="6d"] and Kenney snap called holding the [poker card="qs"][poker card="js"]. The board ran out [poker card="3c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="kh"][poker card="as"][poker card="9s"] giving Kenney the flush and ending Yu’s run in third place. Yu picked up $210,000 for his efforts, his third cash of the 2019 USPO series. Kenney held a massive chip lead headed into heads up play, but Schindler started chipping away at it by winning the first few hands. However, as he had for the entirety of this brief final table, Kenney ended up on top in the most important hand. Kenney limped the button with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"] and Schindler shipped his [poker card="ac"][poker card="7d"] which Kenney quickly called. The flop [poker card="2d"][poker card="9c"][poker card="kh"] flop put Kenney in the lead. The turn came the [poker card="2h"] and the river the [poker card="8s"] securing the win for Kenney and providing Schindler the runner-up result and $300,000 in prize money. Kenney, the Aussie Millions Main Event winner, takes home $450,000 for the victory, sending his lifetime career live earnings north of $27,000,000. The final table for Event #8: $25,000 8 Game Mix takes place on Thursday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/21/19 Event #8: $25,000 8-Game 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 8 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  15. Back in September, Ali Imsirovic put on a bit of a show on his way to winning the 2018 Poker Masters Purple Jacket. On Monday night, the 24-year-old eliminated his final three opponents over a 20-minute span to win the $25,000 No-Limit Hold'em event at the 2019 US Poker Open. Final Table Payouts 1. Ali Imsirovic - $442,500 2. Cary Katz - $295,000 3. Dan Shak - $206,500 4. Nick Petrangelo - $147,500 5. Kristen Bicknell - $118,000 6. Joseph Cappello - $88,500 Joseph Cappello started the final table with three big blinds. An early double up was of little help though. Nick Petrangelo raised from under the gun to 60,000 with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="jc"] before Cappello moved all in for 175,000 from the small blind with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="kh"]. Petrangelo called and then Cappello watched the [poker card="qh"][poker card="ts"][poker card="7h"][poker card="kc"][poker card="as"] runout give Petrangelo a straight to eliminate him in sixth place. With the short stack out of the way, five-handed play continued for an hour before the next elimination. Action folded to Kristen Bicknell on the button and she moved all in for 755,000 with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"] before Dan Shak moved all in over the top with the [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"] and Imsirovic folded his big blind. The [poker card="6h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3s"] flop kept Shak ahead and after the [poker card="kd"] turn and [poker card="td"] river, Bicknell was out in fifth. It was at this point that Imsirovic went to work. From the button, Imsirovic raised to 120,000 with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="as"], Cary Katz folded his small blind and Petrangelo moved all in for 1,160,000 with the [poker card="jc"][poker card="js"]. Imsirovic snap-called. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="jd"][poker card="6d"] flop gave both players a set and the [poker card="3s"] turn and [poker card="2c"] river couldn't save Petrangelo from a fourth-place finish. Five minutes later, Imsirovic had another victim. From under the gun, Imsirovic raised to 125,000 with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="3d"] and Shak called from the small blind with the [poker card="9d"][poker card="8s"]. The flop came [poker card="9s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2s"] and Shak check-called a bet of 75,000 from Imsirovic. The turn was the [poker card="3h"] and Shak bet 150,000. Imsirovic raised to 550,000 and Shak responded by moving all in for 192,000. The river was the [poker card="tc"] and Shak was out in third. As heads-up play began, Imsirovic had a 10-1 lead over Katz and it took less than 10 minutes for Imsirovic to end it. On the final hand, Imsirovic raised to 180,000 and Katz called. After the [poker card="qs"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2c"] flop, Katz check-raised all in for 1,107,000 and Imsirovic called. Katz turned over the [poker card="kc"][poker card="5c"] for a flush draw and Imsirovic showed the [poker card="9c"][poker card="6s"] for middle pair. The [poker card="5d"] turn paired Katz but the [poker card="8h"] river wasn't enough to save him from a runner-up finish and give Imsirovic the title. USPO Top 10 After Event #5 PLAYER CASHES PRIZE MONEY POINTS 1. Sean Winter 4 $419,400 440 2. Stephen Chidwick 3 $354,950 340 3. Jordan Cristos 2 $206,200 240 4. Ali Imsirovic 1 $442,500 200 5. Cary Katz 2 $346,200 200 6. Lauren Roberts 1 $218,400 200 7. Manig Loeser 2 $146,200 180 8. Dan Shak 2 $232,100 140 9. Koray Aldemir 1 $159,250 140 10. David Peters 1 $100,800 140   The final table for Event #5: $10,000 No-Limit Hold’em will take place on Monday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/14/19 Event #1: #10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/15/19 Event #2: #10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/16/19 Event #3: $10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/17/19 Event #4: $10,000 Short Deck 5 p.m. 02/18/19 Event #5: $25,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/19/19 Event #6: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/20/19 Event #7: $25,000 No Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #8: $25,000 8-Game 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 8 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  16. The 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure is in the books, with notable victories coming from Ramon Colillas in the PokerStars Players NL Hold'em Championship, David 'Chino' Rheem in the PCA Main Event, Sam Greenwood in the PCA $100,000 Super High Roller, and Martin Zamani in the PCA $25,000 High Roller. Each of those players earned mammoth payouts from their victories, but where do they stack up on the 2019 money leaderboard? Let’s take a look. The $25,000 buy-in PSPC was such an enormous tournament that the top three finishers from that event make up the top three spots on the 2019 PCA money list, with Colillas on top thanks to the huge $5.1 million score he earned. Runner-up in that event, Julien Martini, sits second on the list, and third-place finisher Marc Rivera is third on the list. Here are the top 25 money earners from the 2019 PCA festival. Top 25 2019 PCA Money List 1. Ramon Colillas - $5,102,100 2. Julien Martini - $2,974,000 3. Marc Rivera - $2,168,000 4. Sam Greenwood - $1,954,860 5. Scott Baumstein - $1,657,000 6. David 'Chino' Rheem - $1,576,200 7. Jason Koonce - $1,304,000 8. Henrik Hecklen - $1,284,260 9. Rainer Kempe - $1,202,760 10. Jesus Cortes - $1,153,440 11. Stephen Chidwick - $1,084,322 12. Marc Perrault - $1,040,520 13. Talal Shakerchi - $994,300 14. Daniel Strelitz - $964,020 15. Alex Foxen - $904,040 16. Martin Zamani - $895,110 17. Farid Jattin - $746,000 18. Igor Kurganov - $697,100 19. Sean Winter - $673,120 20. Scott Wellenbach - $671,240 21. Chris Hunichen - $627,340 22. Steffen Sontheimer - $623,220 23. Dominik Nitsche - $606,360 24. Pavel Veksler - $560,240 25. Justin Bonomo - $533,370 As you can see, Greenwood sits fourth after having won $1.954 million from the 2019 PCA series. Greenwood's big win was in the $100,000 Super High Roller when he scored a $1.775 million first-place prize, but he also added scores of $89,320, $69,100, and $20,980 to his bankroll. Greenwood was one of 21 players to cash at least four times at the 2019 PCA. Another player to cash four times was the player 18th on the 2019 PCA money leaderboard, Igor Kurganov. He banked scores of $378,760, $129,780, $121,040, and $67,450 for a total of $697,100. The largest of those four scores was a sixth-place finish in the $100,000 Super High Roller that Greenwood was victorious in. Other than Greenwood and Kurganov, no player cashed four times in the top 25. Several players in the top 25 cashed three times, though, in addition to Greenwood and Kurganov, of course. Those players were Rainer Kempe, Jesus Cortes, Stephen Chidwick, Daniel Strelitz, Alex Foxen, Sean Winter, and Steffan Sontheimer. Kempe won the most money of that bunch with more than $1.2 million in payouts. He placed fourth in a $25,000 no-limit hold’em event before he won a $50,000 no-limit hold’em event and a $10,200 no-limit hold’em knockout turbo. The $50,000 buy-in tournament that Kempe won earned him $908,000. Foxen doesn't appear that he's going to slow down after an epic 2018 saw him haul in more than $6.6 million in live tournament earnings. Foxen has already won more than $900,000 in 2019 thanks to his performances at the 2019 PCA. He placed 11th in a $25,000 buy-in event, second in the $50,000 event that Kempe won, and third in another $50,000 buy-in tournament. Foxen's three scores were for $45,020, $651,980, and $207,040 in those three events, respectively. Four players cashed five times each at the 2019 PCA, but none of them ranked higher than 75th on the 2019 PCA money list. Sitting in 75th overall with a total of $136,460 won was Ariel Celestino. Daniel Tang, Sean Legendre, and Fernand Dos Santos Ferreira were the others to cash five times during the 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure tournament series. How did the 2019 PCA change the festival's all-time money list? With a little help from our friends at HendonMob.com, here’s a look at the new top 25 following the completion of the 2019 PCA. Top 25 PCA All-Time Money List 1. Bryn Kenney - $6,262,731 2. Ramon Colillas - $5,102,100 3. Steve O'Dwyer - $3,910,382 4. Tony Gregg - $3,183,095 5. Poorya Nazari - $3,000,000 6. Julien Martini - $2,974,000 7. Scott Seiver - $2,970,620 8. Sam Greenwood - $2,927,337 9. Galen Hall - $2,877,080 10. Vanessa Selbst - $2,824,640 11. Jason Koon - $2,645,595 12. Isaac Haxton - $2,583,616 13. Justin Bonomo - $2,524,742 14. Bertrand 'ElkY' Grospellier - $2,484,120 15. Daniel Negreanu - $2,348,097 16. Harrison Gimbel - $2,329,220 17. Dan Shak - $2,323,840 18. Byron Kaverman - $2,307,235 19. Cary Katz - $2,257,420 20. Marc Rivera - $2,168,000 21. Mustapha Kanit - $2,077,000 22. Dimitar Danchev - $1,985,000 23. John Dibella - $1,960,700 24. Daniel Dvoress - $1,946,102 25. Tyler Reiman - $1,937,770 As you can see, Bryn Kenney reigns supreme. He came into the 2019 PCA with a big lead on this list, thanks to $6.245 million in earnings from the PCA, and Kenney added a small cash by his standards of $17,620 to move up to $6.262 million. The most notable additions to the top 25 of the PCA all-time money list were three players we already talked about, Colillas, Martini, and Rivera. Those three finished first, second, and third in the 2019 PSPC. Colillas moved to second on PCA's all-time money list, Martini jumped to sixth, and Rivera went up to 20th. Another big jump was had by Greenwood, who entered the 2019 PCA with $972,477 in earnings from the series. After winning nearly $2 million this year, Greenwood shot up the all-time PCA leaderboard to eighth with nearly $3 million in earnings total from the event. Justin Bonomo also increased his standing, going from 17th to 13th on the all-time PCA list after winning $533,370 at the 2019 PCA. Notable departures from the top 5 PCA all-time money list were Christopher Oliver, Eugene Katchalov, Will Molson, and Nick Petrangelo.
  17. I would like nothing more than to see the game of poker and this industry thrive unimaginably. I also believe the Global Poker Awards, which were previously two distinctions, the American Poker Awards and European Poker Awards, are good for the industry. That belief is becoming less and less so each year. I've always touted the importance of this ceremony to celebrate the industry and accomplishments within. Quite honestly, it's getting to the point where one could make the argument the awards aren't good for poker because some of the nominees and even some of the categories are so far off the mark. If you're like me and believe the awards can help push poker in the right direction, then we're going to need to change how we do things and try a bit harder. I'm well aware the Global Poker Awards aren't going to spark the next poker boom, but they're a piece of the puzzle that can increase the industry's legitimacy. For an industry that is constantly clawing and scratching for every inch of legitimacy it can get, this is important. When the nomination list goes out, do those that receive it take the adequate time to best make their selections? The answer to that question can't possibly be yes. I've talked to enough people to surmise that there's too many with representative votes who aren't holding up their end of the bargain. Of course, this is a shared responsibility between the Global Poker Index and those on the nomination panel. The GPI needs to put standard over inclusion, but ultimately, most of the nomination panel isn't putting in the time and effort the privilege should require. The nomination panel isn't helping if, every single year when it's time for the awards, too many are half-assing it through the process, voting for friends and co-workers simply because of relationship, and not putting in the time it takes to make the best decisions. It's kind of like poker in a lot of ways. Are the voters in it to simply splash around a little in the game and be considered a "known" person in the industry, or do they want to actually put in the effort it takes for this to mean something? Improve the Process This year's nomination panel was pegged at more than 130 members, according to the GPI. That's too many by about 120. I get it, the awards are now global so you're going to need a greater representation from across the globe, but the lobbying for friends and coworkers is blatantly obvious and the lack of knowledge is highly evident. This is where the GPI needs to step in and make a change. Again, we need to emphasize that the awards are a standard of achievement, not a popular participation trophy. Instead of having a huge nomination panel, form a committee and give them real responsibilities. I'd suggest a committee of 10-12 people, and I'd make it an interview process for a person to be accepted to the committee. We can start by having each media outlet nominate one person to possibly be on the committee. Poker media members should, in theory, be the ones with the best grasp on all things poker across the globe. We should want those with the most expansive knowledge on the committee, but we'll certainly need to vet them. Each person nominated to be a part of the committee would be interviewed by the GPI and either accepted or refused. Think of it like a job interview and the GPI is hiring, just for a gig with no pay. If you'd like to be on the committee but having to go through an interview process is something that you balk at, you're not someone who deserves to have representative votes. Of course, we would have to trust that the GPI would pick the best individuals for the committee. I would also suggest that if this is a route taken, the GPI consider a relevancy factor with each committee member and candidate. Meaning, the person must still have relevancy within the industry. Another requirement for being on the committee would be that you absolutely must be present for all meetings, and for the final committee gathering to determine the award winners. There would be several rounds of discussion and voting. Again, this speaks to one's level of commitment. Part of the problem with how it's done now is that you have more than 130 members on the nomination panel who determine the finalists and then a much smaller group of about 10 hand-picked jury members who determine the winners. The way it is, the jury is left to pick from the bunch they're given, rather than go through a few rounds of discussion, vetting, and voting to determine the best winner. Look at what happened a couple of years ago with Breakout Player of the Year. Nick Petrangelo arguably should've won Breakout Player of the Year for 2015, but he didn't even make the list of finalists. Having a committee of the same people who go through the process from start to finish would pay big dividends here. The committee wouldn't, and shouldn't, be all media, though. I would suggest including players or general industry members, but ones that aren't strongly tied to one organization. Again, each candidate would need to be vetted and accepted. With general industry members, it can be difficult for a person working for one organization on a daily basis to have the required knowledge outside of their organization. Not that this is their fault, it's just the nature of how things work. Each year, I would repeat this entire process, giving seniority, based on performance, to those on the committee the year before. I'd also suggest having alternates on standby should anything extreme cause need for a replacement on the committee. Alternates would go through a similar process as other committee members. Better Categories These are the poker awards, right? Why aren’t we giving out an award for Online Poker Operator of the Year, Live Poker Operator of the Year, or Poker Media Outlet of the Year? It seems silly to not award those. The Tournament Performance of the Year award has to go. If we keep it, can we all just agree to award it to the WSOP Main Event champion every year? There is no greater tournament performance each year than grinding through that monstrosity of a poker tournament, competing against really good players in the best-structured tournament in the world for a massive amount of time. Remove Moment of the Year. Half of the things that get listed here aren't "moments" and this award blends too much with Tournament Performance of the Year. In its place, I'd suggest we add in Hand of the Year. In the current digital age and the age of social media, so many great hands see the light of day in consumable content. The content is also easily shareable, which helps promote the awards and generate buzz. Hand of the Year is also a great way to add in a fan vote. Ditch Poker Journalist of the Year. I'd suggest we go back to Media Person of the Year, if anything, and then if we want to further celebrate the media, we do so with individual awards such as Photo of the Year, Story of the Year, and Feature Video of the Year. There are enough great pieces of content to fill these respective categories. Industry Person of the Year needs a new name. I understand what's meant to be done with this award, but doesn’t "industry" implies anyone in the industry can win? Rename this to represent what it is really meant to do, Poker Executive of the Year. With Breakout Player of the Year, the GPI could implement a "breakout factor" for each player to help everyone out. I doubt everyone with a vote is grinding through Hendon Mob. The GPI knows how much a player climbs in the GPI from year to year and the award can be more on-brand if that's what the nominations are based on. Start Earlier Whatever causes these awards to become a thing a month before they happen needs to stop. Give everyone more time to think about the awards, dive into researching what should win and what shouldn't, and pump up the various elements such as the content pieces, tournament performances, and players. We also need to move the awards so that they take place earlier in the year. The awards this year aren't taking place until early April. That's the fourth month of the year. People can't remember what happened last week, let alone 4-16 months ago. The awards being held closer to the start of the year would keep the previous year, which is what we're supposed to be celebrating, fresher in everyone's minds. If the awards are going to be partnered with Poker Central and PokerGO for future years, it seems like a no-brainer to hold the awards would be at the front or back end of the US Poker Open that takes place at the beginning of February. PokerGO could host the awards in the PokerGO Studio either the day before or the day after the US Poker Open festival. If it's before, there's additional content to showcase during the festival. If it's after, you can spend the week hyping up the awards to generate a larger audience for them. Or, maybe we could just hand out participation ribbons ever year? The views and opinions expressed in this Op-Ed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of PocketFives or other staff.
  18. The first gold bracelet won every summer at the World Series of Poker is always a special one. For the winner, it’s an unbelievable thrill, a tone setter, a bankroll booster, and a stress reliever all at once. For the media and fans, it’s the first of many headline-grabbing triumphs. For other competitors, it represents that there is gold at the end of the long rainbow. All of those things are great, but does success beget further success? Here’s a look at how the first gold bracelet winner of the summer has performed throughout the rest of the WSOP. For this article, PocketFives examined the results of the first winner of an individual open gold bracelet event going back to 2004. This time period can be commonly referred to as the "modern poker era." 2004: James Vogl At the 2004 WSOP, James Vogl topped a field of 834 entries to win the $2,000 No Limit Hold’em event for $400,000. Vogl would go on to cash twice more that summer, but the scores were much smaller than his victory. Vogl finished 27th in the $5,000 No Limit Hold’em event for $7,160 and 12th in the $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event for $12,660. 2005: Allen Cunningham Five-time gold bracelet winner Allen Cunningham was the winner of the first bracelet in 2005. Not only was his victory a big one, as Cunningham won the 2,305-entry $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event for $725,405, but it ignited quite the summer for the seasoned professional. After the opening win, Cunningham cashed four more times, and each of the additional cashes came in $5,000 buy-in events. First, he took fourth in the $5,000 Pot Limit Hold’em and fourth in the $5,000 Pot Limit Omaha events for $89,865 and $141,245, respectively. Cunningham then placed 29th in the $5,000 Six-Max No Limit Hold’em for $8,490 and seventh in the $5,000 Omaha Hi-Lo for $42,110. All told, Cunningham earned $281,710 after his opening win that summer. Cunningham’s performances were enough to win him the 2005 WSOP Player of the Year award. 2006: Brandon Cantu After Brandon Cantu won the opening $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event for $757,839, he didn’t cash for the rest of the 2006 WSOP. 2007: Steve Billirakis Like Cunningham, Steve Billirakis opened with a win and then earned four cashes afterwards. His opening win was worth $536,287 after Billirakis topped a field of 451 entries in the $5,000 Limit/No Limit Hold’em tournament. He then scored 45th-, 29th-, 16th-, and 33rd-place finishes in future events. Whereas Cunningham won nearly $300,000 in additional prize money, Billirakis’ four other cashes only totaled $57,458. That’s not bad, but it’s not nearly the year Cunningham had. 2008: Nenad Medic Nenad Medic opened the 2008 WSOP with a bang, scoring first place in the stacked $10,000 Pot Limit Hold’em tournament for $794,112. Medic only cashed once more that summer, taking 24th in the $1,000 No Limit Hold’em for $16,496. 2009: Thang Luu Not only did Thang Luu kick off the 2009 WSOP by winning the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Low tournament for his second gold bracelet, but he did so after winning the same event the previous year. In 2009, Luu’s win was worth $263,190. After this, Luu cashed just once for $8,983. 2010: Michael Mizrachi The year 2010 was a banner year for Michael Mizrachi at the WSOP. He opened things up in enormous fashion by winning the famed $50,000 Poker Players Championship for $1.559 million. Mizrachi then put together quite an impressive string of four more cashes and was challenging for the WSOP Player of the Year award that ultimately fell to Frank Kassela. Additional scores were had that year by Mizrachi when he took sixth in the $10,000 Seven-Card Stud Championship for $68,949, eighth in the $10,000 Limit Hold’em Championship for $49,732, and 26th in the $2,500 Mixed for $6,324. Mizrachi wasn’t done there, either. He reached the final table of the WSOP Main Event and scored fifth place for a whopping $2.332 million. 2011: Jake Cody After Jake Cody opened the 2011 WSOP by winning the $25,000 Heads-Up Championship for $851,192, he only cashed twice that summer and both were for less than $20,000. Cody did, however, place seventh in the 2011 WSOP Europe Main Event for €150,000 ($200,379). 2012: Brent Hanks Brent Hanks won the $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event to kick off the 2012 WSOP. That event drew 2,101 entries and Hanks scored $517,725. Hanks’ only other cash that summer at the WSOP was a 282nd-place finish in the WSOP Main Event for $38,453. 2013: Trevor Pope The opening to the 2013 summer was a big one for Trevor Pope, as he scored first place in the $5,000 No Limit Hold’em event for $553,906. Pope came to the final table with an incredibly large chip lead and rode it all the way to the winner’s circle. After that, Pope cooled off and only cashed two more times. He finished 48th in the $2,500 Four-Max No Limit Hold’em for $5,253 and 13th in the $5,000 Six-Max Pot Limit Hold’em for $19,646. 2014: Vanessa Selbst Vanessa Selbst scored a big victory to open the 2014 WSOP when she won the $25,000 Mixed-Max No Limit Hold’em to the tune of $871,148. Following her opening win that summer, Selbst only cashed once more. Her second cash was a 38th-place finish in the $2,500 Omaha Hi-Lo/Seven-Card Stud Hi-Lo worth $5,517. 2015: Nick Petrangelo Nick Petrangelo had a great 2015. It was his first breakout year that saw him win more than $3.4 million on the live felt. Included in that was a $201,812 gold bracelet victory at the World Series of Poker. Petrangelo won the first piece of jewelry that summer by taking down the $3,000 No Limit Hold’em Shootout atop 308 entries. Despite his big year and first gold bracelet win, not much materialized for Petrangelo over the remaining WSOP events that year. In Las Vegas, he cashed in the $10,000 Main Event for $17,282, and then he took 26th in the €3,250 No Limit Hold’em event at WSOP Europe for €6,035 ($6,863). 2016: Kyle Julius Like Cunningham, Billirakis, and Mizrachi, Kyle Julius, winner of the first gold bracelet in the summer of 2016, cashed four additional times following his trip to victory lane. Julius opened the summer with a win in the $1,000 Top Up Turbo No Limit Hold’em for $142,972. He then record small cashes in the Colossus and $1,500 No Limit Hold’em before returning to a top-10 result in the $5,000 Turbo No Limit Hold’em. In that event, Julius took ninth from a field of 524 entries and won $35,636. That summer, Julius would also take 21st in the $111,111 High Roller for One Drop to add $187,576 to his bankroll. 2017: Upeshka De Silva Upeshka De Silva stormed out of the gate in 2017 with a victory in the $3,000 No Limit Hold’em Shootout for $229,923. He then put together four more cashes - just like Cunningham, Billirakis, Mizrachi, and Julius did in prior years - but De Silva couldn’t quite make it back to a WSOP final table that summer. He did place 30th in the 1,759-entry $2,620 Marathon tournament for $17,491, but that was De Silva’s deepest run outside of his opening gold bracelet win. 2018: Elio Fox In 2018, it was Elio Fox, winner of the 2011 WSOP Europe Main Event, who took the first gold bracelet of the summer. Fox won the $10,000 Turbo No Limit Hold’em event for $393,693. From there, Fox would put together a decent list of three more cashes. He took second in the $100,000 High Roller for $1.798 million, finished 92nd in the $1,500 Millionaire Maker for $8,976, and took ninth in the $50,000 High Roller for $139,699. $357,937 Won and 2.4 Cashes On Average Looking at the whole of it all, the first gold bracelet winners each summer, going back to 2004, averaged $357,937 won and 2.4 cashes that same summer following the gold bracelet win. None of these players were about to earn a second gold bracelet in that same summer, but some did come close by returning to a WSOP final table. Those to perform the latter were Cunningham in 2005, Mizrachi in 2010, Cody in 2011 if you count WSOP Europe, Julius in 2016, and Fox in 2018. Both Cunningham and Mizrachi made it back to three final tables following their opening win. In total, players to win the opening gold bracelet of the summer cashed 36 additional times at the WSOP that year, again that’s if you include WSOP Europe. Of those 36 cashes, six were worth more than six figures and two were in the seven figures. Three times a player landed a score for more than the gold bracelet win, too. Those three times came with Mizrachi in 2010, Julius in 2016, and Fox in 2018. What Does This Mean for Brian Green? The question now is, what does this all mean for Brian Green? He won the first gold bracelet at the 50th annual 2019 World Series of Poker when he topped a field of 204 entries in the $10,000 No Limit Hold’em Super Turbo Bounty event. Green won $345,669. Green now has 25 WSOP cashes. A few times, he put together a nice handful of in-the-money finishes during the summer, so we’ll likely see a fair amount of volume from him given his successful start to the 2019 WSOP. In 2014 and 2015, Green cashed five times each summer at the WSOP. In 2016, he cashed four times. Although he failed to record a WSOP cash in 2017, Green added four more trips to the money in 2018. He frequents the higher buy-in No Limit Hold’em events a lot, so if he makes any additional noise in 2019 it will likely come from one of those tournaments. If we were to take a guess as to how Green will do for the remainder of the 2019 WSOP, we’d say he’ll land three or four more cashes and that there’s a high probability one of those is a score in the six figures.
  19. "I need to win one of these now." Those were the words from Ben Heath in an interview at the beginning of May following his fourth-place finish in the EPT Monte Carlo €50,000 High Roller. At the time, the €298,240 ($333,013) he won for that result was the second largest in his live poker career and his comment was referencing that he's been close in big events and it's time to finally break through. Well, he got that breakthrough when he won the 2019 World Series of Poker $50,000 High Roller for a career-best $1.484 million. "The first three days I think I played really well, a few mistakes," Heath said in the moments after the win. "Today, definitely one or two mistakes but it just happens, I guess. Overall, I’m very happy. Compared to the last four years of my career, there’s a lot fewer mistakes than I’m used to." Coming into the final table, Heath had the chip lead with a stack of 7.63 million. He was only slightly ahead of Sam Soverel, but with Heath’s demeanor, you’d never know one way or another if his emotions were getting the best of him. Heath is a very centered and calm player, but even though he couldn’t fight off the smile the beamed from his face as he described how he felt at the final table. "I wasn’t sure at the start, because I had the exact same chips as Sam,” Heath said. “Then, I think at around one point I had around 16 million and dipped to 8 million four-handed and it was kind of tough to feel like it’s not slipping then. But then it just turned back around." He admitted to only having slept two and a half hours the night before and that he hadn’t slept much all tournament. The young Brit couldn’t pin the reason on jet lag, though, as he mentioned he was only coming over to Las Vegas from Montreal and not all the way across the pond. Armed with adrenaline and coffee and forced to play under the bright lights of the Amazon Room feature table that could keep anyone awake, Heath powered through and found his way to the winner’s circle. "I think it’s mainly the tournament," Heath said of his lack of sleep. "I only came from Montreal and I was surprised there was any jet lag, but there was for three days. Then, on the third day, when I expected it to end, I remembered from my Aussie Millions run that I only slept three hours the night before. I think I’m just not good at sleeping. I just had a lot of coffee today and probably won’t sleep for a while now." Not only did Heath have to fight off a lack of sleep, but he had to do it against some very tough competition. Andrew Lichtenberger was the player Heath had to defeat in heads-up play, and the final six also included the aforementioned Soverel along with Dmitry Yurasov, Nick Petrangelo, and Chance Kornuth. Heath's five opponents in the final six have more than $46 million in live tournament earnings Back in 2017, Heath took second in the Aussie Millions Main Event for a score of A$1 million ($755,229). Up until now, that score was the largest of his live tournament career. It's now taken a back seat to this mammoth gold bracelet victory. After he finished his post-win photos and interviews, Heath jumped in the $5,000 No-Limit Hold'em and bagged a stack for Day 2. No sleep, no problem.
  20. The 2019 Triton Super High Roller Series London kicks off this week with the biggest buy-in in tournament poker history as the highlight. Deemed the Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity, the event has a gargantuan £1,050,000 buy-in, of which £1,000,000 goes to the prize pool and £50,000 goes towards charitable causes. The Triton Million takes place at London Hilton on Park Lane and is sponsored by partypoker LIVE. It is scheduled as a three-day event from August 1-3. Charitable causes to benefit include Caring For Children Foundation, R.E.G., Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity, and One Drop. Triton Million Provides Unique Twist The Triton Million has a freezeout format with a rather unique twist to it. It’s invite-only. Invited players were issued invitations from a committee, and these players are of the recreational or businessman or woman variety. Those fortunate enough to receive invitations can then issue one invitation of their own to a guest player. The guest player can be a professional poker player. This allows for the field to be at least a 50% businessmen. For the first six hours of tournament play, the two player pools will be separated, such that the recreational/businessmen and women compete against one another and the guests/professionals play against one another. Furthermore, players will be asked to dress in formal attire for the final table. The Triton Million field has 25 businessmen signed up. Let’s take a look at them. Paul Phua [caption id="attachment_625843" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Paul Phua (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Paul Phua has been around the ultra high-stakes poker scene for nearly a decade now, amassing more than $11,400,000 in live tournament earnings and cashing in some of the richest poker events in the world. He has two victories on record, first in the Aspers £100,000 High Roller in 2012 for £1,000,000 ($1,621,297) and second in the Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza €100,000 High Roller for €752,700 ($825,619). As for his business exploits that have earned him a fortune, Phua has been a well-known junket operator for some of the world’s richest and he’s been in the news as the "world's biggest bookie," having his Caesars Palace villa raided in July 2014 for running an illegal gambling operation. The raid came just about a month after Phua was arrested in Macau under similar charges. Phua's guest player for the Triton Million is Tom Dwan. Cary Katz [caption id="attachment_625842" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Cary Katz (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Cary Katz is the man atop the Poker Central organizational chart, having founded the company in 2015. Prior to that, he was founder and CEO of one of the largest student loan companies in the United States. On the felt, Katz has nearly $20,000,000 in live tournament earnings, including a career-best score of €1,750,000 ($1,929,203) when he finished fifth in the 2016 Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza €1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. In January 2018, Katz won the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $100,000 Super High Roller to the tune of $1,492,340, and he placed eighth in the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop for $1,306,667. Katz's guest player for the Triton Million is Bryn Kenney. Rob Yong [caption id="attachment_625844" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Rob Yong (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Rob Yong is the owner of Dusk Till Dawn Poker & Casino in Nottingham, UK. Under Yong’s watchful eye, Dusk Till Dawn was built into what is considered to be one of the best card rooms in the world, with top-tier brands such as the World Series of Poker, World Poker Tour, partypoker, and UK & Ireland Poker Tour holding events there. Yong is now heavily involved with partypoker and partypoker LIVE, helping to grow these two brands in the online and live realms, respectively. Although his live tournament results amount to only a little more than $330,000, Yong has been a regular at some of the highest stakes in the world, specifically when it comes to cash games. At the table, he’s an entertaining competitor who doesn’t shy away from risk and will liven up any game. Yong's guest player for the Triton Million is Sam Trickett. Talal Shakerchi [caption id="attachment_625845" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Talal Shakerchi (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Talal Shakerchi is a player from the recreational/businessmen category that could likely fit into the professional poker player category. He doesn’t have the most live tournament earnings, with more than $7,300,000 won in his career, but make no mistake about it, Shakerchi is a grinder. For quite some time, Shakerchi kept his online poker name a secret so others in the high-stakes community wouldn’t realize his ability or the amount of volume he was putting in. On the business side, Shakerchi is an investment manager, running Meditor Capital Management Limited, which he founded. Shakerchi's guest player for the Triton Million is Igor Kurganov. Antanas 'Tony G' Guoga [caption id="attachment_625841" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Antanas 'Tony G' Guoga (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Antanas Guoga, who is best known as 'Tony G' in the poker world, is another player listed in the recreational/businessmen category that could very well be considered a professional poker player. At least that’s what he used to be. Now a politician and Lithuanian Member of the European Parliament, Guoga is rarely seen on the poker scene these days. He is the founder of PokerNews.com and TonyBet. Guoga boasts more than $6,000,000 in live tournament earnings and became famous for his brash table talk. His biggest cash came at the European Poker Tour Grand Final €25,500 High Roller in 2009, when he took third for €420,000 ($552,239). He won the 2005 European Poker Championships Main Event for £260,000 ($456,822) and placed second in the World Poker Tour €10,000 Grand Prix de Paris for €339,930 ($414,478) in 2004. Guoga's guest player for the Triton Million is Fedor Holz. Additional Triton Million players from the recreational/businessmen category are listed below, with their guest players in parentheses. Richard Yong (Dan Cates) Stanley Choi (David Peters) Wai Kin Yong (Rui Cao) Bobby Baldwin (Jason Koon) Liang Yu (Mikita Badziakouski) Ivan Leow (Timofey Kuznetsov) Alfred DeCarolis (Stephen Chidwick) Chin Wei Lim (Wai Leong Chan) Chow Hing Yaung (Christoph Vogelsang) Pat Madden (Nick Petrangelo) Sosia Jiang (Sam Greenwood) Qiang Wang (Elton Tsang) Zang Shu Nu (Tan Xuan) Leon Tsoukernik (Martin Kabrhel) Orpen Kisacikoglu (Matthias Eibinger) Ferdinand Putra (Justin Bonomo) Rick Salomon (Vivek Rajkumar) Bill Perkins (Dan Smith) Winfred Yu (Danny Tang) Andrew Pantling (Andrew Robl) Ben Wu (Michael Soyza) How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  21. Seven days ago, Michael Addamo was sitting on top of the world after winning over $600,000 and a pair of partypoker High Roller Club titles. On Sunday, Addamo had a chance to pick up a second consecutive partypoker High Roller Club Main Event title before he ran into Nick Petrangelo. Petrangelo outlasted 29 other runners and then beat Addamo heads-up to win the Main Event and earned $356,500. Addamo had to settle for the runner-up score of $217,000. Isaac Haxton defeated former #1-ranked Niklas Astedt in the partypoker High Roller Club Mix-Max 2nd Chance event to bank $184,000. Astedt, who has over $20,000,000 in online poker earnings, added $117,734.70 to that total for his second-place result. The PokerStars Sunday Million was up to 12,860 runners this week, an increase of 1,315 over last week, to build a total prize pool of $1,286,000. The final two players chopped up a little more than $220,000. Eventual champ 'c0rl30n3_89' took home $118,981.31 while runner-up 'fcb-serv' squeaked out a six-figure score, earning $101,074.92. Third place went to 'eValiukas' for $67,153.11. Ivan 'Negriin' Luca defeated Simon 'IgorKarkarof' Rønnow heads-up in the PokerStars $5,200 High Roller event. Luca added $134,799.35 to his bankroll for the win while Rønnow earned $104,441.26. Rønnow had a bigger six-figure score after winning the partypoker High Roller Club The Big Game for $181,357.65. Daniel Dvoress finished in the silver medal position in that event for $130,302.04. The GGPoker GGMasters had 3,367 entries to fall $35,354 short of making the $500,000 guarantee. Swiss grinder 'Gogac1' outlasted all of them to win $71,947.50. Finishing one spot behind them, 'TeuCu' banked $50,874.60 and 'spicypigeon' rounded out the podium finishers to earn $35,973.80. PokerStars Sunday Million Buy-in: $109 Entries: 12,860 Prize pool: $1,286,000 c0rl30n3_89 - $118,981.31* fcb-serv - $101,074.92* eValiukas - $67,153.11 PokerStars High Roller Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 123 Prize pool: $615,00 Ivan 'Negriin' Luca - $134,799.35 IgorKarkarof - $104,441.26 needdollarz - $80,920.16 PokerStars Bounty Builder Buy-in: $109 Entries: 3,439 Prize pool: $343,900 IceStream - $20,998.57 + $12,186.45 in bounties woody1234321 - $20,995.62 + $6,553.83 in bounties Skammes - $12,151.99 + $2,652.67 in bounties partypoker High Roller Club Main Event Buy-in: $25,500 Entries: 31 Prize pool: $775,000 Nick Petrangelo - $356,500 Michael Addamo - $217,000 Christoph Vogelsang - $139,500 partypoker High Roller Club Mix-Max 2nd Chance Buy-in: $10,300 Entries: 46 Prize pool: $460,000 Isaac Haxton - $184,000 Niklas Astedt - $117,734.70 Juan Pardo Dominguez - $59,800 partypoker High Roller Club The Big Game Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 161 Prize pool: $819,509.70 Simon Rønnow Pedersen - $181,357.65 Daniel Dvoress - $130,302.04 Bujtás László - $95,063.12 GGPoker GGMasters Buy-in: $150 Entries: 3,367 Prize pool: $500,000 ($35,354 overlay) Gogac1 - $71,947.50 TeuCu - $50,874.60 spicypigeon - $35,973.80 GGPoker High Roller Blade Mulligan Buy-in: $5,000 Entries: 119 Prize pool: $565,250 IAmZeCaptainNow - $123,894.89 Corey Burbick - $94,245.09 PascalHartmann - $71,690.99
  22. American high-stakes tournament pro Nick Petrangelo turned in a stellar performance at the final table of the World Poker Tour Online 6-Max Championship to capture his first WPT title and the $494,550 first-place prize. Even though the tournament was 6-Max, there were seven players left when the final day got underway. Final table chip leader Artisom Prostak wasted little time in thinning the field when roughly fifteen minutes into the start of the day he cracked the pocket kings of Jake Schindler, sending him home in seventh place for $70,200. The UK’s Elior Sion started the final table second in chips. However, after a series of pre-flop clashes where he found himself holding a dominated pocket pair, Sion quickly found himself on the short stack. It wasn’t long before he made a move and shipped his final six big blinds under the gun and was quickly called by Jiachen Gong on the button holding [poker card="jh"][poker card="jd"]. The flop [poker card="js"][poker card="2c"][poker card="ks"] flop had Sion looking for running cards to overtake Gong’s set. The [poker card="qh"] could have been one of those cards, but the [poker card="5c"] closed the door and Sion fell in sixth place $93,630. Things were looking up for Gong who started the day extremely short and found a number of double-ups and, after eliminating, Sion, has amassed nearly 20 big blinds. But that all came to a sudden halt on the very next hand. From the cutoff, Gong put in a raise holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="ad"] only to be three-bet by Petrangelo on the button with his [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"]. Folded back to Gong he moved all-in and Petrangelo made the call. Gong was at risk, but well ahead until the [poker card="7h"][poker card="jc"][poker card="jh"] flop arrived. It was all over when the [poker card="js"] hit the turn and Petrangelo made quads. The [poker card="7c"] river was inconsequential and Gong’s promising start ended in fifth place $128,100. The UK’s Patrice Brandt was the next to exit. After losing a big hand which would have eliminated Russia’s Arsenii Karmatckii, Brandt was the new short stack. Prostak put in a raise from the button holding [poker card="8d"][poker card="8c"] and Brandt defended his big blind with [poker card="ah"][poker card="5d"]. Brandt check over the [poker card="ad"][poker card="6c"][poker card="jh"] flop and Prostak put out a small bet, which Brandt called with top pair. Everything changed when the [poker card="8h"] fell on the turn. Brandt checked again, Prostak, now with a set, put in a bet. Brandt tanked and eventually check-shipped his remaining stack drawing dead, which Prostak snapped off. The river was the [poker card="tc"] and Brandt fell in fourth place for $192,900. Prostak, who had lost the chip lead to Petrangelo, surged back into the lead. That lead grew larger when he collided with Karmatckii. In a three-handed blind versus blind confrontation, Karmatckii raised his [poker card="kc"][poker card="ah"] from the small blind and Prostak shipped his larger stack holding [poker card="jd"][poker card="jc"]. Karmatcki quickly made the call was flipping for his tournament life. The board ran out [poker card="7d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="6s"][poker card="9d"][poker card="5c"] giving Prostak the hand and sending the Russian out in third place for $278,448, just days after he finished as the runner-up in a World Series of Poker event. At the start of heads-up play, Prostak had a 3-1 chip lead and all the momentum on his side. However, Petrangelo who was sitting on just 20 big blinds for the better part of the first 30 minutes, held steady until the first break. After that, he picked up some key pots including a big-time bluff while never being all-in and at risk. Momentum had shifted to Petrangelo as he evened out the chip stacks after nearly an hour and a half into the heads-up battle. Prostak's stack dwindled down to ten big blinds but he battled back from the short stack for and retook the chip lead one final time. But in the end, it was Petrangelo’s day. He regained the lead just before the pair played the biggest hand of the entire tournament. Prostak raised the button with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qs"] and Petrangelo made the call holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"]. The flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="2s"][poker card="ts"] and Petrangelo checked his flopped trips over to Prostak who put out a small. Petrangelo put in a check-raise and Prostak opted to make the call. The turn came [poker card="5s"] giving Prostak some flush outs. Again Petrangelo put out a hefty bet, which Prostak again called. When the [poker card="ah"] hit the river, Petrangelo shipped and having made top pair, Prostak made the call which ended his tournament as the runner-up. Prostak turned a $320 satellite win into a $368,250 payday. Nick Petrangelo takes home $494,550 plus a $15,000 ticket to the WPT Tournament of Champions. Additionally, as the newest member of the WPT Champions Club, he will have his name engraved on the Mike Sexton Champions Cup. Final Table Results Nick Petrangelo - $494,550 Artisom Prostak - $368,250 Arsenii Karmatckii - $278,448 Patrice Brandt - $192.900 Jiachen Gong - $128,100 Elior Sion - $93,630 Jake Schindler - $70,200
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