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Found 14 results

  1. According to PokerNews, the real identities of three high-stakes online poker players have been confirmed. The news site said, "Macau high-stakes player Paul Phua is indeed MalACEsia, while Chun Lei Zhou (pictured) has stepped out as samrostan, the player formerly known as patpatpanda.'" Zhou, who admitted being the man behind two of the three high-stakes accounts, told PokerNews, "Yes, patpatpanda is me, samrostan is me. I played for a long time and lost some money. Then, I changed my account to samrostan." According to data from HighStakesDB, Zhou's samrostan account is down $6.2 million since the site began tracking it in 2011. Meanwhile, the patpatpanda account, which also belongs to Zhou, is down $2.6 million lifetime, according to HighStakesDB. As PokerNews put it, "Zhou is down more than $8.8 million" and holds the fourth and 12th biggest losing accounts ever. Despite being in the red, he told PokerNews that he's not deterred: "It's okay. Before, I only played No Limit Hold'em games. Sometimes no one played me, so I learned other ring games and lost a lot of money. I love to play poker." His patpatpanda account has played three hands where the pot size reached $300,000, the largest of which was worth $553,000 and came late last year. He has also been playing against some fierce competition, including Viktor Isildur1Blom and Ben Bttech86 Tollerene. On his mentality about playing, Zhou explained to PokerNews, "[Sometimes] I'm so tired, but I keep playing [and] that's when I lose a lot. Sometimes you have to know when to quit, but I never quit. When I'm winning, I want to bust them. Sometimes I'm running good and they quit. A lot of people quit, but when I lose money, they will stay and play. I will play, too. When they quit, I'm still play, play, play. If I'm winning, I still play. If I lose back, maybe I'll go to sleep." The MalACEsia account, which Phua(pictured) is the man behind, is down $4.25 million since HighStakesDB began tracking it one year ago. However, he has seemingly made up for at least part of that bleeding on the live circuit. According to the Hendon Mob, Phua has almost $3 million in live scores, including a $1.6 million hit for winning a High Roller Event in London in 2012. Last April, Phua cashed for $340,000 in the WSOP APAC's High Roller Rebuy and followed that up with a third place finish in the APT Manila Millions for another $405,000. A few days ago, he finished sixth in the EPT Grand Final Super High Roller Event in Monaco for more than a half-million dollars. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed. Images courtesy PokerKing and PokerPortal
  2. It took a couple days, but Wei Seng "Paul" Phua and his son, Darren Phua, were finally released from federal custody on bail Monday after being detained for about two days. While it appears that they are certainly still in a heap of trouble, they have a couple deep-pocketed friends to thank for their current freedom. --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by Betsson Poker, a leading global online gaming provider. Betsson Poker is available on Mobile and offers regular promotions to live events around the world along with great bonuses and competitions. Play nowfor a chance to win the a Dream Holiday with the Grand Poker Adventures throughout 2014! --- Ten-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner Phil Ivey (pictured) put up the $500,000 bond required for Darren Phua as well as another $500,000 for father Paul. Andrew good2cu Robl contributed the other $1.5 million for Paul's release. According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Tom "durrrr" Dwan also came to the Phua's aid. Present at the time the Phuas were arrested earlier in July, Dwan signed an affidavit in which he questioned the tactics the agents used when apprehending the two men. He also supported them during their first court appearance. Though Ivey and Robl contributed the entire $2.5 million needed to get the Phuas out from behind bars while their case proceeds, and Paul's $48 million Gulfstream jet was held to prevent him fleeing the country and neither Paul nor Darren was initially released. Detained by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement for possible deportation, the Phuas had to wait while their lawyers got to work. "Our clients have complied with every condition set by a Federal judge for their release," Phua attorney David Chesnoff told the Review-Journal. "We have repeatedly attempted to contact ICE authorities, who have not responded. We are going to take further legal steps." Paul and Darren Phua were finally released Monday after around 48 hours. The 50-year old Phua, his son, and six other defendants were apprehended by FBI agents on July 13 on suspicion of operating an illegal sports betting ring. In the criminal complaint, investigators say that over $360 million in World Cup bets alone ran through the gambling ring. Paul, who the FBI alleges is a "high-ranking member of the 14K Triad," was arrested with more than 20 others on June 18 in Macau for a similar illegal sports betting operation also revolving around the World Cup. He was soon released on bail and, according to the criminal complaint, flew to Las Vegas, where he setup shop in three Caesars villas. Around June 22, the complaint alleges, Phua and his colleagues requested high-speed internet service and an unusually large supply of computer equipment for the villas, all assumed to have been used in the resumption of the World Cup betting business. Investigators say that the group used the Asian online betting sites IBCBET, of which Paul Phua allegedly owns part, and SBOBET. Paul and Darren Phua are under house arrest at the home of a friend in Las Vegas. Ivey has also said he is willing to put up $1 million towards the bail of two other defendants, Seng Chen "Richard" Yong and his son, Wai Kin Yong. Both sometimes play in the famous high-stakes poker games in Macau. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  3. Awaiting trial on charges of running an illegal gambling business, Malaysian businessman Paul Phua (pictured) and his son, Darren Phua, have petitioned the court for permission to enter casinos and play poker. Attorneys for the Phuas, David Chesnoff and Thomas Goldstein, insisted that the men had abided by the conditions of their pretrial release and asked that the court grant more freedom to their wealthy clients. The request was quickly opposed by US Attorney Kimberly Frayn, who wrote that Phua and his son had not proven that the ban wasn't warranted "in light of the nature of the illegal gambling charges pending against them." In July, the Phuas, along with six other men, were arrested in a controversial raid during their stay at several Caesars Palace villas in Las Vegas. The FBI claims that the men were operating a large-scale illegal bookmaking scheme, centered on the World Cup football tournament, using the villas as their command center. Frayn argued that due to the nature of the Phuas' alleged crimes, the men had no business entering a casino. "They are charged with crimes connected to unlawful gaming activities, which they conducted clandestinely on casino premises and which were furthered through associations made and maintained through poker gambling salons located within the casino," she said. Chesnoff and Goldstein countered that their clients had not been charged with crimes related to playing poker illegally. They also maintained that casinos were "highly regulated environments" secured by a multitude of cameras. Before their arrest, the Phuas were already well-known inside the Las Vegas high-stakes poker community. Paul Phua boasts nearly $3 million in live tournament winnings and could often be found playing the biggest games in poker rooms from Las Vegas to Macau. In fact, court documents reveal that the defendants' combined bail of $2.5 million was paid by none other than Phil Ivey, Andrew Robl, and Tom Dwan. Ivey is pictured. Of the eight individuals initially arrested, Paul and Darren are the only defendants who chose to take their chances in a trial. Five of the men have already pleaded guilty and were sentenced to five years of probation, during which they must stay out of the United States. Charges were dropped against the remaining defendant. But even if the FBI brings a strong case against the Phuas, the father and son still have outs. Chesnoff and Goldstein argue that the case should be thrown out entirely, as the operation was based on evidence acquired unconstitutionally. Indeed, investigators have come under fire for their aggressive tactics in gaining access to the Phua's villas without a warrant. As part of their ploy, authorities cut internet service to the group's rooms and sent in undercover officers posing as Caesars tech staff after the men called the front desk for assistance. Paul Phua also seems to have the support of a few high-ranking politicians in the government of his native Malaysia. In a strange twist, Home Affairs Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi penned a letter to the FBI asserting that the elder Phua was not a member of the notorious 14k Triad organized crime group. He also claimed that Phua regularly assisted the Malaysian government in matters of national security. "We are eager for him to return to Malaysia," Hamidi wrote. The Minister's comments have sparked a backlash in the country, with opposition party members demanding an explanation for the letter. The allegation that Phua was a member of the 14k Triad had come directly from the country's Royal Mounted Police. "The RMP has identified the 14K Triad as a local organized crime syndicate involved in illegal drugs, illegal gambling, and money laundering activities in Malaysia," a 2008 internal FBI document read. "The RMP has also identified Malaysian Phua Wei Seng as a 14K Triad member." Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  4. [caption width="640"] The Aussie Millions is a can't miss event on the poker schedule.[/caption] Poker players from all over the world have converged on the Crown Melbourne Resort to participate in the 19th annual Aussie Millions Poker Championship tournament series this week. Highlighted as the marquee event of the Asia Pacific Poker Tour (APPT), this year’s series features 24 events spread over 18 days, with buy-ins ranging from AU$1,150 to AU$250,000. Players are vying for a piece of an estimated AU$30 million prize pool and have the chance to win one of the coveted Aussie Millions LK Boutique championship rings awarded to the winner of each event. While Aussie Millions is now one of the most popular tournaments on the international poker circuit, it has grown from humble beginnings. The Crown Melbourne introduced poker to its casino in 1997, some six years before Chris Moneymaker sparked a worldwide poker boom with his stunning 2003 WSOP Main Event win. In July 1998, the inaugural Crown Australian Poker Championship, which would later be renamed the “Aussie Millions,” was born, boasting a AU$1,000 buy-in Limit Hold‘em main event. The fledgling tournament attracted just 74 entrants and generated a modest prize pool of AU$74,000. Australian Alex Horowitz went on to win the AU$25,900 first-place prize and become the event’s first champion. The following year, organizers decided to switch the main event format to Pot Limit Hold’em, then settled on No Limit Hold‘em for the 2000 iteration. One year later, the tournament was rescheduled to January, but still remained a mostly local affair, with Australians dominating the top nine places nearly every year. In 2003, online poker began to garner mainstream appeal, and interest in No Limit Hold’em was growing worldwide. That year, the main event had 122 entrants, each of whom paid the AU$10,000 buy-in for chance at the AU$1.2 million prize pool. This time, players from three countries populated the leaderboard, with England’s Peter Costa taking first place in the main event for AU$394,807. In 2005, things got serious. The main event boasted a record 263 participants and a hefty AU$2.6 million prize pool, with AU$1 million going to first place. This was the year that the series became a truly international event, with half the field making the overseas trip from Ireland, England, Norway, New Zealand, USA, Denmark, Sweden, Holland, Italy, Canada and Lebanon. The following year, the tournament continued to grow almost exponentially, this time attracting 418 players, including big-name pros like Phil Ivey, Daniel Negreanu and Australian WSOP champion Joe Hachem. New Zealand’s Lee Nelson took a AU$1.3 million slice of the AU$4.1 million total prize pool for his main event win. The 2006 tournament also saw tournament take a giant leap with the introduction of the $100,000 No Limit Hold’em Challenge, the biggest buy-in tournament in the history of poker at the time. Only 10 players participated in the inaugural high stakes event, with John Juanda taking the AU$1 million top prize. While the six-figure buy-in tourney pales in comparison to events like the $1 million Big One for One Drop, the Aussie Millions was clearly a pioneer in the high roller trend. Series organizers have used these high buy-in tournaments to experiment with some unorthodox rules. Aussie Millions is one of the few major tournaments to offer events which enforce a shot clock, in which players are given a period of 30 seconds or less to make their decision. The series also spreads events that feature some interesting quirks, like only allowing pot limit betting pre-flop, and no limit betting post-flop. The reverberations of 2006’s UIGEA legislation had not yet been felt at Asia-Pacific’s most popular tournament series, however, with a record-high 747 participants entering the 2007 main event just months after a number of online operators left the US market. Danish poker legend Gus Hansen prevailed after besting American online poker specialist Jimmy “Gobboboy” Fricke for a AU$1.5 million payday. [caption width="300" align="alignright"] Gus Hansen won the 2007 Aussie Millions Main Event[/caption] Hansen later wrote a book called Every Hand Revealed, in which he broke down his thought process on key hands he played during the tournament. To keep track of his playing history, he described using a portable recorder to dictate the details of each hand during breaks. Attendance at the Aussie Millions main event peaked in 2008 when 780 players entered to create a prize pool of AU$7.7 million. Russian grinder Alexander Kostritsyn bested legend Erik Seidel to take first-place and the AU$1.65 million prize, the largest ever awarded at a live tournament in the southern hemisphere at the time. Seidel, for his efforts, took home a consolation prize of AU$1 million. The Crown Melbourne partnered with Fox Sports Net (FSN) to broadcast the 2007 and 2008 main events, introducing the series to a large mainstream audience in the United States. In 2009, Australian Stuart Scott took home a record AU$2 million first-place prize after topping a field of 681 entrants. Likewise, Australian-born David Steicke snagged first place in the AU$100,000 challenge for AU$1.2 million. That year, the casino continued its partnership with FSN, which broadcasted the tournament to 81 million homes. 2010 saw a bump in participation from the previous year, with 746 players in the main event. Sydney’s Tyron Krost won AU$ for beating a final table that included Sorel Mizzi, Peter Jetten and Annette Obrestad. In 2011, Aussie Millions pushed the envelope again by offering a AU$250,000 buy-in super high roller tournament, then the largest on record. The event drew 20 entrants and saw Erik Seidel take first-place for massive AU$2.5 million prize. The biggest story that year may have been the emergence of the “Macau businessmen” from the shadows of cash game lore. Richard Yong, Paul Phua, and Wang Qiang played the Main Event, and both the $100,000 Challenge and the $250,000 Challenge. The Australians were back on top in the 2012 main event, with local Oliver Speidel besting a field of 659 for a AU$1.6 million payday. [caption width="640"] Phil Ivey has made the LK Boutique 0,000 Challenge his own personal playground[/caption] While Speidel was the local hero, 2012 saw the start of Phil Ivey’s extraordinary string of wins in the LK Boutique $250,000 Challenge. That year, Ivey bested 16 of the world’s best poker players to take home the AU$2 million first place prize. In 2014, Ivey dominated again, this time topping a field of 30 and taking home an even bigger AU$4 million haul. But the 39-year-old poker pro still wasn’t finished. In 2015, Ivey navigated his way through a field of 25 to win his third LK Boutique $250,000 Challenge crown, along with AU$2.2 million. Between the 2013 and 2014 Aussie Millions, Crown Casino played host to WSOP-APAC and used that tournament to introduce a new tournament format – “The Accumulator”. Players could enter all three flights of the event and accumulate chips each day, combining all remaining stacks before the start of Day 2. The event was then added to the 2014 Aussie Million schedule. The Aussie Millions has developed into one of the most important stops on the global poker circuit. Crown’s willingness to innovate by experimenting with new formats coupled with its bold decision to offer some of the biggest buy-in tournaments in the world has made the series a must-attend event for seasoned poker pros and amateurs alike.
  5. The Triton Poker High Roller roadshow moved to Sochi, Russia this week for the first formal partnered event with a major tour. partypokerLIVE played host with the first of two Triton Rollers finishing today as part of the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS Russia festival. This event was played as standard No Limit Hold'em, not the Short Deck variation Triton is synonymous with. Aymon Hata took down the ₽3 million ($50,000) High Roller amidst a field of 47 to win the ₽48 million ($756,000) first-place prize. Six places paid and nine players made the final table leading to a tense bubble midway through Day 2. Bartlomiej Machon busted an hour into the final table to claim the distinction of ninth and Timothy Adams followed him out the door a few hours after then. Ivan Leow led the final table when play started but an unfortunate streak earned him the bubble boy label. Hata doubled with A♦J♥ against the K♦K♠ of Leow when an ace flopped and Leow sent 25 percent of his stack to his opponent. Phillip Gruissem then caught a Leow bluff with pocket aces and the former chip leader was suddenly looking to hang on for a cash. Leow busted when his A♠10♥ failed to catch up to the Q♣Q♥ of Patrik Antonius for his last 14 big blinds to clinch a payout for the six remaining players. With six players still in, Hata won a key flip to improve his title chances. Hata won with A♥K♥ versus Gruissem's Q♣Q♥ when a king flopped. Gruissem dropped to only 10 big blinds and he busted to Antonius a few hands later to notch another cash on the year. Paul Phua left the action in fifth place and Antonius won another key all-in. Phua shoved for 256,000 with the blinds at 8,000/16,000 holding 9♣9♠ and Antonius woke up with K♦K♠. The board ran out in the favor of Antonius and the final table was left to four. Antonius became the fourth-place finisher as he doubled up Vladimir Troyanovskiy and then busted to the Russian within the span of a few hands. Troyanovskiy won with queens against the fives of Antonius to knock the mighty Fin down to under 30 big blinds. The action picked up from there. Troyanovskiy opened the A♦K♥ to 37,000 and Antonious joined him with 7♥6♥ from the small blind. Hata didn't want to be left out and called in the big blind with A♥4♥. A 10♥3♥3♠ flop resulted in Troyanovskiy betting 50,000 and Antonius following his action with an all-in raise of 408,000. Hata moved all-in over the top and Troyanovskiy pitched his hand. Antonious' limited outs did not materialize and fourth would be his final result. Konstantin Uspenskii felt to Hata only 10 minutes into three-handed play. Uspenskii's K♠8♠ went in for 14 blinds against Hata's queens and did not improve. Hata's heads up lead over Troyanovskiy never left his grasp and he closed out the impressive victory in a brief match. Troyanovskiy pushed for nine big blinds with J♠7♣ and was met in the middle by Hata's K♣4♣. The board ran out queen-high and Hata stepped into the Triton Poker winner's circle for the first time. The next Triton High Roller event in Russia is already in session with Day 1 of the ₽6 million ($100,000) Super High Roller underway. Triton Poker High Roller Final Table Results 1. Aymon Hata - $756,000 2. Vladimir Troyanovskiy – $501,795 3. Konstantin Uspenskii – $354,375 4. Patrik Antonius – $236,250 5. Paul Phua – $165,375 6. Philipp Gruissem – $118,125
  6. The 2019 Triton Poker Super High Roller Series Montenegro is in the books, and several huge winners emerged from the high-stakes poker series held at the Maestral Resort & Casino along the Adriatic Sea. Chief among them was Bryn Kenney, who won more than $4.1 million total and jumped to No. 4 on poker's all-time money list, per Hendon Mob. Kenney only cashed twice in the series, but both times he won the tournament. In the first, Kenney topped a field of 79 entries to win the HK$500,000 Six-Handed No-Limit Hold’em event for HK$11.23 million ($1.43 million). In the second, he topped a field of 75 entries in the HK$1 million Main Event to win HK$21.3 million ($2.71 million). With those two wins, Kenney improved to just shy of $34.8 million in career live tournaments earnings, of which he's won more than $9.1 million in 2019 alone. Kenney’s previous best year on the live tournament felt was in 2017 when he won more than $8.5 million. Other big winners to come out of the 2019 Triton Poker Super High Roller Series Montenegro include Rui Cao ($3.61 million), Paul Phua ($3.59 million), Nikita Badziakouski ($2.91 million), and Daniel Dvoress ($2.71 million). Both Phua and Dvoress cashed five times in the series and a total of 12 players earned combined prizes of more than $1 million. Top 10 Triton Poker Series Montenegro Money List Bryn Kenney - $4,145,235 Rui Cao - $3,611,013 Paul Phua - $3,594,983 Nikita Badziakouski - $2,912,467 Daniel Dvoress - $2,717,155 Arnaud Romain - $2,130,372 Daniel Tang - $1,976,217 Sam Greenwood - $1,943,613 Peter Jetten - $1,865,303 Ben Lamb - $1,192,009 Just outside of the top 10 were Kenneth Kiang and Seng 'Ivan' Leow, who cashed for $1.08 million and $1.06 million from the series, respectively. Triton Poker Series Montenegro Results HK$250,000 Eight-Handed NL Turbo Entries: 45 Prize Pool: HK$10,575,000 Steve O'Dwyer - HK$3,708,784 ($472,788) Isaac Haxton - HK$2,901,216 ($369,841
) Linus Loeliger - HK$1,720,000 ($219,262) Kok Beh - HK$1,240,000 ($158,073) Sam Greenwood - HK$1,005,000 ($128,115) [caption id="attachment_624174" align="alignnone" width="1354"] Bryn Kenney won two tournaments at the recent Triton Poker Series in Montenegro (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] HK$500,000 Six-Handed NL Entries: 79 Prize Pool: HK$37,130,000 Bryn Kenney - HK$11,230,000 ($1,431,376) Daniel Dvoress - HK$7,430,000 ($947,028) Seng 'Ivan' Leow - HK$5,070,000 ($646,222) Sergio Aido - HK$3,820,000 ($486,897) Jason Koon - HK$2,970,000 ($378,556) Christoph Vogelsang - HK$2,300,000 ($293,158) Richard Yong - HK$1,820,000 ($231,977) Daniel Tang - HK$1,410,000 ($179,719) Cheong Ieng - HK$1,080,000 ($137,657) HK$100,000 Short Deck NL Ante Only Entries: 70 Prize Pool: HK$6,580,000 Winfred Yu - HK$2,040,000 ($259,952) Isaac Haxton - HK$1,370,000 ($174,576) Peter Jetten - HK$920,000 ($117,233) Leon Tsoukernik - HK$700,000 ($89,199) Steffen Sontheimer - HK$540,000 ($68,811) Ihor Shkliaruk - HK$420,000 ($53,520) Tam Lon - HK$330,000 ($42,051) Jordi Urlings - HK$260,000 ($33,131) HK$1,000,000 NL Main Event Entries: 75 Prize Pool: HK$70,500,000 Bryn Kenney - HK$21,300,000 ($2,713,859) Daniel Tang - HK$14,100,000 ($1,796,498) Peter Jetten - HK$9,600,000 ($1,223,148) Nikita Badziakouski - HK$7,260,000 ($925,005) Sam Greenwood - HK$5,650,000 ($719,873) Paul Phua - HK$4,440,000 ($560,609) Erik Seidel - HK$3,460,000 ($440,842) Matthias Eibinger - HK$2,680,000 ($341,462) Jason Koon - HK$2,050,000 ($261,193) HK$250,000 NL Turbo Entries: 37 Prize Pool: HK$8,972,500 Henrik Hecklen - HK$3,410,000 ($434,500) Alex Foxen - HK$2,200,000 ($280,323) Timothy Adams - HK$1,460,000 ($186,032) Daniel Dvoress - HK$1,052,500 ($134,109) Michael Watson - HK$850,000 ($108,306) HK$1,000,000 Short Deck NL Main Event Entries: 98 Prize Pool: HK$92,120,000 Rui Cao - HK$26,300,000 ($3,351,130) Paul Phua - HK$17,100,000 ($2,178,871) Arnaud Romain - HK$11,800,000 ($1,503,549) Daniel Dvoress - HK$9,070,000 ($1,155,694) Kenneth Kiang - HK$7,200,000 ($917,420) Ming Liu - HK$5,620,000 ($716,097) Choon Siow - HK$4,400,000 ($560,645) Isaac Haxton - HK$3,400,000 ($433,226) Timofey Kuznetsov - HK$2,630,000 ($335,113) Nikita Badziakouski - HK$2,300,000 ($293,065) Guang Lu - HK$2,300,000 ($293,065) HK$200,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Entries: 37 Prize Pool: HK$6,956,000 Hing Chow - HK$2,640,000 ($336,383) Ben Lamb - HK$1,706,000 ($217,375) Viacheslav Osipov - HK$1,130,000 ($143,982) Henrik Hecklen - HK$820,000 ($104,483) Wai Chan - HK$660,000 ($84,096) HK$200,000 Short Deck NL Ante Only Turbo Entries: 64 Prize Pool: HK$12,032,000 Quek Sheng - HK$3,700,000 ($471,416) Peter Jetten - HK$2,500,000 ($318,524) Paul Phua - HK$1,700,000 ($216,596) Kenneth Kiang - HK$1,292,000 ($164,613) Wai Chan - HK$980,000 ($124,861) John Gabe Patgorski - HK$770,000 $98,105) Daniel Dvoress - HK$610,000 ($77,720) Rui Cao - HK$480,000 ($61,157) [caption id="attachment_624175" align="alignnone" width="1354"] John Juanda was among the winners at the recent Triton Poker Series in Montenegro (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] HK$250,000 Short Deck NL Ante Only Entries: 65 Prize Pool: HK$15,275,000 John Juanda - HK$4,720,000 ($601,358) Daniel Dvoress - HK$3,160,000 ($402,604) Wai Yong - HK$2,150,000 ($273,924) Peter Jetten - HK$1,620,000 ($206,398) Sergey Lebedev - HK$1,250,000 ($159,258) Daniel Cates - HK$980,000 ($124,858) Christopher Soyza - HK$780,000 ($99,377) Paul Phua - HK$615,000 ($78,355) HK$750,000 Short Deck NL Ante Only Entries: 52 Prize Pool: HK$38,122,500 Nikita Badziakouski - HK$13,300,000 ($1,694,397) Sam Greenwood - HK$8,600,000 ($1,095,625) Qiang Wang - HK$5,700,000 ($726,170) Paul Phua - HK$4,400,000 ($560,552) Andrew Robl - HK$3,422,500 ($436,021) Xuan Tan - HK$2,700,000 ($343,975) [caption id="attachment_624173" align="alignnone" width="1354"] Ben Lamb was another big name to score a victory at the recent Triton Poker Series in Montenegro (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] HK$500,000 Short Deck NL Ante Only Entries: 42 Prize Pool: HK$20,080,000 Ben Lamb - HK$7,650,000 ($974,634) Arnaud Romain - HK$4,920,000 ($626,823) Seng 'Ivan' Leow - HK$3,250,000 ($414,060) Xuan Tan - HK$2,350,000 ($299,397) Timofey Kuznetsov - HK$1,910,000 ($243,340) HK$300,000 NL/Short Deck Mix Entries: 27 Prize Pool: HK$7,857,000 Daniel Cates - HK$3,930,000 ($500,682) Jason Koon - HK$2,367,000 ($301,556) Rui Cao - HK$1,560,000 ($198,744) Effect On Poker’s All-Time Money List The big results coming out of the Triton Poker Super High Roller Series Montenegro caused plenty of shifting towards the top of poker’s all-time money list. As already mentioned, Kenney jumped to No. 4 overall. Jason Koon, who cashed three times in Montenegro for just under $1 million, slid up one spot ahead of Antonio Esfandiari to be No. 8. Isaac Haxton, who, like Koon, won just under $1 million from this series, is now No. 13 and Badziakouski jumped to No. 15. John Juanda, who won an event in Montenegro for just more than $600,000, actually dropped back to No. 14. Then, looking a bit further down the leaderboard, Phua can now be found at No. 62 on the list after winning $3.59 million in Montenegro. High roller and super high roller events are as plentiful as they have ever been on the poker circuit. Numerous stops have $25,000 or $50,000 buy-in events, and some even push the envelope even further with $100,000 price tags on the schedule. Then, there are several festivals a year that are solely dedicated to ultra high-stakes players, such as the Triton Poker Series festivals. If there was ever a 'steroid era' in poker, similar to what baseball went through for an extended period of time, most commonly referred to as the latter half of the 1990s and into the 2000s. It's not that poker players are using performance-enhancing drugs to boost their earnings, but rather that there’s such an injection of these super high buy-in small-field events that are causing grand shifts in money lists. It doesn’t appear that these events and festivals are going anywhere, so poker will need to go through a bit of a market correction and rankings adjustments to correctly account for the juiced results.
  7. It was another banner day for one of poker’s winningest players as Bryn Kenney found himself back in the winner’s circle again after taking down the 2019 HK$1,000,000 Triton Montenegro Main Event for $2,713.859. Kenney outlasted an all-star final table that included runner-up Daniel Tang, Peter Jetten, Nikita Badziakouski, Sam Greenwood, Erik Seidel, Matthias Eibinger, Jason Koon and Triton Poker Series founder Paul Phua. Kenney’s over $2.7 million score is the second largest of his career, right behind his over $3.06M haul that he took home for his runner-up finish in Triton’s HK$2M Super High Roller Series Jeju Main Event in March. It’s his second victory of the Montenegro series, the first coming in Event #2 (HK$500,000 No Limit Hold’em Six Handed) where he won the $1,431,376 first-place prize. Kenney’s 2019 has been nothing short of incredible. According to The Hendon Mob, the New York pro has eight results this year, four of which are for victories - including his official first-place finish in the 2019 Aussie Millions Main Event. In total, Kenney has over $9.1 million in total earnings this year alone, putting him at the top of the list for 2019 earners. He has also jumped up two spots on the All-Time Money List to fourth place sitting only behind Erik Seidel (3rd), Daniel Negreanu (2nd) and list leader Justin Bonomo. HK$1,000,000 Triton Montenegro Main Event Final Table Results 1. Bryn Kenney - $2,713,859 (HK$21,300,000) 2. Daniel Tang - $1,796,498 (HK$14,100,000) 3. Peter Jetten - $1,223,148 (HK$9,600,000) 4. Nikita Badziakouski - $925,005 (HK$7,260,000) 5. Sam Greenwood - $719,873 (HK$5,650,000) 6. Paul Phua - $560,609 (HK$4,400,000) 7. Erik Seidel - $440,842 (HK$3,460,000) 8. Matthias Eibinger - $341,462 (HK$2,680,000) 9. Jason Koon - $261,193 (HK$2,050,000) Kenney’s Path To Victory Although the player pool for the Main Event was limited, a total of 44 players (plus their 31 re-entries) pushed the prize pool to HK$70,500,000 ($8,982,494 USD). When the final nine returned to play to a winner, there were plenty of short stacks at the table. One of them was Triton ambassador Jason Koon. After losing a flip and doubling up Paul Phua, Koon was sitting on five big blinds. He moved in on the button with [ac][7d]. Nikita Badziakouski reshoved to isolate Koon, holding [8c][8s]. However, Matthias Ebinger also got involved from the big blind, calling with [ad][qh]. While a queen did hit the flop, an eight turned and both Koon and Eibinger hit the rail. Koon, the shorter stack, would take ninth place for $261,193 while Eibinger settled for eighth place and $341,462. Seidel finished in seventh place when his short stack re-shove with [qh][9h] from the small blind was called by Badziakouski’s [as][td]. The pro from Belarus turned the ten-high flush to send Seidel out the door in seventh for $440,842. The final six battled for the better part of three levels, during which time Kenney began to accumulate chips from the then chip leader Badziakouski. Six handed, Kenney picked up pocket queens on the button and limped, the small blind folded and Paul Phua checked his option holding [7s][4d]. The flop brought both a seven and a queen, giving Kenney a lock on the hand. Phua, however, moved all in with his pair of sevens, practically drawing dead. Phua finished in sixth for $560,609. Greenwood was sitting on a short stack and from the cutoff, he limped with the [ad][qd]. Danny Tang completed in the small blind with the [ks][5d] and Badziakouski checked his option with the [kc][9h]. The flop came [2c][kd][4s] with both blinds flopping a pair. Checked to Greenwood he put out a min-bet. Tang made the call and Badziakouski put in a raise. Greenwood tank-shoved which got Tang to fold. Badziakouski tanked, fearing Greenwood has limped aces pre-flop. Eventually, Badziakouski made the call. The board bricked out for Greenwood who finished in fifth place adding $719,813 to his earnings, which is now more than $17.445M lifetime. Kenney and Badziakouski then got the two biggest stacks in on a massive flip as Badziakouski’s [ac][js] faced off against Kenney’s [7c][7s]. Kenney’s pair held and Badziakouski, who had led for the majority of the final table, ended up in fourth place taking home $925,005. After that hand, Kenney was a massive chip leader over both Jetten and Tang. Kenney took out Jetten in third place when his [th][9s] clipped Jetten’s [ks][6h]. Jetten picked up the second largest cash of his career, taking home $1,223,148. Finally, Danny Tang faced off against Kenney with 12-1 chip deficit. There was no coming back in this one as Kenney closed it out, making Tang the runner-up for $1,796,498. It is the first seven-figure cash of Tang’s career. For Kenney, the heater continues as the $2,713,859 first-place prize of the HK$1,000,000 Triton Montenegro Main Event is his third million dollar score in a row. The 2019 Triton Super High Roller Series Montenegro continues through May 17.
  8. The 2019 Triton Poker Super High Roller Series wrapped up its festival of high-stakes events in London last week. There were seven events, headlined by the £1,050,000 buy-in Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity and several million-dollar scores were had. Chief among them was Bryn Kenney with his £16,890,509 result, that converted to $20,563,324. The monstrous score earned Kenney the largest payday in poker history and put him atop the all-time money list. Kenney wasn’t the only big winner, though. Here’s a look at the biggest winners from the 2019 Triton Poker Super High Roller Series London. Top 20 2019 Triton Poker Series London Money List 1. Bryn Kenney - £16,890,509 ($20,563,324) 2. Aaron Zang - £13,779,491 ($16,775,920) 3. Dan Smith - £7,245,300 ($8,820,778) 4. Stephen Chidwick - £5,383,800 ($6,553,948) 5. Wai Kin Yong - £4,426,695 ($5,386,804) 6. Paul Phua - £3,582,305 (4,359,418) 7. Vivek Rajkumar - £3,000,000 ($3,652,345) 8. Justin Bonomo - £2,871,600 ($3,494,073) 9. Bill Perkins - £2,200,000 ($2,678,386) 10. Timothy Adams - £1,899,000 ($2,311,845) 11. Alfred De Carolis - £1,720,000 ($2,094,011) 12. David Benefield - £1,578,600 ($1,919,582) 13. Chin Lim - £1,561,300 ($1,900,134) 14. Wai Chan- £1,550,300 ($1,887,269) 15. Xu Liang - £1,452,900 ($1,767,878) 16. Ben Heath - £1,393,100 ($1,695,407) 17. Charlie Carrel - £1,321,000 ($1,601,853) 18. Linus Loeliger - £1,284,000 ($1,560,327) 19. Christopher Soyza - £1,242,300 ($1,511,921) 20. Jason Koon - £1,177,500 ($1,428,868) Kenney sits atop the series’ leaderboard thanks to his historic score. An interesting note about the score is that, while it broke the record for poker’s largest single tournament score, it was for a second-place finish in the event. Aaron Zang, who is second on this list, actually won the Triton Million event, but a deal with Kenney allowed Kenney to take more money. As a brief aside, Kenney’s 2019 has been absolutely incredible. He’s won nearly $30,000,000 in 2019 and this year alone would have him ranked #10 on poker’s all-time money list. Of note, Kenney won the Aussie Millions Main Event and was the fifth biggest winner from that entire series. Dan Smith and Stephen Chidwick are third and fourth on the list, respectively, and both placed in this positions in the Triton Million. But unlike Kenney and Zang ahead of them, Smith and Chidwick cashed in more events than just the £1,050,000 headliner. Smith took 15th in the £25,000 6-Handed No Limit Hold’em Turbo event for £45,300 ($55,150). Chidwick cashed in three other events for an additional £973,800 ($1,185,001) on top of the £4,410,000 ($5,368,947) he cashed for in the Triton Million. Chidwick took sixth in the £50,000 Short Deck Ante-Only event, seventh in the £100,000 Triton Main Event, and ninth in the £100,000 Short Deck Main Event. The next two names on the list, Wai Kin Yong and Paul Phua, did not cash in the Triton Million, so their performances over the course of the rest of the series must have been pretty good if they landed this high on the leaderboard. Yong won the £100,000 Triton Main Event for £2,591,695 ($3,154,064), and the player he beat was Phua, who took £2,558,305 ($3,113,429) for second place after the two struck a deal. Yong then took second in the £100,00 Short Deck Main Event for £1,835,000 ($2,232,740). Interestingly enough, Phua also went deep in that one, finishing fourth for £974,500 ($1,185,725). Phua added a third cash to his performance. Timothy Adams found himself as the 10th biggest earner from the series, having cashed a total of three times including once in the Triton Million. Outside of the top 10, David Benefield, Chin Lim, Wai Chan, Jason Koon, and Isaac Haxton also cashed three times at the festival. All told, 24 players cashed for at least $1,000,000 at the series. The 20 listed above were joined by Winfred Yu, Sam Greenwood, Haxton, and Rui Cao as seven-figure winners.
  9. When Richard Yong and Paul Phua co-founded the Triton Super High Roller Series, they had visions of battling some of the best high roller players in the world on a regular basis. They probably never envisioned a day where one of them would battle with the other's offspring for £1 million. That's exactly what happened on Tuesday in London though. Wai Kin Yong, the son of Richard Yong, defeated Paul Phua heads-up after each outlasted 128 other entries in the £100,000 Triton Super High Roller Series London No Limit Hold'em Main Event for £3,080,000 ($3,752,394 US). The final table began with Phua holding the chip lead and Yong sitting third in chips. It took 5.5 hours of play for Yong to take down the crown as he eliminated four of the eight other players at the final table. It took just 10 minutes for things to get started in earnest. From the hijack, Wai Leong Chan moved all in for 1,650,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="jh"]. Action folded to Wai Kin Yong in the big blind and he called instantly with [poker card="6d"][poker card="6s"]. The [poker card="kd"][poker card="6h"][poker card="2s"] flop gave Yong a set of sixes and Chan was unable to get any help on the [poker card="3d"] turn. The meaningless river was the [poker card="4s"] and Chan was out in ninth place for $371,584. Nearly an hour passed before a three-way pot ended with two players heading to the cashier to collect a payout. Action folded to Daniel Cates in the cutoff and he moved all-in for 1,650,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="3d"]. Stephen Chidwick re-shoved for 2,300,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="7h"] from the small blind only to have Michael Soyza call from the big blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="qd"]. The board ran out [poker card="kh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4h"][poker card="6s"][poker card="6c"] to send Cates home in eighth for $499,507 and Chidwick out in seventh for $662,760. Phua found his first victim ten minutes later. Phua raised to 425,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"] from the hijack. Michael Zhi Chang moved all-in for 5,010,000 with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"] from the small blind. Phua called and then celebrated when the [poker card="qh"][poker card="3c"][poker card="3d"] flop left Chang in dire straits. The [poker card="qd"] turn gave Phua quads and eliminated Zhang in sixth place, earning $866,218 for the second-best score of his career. Five-handed play lasted nearly 90 minutes before a blind vs. blind altercation sent one player home. Action folded to Sam Greenwood in the small blind and he moved all-in for1,675,000 with [poker card="ts"][poker card="8d"] and Wai King Yong called with [poker card="jh"][poker card="3s"] from the big blind. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="ah"][poker card="3h"] flop gave Yong two pair. The [poker card="kd"] turn and [poker card="7d"] river failed to save Greenwood from a fifth-place finish. The $1,098,915 score is the fourth time in 2019 that Greenwood has won at least $1 million in a poker tournament. He started the year off by winning the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $100K Super High Roller for $1,775,460 and then finished runner-up to Soyza in the Triton HK$500K Super High Roller Six-Handed Event in Jeju for $1,019,251. In May he finished runner-up to Nikita Bodyakovskiy in the Triton HK$750K Short Deck event in Montenegro for $1,095,625. Soyza managed to outlast Greenwood yet again, but this time it didn't result in a trophy. Soyza moved all-in for 2,850,000 with [poker card="8h"][poker card="8s"] in the small blind and Wong called from the big blind with [poker card="qh"][poker card="2h"]. There was no drama left after the [poker card="th"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7h"] flop gave Wong the flush. The [poker card="kc"] turn and [poker card="9h"] river were nothing but a formality and Soyza was out in fourth place with a $1,354,507 score. Just ten minutes later, the action went from three-handed to heads-up thanks to a bit of a setup that went badly for the favorite. Yong folded his button before Ben Heath called from the small blind with [poker card="kd"][poker card="ks"]. Phua raised to 925,000 from the big blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"] and Heath responded by re-raising to 2,500,000. Phua announced all in and Heath called instantly with his tournament life at risk. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="jh"][poker card="th"] flop gave Phua Broadway and left Heath drawing to a chop or runner-runner full house. The [poker card="6d"] turn was no help and the [poker card="jd"] river finished off Heath's run in third place for $1,644,718. That win left Phua with 56% of the chips in play heading into heads-up play. Just over 45 minutes into heads-up play, Yong made a call for his tournament life with [poker card="kd"][poker card="5h"] on a [poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"][poker card="5d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"] board after Phua moved all-in on the river. That hand gave Yong the lead for the first time heads-up and he never looked back. Just over 30 minutes over the two clashed for the final time. Phua shoved for his last 4,250,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"] and Yong called with [poker card="ks"][poker card="jc"]. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="7c"][poker card="7h"] flop gave Phua a flush draw and he took the lead on the [poker card="6d"] turn. The [poker card="js"] river, however, eliminated Phua and gave Yong his third career Triton title and $3,752,394. Final Table Payouts Wai Kin Yong - $3,752,394 Paul Phua - $2,521,901 Ben Heath - $1,644,718 Michael Soyza - $1,364,507 Sam Greenwood - $1,098,915 Michael Chi Zhang - $866,218 Stephen Chidwick - $662,760 Daniel Cates - $499,507 Wai Leong Chan - $371,584
  10. The Triton Super High Roller Poker Series is about to make history. On Thursday, August 1 the Triton Million: A Helping Hand For Charity tournament will begin and it’s £1,050,000 buy-in will make the three-day event the biggest buy-in in poker history. Some of the biggest names in the game of poker will make their way to the UK to participate in this historic event that blends nosebleed stakes with an effort to raise money for a host of charitable causes. From every buy-in, £50,000 will be raised to benefit charities that include REG, the Caring For Children Foundation, Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity, and One Drop. Invitations Please It’s not just the super-sized buy-in that makes playing in this tournament unique. The Triton Million was searching for a way to make sure the event wasn’t simply packed with pieced-out pros. They wanted to give recreational players and business professionals a reason to participate, so that made the event invitation only - with a twist. A Triton Poker Series committee handed out invitations only to non-professional players and then allowed them to invite one player each, which could be a pro player. The result is a field consisting of one half ‘recreationals’ and the other half, super high roller poker pros. For the first six hours, each half will be separated. The pros will only play against other pros and the recs will battle the recs. Then, there will be a redraw and the tournament will proceed as usual. With only 23 business professionals signed up, pro players needed to find themselves an invite from a like-minded counterpart. Here are those pro players that made a connection or two and will be taking a seat at the Triton Million. Bryn Kenney [caption id="attachment_625864" align="alignnone" width="903"] Bryn Kenney (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Bryn Kenney is in the midst of a career year. The regular super high roller and former #1-ranked GPI player has spent the better part of 2019 destroying the biggest buy-ins in the world, claiming three seven-figure scores this year alone. In addition to taking down the 2019 Aussie Million Main Event for over $914,000, Kenney has posted some of the biggest results of his career in previous Triton Poker Super High Roller Series. In March, he finished as the runner-up in the Triton Jeju Main Event for a career-high cash of $3,062,513. He followed that up with back-to-back victories during Triton Montenegro bringing him scores of $1.4 million and $2.7 million in a three-day span. His incredible run has vaulted him to the rarified air of the top 5 on the All-Time Money List, where he currently sits at #4. He is also currently resting as the #2 player on the 2019 Money List, second only to the winner of the World Series of Poker Main Event, Hossein Ensan. Kenney was invited to the Triton Million by Poker Central founder Cary Katz. Tom Dwan [caption id="attachment_625865" align="alignnone" width="903"] Tom Dwan (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Tom Dwan is arguably one of the most popular poker players in the history of the game. When his exciting, aggressive style of play was featured in the pre-Black Friday televised cash games heyday, the young man known as ‘Durrrr’ became iconic as the representative of the young crop of online grinders who helped push the game of poker to the next level. Nowadays, a Tom Dwan sighting is rare. Especially in a tournament. It’s generally understood that Dwan spends his time grinding the largest cash games in the world in Macau, only buying into tournaments when the stakes are at their highest, like the Triton Million. In fact, Dwan only has five recorded tournament results since 2011, two of which were invitational events. His last tournament cash was from June 2018 where he had a final table finish during the Triton Jeju Short Deck event for $252,320. In April 2019, Dwan was named an official Triton Poker ambassador. Dwan was invited to the Triton Million by the founder of the Triton Series himself, Paul Phua. Justin Bonomo [caption id="attachment_625867" align="alignnone" width="903"] Justin Bonomo (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] It wouldn’t be a Super High Roller event without the current king of the All-Time Money List, Justin Bonomo. For roughly a two year stretch between 2017-2018, it seemed like there wasn’t a nosebleed tournament where Bonomo didn't end up with all the chips. With just over $45 million in career earnings, Bonomo has a trophy case filled with super high roller scores including the 2018 Super High Roller Bowl China for $4.8 million, the 2019 Super High Roller Bowl title in Las Vegas for $5 million and the 2018 $1M The Big One For One Drop at the World Series of Poker for $10 million. Bonomo’s last outright victory took place this past March when he conquered the field in the first Short Deck event of the 2019 Triton Juju SHR Series taking home just over $586,000. Bonomo was invited to the Triton Million by Ferdinand Putra. Fedor Holz [caption id="attachment_625869" align="alignnone" width="903"] Fedor Holz (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Despite having ‘retired’ from poker, German poker savant Fedor Holz is still very much categorized as a pro. Hailing from a country packed with some of the greatest minds in the game, Holz sits at #1 on Germany’s All-Time Money List (#6 in the world) thanks to his over $32M in career earnings. Like many players who will be attending Triton Million, Holz found the majority of his success in the high rollers, where he absolutely dominated the scene in 2016. At the time Holz went on his outstanding tournament tear, the poker world had not seen anything like it. Holz took down the 2016 Triton Philippines Main Event title for over $3 million as well as the WSOP’s $111,111 High Roller for One Drop for nearly $5 million in a campaign that brought his over $16 million for the year. Nowadays, Holz spends much of his time working in business endeavors off the felt, including his midset app, Primed Mind. However, it was just last year that Holz finished as the runner-up to Justin Bonomo in the $1M buy-in Big One For One Drop, taking home $6 million for his efforts. Holz was invited to the Triton Mliion by Antanas ‘Tony G’ Guoga. Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates [caption id="attachment_625872" align="alignnone" width="903"] Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] One of the most unique and entertaining players on the SHR circuit is Daniel ‘Jungleman’ Cates. A regular in the nosebleed cash games in Bobby’s Room at the Bellagio Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Cates is known as a fearless player willing to take on anyone, anywhere, and at any stakes. When Cates isn’t busy producing steamy poker themed music videos, he has found plenty of success on the Triton tour. In 2016 he took home the Triton SHR Series Sanctity Cup title, just days before finishing third in the same series Main Event for over $1 million. He also took home another Triton trophy in May 2019 taking down the NLHE/Short Deck Mix event for just over $500,000. Cates was invited to the Triton Million by Malaysian businessman Richard Yong. Plenty of other pro players were able to find an invite into the tournaments and they are listed below, with their businessman/recreational counterpart in parentheses. David Peters (Stanley Choi) Rui Cao (Wai Kin Yong) Jason Koon (Bobby Baldwin) Mikita Badziakouski (Liang Yu) Timofey Kuznetsov (Ivan Leow) Stephen Chidwick (Alfred DeCarolis) Wai Leong Chan (Chin Wei Lim) Christoph Vogelsang (Chow Hing Yaung) Nick Petrangelo (Pat Madden) Sam Greenwood (Sosia Jiang) Elton Tsang (Qiang Wang) Tan Xuan (Zang Shu Nu) Martin Kabrhel (Leon Tsoukernik) Matthias Eibinger (Open Kisacikoglu) Igor Kurganov (Talal Shakerchi) Sam Trickett (Rob Yong) Bill Perkins (Dan Smith) Andrew Robl (Andrew Pantling) Vivek Rajkumar (Rick Solomon) Danny Tang (Winfred Yu) Michael Soyza (Ben Wu) How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code “POCKET5S” for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  11. London won't be burning with boredom this week. The biggest buy-in poker tournament ever takes over London this week with many of the world's best high roller poker players playing at the invite of big-swinging recreational players. The Triton Million is a £1,050,000 buy-in tournament with unique rules designed to provide some level footing for the businessmen and women against some of poker's elite and all of the action will be streamed live. Leveling the Playing Field Not just anybody can play though. The Triton Million features a unique format designed to ensure the tournament isn't a shark fest. Triton organizers invited 23 recreational players, mainly businessmen and women, and each of them is allowed to invite one professional poker player as their guest. In an attempt to create a fair playing environment, recreational players will be separated from the pros for the first six levels of play with a full re-draw taking place following the sixth level. At that point, all players will be inter-mingled with the exception that recreational players can not be seated with the pro they invited until reaching the final table. Players are also not permitted to wear any form of clothing that covers their face or head. This includes scarves, funnel neck sweatshirts, turtle neck jumpers, hats/caps. All-Star Calibre Field As with any Triton Poker event, Paul Phua and Richard Yong will be in the field as two of the recreational players. They'll be joined on the recreational side by the likes of Bobby Baldwin, Cary Katz, Rob Yong, Talal Shakerchi, Tony G, and Leon Tsoukernik. Fedor Holz, Tom Dwan, Jason Koon, Sam Greenwood, Bryn Kenney, Mikita Badziakouski, Stephen Chidwick, Nick Petrangelo, and Timofey Kuznetsov are just a sprinkling of the players who have accepted an invite to play. There are currently 47 players registered including two additions made late Monday when hedge fund manager Bill Perkins invited Dan Smith to play. The only recreational player who has so far chosen not to extend an invite to a pro is Rick Salomon. The History of $1 Million Buy-In Poker Tournaments The £1,050,000 buy-in - roughly $1,285,000 US - make this just the fifth tournament in history to have a seven-figure buy-in. The previous four were all World Series of Poker Big One for One Drop events. The first Big One for One Drop in 2012 featured 48 players and was won by Antonio Esfandiari and represents the largest prize pool of the four. Year Event Entries Winner Prize pool 2012 $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop 48 Antonio Esfandiari $42,666,672 2014 $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop 42 Dan Colman $37,333,338 2016 €1,000,000 Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza 28 Elton Tsang $27,437,564 2018 $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop 27 Justin Bonomo $24,840,000 The 2016 event in Monte Carlo was only open to recreational players and was won by Elton Tsang. Multiple Charities Set to Benefit Like the Big One for One Drop, the Triton Million also has a charitable angle. £50,000 from each buy-in goes to Triton Million beneficiaries, a hand-selected collection of charities including Caring for Children Foundation, Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity Foundation, Sarawak Children's Cancer Society, Malaysian Red Crescent, One Drop, and Raise for Effective Giving (REG). Full Triton Super High Roller London Schedule The Triton Million is the star of a seven-event Super High Roller London schedule that includes a mix of traditional No Limit Hold'em and Short Deck Hold'em spread over the eight days of play. Event # Buy-In Game Dates 1 £25,000 Six Max No Limit Hold'em Turbo July 31 2 £1,050,000 Triton Million for Charity August 1-3 3 £50,000 No Limit Hold'em August 2-3 4 £100,000 Main Event August 4-5 5 £25,000 Short Deck Ante Only No Limit Hold'em August 5-6 6 £100,000 Short Deck Main Event August 6-8 7 £50,000 Short Deck Ante Only No Limit Hold'em August 7-8 How to Watch the Triton Million Triton Poker has an established history of hosting live streams of their events to huge audiences around the world with commentary in multiple languages. Previous tournaments have been streamed on YouTube and Twitch, but the all three days of Triton Million will be streamed for free on PokerGO beginning, August 1 at 8 AM ET. Ali Nejad and Nick Schulman will be in the booth calling all of the action. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  12. The 2019 Triton Super High Roller Series London kicks off this week with the biggest buy-in in tournament poker history as the highlight. Deemed the Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity, the event has a gargantuan £1,050,000 buy-in, of which £1,000,000 goes to the prize pool and £50,000 goes towards charitable causes. The Triton Million takes place at London Hilton on Park Lane and is sponsored by partypoker LIVE. It is scheduled as a three-day event from August 1-3. Charitable causes to benefit include Caring For Children Foundation, R.E.G., Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity, and One Drop. Triton Million Provides Unique Twist The Triton Million has a freezeout format with a rather unique twist to it. It’s invite-only. Invited players were issued invitations from a committee, and these players are of the recreational or businessman or woman variety. Those fortunate enough to receive invitations can then issue one invitation of their own to a guest player. The guest player can be a professional poker player. This allows for the field to be at least a 50% businessmen. For the first six hours of tournament play, the two player pools will be separated, such that the recreational/businessmen and women compete against one another and the guests/professionals play against one another. Furthermore, players will be asked to dress in formal attire for the final table. The Triton Million field has 25 businessmen signed up. Let’s take a look at them. Paul Phua [caption id="attachment_625843" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Paul Phua (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Paul Phua has been around the ultra high-stakes poker scene for nearly a decade now, amassing more than $11,400,000 in live tournament earnings and cashing in some of the richest poker events in the world. He has two victories on record, first in the Aspers £100,000 High Roller in 2012 for £1,000,000 ($1,621,297) and second in the Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza €100,000 High Roller for €752,700 ($825,619). As for his business exploits that have earned him a fortune, Phua has been a well-known junket operator for some of the world’s richest and he’s been in the news as the "world's biggest bookie," having his Caesars Palace villa raided in July 2014 for running an illegal gambling operation. The raid came just about a month after Phua was arrested in Macau under similar charges. Phua's guest player for the Triton Million is Tom Dwan. Cary Katz [caption id="attachment_625842" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Cary Katz (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Cary Katz is the man atop the Poker Central organizational chart, having founded the company in 2015. Prior to that, he was founder and CEO of one of the largest student loan companies in the United States. On the felt, Katz has nearly $20,000,000 in live tournament earnings, including a career-best score of €1,750,000 ($1,929,203) when he finished fifth in the 2016 Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza €1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. In January 2018, Katz won the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $100,000 Super High Roller to the tune of $1,492,340, and he placed eighth in the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop for $1,306,667. Katz's guest player for the Triton Million is Bryn Kenney. Rob Yong [caption id="attachment_625844" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Rob Yong (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Rob Yong is the owner of Dusk Till Dawn Poker & Casino in Nottingham, UK. Under Yong’s watchful eye, Dusk Till Dawn was built into what is considered to be one of the best card rooms in the world, with top-tier brands such as the World Series of Poker, World Poker Tour, partypoker, and UK & Ireland Poker Tour holding events there. Yong is now heavily involved with partypoker and partypoker LIVE, helping to grow these two brands in the online and live realms, respectively. Although his live tournament results amount to only a little more than $330,000, Yong has been a regular at some of the highest stakes in the world, specifically when it comes to cash games. At the table, he’s an entertaining competitor who doesn’t shy away from risk and will liven up any game. Yong's guest player for the Triton Million is Sam Trickett. Talal Shakerchi [caption id="attachment_625845" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Talal Shakerchi (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Talal Shakerchi is a player from the recreational/businessmen category that could likely fit into the professional poker player category. He doesn’t have the most live tournament earnings, with more than $7,300,000 won in his career, but make no mistake about it, Shakerchi is a grinder. For quite some time, Shakerchi kept his online poker name a secret so others in the high-stakes community wouldn’t realize his ability or the amount of volume he was putting in. On the business side, Shakerchi is an investment manager, running Meditor Capital Management Limited, which he founded. Shakerchi's guest player for the Triton Million is Igor Kurganov. Antanas 'Tony G' Guoga [caption id="attachment_625841" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Antanas 'Tony G' Guoga (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Antanas Guoga, who is best known as 'Tony G' in the poker world, is another player listed in the recreational/businessmen category that could very well be considered a professional poker player. At least that’s what he used to be. Now a politician and Lithuanian Member of the European Parliament, Guoga is rarely seen on the poker scene these days. He is the founder of PokerNews.com and TonyBet. Guoga boasts more than $6,000,000 in live tournament earnings and became famous for his brash table talk. His biggest cash came at the European Poker Tour Grand Final €25,500 High Roller in 2009, when he took third for €420,000 ($552,239). He won the 2005 European Poker Championships Main Event for £260,000 ($456,822) and placed second in the World Poker Tour €10,000 Grand Prix de Paris for €339,930 ($414,478) in 2004. Guoga's guest player for the Triton Million is Fedor Holz. Additional Triton Million players from the recreational/businessmen category are listed below, with their guest players in parentheses. Richard Yong (Dan Cates) Stanley Choi (David Peters) Wai Kin Yong (Rui Cao) Bobby Baldwin (Jason Koon) Liang Yu (Mikita Badziakouski) Ivan Leow (Timofey Kuznetsov) Alfred DeCarolis (Stephen Chidwick) Chin Wei Lim (Wai Leong Chan) Chow Hing Yaung (Christoph Vogelsang) Pat Madden (Nick Petrangelo) Sosia Jiang (Sam Greenwood) Qiang Wang (Elton Tsang) Zang Shu Nu (Tan Xuan) Leon Tsoukernik (Martin Kabrhel) Orpen Kisacikoglu (Matthias Eibinger) Ferdinand Putra (Justin Bonomo) Rick Salomon (Vivek Rajkumar) Bill Perkins (Dan Smith) Winfred Yu (Danny Tang) Andrew Pantling (Andrew Robl) Ben Wu (Michael Soyza) How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  13. Nominations for the second annual Global Poker Awards were announced on Friday with popular poker personality Joey Ingram leading the way with four nominations. The Global Poker Awards, slated to take place at the PokerGO Studio in Las Vegas on March 6, celebrates the poker industry by recognizing the game of poker's top talent both on the felt and behind the scenes. This year, awards will be handed out in 19 different categories including two that are voted on by the fans. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="GG Poker"][ptable zone="BetMGM NJ"] Multiple Nods Sixteen former award winners are back in contention this year with a number of them recognized in multiple categories. Poker personality and podcast/video producer Joey Ingram picked up nominations in the People’s Choice for Poker Personality of the Year, Podcast of the Year (Poker Life Podcast), Journalist of the Year and Media Content of the Year for his extensive work investigating the Mike Postle cheating allegation story. PocketFives’ own three-time GPI award winner Lance Bradley earned another three nominations for Journalist of the Year, Media Content of the Year, and Podcast of the Year for The FIVES Poker Podcast, alongside PocketFives own Managing Editor Donnie Peters. Daniel Negreanu, Jamie Kerstetter, Lex Veldhuis, Hayley Hochstätter and tournament director Matt Savage each earned two nominations. Alex Foxen, Andrew Neeme, Barny Boatman, Brad Owen, Bryn Kenney, Cary Katz, Joe Giron, Joe Stapleton, Kevin Mathers, Nick Schulman, and Paul Campbell join Bradley, Ingram, Negreanu, Savage, and Veldhuis as previous award winners who find themselves back in the running for even more hardware at the upcoming ceremonies. In addition to the 18 awards that will be voted on and the Global Poker Index Player of the Year awards, the PocketFives Legacy Award will once again be handed out to a PocketFives player who has shown success in both the online and live poker arenas. Previous award winners include Ari Engel, Cliff Josephy and Chris Moorman. 2019 Global Poker Award Nominees GPI BREAKOUT PLAYER OF THE YEAR Robert Campbell (AUS) Ramon Colillas (ESP) Ben Farrell (UK) George Wolff (USA) FINAL TABLE PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR Hossein Ensan (GER), WSOP Main Event William Alex Foxen (USA), WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Phillip Hui (USA), WSOP Poker Players Championship Bryn Kenney (USA), Triton Poker Super High Roller Series Montenegro TWITTER PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR Barny Boatman (UK) Jamie Kerstetter (USA) Kitty Kuo (TAI) Kevin Mathers (USA) PLAYERS CHOICE FOR TOUGHEST OPPONENT Michael Addamo (AUS) Kahle Burns (AUS) Stephen Chidwick (UK) Ali Imsirovic (BIH) STREAMER OF THE YEAR Hristivoje Pavlovic (AUS) Benjamin Spragg (UK) Matthew Staples (CAN) Lex Veldhuis (NED) VLOGGER OF THE YEAR Jaman Burton (USA) Andrew Neeme (USA) Daniel Negreanu (CAN) Brad Owen (USA) PODCAST OF THE YEAR DAT Poker Podcast: Terrence Chan, Ross Henry, Adam Schwartz, Daniel Negreanu (CAN) Poker Life Podcast: Joey Ingram (USA) The Fives, a PocketFives Podcast: Lance Bradley (CAN), Donnie Peters (USA) The Grid: Jennifer Shahade (USA) INDUSTRY PERSON OF THE YEAR Phil Galfond (USA), Run it Once Poker Cary Katz (USA), Poker Central/PokerGO Paul Phua (MAS), Triton Poker Matt Savage (USA), WPT/TDA TOURNAMENT DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR Tony Burns (USA), Seminole Hard Rock Paul Campbell (USA), Aria Jack Effel (USA), World Series of Poker Matt Savage (USA), WPT/TDA EVENT OF THE YEAR PokerStars Players Championship Bahamas Triton London Million for Charity World Series of Poker Main Event World Series of Poker BIG 50 MID-MAJOR TOUR/CIRCUIT OF THE YEAR Road to PSPC RUNGOOD Poker Series WPTDeepStacks WSOP Circuit JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR Lance Bradley (CAN) Haley Hintze (USA) Joey Ingram (USA) Nick Jones (UK) BROADCASTER OF THE YEAR Jamie Kerstetter (USA) Jeff Platt (USA) Nick Schulman (USA) Joseph Stapleton (USA) MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: WRITTEN A Fight for Fatherhood: The Biggest Win of Jason Young’s Life, Lance Bradley (CAN) for PoketFives Kevin Roster Spread Sarcoma Awareness at WSOP, Wants to End Life on His Terms, Aleeyah Jadavji (CAN), Hayley Hochstetler (USA) for PokerNews Poker and Pop Culture, Martin Harris (USA) for D+B Publishing The Unabridged Story of The Hendon Mob, Paul Seaton (UK) for PokerNews MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: PHOTO Antonio Abrego (USA): Ryan Laplante in deep thought at the WSOP (PokerNews) Drew Amato (USA): Dario Sammartino folds at the WSOP (Poker Central) Joe Giron (USA): WPT Champion Frank Stepuchin is lifted in victory (WPT) Hayley Hochstetler (USA): Doyle Brunson and Jack Binion at WSOP celebration (WSOP) MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: VIDEO Investigating Mike Postle Hand Histories from Stones Live, Joey Ingram (USA) Legends of the Game – Stu Ungar (PokerGO) The Big Blind w/Jeff Platt featuring Mike Matusow, Normand Chad, Sarah Herring (PokerGO) Who Makes Money from Professional Poker, Sam Rega (USA) for CNBC PEOPLE’S CHOICE FOR POKER PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR Joey Ingram (USA) Jonathan Little (USA) Ryan DePaulo (USA) Lex Veldhuis (NED) PEOPLE’S CHOICE FOR HAND OF THE YEAR Bryce Yockey takes a historic hit against Josh Arieh in the WSOP Poker Players Championship Ryan Riess makes 10-high all-in call at EPT Monte Carlo final table Sam Trickett makes Stephen Chidwick fold best hand at Triton London 1M event Thi Xoa Nguyen folds full house to Athanasios Polychronopoulos at PSPC
  14. Less than a week after winning the Industry Person of the Year award at the Global Poker Awards, Paul Phua took home $1.512 million for winning the MILLIONS Super High Roller Series Sochi $100,000 No Limit Hold’em event. Final Table Payouts Paul Phua - $1,512,000 Matthias Eibinger - $1,008,000 Webster Lim - $672,000 Adrian Mateos - $420,000 Michael Addamo - $336,000 Kahle Burns - $252,000 The event attracted 42 entries and generated a prize pool of $4.2 million. The top six spots were set to be paid, with a min-cash being worth $252,000. Entering the final table, it was Michael Addamo in the lead. Following the eliminations of Cary Katz and Ben Heath, the tournament was on the money bubble. The next player to fall was Michael Soyza, hitting the rail just one spot outside the money and securing a cash for the others. Soyza went out at the hands of Matthias Eibinger. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="GG Poker"][ptable zone="Party Poker NJ"] According to the partypoker LIVE reporting staff, first to bust in the money was Kahle Burns, going out in sixth place at the hands of Adrian Mateos. Then it was Addamo falling in fifth place to Webster Lim. With four players left, Phua was third in chips and Mateos was fourth. Mateos moved all in from the small blind with the [poker card="5c"][poker card="4c"] and Phua made the call from the big blind with the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="7c"]. The board ran out [poker card="8d"][poker card="8s"][poker card="7s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="9h"] and Mateos took his exit with a $420,000 payday. Shortly after busting Mateos, Phua doubled through Eibinger to take the chip lead. Eibinger had opened with a raise on the button and Phua had moved all in from the big blind. Eibinger called with the [poker card="As"][poker card="Jd"] but was dominated against Phua’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qc"]. The [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="3s"][poker card="4c"][poker card="Tc"] board kept Phua in the lead and scored him the double. Despite losing a chunk of chips doubling up Phua, Eibinger wasn’t the next player to bust. That was Lim who fell after Phua made a very good call against him. After a preflop raise by Phua on the button and a call from Lim out of the big blind, Lim check-raised all in on the [poker card="4h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="3s"] flop. Phua tanked for a bit and eventually called with the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5d"]. Lim had the [poker card="7c"][poker card="5c"]. The turn was the [poker card="8d"] and the river was the [poker card="9c"] to give Phua the win and send Lim out in third place for $672,000. Phua took the chip lead into heads-up play against Eibinger and made fairly quick work of his opponent. On the final hand, Phua had raised with the [poker card="As"][poker card="8s"] and Eibinger defended with a call holding the [poker card="Th"][poker card="8h"]. Eibinger then called bets on the flop and turn of the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8c"][poker card="Kd"] board to bring the two to the [poker card="6c"] on the river. After Eibinger checked the river, Phua bet to put him all in. Eibinger made the call with his pair of eights but saw the bad news that Phua had two pair. With that, Eibinger was eliminated in second place for a $1.008 million payday. The victory pushed Phua to more than $18.2 million in career live tournament earnings, and the score was his sixth seven-figure payday from a live poker tournament.
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