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  1. It wasn’t that long ago when poker fans were starved for content. Waiting for the next EPT live stream or setting their TiVo's to grab the latest rerun of an old WSOP episode. But that time has passed and today, we live in an era of the non-stop poker content frenzy. This week, the buffet for the eyes will only get bigger as the World Series of Poker, World Poker Tour, and Triton Poker all have brand new programming headed to a screen near you. WSOP on PokerGO In case you hadn’t heard, the 2021 World Series of Poker is underway and as thousands flock to the Rio to take a shot at a gold bracelet, there tens of thousands at home wanting a glimpse of the action. The live streaming for the WSOP kicks off on October 4 with the final table of Event #6 ($25,000 No Limit Hold’em High Roller) an event primed to be packed with some of the biggest names in the game. The action doesn’t stop there with 25 days of streaming to take place throughout the series - and that doesn’t include the Main Event. Final tables from all the biggest events in an effort to bring you the sights and sounds from the Amazon Room. Here’s the kicker, all that poker action comes with a price. If you want all of that, you’ll need a PokerGO subscription. Annual subscriptions are around $100, with discount codes readily available all over the internet. Sundays Are For The World Poker Tour This Sunday, October 2, Season XVIII of the World Poker Tour premiers on the Bally Sports Network with the Gardens Poker Championship final table. Chance Kornuth headlines the final six as they vie for their piece of the more than $2.4 million prize pool. “Our fans have been very patient waiting for the Season XVIII episodes and we are excited for Sunday Night,” said WPT CEO Adam Pliska “The action from Season XVIII promises to live up to the expectations of our audience.” Brand new episodes can be seen each of the next three Sundays - on actual television - with hefty three-hour episodes. The Gardens Poker Championship is the first of four final tables that can be watched through December 19. It should be interesting as it’s the first of the COVID-delayed content to come out and the whole gang - Vince, Tony, and Lynn are all back in action. While the Bally Sports Network isn’t one of the most well-known networks, a quick Google search will get you sorted out. Triton Million Charity is Waiting For Your Views Do you want action? Triton gives you action. Big time. They are also shipping out a 10-part series of their £1,050,000 buy-in Triton Million - A Helping Hand for Charity. This event was held in London in 2019. You might remember the event, the one that set the record for the biggest live tournament buy-in in history. £50,000 of every buy-in was donated to a number of worthy organizations while some of the biggest names in the game - including Tom Dwan, Bryn Kenney, Fedor Holz, and Dan ‘Jungleman’ Cates - made the trip to be a part of history. You don’t remember who won? Well, no spoilers here. Go take an inside look at how some of the elite battle against each other as well as some more recreational businessmen. This 10-part series, available on the Triton YouTube channel, was previously aired on a number of large television outlets but the real plus is that it’s now available on the small screen in your pocket. Can’t wait? Here’s episode one right here:
  2. After taking the final two events of the 2021 Poker Masters to claim the Purple Jacket, Michael Addamo followed that performance up by besting the 21-entry Super High Roller Bowl VI for a resume-topping cash of $3,402,000. After three days of high-stakes tournament action in the PokerGO Studio, Addamo was, once again, the last player standing. “It’s been an incredible week,” Addamo said after the win. “I’ve been running very fortunate in a lot of spots…it’s unreal to be honest.” After Bill Klein and Michael Addamo clashed at the end of Day 2, Klein hit the rail setting the stage for the final five players to return to crown the champion. Addamo held a commanding chip lead with Justin Bonomo also sitting on a healthy stack, while Alex Foxen, Chris Brewer, and Sean Winter were searching for ways to climb up over the million chip mark. Foxen, who ended Day 1 with the chip lead, was the first to hit the rail. After an hour of play, Foxen’s stack had dwindled down to roughly eight big blinds. With the blinds at 15,000/25,000 (25,000 bb ante) the action folded to Foxen in the small blind with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="5c"]. After taking a few moments he moved all in only to be snap-called by Bonomo in the big blind with [poker card="kc"][poker card="th"]. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3h"] keeping Foxen’s ace-high in the lead. That quickly changed with the [poker card="td"] hit the turn, giving Bonomo a pair and leaving Foxen looking for an ace on the river. Instead, it was the [poker card="qh"] on the river, bringing in a straight for Bonomo and sending Foxen out in fifth place, leaving the final four to battle on the stone bubble. After the elimination of Foxen, Bonomo and Addamo had plenty of separation from Brewer and Winter, both of the short stacks sitting on roughly 20 big blinds. Another hour passed and Brewer’s stack fell to roughly 10 big blinds and he was looking for a spot to double. The blinds climbed up to 15,000/30,000 and Bonomo applied pressure from the button with his [poker card="th"][poker card="4h"], raising enough to force Winter or Brewer all-in should they call. Winter let go of the small blind, but Brewer looked down at [poker card="ad"][poker card="qs"] and instantly called. Brewer stood and leaned over the table as the flop came out [poker card="qd"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5h"] giving Brewer top pair but bringing in a flush draw and backdoor straight outs for Bonomo. Brewer looked pained as a smile appeared on Bonomo’s face and the [poker card="js"] appeared on the turn. Brewer just needed to fade a heart, but the [poker card="kh"] hit the river, bursting the million-dollar bubble and sending Brewer out in fourth place. After the bubble burst, Winter picked up some chips and climbed to just under 30 big blinds. During the same level, Addamo put in a raise on the button to 65,000 with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="jc"] and after Bonomo let go of the small blind, Winter picked up the [poker card="th"][poker card="td"] and moved all-in. Addamo made the quick call and Winter was at risk. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"][poker card="5s"] flop kept Winter in the lead but brought Addamo some additional gutshot and backdoor flush outs. The [poker card="ts"] on the turn send Addamo into the lead with a straight, but Winter improved to a set but needed to pair the board to stay alive. The river was the [poker card="7c"] and Winter congratulated Bonomo and Addamo saying ‘good game, good luck guys” as he made his exit in third place for $1,008,000. After a quick break, Addamo and Bonomo returned to play down heads-up with Addamo holding a 35 big blind chip lead. Over the course of roughly an hour, Bonomo’s chip stack fluctuated up and down but he was never able to wrestle the chip lead away from Addamo. With the blinds still at 15,000/30,000, Bonomo, with 2.4 million in his stack, opened the button to 80,000 and Addamo made the call with the [poker card="7d"][poker card="2d"]. The [poker card="4d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2h"] flop brought Addamo a flush draw and bottom pair, which he checked over to Bonomo who checked back. The turn was the [poker card="qd"], bringing Addamo the flush while giving Bonomo top pair. Addamo overbet the pot for 250,000 and Bonomo opted for a call. The [poker card="tc"] completed the board and Bonomo improved to a second-best two pair. Addamo went for it all - moving all-in. Bonomo took his time, used nearly all his time banks while glaring at Addamo. In the end, Bonomo sat up and said “I call” and it was all over. Bonomo and Addamo shook hands as Bonomo falls just one spot short of a fourth SHRB title, settling for second place and his $1,890,000 payday. Addamo completed the hat trick, winning the final two events of the 2021 Poker Masters and his first Super High Roller Bowl championship for a career-high score of $3,402,000.
  3. The 2021 Super High Roller Bowl kicks off in Las Vegas at the PokerGO Studio on Monday, September 27 with some of the biggest names in tournament poker vying for a piece that will be, undoubtedly, a hefty seven-figure prize pool with multiple millions of dollars being shipped to the winner. With the $300,000 buy-in bringing out poker's best and brightest you might be thinking about getting a sweat going while watching the action unfold online. So, whether you are drafting a team with a few friends or playing a little fantasy poker these are the names you should be targeting to make sure they are on your SHRB Squad. These guys are the first-round picks for the 2021 Super High Roller Bowl. #1. Michael Addamo The dominance of Michael Addamo cannot be denied. And when you run as good as he is running right now, you top the list of SHRB draft picks. His high-roller credentials have been more than checked out - in addition to going back-to-back at the end of the 2021 Poker Masters to claim the Purple Jacket (and $1.84 million in 48-hours), Addamo is also the all-time leader in victories of the GGPoker Super MILLION$ where he’s amassed more than $1 million in profit. Add to that, he's also a two-time WSOP bracelet winner and Aussie Poker Open Main Event champ (among other accolades.) While others on this list may have more past SHRB success, Addamo is a player you simply can’t pass up. #2. Stephen Chidwick But...if one were to pass up Addamo and his sun run, they’d be a fool to pass up UK crusher Stephen Chidwick. With more than $35 million in total live earnings, Chidwick - a former #1 GPI ranked player and 2019 European Player of the Year - is both the 2018 U.S. Poker Open champion and 2020 Australian Poker Open winner. As an aside, he was voted, by his peers, at the Global Poker Awards as the Players Choice for Toughest Opponent. Like Addamo, he enters the SHRB with momentum, cashing in three events of the 2021 Poker Masters, including a victory in Event #7 for $183,600. Plus, he’s cashed in three previous Super High Roller Bowls, all in 2018, including the last one that took place in Las Vegas where he finished in third place for $1.5 million. #3. David Peters David Peters may not be a trendy pick at #3, but there may be no more reliable player in the field. Sitting fifth on the All-Time Money List, Peters simply knows how to win. He’s proven that yet again this year by taking home the Golden Eagle trophy in the 2021 U.S. Poker Open after winning three of the four events he cashed in. Plus, he’s had plenty of SHRB success, including a fifth-place finish in this year’s SHRB Europe for $820,000 and a final table finish in the inaugural event back in 2015. Simply put, Peters is the kind of player who can win it all on any given day. #4 Ali Imsirovic Critics might say that fourth is a little high for young Ali Imsirovic, after all, there are SHRB champions that are ranked underneath him. But there are only a few players who have spent as much time in the PokerGO Studio grinding high rollers in the past 24 months as Imsirovic. This gives him a huge home-field advantage. And you don’t have to look too hard to see how hard (and often) Imsirovic crushes high rollers. The 2018 Poker Masters champion currently only has one seven-figure cash on his ever-growing resume however that was a runner-up finish to Cary Katz in the 2019 Super High Roller Bowl London. Imsirovic just seems destined to add more million-dollar scores in the very near future. While he didn’t have a standout performance in this year’s Poker Masters, he should find a way to bounce back here in the Main Event. #5. Justin Bonomo No one loves the Super High Roller Bowl more than Justin Bonomo. According to PokerGO, no one has won more money from Super High Roller Bowl events than Bonomo, who has reaped $12,706,516 worth of cashes thanks to back-to-back SHRB title in 2018. Hell, even in the midst of COVID, Bonomo took down the Super High Roller Bowl $100K Online Event for $1.775 million. So, why is Bonomo only fifth? It’s not a comment on his talent against the field obviously, it’s simply a question of if he will actually be in the field? And if so, without a live result for the better part of two years, how will he perform? Even not knowing the answer to either question, you still gotta put respect on his name and include him in the top 5 picks. #6. Mikita Badziakouski Belarusian nosebleed crusher Mikita Badziakouski has proven himself time and time again to be one of the best tournament players on the planet. With more than $29 million in live earning, Badziakouski seems to have a way of always making a deep run in the most critical of events. Like Addamo, Badziakouski showed up a little early in Las Vegas to warm up before the SHRB. He promptly took down a Poker Masters event and made the final table of the Main Event. That was coming off of two third-place finishes in the prelims of the SHRB Europe. In 2018, Badziakouski took third in May’s SHRB event for $1.6 million, and then in 2020, he did the same in the event in the Bahamas for another $1.6 million. If it’s Badziakouski walking away with the win in 2021, there won’t be a single surprised person in the PokerGO Studio. #7. Jake Schindler You’d best not sleep on Jake Schindler in any event, especially one in the PokerGO Studio. Schindler rolls into the SHRB with three recent results from the 2021 Poker Masters, a pair of cashes in the prelims of the SHRB Europe, and a PokerGO cup event win. He’s generally considered one of the very best tournament players on the planet and that was on full display in 2017 when he finished second to Christoph Vogelsang in the SHRB for a career-high $3.6 million payday. Although he’s seventh on this list, any person betting on Schindler should feel confident that they have an absolute top-tier player on in their corner. #8. Jason Koon One of the nicest guys on the high-roller scene is also one of the most dangerous. Jason Koon, currently seventh on the All-Time Money List, has enjoyed plenty of success in the SHRB over the years, cashing in four SHRB live events. Because the 2018 heads-up between Bonomo and Daniel Negreanu was so memorable, it often gets forgotten that Koon had a shot at winning the title that year, but he fell in third place for $2.1 million score. However, history aside, Koon has been putting in work at the PokerGO Studio over the summer, including taking down a PokerGO cup event for $324,000. Like Schindler ahead of him on the list, Koon isn’t flashy at the table - he just produces results. If he gets close here in 2021, it wouldn't be a shocker to see him finally take one down. #9. Daniel Negreanu Daniel Negreanu’s infamous “second-place streak” has come to an end and "Kid Poker" is back to his winning ways. This includes locking up the overall leaderboard in the 2021 PokerGO Cup and a victory in the 2021 Poker Masters, where he was in the running for the Purple Jacket right up until the start of the final event. Negreanu is one of those “old school” players that polarizes fans when it comes to the biggest events in the world. However, where others of his era have been unable to compete with the young crop of crushers, Negreanu constantly provides receipts. It should be noted that one of those second-place finishes that people point to was his runner-up finish in the 2018 SHRB to Bonomo - good for a cool $3 million. In the interest of transparency, Daniel Negreanu is selling a piece of his 2021 Super High Roller Bowl action here on PocketFives. #10. Sam Soverel Another player that thrives in the PokerGO Studio is Sam Soverel. Soverel, the 2019 Poker Masters overall champion, currently sits in third place on PokerGO’s high-roller leaderboard by thoroughly dominating a string of $10K tournaments throughout 2021. There are a number of players who could be considered right here, but it’s Soverel’s undeniable success in this atmosphere plus incredible momentum that puts him as the final player in round one. The only downside of taking him here, as opposed to a player like two-time champion Tim Adams, fan-favorite Nick Petrangelo, or up-and-comer Chris Brewer, is his lack of previous SHRB results. But this may be the year that changes. The 2021 Super High Roller Bowl is available to stream from Sept. 27-29 on PokerGO. A recap of the final table will be available here on PocketFives.
  4. Stephen Chidwick started the final table of Event #7 ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em) with a healthy chip lead and carried it all the way through to the end, taking down his first tournament of the 2021 Poker Masters for a $183,600 payday. It was Chidwick’s second final table in as many nights and it finished it off in a fast-paced performance of just over two hours. “It’s always nice to win a tournament,” Chidwick said after the victory. “It was a bit of a slow start to the series for me with no cashes in the first handful of events so to make two in a row, and win one, puts myself in contention in points. That should make it a fun rest of the week.” Twenty minutes into the final table, Chidwick clashed with the dangerous Dan Smith for the first elimination of the day. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Chidwick picked up [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"] from under the gun and raised it up to 100,000. Smith, next to act, looked down at the [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"] and after a few moments moved all-in for just over 1 million in chips. The rest of the table got out of the way and Chidwick quickly called. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="6d"] flop kept Chidwick with a commanding lead. The [poker card="3s"] turn eliminated any backdoor options Smith had. The [poker card="kd"] improved Chidwick to an unnecessary set and sent Smith out in fifth place for $54,400. Three minutes later, Lou Garza opened to 125,000 from the button holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="7c"]. After Chidwick released his small blind, Brek Schutten three-bet shipped his final ten big blinds with [poker card="ad"][poker card="kh"]. Garza didn’t take long before making the call and moments later the pair watched on as Garza out flopped Schutten with a [poker card="as"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"] flop. The [poker card="td"] hit the turn, giving Schutten some counterfeit outs in addition to hitting his king kicker. However, the [poker card="8d"] completed the board, and Schutten headed for the exit in fourth place, good for a $68,000 payday. Over the next sixty minutes, Chidwick continued to build his castle of chips as the blinds climbed to 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante). When from the button, Dylan DeStefano, raised to 120,000 with the [poker card="as"][poker card="js"] and Garza, in the small blind, once again looked down at [poker card="ac"][poker card="7d"]. Garza, the short stack, moved all-in for his final 20 big blinds and, once Chidwick got out of the way, DeStefano snap-called. Both players paired their ace on the [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"][poker card="2h"], but DeStefano was still a considerable favorite. The [poker card="5h"] hit the turn and the river was [poker card="ks"] sending Garza home holding the same hand he sent Schutten out the door with. Garza tapped the table and made his way to the cage to collect his $88,400 for third place. Chidwick and DeStefano returned from a break with Chidwick holding a two-to-one chip lead. It took the former U.S. Open champion roughly twenty minutes of heads-up play to wrap up the event. The final hand took place with the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) and DeStefano opened the button to 180,000 holding the [poker card="qh"][poker card="ts"]. In the big blind, Chidwick three-bet to 550,000 with his [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"] and DeStefano made the call. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="9h"][poker card="5d"] flop brought DeStefano top pair but kept Chidwick in the lead with his pocket kings. Chidwick led for 350,000 and DeStefano made the call. The [poker card="3c"] turn changed nothing and Chidwick pushed out a bet of 525,000. With 1.4 million behind, DeStefano burned some time bank extensions before he made the call. The river was the [poker card="8s"] and Chidwick went for the win, betting enough to put DeStefano all-in. DeStefano counted his stack and decided on a call and was shown the winner by Chidwick. DeStefano, out in second, collected $136,000 and Stephen Chidwick earned $183,600 for his latest victory in the PokerGO studio. 2021 Poker Masters Event #7 Final Table Results Stephen Chidwick - $183,600 Dylan DeStefano - $136,000 Lou Garza - $88,400 Brek Schutten - $68,000 Dan Smith - $54,400
  5. In back-to-back final tables, going wire-to-wire with the chip lead in both, Michael Addamo took down the finale of the 2021 Poker Masters, Event #12 ($100,000 NLH), for a career-high live score of $1,160,000 as well as the Purple Jacket and $50,000 leaderboard prize. Addamo somehow makes taking on some of the toughest competition in the world look easy. The Australian came in late to the series, played in just the final three events, and in 48 hours won two of them. He earned $1.84 million, was rewarded as the player of the series, and on this particular day, wrapped up the final table in a little under an hour. “It’s insane, I’m incredibly tired, I’m looking forward to getting some sleep,” Addamo said right after the win. “It’s been an amazing run and I’m grateful the cards turned my way I guess.” In the early action of the final table, Addamo continually leveraged his enormous chip lead to apply constant pressure on his opponents as Mikita Badziakouski, Alex Foxen, and Stanly Tang all had stacks of less than 15 big blinds and with significant pay jumps ahead. Twenty-five minutes in, with the blinds at 15,000/30,000 (30,000 bb ante), Addamo raised from the button to 265,000 holding the [poker card="jc"][poker card="ts"]. After Tang released his small blind, Badziakouski looked down at the [poker card="6s"][poker card="6d"] and called off the rest of his short stack. The [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"][poker card="2s"] kept Badziakouski in the lead but offered Addamo gutshot straight outs to go with his overcards. That’s exactly what came in with the [poker card="qc"] turn, giving Addamo a straight and leaving Badziakouski drawing dead to the [poker card="3s"] river. Badziakouski fell in fifth place and picked up a score of $203,000. The very next hand, Addamo was back at it. He raised to 420,000 from the cutoff holding [poker card="js"][poker card="9c"] and Tang, with exactly 420,000 in his stack, quickly pushed all-in on the button with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="qh"]. Foxen and Nick Petrangelo folded in the blinds the two live hands were turned up, with Tang as a two-to-one favorite. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="td"][poker card="8d"] keeping Tang in the lead but bringing Addamo open-ended straight outs to go with his nine. Yet again, Addamo spiked the card he was looking for on the turn when [poker card="9h"] hit. Addamo picked up a pair and then it was Tang looking for help. The [poker card="6c"], however, was a brick, and Addamo sent Tang to the rail in fourth place for $319,000. With the elimination of Tang, Foxen laddered the pay scale for more than $200,000, but his stack continued to slip. Minutes later, it was the two-time GPI Player of the Year’s turn to get it in. And this time, it wasn’t Addamo who he was up against. From the small blind, Foxen shoved his final eight big blinds with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="4d"] and Petrangelo, in the big blind, quickly made the call with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="7d"]. The [poker card="7h"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2d"] put Foxen in jail, leaving him looking for runner-runner outs to a straight or trip fours. When the [poker card="9c"] hit the turn, it was all over. Foxen was already pushing his chips into Petrangelo’s stack when the [poker card="jd"] completed the board. Foxen grabbed his backpack and headed to the cashiers to collect his $464,000 third-place prize. Once Foxen was eliminated, the race for the Poker Masters Purple Jacket was over. Thanks to his victory in Event #11 and the prize money he’d secured in the finale, Addamo had a future date to be fitted for the Poker Masters trophy as well as claim the additional $50,000 that goes along with it. “I’m surprised it fits actually,” Addamo said as a break in the action allowed him to slip on the jacket for the first time. “It’s really amazing. I actually didn’t even there’d be a chance. I only came for three events. I didn’t know the points system would give me a chance, but yea, that’s amazing.” “It definitely gives me a lot of confidence, but I guess there’s also a lot of luck in these tournaments. A lot of the players are very strong players I respect a lot. I’m very fortunate the cards went my way as well.” But before any real celebrating could be done, Addamo and Petrangelo had a heads-up battle to finish. After a short break the two sat back down with Addamo having a four-to-one chip lead. Unlike some of the early final tables of the Poker Masters, where the heads-up portion took an extended time to complete, the finale was over in roughly 15 minutes. The blinds were still at 15,000/30,000 when Petrangelo raised to 70,000 with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="8d"] on the button and Addamo defended the big blind with the [poker card="7h"][poker card="3c"]. The flop came [poker card="7c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="2h"] and Addamo checked it over to Petrangelo who bet 50,000. Addamo then check-raised to 165,000 and Petrangelo opted for a call. The turn was the [poker card="th"] and Addamo checked it to Petrangelo who made it 250,000 to go, leaving himself with roughly 15 bigs behind. Addamo made the call and the river came the [poker card="5c"]. Addamo checked it again and Petrangelo stuck the rest of his chips in the middle with his king-high. Addamo instantly looked uncomfortable, uttered an audible expletive, and went into the tank. “I know I’m supposed to fold but I don’t like it.” He tossed in a time extension and then, suddenly, tossed in a single chip and called for it all. Petrangelo finished up in second place, good for $754,000 while Michael Addamo won a career-high live cash of $1,160,000 and the aforementioned Poker Masters Purple Jacket. 2021 Poker Masters Event #12 Final Table Results Michael Addamo - $1,160,000 Nick Petrangelo - $754,000 Alex Foxen - $464,000 Stanley Tang - $319,000 Mikita Badziakouski - $203,000
  6. It was a dominant wire-to-wire final table performance by Australian high stakes tournament crusher Michael Addamo in Event #11 ($50,000 No Limit Hold’em) of the 2021 Poker Masters. A short two-hour affair that saw Addamo enter with the chip lead, eliminated all four of his final table opponents, and walk away with the $680,000 first-place prize. “It’s pretty nice, of course,” Addamo said about adding a Poker Masters win to his long list of poker accomplishments. “I’m pretty happy.” “I had such a great stretch of hands and I pretty much had it the whole time on the final table,” he told PokerGO. “So I can’t credit it to any good bluffing skills. Just good fortune.” That good fortune started on the second hand of the final table. With blinds at 15,000/30,000 (30,000 bb ante), PokerGO boss Cary Katz ran right into Addamo when he raised to 95,000 from under the gun holding [poker card="jd"][poker card="jc"]. When it was Addamo’s turn to act in the small blind, he three-bet to 250,000 with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="kd"]. The action was back on Katz, who four-bet shipped his 26 big blind stack only to be snap-called by Addamo. The flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="6d"] providing no help to Katz who needed to hit a jack to stay alive. The [poker card="5d"] turn and [poker card="td"] river ended Katz’s day early in fifth place. “That was fun,” Katz quipped as he packed up his belongings and headed to the cage to pick up his $119,000 score. Addamo went back to work. Twenty minutes later, he opened to 60,000 from the button with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="kh"]. In the small blind, Alex Foxen three-bet to 500,000, leaving himself with less than ten big blinds behind. David Coleman in the big blind let go of his [poker card="as"][poker card="td"] and Addamo wasted no time in four-betting enough to force Foxen all-in. Foxen obliged and saw his hand was dominated. The [poker card="as"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3d"] flop didn’t change much, keeping Addamo’s ace-high ahead and giving both backdoor straight possibilities, if they can hit each other’s kicker. The [poker card="3h"] eliminated any straight potential and, like Katz, Foxen was left looking for a river jack to survive. The river came the [poker card="7h"] and Foxen found himself on the rail in fourth place, collecting $187,000. The brisk pace of play continued as Addamo continued to leverage his chip lead to apply pressure on his opponents. During the same level, Coleman raised the button to 60,000 with the [poker card="th"][poker card="td"] and after Jason Koon let go of his [poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"] in the small blind, Addamo decided to defend his big blind with the [poker card="9h"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6h"] keeping Coleman’s pocket tens ahead but offering Addamo a gutshot straight draw. Addamo checked it over to Coleman bet 55,000 off his 700k stack. Addamo took a few moments and opted for a call. The [poker card="8c"] spiked on the turn and Addamo’s straight came in. Addamo then took the lead and bet out for 75,000, which Coleman called. The [poker card="ad"] hit the river and after taking a few more moments, Addamo shoved and a visibly irritated Coleman was put to the test. With just under 20 big blinds left, Coleman went into the tank and eventually made the fold. The blinds went up to 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) and Addamo continued to chip up. Both Koon and Coleman slipped under 20 big blinds and Addamo was taking every spot to force the two short stacks into uncomfortable spots. Another hour passed and the blinds climbed again to 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante) and by this time Addamo had 75% of the chips in play. Coleman’s time came when Addamo open-shoved from the small blind with his [poker card="4s"][poker card="4c"] and Coleman, down to roughly five big blinds, looked down at the [poker card="qd"][poker card="js"] and went with it, calling all-in. It was a flip for Coleman’s tournament life and the flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="th"][poker card="6s"], giving Coleman some additional outs. The [poker card="8d"] hit the turn, and Coleman added even more outs - 14 in total, one time. But Addamo was running too good and when the [poker card="8s"] fell on the turn, Coleman stood, shook Addamo’s hand, said “good luck guys” and made his exit in third place, good for $272,000. With a four-to-one chip lead, Addamo went to work on closing out the tournament. Koon hung around, looking for spots to turn the tide but he was never able to build a chip stack over 1 million at the end. The final hand had Koon ship a stack of just under 20 big blinds with [poker card="kc"][poker card="6d"] from the button and Addamo, after asking for a count, made the casual call holding [poker card="kd"][poker card="jh"]. The [poker card="8h"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4s"] flop gave Koon some additional gutshot straight outs. However, the turn came the [poker card="4c"] and the river was the [poker card="kh"], keeping kickers in play and forcing Koon to settle as the runner-up which was good for $442,000. For his dominating performance, Addamo earned $680,000 and climbs to more than $9 million in career live earnings. 2021 Poker Masters Event #11 Final Table Results Michael Addamo - $680,000 Jason Koon - $442,000 David Coleman - $272,000 Alex Foxen - $187,000 Cary Katz - $119,000
  7. Belarusian high-stakes tournament crusher Mikita Badziakouski touched down a little early in Las Vegas in order to play the upcoming Super High Roller Bowl and decided to warm up with an entry into the 2021 Poker Masters Event #10 ($25,000 NLHE). By the end, he had toppled a star-studded final table that included Jason Koon, Ali Imsirovic, Seth Davies, and Daniel Negreanu to collect the $342,000 first-place prize and the first Poker Masters victory of his career. Just a few minutes into the final table, Seth Davies found a way to pick up chips and climb up from the short stack - even if he had to get a little lucky to do it. The blinds were at 10,000/20,000 (20,000 bb ante) when Davies make it 45,000 to go from the button holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="jc"]. On the button, Jason Koon picked up [poker card="qh"][poker card="qd"] and made it 115,000 to go. The blinds both got out of the way and Davies opted to move all-in for 30 big blinds total. Koon quickly called, putting Davies at risk. The danger for Davies didn’t last long as the flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="ah"][poker card="6d"], putting Davies on the verge of a big double up. Koon, with just two outs, watched as the turn came the [poker card="kh"] and the river came the [poker card="jd"], crippling his already short stack. Davies chipped up to second place while Koon was left with just six big blinds. Over the next two orbits, Koon tried to find a spot to double, but 10 minutes later he was out when his [poker card="kd"][poker card="5d"] couldn’t catch up to Daniel Negreanu’s [poker card="ts"][poker card="th"]. Koon’s early fifth-place exit was good for $76,000. Ali Imsirovic has had plenty of noted success inside the PokerGO studio. But at the 2021 Poker Masters, it took until Event #10 before he made a final table appearance - one that was cut short in a clash of huge hands. With the blinds at 15,000/25,000 (25,000 bb ante), Imsirovic raised to 75,000 on the button with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="kh"]. After Negreanu folded his small blind, Badziakouski looked down at the [poker card="ad"][poker card="kd"]. Badziakouski, having Imsirovic covered by roughly 15 big blinds, three-bet to 275,000. The action was back on Imsirovic. With 50 big blinds total, Imsirovic four-bet to 475,000 after which Badziakouski took some time and five-bet shoved. Imsirovic snap-called and the cards were on their backs when the flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="qs"][poker card="ts"]. Imsirovic’s pocket kings were well ahead but Badziakouski had three aces and a gutshot straight draw as outs. The [poker card="js"] spiked on the turn, bringing in Badziakouski’s straight but giving Imsirovic additional flush out to go with his full house draw. But an innocent [poker card="4c"] completed the board and with kings cracked, Imsirovic made his exit to collect his $104,500 payday. Three-handed play between Badziakouski, Davies, and Negreanu wore on. Over two hours later, Badziakouski had lost his chip lead with Davies taking over while Negreanu deftly navigated the short stack. Negreanu made a series of critical pre-flop shoves to stay alive, and after a gutty hand in which he check-shoved a turn on Badziakouski with king-high (it happened to be good), Negreanu finally climbed out of the cellar. But just as Kid Poker was gaining momentum he ran into a roadblock. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante) Davies called in the small blind holding [poker card="8h"][poker card="5h"]. In the big blind Negreanu raised to 175,000 with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="kh"] and Davies opted for a call. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="qh"][poker card="9c"] giving Negreanu top set and a 94% advantage in the hand. Davies checked and Negreanu checked back. The turn came the [poker card="th"], opening the door with flush outs for Davies. Davies checked again and Negreanu followed suit once again. The river was the [poker card="7h"] bringing the runner-runner flush for Davies. Davies led for 400,000, roughly half of what Negreanu had left. Negreanu couldn’t get away and flipped in a single chip for a call and ended up back on a ten big blind stack. It was all over for Negreanu a few minutes later when, on the button, Badziakouski limped in with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="ac"] and Negreanu picked up [poker card="6s"][poker card="6d"] in the big blind. Negreanu shoved, Badziakouski called and the board ran out [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"][poker card="jh"][poker card="5c"][poker card="js"] giving Badziakouski a full house and eliminating Negreanu in third place for $152,000. After a short break, heads-up began with Davies holding a roughly two-to-one chip lead. Davies continued to apply pressure on Badziakouski, at times widening the chip gap only to have Badziakouski battle back. But at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante), Badziakouski decided to risk it all in an effort to flip the script. On the button, Davies moved all-in with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="6h"] and Badziakouski looked down at the [poker card="jc"][poker card="9c"]. Badziakouski took a moment, counted his chips, and suddenly said “Yea, why am I thinking? Easy.” and stuck his 22 big blind stack in the middle. The flop came [poker card="kd"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3d"] missing both and keeping Davies ace-high ahead. The [poker card="7s"] turn did nothing for either player and Badziakouski was down to six outs one time. But the [poker card="9h"] came on the river and just like that Badziakouski soared to a hefty chip advantage that he never surrendered. On the final hand of the event, with the blinds at 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante) Badziakouski called on the button holding [poker card="qh"][poker card="ts"] and Davies checked his option with his [poker card="js"][poker card="4h"]. The [poker card="jc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6c"] gave Davies top pair and he quickly checked it over to Badziakouski who bet 100,000. Davis, with just over 600,000 behind, check-raised to 225,000. Badziakouski opted to put Davies all-in and Davies stuck his stack in as a 70% favorite. The [poker card="7h"] didn’t change much, but the [poker card="9s"] on the river gave Badziakouski the straight and ended the hard-fought heads-up battle. Davies falls in second place and collected $228,000 while Badziakouski picked up the win and the $342,000 first-place prize. 2021 Poker Masters Event #10 Final Table Results Mikita Badziakouski - $342,000 Seth Davies - $228,000 Daniel Negreanu - $152,000 Ali Imsirovic - $104,500 Jason Koon - $76,000
  8. There was a new face in the PokerGO studio for 2021 Poker Masters Event #9 ($25,000 Pot Limit Omaha) and that was California-based entrepreneur Miles Rampel. Rampel, who decided to made his Poker Masters debut in a $25K PLO event, walked away with what was, reportedly, his first-ever tournament cash of $365,500. As told to PokerGO, Rampel, who does play cash games, started playing PLO this year but had never bought into any tournament for more than $100. When his buddies brought him out to Las Vegas he thought “You know what, I’ll take a shot.” And what a shot it was, besting some of the game’s top high rollers and making his first Hendon Mob entry a victory at the Poker Masters. "It hasn't hit me yet, but I feel great, I feel great," Rampel told PokerGO after the win. Five-handed play lasted through the first break, nearly an hour forty-five minutes into the final table. At 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) Jeremy Ausmus, with 10 bigs, opened from the button to 140,000 holding [poker card="as"][poker card="qs"][poker card="jd"][poker card="7s"]. In the big blind, Rampel looked down at [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="2d"]. Rampel, who had assumed the chip lead, quickly three-bet to 440,000. Ausmus took some time, and decided to call, leaving himself with just 15,000 behind. The flop came [poker card="6d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2d"] giving Rampel bottom pair and missing Ausmus entirely. Rampel checked it over to Ausmus who checked back. The turn was the [poker card="4d"] giving Rample diamond flush outs. He led out enough to cover Ausmus’ final few chips. Ausmus took one more look at his hand before tossing them in. The [poker card="8s"] river was no help to Ausmus who tapped the table and went to collect his $86,000 for fifth place. It didn’t take long before another player hit the rail. Ten minutes later, Ben Lamb found himself with just 10 big blinds when he opened from the button to 140,000 holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"][poker card="8h"][poker card="3c"]. From the small blind, Rampel made the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2h"]. The [poker card="9s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2s"] flop gave Lamb a wrap and, once again, brought a pair of deuces for Rampel. Rampel checked it over to Lamb who moved the rest of his 290,000 stack all-in. It wasn’t enough to take Rampel off his hand, and the chip leader made the call. Although technically behind in the hand, with 17 outs twice Lamb was the statistical favorite to win. That changed when the [poker card="qh"] hit, nothing changed except Rampel’s chance of fading Lamb’s outs. He did just that on the [poker card="9d"] river, letting Rampel’s pair of twos hold and sending Lamb out in fourth place for $118,250. The final three players grinded for roughly another hour, passing chips back and forth. Lou Garza, who started the day with the chip lead, took it back, but Rampel stayed close. Sean Winter found his stack dwindling, unable to pick up the key hand that would allow him to get back in the thick of it. His time finally came at the 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante) level. After taking a number of hits to his already short stack, Winter was sitting on just over two big blinds. He raised to 120,000 from the button holding [poker card="qd"][poker card="ts"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8h"] and was called by Garza in the small blind with his [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"][poker card="8c"] and Rampel in the big blind holding [poker card="kh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4c"]. The [poker card="8d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] gave Rampel trip fours, a pair and a flush draw for Winter, and a pair for Garza. It was checked to Winter on the button and he tossed in his final 20,000. Both Garza and Rampel called. The turn was the [poker card="5h"] improving Rampel to a full house and leaving both other players drawing dead to the [poker card="9c"] river. Winter walked with $161,250 for third place. The start of head-up play had Garza holding a slim lead over Rampel, both with more than 40 big blinds. It didn’t take long for Rampel to take the chip lead away from Garza once again, this time he didn’t give it back. He extended his lead to a roughly five-to-one advantage when the final hand went down. Blinds were up to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) when Garza raised it up to 240,000 holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7s"]. Rampel made the call from the big blind with his [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2s"][poker card="2h"]. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="4h"] giving Garza the nut flush draw as well as a straight draw while Rampel hit top pair. Rampel checked it over to Garza who bet full pot, only to be shoved on by Rampel. Garza stuck the rest of his chips in the middle as a favorite. The [poker card="4d"] came on the turn and Rampel needed to once again fade a multitude of outs, this time to win the tournament. And again, he did that when the [poker card="qd"] completed the board. In his third straight final table, Garza again falls just short of his first Poker Masters victory, this time as the runner-up for $236,500. After Garza made his exit, Rampel was mobbed by a few friends on set as they celebrated his victory and $365,500 first-place payday. 2021 Poker Masters Event #9 Final Table Results Miles Rampel - $365,500 Lou Garza - $236,500 Sean Winter - $161,250 Ben Lamb - $118,250 Jeremy Ausmus - $86,000
  9. The stakes have been raised in the 2021 Poker Masters as Chris Brewer took down Event #8 ($25,000 NLHE) on Wednesday for a career-high tournament cash of $427,500. The $10Ks on the schedule are in the rearview mirror and the super high rollers have made their way to the PokerGO studio in Las Vegas. In fact, Event #8 saw a total of 57 entries which created an impressive prize pool of $1.425 million. For Brewer, an emerging face on the high-stakes scene, he relied on both his experience and a little bit of luck to take down first of the $25Ks. “I won a lot of all-ins which was super helpful,” Brewer said after his win. “I’m pumped to win.” It looked like it could be a quick final table after the early exit of table short stack John Riordan. On the very first hand, with the blinds at 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante), Darren Elias was looking to apply some pressure on the short stack as he moved all-in with the [poker card="qs"][poker card="4s"]. Riordan, the lone blind, picked up [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] and went with it, sticking his eight big blind stack in the middle. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4c"] giving Elias trips and leaving Riordan looking for runner-runner help to survive. The [poker card="8c"] opened the door for a possible flush for Riordan, but he missed when the river came the [poker card="td"]. Riordan’s fifth-place finish was good for $114,000 and it marked his fourth cash in the first eight events. Brock Wilson had also been on a Poker Masters heater, sitting at his third final table of the series and capturing a win in Event #4 for $189,800. For the better part of an hour, Wilson had been nursing the short stack and when the blind climbed to 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) he was sitting on just eight big blinds when he moved all-in from the small blind holding [poker card="qd"][poker card="8c"]. Elias was in the big blind, looked down at [poker card="ac"][poker card="qs"] and instantly called. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2c"] flop kept Elias’ dominating hand in the lead with top pair. The turn came the [poker card="6d"] and Wilson found himself drawing dead to the [poker card="4s"] river. He added to his Poker Masters resume with his fourth-place finish for $142,500, bringing his 2021 Poker Masters total to $414,300, good enough to assume the top of the leaderboard for the Purple Jacket. Lou Garza, who started the day with the chip lead continued to be the leader when three-handed play started. But as the first break approached, he lost that lead to a surging Elias while Brewer also found himself losing chips. By the end of the third hour, Elias was building a tower of chips as Garza slipped to the bottom of the chip counts. With the blinds at 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante) the two short stacks went to war. Brewer opened from the small blind to 575,000 with his [poker card="8h"][poker card="6h"], forcing Garza to go all-in if he wanted to call. Indeed he did as Garza put his chips in the middle with the [poker card="as"][poker card="4c"]. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="tc"][poker card="8d"] flop paired up Brewer and left the former chip leader needing help to stick around. The turn was the [poker card="5d"] and the river was not an ace, but the [poker card="3d"], ending Garza’s back-to-back final table run in third place for $199,500. Elias held a healthy 2.5-to-1 chip lead over Brewer when heads-up began. But in a key hand where Elias had [poker card="qc"][poker card="5c"] and Brewer held [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"] and the flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2c"], Brewer was able to bring the two stack to even. It was just twenty minutes later that Brewer had flipped the chip counts, holding the 2.5-to-1 chip lead over Elias. The blinds escalated to 50,000/125,000 (125,000 bb ante) and Elias was sitting on just over 10 big blinds when he moved all-in from the button with his [poker card="tc"][poker card="9h"]. With the lead and [poker card="kd"][poker card="9c"], Brewer defended, looking to finish off the four-time WPT champion. The [poker card="js"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"][poker card="ah"][poker card="qh"] board never really provided a sweat for the duo as Brewer’s king-high hand was good enough to score the win. Elias collected $285,000 as the runner-up and Brewer booked the win and $427,500 to go with it. Brewer’s third 2021 Poker Masters cash brings his series total to $490,800. 2021 Poker Masters Event #8 Final Table Results Chris Brewer - $427,500 Darren Elias - $285,000 Lou Garza - $199,500 Brock Wilson - $142,500 John Riordan - $114,000
  10. The 2021 Poker Masters schedule may be heavy on the No Limit Hold’em, but on Monday the schedule took a break from the standard fare to allow some of the high stakes mixed game players to enjoy some of the action. It was Maxx Coleman who enjoyed it the most, taking down Event #6 ($10,000 8-Game) to the tune of $120,000. In addition to No Limit Hold’em and Pot Limit Omaha, the two most popular poker variants, the 8-Game Mixed rotation included Limit Hold’em, Seven Card Stud, Seven Card Stud Eight or Better, 2-7 Triple Draw, Omaha Eight and Razz. The event drew 30 entries but only five who returned on Day 2 made the money. The first elimination took place during Pot Limit Omaha when Jeremy Ausmus, who had started the day as the short stack, found himself with just 35,000 in chips. With the blinds at 10,000/20,000 (20,000 bb ante), Ausmus stuck his stack in holding [poker card="as"][poker card="kh"][poker card="td"][poker card="9d"]. Coleman in the big blind committed the few chips necessary for a call with his [poker card="9h"][poker card="9c"][poker card="5s"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2d"] keeping Coleman’s pair of nines in the lead but leaving outs for Ausmus. The [poker card="2c"] turn changed nothing and when the [poker card="jh"] completed the board Ausmus was out in fifth for $21,000. Playing Omaha 8 with blinds at 25,000/50,000 a short-stacked Erik Sagstrom raised to 100,000 holding [poker card="kd"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3s"]. Stephen Chidwick, also very short but covering Sagstrom, made the call holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="qs"][poker card="ts"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2h"] giving Chidwick top pair on the high and a wheel draw for the low while Sagstrom had a wrap straight draw plus possible lows as well. Chidwick checked and Sagstrom bet. Chidwick raised and Sagstrom called. The [poker card="qh"] came on the turn, improving Chidwick’s high hand to trips and he bet again (100,000) and Sagstrom put the rest of his chips in the middle needing help on the river. It didn’t come as the [poker card="7s"] hit the river, allowing Chidwick to scoop the pot and ending Sagstrom’s run in fourth for $33,000. Even after the elimination, Chidwick was still short-stacked when No Limit Hold’em came around. With the blinds at 15,000/25,000 (25,000 ante) Chidwick moved all-in from the button holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"]. He ran into Coleman who made the call in the small blind with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="jd"]. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="jc"][poker card="5d"] leaving the 2018 U.S. Poker Open champion drawing thin. The [poker card="7c"] on the turn left Chidwick drawing dead to the [poker card="9c"] river. Chidwick collected his belongings and headed to the cage to collect his $48,000 third-place prize. Coleman and Chad Eveslage battle across the 8-Game landscape for the better part of an hour-and-a-half with Coleman eventually assuming a commanding chip lead. He sealed the tournament playing a hand of Razz. The game where the lowest hand wins determined the player who would take home the biggest payday. With the blinds at 80,000/160,000 (20,000 ante) Eveslage found himself all-in with one card to come holding [poker card="jh"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"] while Coleman held the slightly better [poker card="qc"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2h"][poker card="ac"]. Eveslage’s needed some help but he didn’t get it when the [poker card="qs"] came on seventh street and Coleman’s final card - the [poker card="8h"] - was irrelevant. Eveslage said “I don’t want to go play No Limit now” as he finished in second place for $78,000. Maxx Coleman is the Poker Masters 8-Game champion and earned $120,000 Poker Masters Event #6 Final Table Results Maxx Coleman - $120,000 Chad Eveslage - $78,000 Stephen Chidwick - $48,000 Erik Sagstrom - $33,000 Jeremy Ausmus - $21,000
  11. If it wasn’t over with his PokerGO Cup title, the narrative that Daniel Negreanu cannot close is officially done as he took down Event #5 ($10,000 NLHE) of the 2021 Poker Masters for $178,200, his second victory in the past 60 days. Just two months ago, articles were written and videos were made about how Negreanu had a multi-year long streak of finishing as the runner-up (rather than the winner) in big-time tournaments and heads-up battles. But almost as soon as the conversation hit its high point, Negreanu broke that streak in Event #7 of the 2021 PokerGO cup, a $50K in which he walked away with the win and $700,000. Now it appears he’s in no hurry to going back to runner-up status as he locked up his second victory of the year in the PokerGO studio for another six-figure score. Entering the final table as the short stack, Jeff Trudeau was going to need to make something happen early in order to stick around. With just five players returning for Day 2, everything seemed to take place a little faster, giving him less time to find a spot. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Trudeau had just six big blinds. Negreanu, who started the day with a healthy chip lead, opened to 125,000 from the cutoff with his [poker card="qd"][poker card="th"]. On the button, Trudeau found his spot and moved all-in for 300,000 holding [poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"]. The action folded back to Negreanu and he made the call. Negreanu jumped out to the lead with the [poker card="td"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2c"] flop. His pair of tens held through the [poker card="4d"] turn and [poker card="7s"] river and Trudeau was eliminated in fifth place for $52,800. Twenty minutes later it was Jake Daniels' turn to try and double. With just over ten big blinds, Daniels moved all-in from the button with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="jd"] and Nick Petrangelo looked down at [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"] in the small blind. Petrangelo made the call and after Negreanu folded his big blind, the cards were on their backs. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="th"][poker card="7d"] keeping Petrangelo’s pocket kings in the lead and leaving Daniels looking to spike an ace or one of the last two kings in the deck. The turn came the [poker card="9s"], giving Daniels some additional outs. However, the river came the [poker card="qh"] and Daniels exited in fourth place for $66,000, his second cash of the series. After the knockout, Petrangelo took over the chip lead and had nearly ten times the amount of chips as Vikenty Shegal, the short stack at three-handed. Forty-five minutes later, with the blinds up to 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante), Shegal looked like he was on the cusp of a critical double. Petrangelo, holding [poker card="tc"][poker card="7s"], folded the button. Negreanu, holding the same hand, [poker card="ts"][poker card="7h"], applied max pressure to Shegal by moving all-in. With 10 big blinds left, Shegal decided to make the call holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="td"]. Dominated with the ten and with a seven in the muck, the flop came [poker card="qc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="5c"] giving Negreanu the lead. The turn was the [poker card="3h"] and Shegal was left looking for a king. The river came the [poker card="jc"] leaving Shegal to say his goodbyes before he went to collect his $85,800 for third place. Heads-up play started with Petrangelo holding a 1.5-to-1 chip lead however both players had plenty of play with the shorter stack of Negreanu being 50 big blinds deep. Even so, the match didn’t take long. After a short break, Negreanu dragged a pot that put him in the chip lead and five minutes later, the pair played the most critical hand of the final table. At 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante), Petrangelo raised the button to 180,000 with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="7c"] and Negreanu quickly three-bet to 610,000 with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="qc"]. Petrangelo called and the pair took a flop of [poker card="as"][poker card="qd"][poker card="jh"] giving Negreanu two pair but giving Petrangelo top pair as well. Negreanu led out for 725,000 and Petrangelo made the call. The pot swelled to more than 2.7 million, slightly more than Petrangelo had left in his stack. The turn was the [poker card="4h"] and Negreanu opted to check it over to Petrangelo who checked it back. The river came the [poker card="4s"] and Negreanu took a few moments and made it 1.8 million to go. Petrangelo didn’t take much time to make the call and was shown the winner by Negreanu. Petrangelo was left with just under 10 big blinds and the very next hand Negreanu picked up [poker card="as"][poker card="ad"] and made the call on the button. Petrangelo looked at the [poker card="qs"][poker card="ts"] and moved all-in. Negreanu snap-called and the board ran out [poker card="kd"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="kc"], providing little drama for Negreanu’s aces. Petrangelo finished as the runner-up for 132,000 and Daniel Negreanu scored his first Poker Masters win of his career and the $178,200 first-place prize. 2021 Poker Mastrers Event #5 Final Table Results Daniel Negreanu - $178,200 Nick Petrangelo - $132,000 Vikenty Shegal - $85,800 Jake Daniels - $66,000 Jeffrey Trudeau - $52,800
  12. After starting the final table of 2021 Poker Masters Event #4 (10,000 No Limit Hold’em) dead last in chips, Brock Wilson willed himself to the top of the chip counts and found a way to take down the first Poker Masters event of his career, earning $189,800 and the top spot on the Poker Masters Purple Jacket leaderboard. For a relatively new face on the high roller scene, Wilson has been making quite the impression. Tor the better part of two years, the Las Vegas resident has been firing in some of the biggest live tournaments on the circuit. While he’d come close on numerous occasions to bringing home a win in the PokerGO studio, it had yet to materialize. On Saturday night, however, the win that felt inevitable finally came to pass. His victory in Event #4 is not only his most high-profile official victory, but the cash also ranks as a top-5 career score of over $3.5 million in earnings. READ: Empire State to Sin City: Brock Wilson Ready for Breakout Moment It took nearly an hour and a half before the final table had its first elimination. Wilson started the day as the short stack, and right behind him was Elio Fox. However, both players navigated the early levels to give themselves a little breathing room. The opposite was true for Nick Petrangelo who went from third in chips to the bottom of the chip counts. With blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Petrangelo, with just 10 big blinds, raised to 100,000 holding [poker card="qh"][poker card="qc"]. It folded around to Chad Eveslage in the big blind who defended with his [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"]. The flop came [poker card="7h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2h"], giving Eveslage bottom set and offering Petrangelo a flush draw to go with his overpair. When checked to, Petrangelo min-bet 50,000. Eveslage check-raised all-in, and Petrangelo, covered, made the call. The turn was the [poker card="js"] and the river came the [poker card="2c"], improving Eveslage to quads and sending Petrangelo out in sixth for $43,800. Five-handed play took place for over an hour more. The blinds increased to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) when Wilson raised to 175,000 from the cutoff holding [poker card="as"][poker card="ah"]. In the small blind, Brekstyn Schutten, who started the day with the chip lead, flatted with his [poker card="7h"][poker card="7c"]. Then, Sam Soverel, with just under ten big blinds came along holding the [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"]. The flop came [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"][poker card="3h"] and it checked through to Wilson who bet 150,000. Schutten let his pocket sevens go but Soverel didn’t follow suit, he made the call. The turn was the [poker card="9d"], bringing Soverel two pair. Soverel checked it to Wilson again, and Wilson moved all-in. Soverel snapped called, his hand ahead and just one card from a double. However, the river was the [poker card="ac"], bringing a set for Wilson and sending the 2019 Poker Masters champion to the rail in fifth place for $58,400. As Wilson climbed to second in chips, Eveslage found himself slipping. At 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante), Eveslage had just eight big blinds. From the small blind, he moved all in with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="jc"] and, in the big blind, Wilson made the call holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="8s"]. The board ran out [poker card="7c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="kd"] leaving Wilson’s ace high as the best hand and finishing Eveslage in fourth place for $73,000. At three-handed, Wilson, Schutten, and Elio Fox were all roughly even in stacks. After Elio took a big pot to put a dent into Schutten’s stack, the former chip leader was looking for a spot to double up. At 50,000/125,000 (125,000 bb ante), Fox was applying pressure to Schutten’s big blind when he moved all-in from the small blind with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="qd"]. Schutten woke up with [poker card="ad"][poker card="7s"] and called for his final 8 bigs. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5h"], putting Fox in the lead with top pair. That held through the [poker card="jd"] turn and the [poker card="3d"] river. Schutten settled for third place and collected $94,900 for his efforts. After a short break, Wilson and Fox sat down to play heads-up with Fox holding a better than two-to-one chip lead. Unlike some of the recent heads-up matches in the Poker Masters, these two didn’t take long to determine a winner. Wilson picked up a big pot, assumed the chip lead, and closed it out in roughly thirty minutes. On the final hand, Fox called on the button with the [poker card="8c"][poker card="5d"] and Wilson checked his option in the big blind holding [poker card="8s"][poker card="7c"]. The flop came [poker card="kd"][poker card="td"][poker card="8d"] and Wilson checked it to Fox who checked it back. The [poker card="8h"] hit the turn, giving both players trips. Wilson checked again and Fox put out 175,000. Wilson check-raised to 600,000 and Fox made the call. The river was the [poker card="7h"], eliminating the chop by giving Wilson a full house. After letting the shot clock wind down, Wilson shoved and after thinking it over, Fox decided to call and was shown the winner. Fox laddered from fifth in chips at the start of the day to finishing in second for $138,700. Brock Wilson won Event #4 for $189,800 and surged to the lead in the Poker Masters leaderboard. Poker Masters Event #4 Final Table Results Brock Wilson - $189,800 Elio Fox - $138,700 Brekstyn Schutten - $94,900 Chad Eveslage - $73,000 Sam Soverel - $58,400 Nick Petrangelo - $43,800
  13. For the second time in three events of the 2021 Poker Masters, the winner was forced to endure an extended, hard-fought heads-up battle before taking down the title. This time it was Adam Hendrix facing off against Matthew Wantman in Event #3 ($10,000 Pot Limit Omaha) and only after 125 hands and nearly 3 hours of heads-up play did Hendrix finally took out his final opponent to lock up the $186,300 first-place prize for his first Poker Masters win. The victory, which Hendrix said was “sort of emotional” was his first in the PokerGO Studio. He came extremely close during the 2021 U.S. Poker Open, holding a massive chip lead against Joey Weissman, however, Weissman mounted an improbable comeback to take the win away from Hendrix. The score pushes the Alaska native over $2 million in career recorded live earnings and currently sits as the second-largest cash of his tournament career. Traditionally, the Poker Master final tables play pretty quickly. However, in Event #3, it took more than two hours for the first of the final six to make their way to the exit. But once players started to fall, they began to fall fast. First up was Chris Brewer. With the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante) Brewer, with seven big blinds total, completed from the small blind to 100,000 with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="jc"][poker card="ts"][poker card="5c"]. In the big blind Hendrix, who had built his stack to second in chips, three-bet to 420,000 holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"][poker card="3s"]. Brewer took some time but eventually moved all-in and Hendrix made the call. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="qd"][poker card="4d"] giving Hendrix top two pair, as well as a flush draw and Brewer, was left looking for help in the form of a straight draw or running card. The turn came the [poker card="5h"], bringing Brewer a little hope. But the river was the [poker card="9c"], ending the six-person stalemate and sending Brewer home in sixth for $41,400. Moments later, with the chip lead, Wantman raised from the button to 130,000 holding the [poker card="qc"][poker card="jc"][poker card="td"][poker card="7h"]. A short-stacked Jake Schindler defended from the big blind with his [poker card="7s"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="4d"]. The [poker card="9d"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6c"] flop brought Schindler straight but it also gave Wantman a straight - a higher one. Schindler checked it over to Wantman who put out a tiny bet of 75,000. Schindler then check-raised all-in and Wantman made the quick call. The [poker card="kh"] came off on the turn, leaving Schindler drawing dead to the [poker card="4h"] river. Schindler, who finished fourth in Event #2 for $86,000, wrapped up in fifth place for $55,200. Jake Daniels and Brent Roberts were each sitting on ten big blind when Hendrix, first to act, put in a raise to 150,000 holding [poker card="tc"][poker card="9s"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"] and when it folded to Roberts in the big blind, he defended with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="th"][poker card="8d"][poker card="4d"]. The pair took a flop of [poker card="kd"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4s"] and when Roberts checked it over to Hendrix checked it back. The turn came the [poker card="9d"] bringing a set for Hendrix a set of nines and offering Roberts a flush draw and straight draw to go with his bottom pair. Roberts wasted no time and moved all-in for 340,000 and Hendrix put out calling chips. “Damn, that sucks,” Roberts said as the [poker card="6h"] hit the river sending him home in fourth place for $69,000. Three hands later, and with fewer than 10 big blinds left, it was Daniels' turn to get it all in. Hendrix made it 210,000 with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="th"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8c"] and Daniels, from the big blind, called with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="td"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4d"]. The flop came [poker card="9h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3c"] giving Hendrix top pair and Daniels middle pair, wheel draw, and nut flush draw. Daniels snap moved all-in and Hendrix called. Daniels was better than 60% with 19 outs twice. The turn was the [poker card="3s"], leaving Daniels looking for any number of cards in half the deck to survive. However, the river was the [poker card="6h"] missing Daniels and ending his run in third place for $89,700. After the final two players took a quick break, Wantman started heads-up play with a nearly two-to-one chip advantage over Hendrix. The two battled for nearly half an hour while Hendrix chipped away at Wantman’s lead. Eventually, Hendrix wrestled the lead away from Wantman for the first time in the tournament. From that point, a bit of back and forth took place as the heads-up match turned into a grind. After more than two-and-a-half hours of play, with the blinds up to 100,000/200,000 (200,000 bb ante), the final hand took place. With a better than two-to-one chip lead, Hendrix raised the button to 600,000 with his [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="2c"] and Wantman defended his big blind holding [poker card="qh"][poker card="tc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"]. The flop came out [poker card="9c"][poker card="8c"][poker card="2d"] bringing Hendrix bottom pair and a king-high flush draw while Wantman hit middle pair and a gutshot straight draw. Wantman led out for pot, 1.4 million, and Hendrix raised all-in. Wantman made the call and the turn came the [poker card="3s"], keeping Wantman ahead and giving Hendrix just one more card to hit his 17 outs. The [poker card="ad"] spiked on the river, giving Hendrix the best hand and the Event #3 title. Wantman took home $138,000 as the runner-up and Adam Hendrix picked up $186,300 and his first career Poker Masters event victory. Poker Masters Event #3 Final Table Results Adam Hendrix - $186,300 Matthew Wantman - $138,000 Jake Daniels - $89,700 Brent Roberts - $69,000 Jake Schindler - $55,200 Chris Brewer - $41,400
  14. Sean Perry was never really in any danger of elimination during the final table of the 2021 Poker Masters Event #2 ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em). He started the day with the chip lead, held on to it by taking out four of his final five opponents, and, in under three hours, walked out of the PokerGO studio with $206,400 for the win. The tournament was slightly larger than Event #1, as 86-entries created an $860,000 prize pool. For Perry, the victory, plus his eighth-place finish in the first event for $32,800, has made him the early points leader for the Purple Jacket something he said, “would mean the world to me.” Just six players returned to the PokerGO studio to battle for the Event #2 title, including John Riordan, fresh off his sixth-place finish in Event #1 for $49,200. Roughly 30 minutes into play, with the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante), Riordan found himself on the short stack with just eight big blinds. From the hijack, he moved all-in holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="qd"] and Jake Schindler, next to act, made the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="js"]. The rest of the table got out of the way and the pair watched as the board ran out [poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7d"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2s"] giving Schindler a straight and, for the second tournament in a row, ending Riordan’s day in sixth place for $51,600. With the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) Sam Soverel clashed in a big pot against Daniel Negreanu. All-in before the flop, Negreanu held the [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"], and Soverel, with the slightly larger stack, had the [poker card="ad"][poker card="qc"]. The flop came [poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2d"], keeping Negreanu in good shape. It got even better for "Kid Poker" when the [poker card="kd"] hit the turn leaving Soverel drawing dead to the [poker card="8d"] river. After the hand, Soverel was left with roughly two big blinds. Although he hung around for fifteen minutes, Soverel could build it back up when his [poker card="5d"][poker card="5c"] eventually lost to Perry’s [poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"] on the [poker card="th"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8c"][poker card="kd"][poker card="7c"] run out. Soverel, who won the Poker Masters Purple Jacket back in 2019, finished in fifth place for $68,800. Perry grabbed a commanding chip lead with four players left and began to apply the pressure. From the button, Perry made it 160,000 to go with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="4h"]. Negreanu bowed out in the small blind and then Schindler, with seven big blinds left, three-bet all-in holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="2s"]. Perry took some time to consider and ended up making the call. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4c"] flop gave Perry bottom pair which held through the [poker card="5c"] turn and [poker card="2d"] river. Schindler fell in fourth place and picked up $86,000 on the day. The final three then went to break. On the first hand back, with blinds up to 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante), there was only one big blind due to the prior elimination. First to act, Perry made it 225,000 holding [poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and Negreanu quickly moved all-in on the button for 1.425 million with his [poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"]. Jeremy Ausmus folded the single big blind and Perry wasted no time in calling. The flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"] keeping Perry’s sixes ahead, but not the favorite to Negreanu’s over cards, flush outs, and back door straight outs. The turn came the [poker card="9d"] giving Negreanu 16 outs one time. But that was simply too many outs, as Negreanu missed them all when the [poker card="ad"] completed the board. “He had half the deck and missed somehow,” Perry shouted as Negreanu collected his things and went to collect his $103,200 prize for third place. Unlike in Event #1, the heads-up match between Perry and Ausmus didn’t take very long. With a two-to-one chip lead, Perry kept control for the roughly 25-minute match. On the final hand, Ausmus raised to 200,000 holding the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"] and Perry raised it to 825,000 with his [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"]. Ausmus called and the flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="2c"] and Perry led for 400,000. In position, Ausmus opted for a call and the turn came the [poker card="kh"]. Perry checked it to Ausmus and Ausmus bet 800,000. After taking some time, Perry made the call. The [poker card="6d"] hit the river and Perry once again checked to Ausmus. Having missed all his outs, Ausmus moved all-in for just over 2 million. Perry went into the tank and eventually called the bluff with his pair of kings and ended the tournament. Ausmus was eliminated as the runner-up for $146,200 and Sean Perry took home the win and $206,400. Poker Masters Event #2 Final Table Results Sean Perry - $206,400 Jeremy Ausmus - $146,200 Daniel Negreanu - $103,200 Jake Schindler - $86,000 Sam Soverel - $68,800 John Riordan - $51,600
  15. Clear your calendars poker fans and get ready to settle in for some serious screen time when the World Series of Poker returns on September 30. PokerGO has announced their live streaming schedule of the 2021 WSOP and it includes 25 featured final tables in addition to extensive beginning-to-end coverage of the $10,000 Main Event. “PokerGO is proud to present the 2021 World Series of Poker live streaming schedule, featuring 36 days of live broadcasts including comprehensive coverage of the WSOP Main Event,” said PokerGO President Mori Eskandani. “The WSOP represents the most exciting time on the poker calendar and we look forward to bringing the thrill of winning gold bracelets to millions of poker fans around the world.” Live from the Amazon room at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino, the scheduled final tables include some of the biggest tournaments on the schedule. The tournaments that will, no doubt, be filled with some of poker's biggest stars. Standout events include the $25,000 NLHE High Roller, which kicks off the streaming on October 4, the $25,000 Heads-Up Championship, $1,000 Ladies Championship, $5,000 NLHE 6-Handed, two $50,000 NLHE High Rollers, a $100,000 High Roller, the $250,000 Super High Roller, and the battle for the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship. PokerGO promises daily coverage of the Main Event which begins on Thursday, November 4, and plays straight through until a winner is determined on Wednesday, November 17. Final table dates and times are all subject to change. The exact times for Main Event coverage have not yet been announced. In addition to the streaming coverage provided by PokerGO, the World Series of Poker Main Event television show has found a new home on CBS Sports. In a previous announcement, the CBS Sports Network announced 15 hours of 2021 WSOP Main Event coverage, which is expected to be the edited version of the events, as well as another 36 hours of 18 other bracelet events. Here’s a look at the current PokerGO streaming schedule for the 2021 WSOP. [table id=262 /] Main Event Coverage [table id=261 /]
  16. The record books will reflect that there was an official winner in Event #1 of PokerGO’s 2021 Poker Masters ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em), but it was hardly a definitive one as Shannon Shorr and David Peters effectively “played to a tie” on Wednesday night. After a lengthy, see-saw heads-up battle that lasted nearly two hours, the duo agreed that, in order to play the next event (Event #2), that they would simply split up the remaining prize pool and flip for leaderboard points. In the end, all the chips ended on Shorr’s side of the table and he was crowned the winner of the tournament and given 1st place points. The 12-event Poker Masters kicked off with 82 entries of Event #1 pushing the prize pool to $820,000. After a full day of play, the final seven returned for Day 2 to crown a winner and try to award a $205,000 first-place prize. Coming into the final table with fewer than ten big blinds, Ben Yu wasn’t long for the final table busting in the day’s opening moments when he got all-in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="9c"] against Shorr’s [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"]. When the board ran out [poker card="kc"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"][poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"], Yu tapped the table and exited in seventh place for $41,000. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Shorr opened to 100,000 on the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="qh"]. In the small blind, Brock Wilson looked down at [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"] and made the call. Then from the big blind, John Riordan who started the day as the second shortest stack moved all-in for his final 10 big blinds with [poker card="as"][poker card="8h"]. With the action on Shorr, he four-bet shipped all-in having Wilson covered. Wilson quickly released and the cards were put on their backs. The flop came [poker card="8d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5s"], giving Riordan top pair and putting him in a good spot to double up. However, the [poker card="qh"] turn quickly put Shorr back in charge as Riordan was left looking for one of just two outs. The [poker card="qc"] river ended Riordan’s day in sixth place, good for $49,200. The final five battled for nearly two hours until the next player made their exit. The blinds had climbed to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) and Jonathan Jaffe found himself on the short stack with roughly ten big blinds. When it folded to him in the cutoff with [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"], Jaffe moved all-in. It folded through to Wilson in the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"] and he quickly made the call. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3h"] flop gave Wilson top pair and a commanding lead in the hand. The turn came the [poker card="5d"] bringing some additional gutshot straight outs for Jaffe. But the [poker card="ad"][ spiked on the river and Jaffe moved his chips into the middle, collected his belonging, and headed to the cage to collect $65,500 for fifth place. After losing a big hand against Peters, one in which Wilson was all-in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="3d"] against Peters’ [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"], Wilson moved to the bottom of the chip counts. At the 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante) level, Wilson and Peters clashed again. Peters put in a raise on the button to 225,000 with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"] and Wilson, in the big blind with just under 10 big blinds remaining, defended holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="6h"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5s"], giving both players top pair but keeping kickers in play. Wilson checked it over to Peters who bet the minimum, 100,000. Wilson then check-raised all-in and Peters made the call. The turn was the [poker card="ac"], bringing Wilson some chop outs. But the [poker card="3s"] ended Wilson’s run in fourth place, adding $82,600 to his bankroll. READ: Empire State to Sin City: Brock Wilson Ready for Breakout Moment At three-handed, the chip stacks evened out until at 50,000/125,000 (125,000 bb ante) Shorr crept out to a small lead, while Peters and Dylan DeStefano remained neck and neck. On the button, Peters looked down at [poker card="js"][poker card="jh"] and put in a raise to 250,000. After Shorr folded his small blind, action was on DeStefano in the big blind with [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"] and just under 20 big blinds. He took a long look at Peters and then announced he was all-in and Peters, with the bigger stack, snap-called. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7h"] brought DeStefano a whole host of outs including potential flush, pair and backdoor straight outs. The turn was was the [poker card="ks"], leaving DeStefano with one more chance to his 10 outs. It didn’t come, the river was the [poker card="7c"] and DeStefano wrapped up in third place for $98,400. After taking out DeStefano, Peters started head-up play with a slight chip lead but Shorr was quick to even the stacks. Then the pair went to battle. Shorr built a considerable chip lead of roughly four-to-one and then Peters doubled. Shorr built it back up and Peters continued to hang around and then he took the lead. The pair bounced back and forth each taking turns trying to eliminate the other. All the while, registration for Event #2 was coming to a close and both players were eager to make sure they registered. Peters held a 7.6 million to 2.6 million chip lead over Shorr, at the 100,000/200,000 (200,000 bb ante) level, when he open shipped the big stack holding [poker card="as"][poker card="9d"]. Shorr made the call holding the [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"] and it looked like Peters might finally lock up the win. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="th"][poker card="3c"] flop gave Shorr a flush draw which came in on the [poker card="9c"] turn. Peters needed a nine on the river to take the hand, but instead the river came the [poker card="qh"] and the pair were back to even with a quarter of an ante difference between them. At that point, they agreed to a deal (that may have been agreed to earlier) and then flipped for leaderboard points. “We’re effectively calling this a draw,” said PokerGO commentator Jeff Platt. “We can do an adjusted chop,” Shorr said, indicating that what little difference there was would be split in the aftermath. They both shipped all-in blind with Shorr winning the hand and being declared the official winner, claiming first-place leaderboard points. Poker Masters Event #1 Final Table Results Shannon Shorr - $205,000 officially* David Peters - $147,600 officially* Dylan DeStefano - $98,400 Brock Wilson - $82,000 Jonathan Jaffe - $65,600 John Riordan - $49,200 Ben Yu - $41,000 * Specific details of the deal were not made public but were discussed in the broadcast.
  17. “What he has now is real problems,” Ali Nejad said as he called the action on PokerGO's High Stakes Duel III. “Dwan binks the nine on the turn, a demoralizing development…and now, Hellmuth has twelve outs, or the streak is over.” The river was a brick for the defending champion and as soon as Phil Hellmuth and Tom Dwan rose from their seats to share a friendly handshake in the center of the frame, the headlines were already being written: Tom Dwan Dethrones Phil Hellmuth in Round 2 of High Stakes Duel III The entertaining five-and-a-half-hour match gave fans just about everything they could have wanted. There was Dwan back in the poker spotlight, public closure over the duo’s famous 2008 feud, and, of course, peak Hellmuth - jovial and steaming, cursing and eating. (Oh, the eating!) That’s a big part of what makes High Stakes Duel work. Of course, for die-hard fans, the poker is critical. But, for many, it’s the dynamics between the players that make HSD good TV. And sure, by the end of the broadcast the big question of "who will win?" is always answered, but the show is more than just a point tally on a scoreboard. Emerging from this match were plenty of other storylines that were fun to see play out and could also play a big part in the future of the show. That was ‘Durrrr’, this is Dwan. You know the story: Dr. Bruce Banner infused himself with high doses of gamma rays while in the lab altering his DNA so when he becomes angry he transforms into…the Incredible Hulk! Banner is always trying to control his temper, but when the rage comes out the Hulk gets loose, and he destroys everything in his path. Perhaps Tom Dwan is a little like Dr. Banner. In the late 2000s, at the height of the online poker boom, Dwan exposed himself high doses of understanding ranges (before most people understood ranges) while “in the lab” and when he appeared on TV he transformed into “Durrrr”, the incredible online wunderkind who destroyed every bankroll in his path. That was then. His amazing, creative style of play is what Dwan built his reputation on. It's why still today fans are attracted to watching him play, despite him spending the better part of a decade grinding private ultra-stakes behind closed doors. But this is now: “The thing about high stakes poker back then was…a lot of people were missing some pretty core concepts and it gave me a lot of flexibility,” he said on PokerGO’s HSD “Weigh-In” show. “I just played this WPT show a week ago and I couldn’t really get that out of line, everyone’s studied No Limit a ton. I had a lot more options ten years ago.” That showed during his High Stakes Duel with Hellmuth as Dwan played a measured game, never really getting out of line, never really putting Hellmuth to the test with a less than adequate hand. Instead, he settled into the match, taking it seriously (when many thought he wouldn’t), and let the match come to him. Additionally, Dwan had an answer to Hellmuth's antics. Nothing. Whereas all of Hellmuth's previous opponents had a tendency to jaw back-and-forth with "The Poker Brat", Dwan never flinched. He never seemed compelled to answer back. Instead, Dwan kept his cool rather than responding with taunts like he did in his 2008 NBC Heads Up Poker Championship. He soldiered on, a wry smirk or left-looking glance here or there, but in general, he simply took care of business. Certainly, ‘Durrrr’ will emerge at some point in the future, but right now Tom Dwan looked like he was in complete control. Did Hellmuth actually...win? No doubt about it, the streak is over. Hellmuth’s reign as the undisputed king of High Stakes Duel has come to an end. But, honestly, is that a bad thing for Hellmuth? At the time of this writing, Hellmuth has yet to accept a rematch against Dwan and, if he doesn’t, who can blame him? He can credibly claim he has nothing left to prove in the format. He bested Antonio Esfandiari three times. He came back from a 19:1 deficit against Daniel Negreanu and ended up sweeping him in three straight. Finally, he played an experienced amateur in Nick Wright (something Dwan called him one of the best at) and took care of business. Plus, every sponsor of Hellmuth - from energy drinks to altcoins - must be happy with the amount of exposure he’s given them (far more than 24 total hours of screen time) on this show. Whenever the opportunity presented itself Hellmuth (is “shilling” too harsh a word?) took the opportunity to promote those who support him. A loss to Dwan marks the perfect time to exit stage left. Hellmuth, almost notoriously, is averse to stakes that climb too high. Yes, he played the 2012 Big One For One Drop with its $1 million buy-in, but for a player who sometimes has extended stays at the Aria Resort & Casino he’s notably absent in the regularly running $10Ks that take place in the Aria poker room. When it comes to bankroll management and game selection, super high-stakes tournaments are not traditionally where Hellmuth has found his success. So with the next High Stakes Duel, should PokerGO continue down the road they have established, be Round 3 would have a buy-in of $200,000. Win or lose, Hellmuth’s next option would be a $400,000 match. If Hellmuth were to win, he would be forced to defend a title at $400,000 and, in order to walk away, play and win a Round 5 that comes with a $800,000 price tag - legitimately making it among the biggest buy-in tournaments of all time. Losing to Dwan makes it the perfect time for Hellmuth to step aside under the notion that all his focus needs to be on his first love - the World Series of Poker. No one would blame Hellmuth for saving all his #WhiteMagic for chasing bracelet #16. Plus, by saving a $200K buy-in, Hellmuth could play just about every event on the WSOP schedule if he wanted to (provided he can pull himself away from his new bestie Mr. Beast.) All in all, a Round 2 loss to Dwan could end up being an easy exit and the real win for Hellmuth. Will PokerGO push Dwan (and the show) into deep waters? “If no one challenges a winner within 30 days of the previous match, that last winner declares victory.” The original High Stakes Duel rules have the stakes doubling through Round 8 “resulting in a potential prize pool of $12,800,000” and a player needing to win three straight matches before Round Six (or two in a row from Round Five) in order to cash out and win. If that stays true (it’s a TV show so producers can change the rules at will), there could be some incredibly high stakes to fight for in the next few months. As mentioned earlier, Dwan would play again at $200,000 and whoever wins that would need to battle at twice that with only Dwan having the potential to walk away with a victory and an $800,000 prize pool. That seems to be the minimum. So, all eyes will be on how far can the show go and how big is the player pool to help them get there. By the time Round 4 takes place, a $400,000 buy-in is bigger than PokerGO’s marquee event, the Super High Roller Bowl and it’s unlikely that there’s a massive player pool willing to play at those stakes in such a shallow format. Phil Ivey is a natural fit, and fans would love to see it. A rehashing of the “Durrrr Challenge” debate could take place if Daniel ‘Jungleman’ Cates were to answer the call. Maybe it would be a nosebleed tournament pro like Justin Bonomo, Dan Smith, Andrew Robl or All-Time Money List leader Bryn Kenney. As the rounds go higher, would the wealthiest of businessmen in the poker space need to courted? Players like Paul Phua, Rick Solomon, or perhaps even PokerGO founder Cary Katz himself. This is what is on the horizon for the show itself. It looks like either the initial premise is about to pay off on the promise of astronomical heads-up stakes or a hard reset is right around the corner with two new combatants creating new storylines (in anticipation of a Phil Hellmuth return.) More on the conversation on High Stakes Duel can be heard on The FIVES Poker Podcast below:
  18. Phil Hellmuth’s High Stakes Duel seven-match winning streak came to an end Wednesday night after nosebleed cash game savant Tom Dwan defeated the reigning champion in an entertaining five-and-a-half-hour, hard-fought heads-up battle for $200,000. Those hoping for Phil Hellmuth and Tom Dwan to reignite their 2008 NBC Heads Up Poker Championship feud may have been disappointed when the pair sat down with commentator Ali Nejad for the High Stakes Duel III (Round 2) “Weigh-In” show. Whereas in boxing or MMA, the combatants posture as to who will have the upper hand, this pre-game hype show saw a pair of players who seemed to genuinely enjoy and respect each other as people, if not each other's poker game. As Nejad peppered both with questions about their past encounters on the felt and their evolution (both as players and people) over the past 13 years, he received mostly replies of the duo slinging compliments at each other. Dwan, adamant that Hellmuth is one of the best at playing against amateurs (even better than Daniel [Negreanu]), while Hellmuth reminisced about how he and Dwan have recently palled around, smoking cigars and talking crypto. Hellmuth even called Dwan at age 35, “already a legend.” The good vibes continued once the cards were in the air. Dwan and Hellmuth kept the conversation going in the early moments with “Durrrr” asking “The Poker Brat” some probing questions about his prior matches and Hellmuth doing his promotional duties for his many sponsors. Dwan got off to a quick start, flopping a flush on the very first hand holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"] on the [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"] flop. But with little to continue with, Hellmuth folded his [poker card="ad"][poker card="2c"] and just two hands later Hellmuth took over a chip lead that he didn’t surrender for the better part of two hours. The first important hand of the match took place in the first hour with Dwan raising the button to 1,200 holding [poker card="9h"][poker card="7d"] and Hellmuth defending his big blind with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"]. Hellmuth checked in the dark as the dealer spread the [poker card="qh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="6h"] flop, giving Hellmuth two pair and Dwan an open-ended straight draw. Dwan continued for 1,500 and Hellmuth made the call. The turn came the [poker card="2s"] and Hellmuth checked again. Dwan fired 4,400 and Hellmuth made the call. The river came the [poker card="ac"] and after Hellmuth checked, Dwan bluffed for 11,000 with nine-high, and Hellmuth snap-called dragging more than 36,000 chips in the middle. As Dwan began climbing back from his lows, Hellmuth picked up another important early pot. From the button, Hellmuth called the 500 chip big blind with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="2d"]. Dwan made it 1,500 more to go holding the [poker card="jh"][poker card="jd"] and Hellmuth came along. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="5c"][poker card="5s"] flop kept Dwan in the lead and he led for 1,600 which Hellmuth called. The turn was the [poker card="4c"] and the action checked through. The [poker card="kh"] hit the river and Dwan led again, this time for 3,000. Hellmuth took a moment and announce a bet of 7,200 and after taking some time, Dwan paid him off, giving Hellmuth a 40,000 chip lead. Despite the things not going his way early, Dwan never showed any real frustration. He chipped away at Hellmuth and took over the chip lead for the first time since the first few minutes. From the button, Hellmuth made the call to 800 with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="9s"] and Dwan checked his option in the big blind holding [poker card="qc"][poker card="th"]. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="td"][poker card="5s"] brought Dwan top two pair and Hellmuth both a flush and straight draw. Dwan checked it over to Hellmuth who bet 800 and Dwan promptly check-raised to 3,000, which Hellmuth called. The turn was the [poker card="6h"] and Dwan bet 4,800 and Hellmuth snap-called. The [poker card="3d"] came on the river and Dwan bet 13,300 and Hellmuth started talking to himself before finally letting it go. By the end of the third hour, Dwan had extended his chip lead and was looking for opportunities to take Hellmuth out. It almost came when Hellmuth, with 72k behind, called 1,000 from the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="4h"]. Dwan raised it up to 4,000 from the big blind and Hellmuth made the call. The [poker card="9d"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"] flop brought an open-ended straight draw for Dwan and he led for 5,000. Hellmuth clicked it back, raising to 10,000 with his ace-high hand. Dwan made the call and the turn came the [poker card="jh"], bringing Dwan a straight. Dwan checked it over to Hellmuth, who bet another 14,000 drawing dead. Dwan considered his options and decided to shove. Hellmuth made the quick fold and Dwan’s lead surged to roughly three-to-one. “This is f***ing ridiculous actually,” Hellmuth fumed. “Noone’s ever beaten me raising every f***ing button before.”   Dwan continued to apply pressure, looking for the knockout blow and moving in with his big draws. But Hellmuth hung around and as he had in matches prior, turned his short stack around. Not only did he draw even with Dwan, but he reclaimed the chip lead for a short amount of time. But eventually, as the fifth hour was coming to a close, Dwan grabbed the lead back as well as a momentum that he wouldn’t let go of. With the blinds at 3,500/7,000, Dwan completed from the button with the [poker card="8h"][poker card="3h"] and Hellmuth checked holding the [poker card="qd"][poker card="7c"]. The flop came [poker card="jc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="4h"] and the action checked through. The turn came the [poker card="2h"] and Hellmuth led out for 9,000 from his 83k stack. Dwan considered and opted for a call with his heart flush draw and live eight. The river came the [poker card="8s"], giving Dwan the best hand and when Hellmuth fired 11,000, Dwan found the call, scooped the pot, and built one of his biggest leads of the match. “Motherf***er. Call nine thousand with a dry f***ing flush draw,” Hellmuth rants. “Never getting paid off…He doesn’t know any better.” As Hellmuth paced and ranted, Dwan didn’t reply with the bravado he showed off in 2008. He calmly stacked his chips, like a pro who had been there many times before, unfazed by the antics. While not the final hand, the one that summed up the match came early in the sixth hour of play. Dwan made it 9,000 to go on the button with [poker card="kh"][poker card="2s"] and Hellmuth made the call from the big blind with the [poker card="td"][poker card="8d"]. The flop came [poker card="9c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2d"], giving Dwan bottom pair. Hellmuth checked to Dwan who checked it back. The turn was the [poker card="5c"] and Hellmuth fired for 11,000 and Dwan made the call. The [poker card="3s"] hit the river and after cutting out some chips, Hellmuth announced a bet of 27,000 - half his remaining stack. Dwan tanked, used a time extension and let out a long sigh. Eventually, Dwan made the call, scooping the pot and grabbing an overwhelming eight-to-one chip lead. Down to his final 20K, Hellmuth picked up [poker card="ah"][poker card="ac"] on the button and limped for 4,000. Dwan checked his [poker card="9s"][poker card="3c"] and the pair saw a flop of [poker card="5c"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2h"]. Dwan led out for 5,000 with his middle pair and Hellmuth sprung the trap, moving all-in with his pocket aces. Dwan called the extra three big blinds and was looking for help. Help arrived for Dwan when the [poker card="9c"] hit the turn, improving him to two pair. Down to his final card, Hellmuth needed help. However, as the [poker card="6c"] arrived on the river, Hellmuth’s High Stakes Duel unbeaten streak was over and Dwan became the show’s new champion. “Good battle,” Hellmuth said shaking Dwan’s hand with a smile on his face. Dwan laughed and replied “Yea, crazy last one.” Hellmuth now has 72 hours from the end of the match in which to declare if he will challenge Dwan for another match. If he declines, a new challenger will be announced for Round 3.
  19. “Pick your stakes heads up…I’ve said it a million times.” The highly-anticipated heads-up match 13 years in the making will finally take place on Wednesday, August 25 when Phil Hellmuth takes on Tom Dwan in High Stakes Duel III (Round 2) at 8 pm ET on PokerGO. Now with an undefeated record of 7-0 in the High Stakes Duel format, Hellmuth most recently vanquished Fox Sports personality Nick Wright in the first round of HSD III. When Wright declined the option for a rematch, the powers at PokerGO filled the open seat with of the most popular personalities to emerge from the early eras of online poker, fan favorite Tom Dwan. Hellmuth and Dwan will pick up where Wright left off, skipping the initial $50,000 buy-in match and jumping straight to Round 2, where both players will put up $100,000. "We're going to play heads up, I told you." Bringing Dwan in to face Hellmuth is more than just a case of fan service, it’s also a nice nod to history. At the 2008 NBC Heads-Up Poker Championship, Hellmuth and Dwan faced off in what is arguably the most memorable match of the events eight-year history. Back then, Hellmuth was just an 11-time WSOP bracelet winner - still the record holder - and as popular as he’d ever been. Dwan was an emerging online poker star in a time when there was still a divide between “real poker” and “internet poker.” The miniature heads-up table was nowhere near big enough for the two egos sitting at either end. Hellmuth, clad in his then signature Ultimate Bet hockey jersey, looked eager to show the kid a lesson or two while Dwan, having trouble getting comfortable, wasn’t interested in old-school ways of thinking. And just when the match was getting started, it was over. Hellmuth and Dwan were both all in, Hellmuth with pocket aces and Dwan with pocket tens. Standard. But when the ten of spades hit the turn and Dwan took the lead, the Poker Brat quickly emerged and the jawing began. “Son, I would tell you this much, son, I’d never put in more than three thousand with two tens before the flop,” Hellmuth chided Dwan. “I was going to say good game, sorry for the suck out but…when you phrase it that way it makes me not wanna.” Dwan replied, with his ever-present skyward side-eye in full effect. “Phil, that’s why you lose money online.” Dwan pushed the envelope telling Hellmuth to pick his stakes, that he’d play Hellmuth as many times as he’d like. As the back-and-forth continued, Hellmuth then uttered what may be the most memorable line from the match. “We’ll see if you’re even around in five years,” Thirteen Years Later Far more than five years later, Dwan is still here and both he and Hellmuth enjoy the perks of being two of the most popular players in the game today. With the clash of thirteen years ago well behind them, the 2008 NBC Heads Up Poker Championship is still the backdrop for what will be an interesting clash of perceived styles when they reunite to finally face off in a televised rematch. The hype for the match will get started on PokerGO on Tuesday, August 24 at 8 pm. ET when Ali Nejad and Nick Schulman are scheduled to break down what can be expected when the two meet face-to-face. Then both Hellmuth and Dwan sit down with Nejad just before cards are in the air during The Weigh-In which starts on Wednesday, August 25 at 7:30 pm ET. Both players will give their thoughts about the match and, very likely, talk about their history together both in front of the cameras and behind the scenes. [caption id="attachment_635969" align="aligncenter" width="750"] Phil Hellmuth, Tom Dwan (and Mr. Beast) play high-stakes cash at the Aria.[/caption] Finally, the action kicks off on August 25 at 8 pm ET as Hellmuth puts his undefeated record on the line while Dwan returns to the poker spotlight, bringing his years of playing in the ultra-high-stakes Macau cash games to the High Stakes Duel felt. Whether Dwan bests Hellmuth to take the HSD belt or if Hellmuth avenges his 2008 NBC Heads-Up loss over Dwan, the loser of the match will have the option to call for a rematch with the stakes doubling to $200,000 a player. High Stakes Duel III, Round 2 - Phil Hellmuth vs. Tom Dwan is available with a subscription to PokerGO.
  20. For six hours on Wednesday night, Phil Hellmuth sat across from Fox Sports 1's First Things co-host Nick Wright and found an opponent willing to match him blow-for-blow - both in cards and the verbal jabs. In the end, it didn't matter and Hellmuth went on to win the opening round of PokerGO's High Stakes Duel III. Hellmuth now has a perfect 7-0 record in this format. He defeated Antonio Esfandiari 3-0 in 2020 and then rattled off three straight wins against Daniel Negreanu earlier this year. Hellmuth and Wright spent the opening minutes of the match promoting each other's platforms before spending the next 30 minutes playing small pots, feeling each other out, before Wright struck the first blow. Hellmuth raised to 450 with [poker card="as"][poker card="8d"] and Wright called with [poker card="5d"][poker card="5s"]. The flop came [poker card="jc"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5c"] and Wright bet 500 and then called after Hellmuth raised to 1,500. Both players checked the [poker card="9h"] turn. After the [poker card="4s"] river, Wright bet 3,500 and while Hellmuth was considering his options, Wright began to to talk to the 15-time WSOP bracelet winner. "You're definitely folding," Wright said, multiple times. Hellmuth called and Wright showed him the winner to take a 57,000-43,000 lead. The next big hand didn't come for another 45 minutes but lead to an epic Hellmuth rant. Hellmut opened to 500 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="jc"] and Wright called with [poker card="td"][poker card="6s"]. After the [poker card="6h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3s"] flop, Wright check-called Hellmuth's bet of 500. Wright then checked the [poker card="jh"] turn and Hellmuth bet 1,500 with top pair and Wright called. The river was the [poker card="tc"] to give Wright two pair and he checked once again. Hellmuth bet 4,600 and Wright called and tabled his hand saying, "I rivered you, buddy." Hellmuth immediately stood up and began pacing around the studio, and dropped F-bombs in the ensuing rant including the following soliloquy. "What a fucking mockery, man. This is my fucking living here. Just a fucking off-suit fucking ten. From a fucking calling station," Hellmuth said as both players were playing the next hand. Wright had built his stack up to 72,000. Hellmuth took a chunk back 15 minutes later with [poker card="7c"][poker card="7s"] against Wright's [poker card="as"][poker card="9d"] on the [poker card="4c"][poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3d"][poker card="qs"] board. Most of that went back to Wright after Hellmuth led out for 7,200 into a pot of 12,500 on a board of [poker card="qs"][poker card="8c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="qc"][poker card="3s"]. Hellmuth was bluffing with [poker card="7d"][poker card="5d"] while Wright had turned quads with [poker card="qd"][poker card="qh"]. Wright raised to 27,000 and Hellmuth tossed his cards into the muck. Wright was in front with 64,000 to Hellmuth's 36,000. Hellmuth slowly chipped away at Wright's lead over the next hour to once again find himself even. Rather than relinquish the opportunity, Hellmuth continued to apply pressure to Wright and three hours into play, held a 2-1 chip lead of his own. An an hour later, that lead had grown to 5-1 before Wright played a familiar tune to gain some chips back. Hellmuth called from the button with [poker card="qh"][poker card="js"] before Wright moved all in for 12,200 with [poker card="5d"][poker card="5s"]. Hellmuth called only to see the [poker card="5h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="3d"] flop give Wright a full house. Hellmuth was drawing dead after the [poker card="as"] turn as the meaningless [poker card="8d"] river completed the board. Hellmuth still held a 3-1 lead. The duel went on for another two hours with little fluctuation before a cooler of a hand ended things. Holding 70,000 of the 100,000 in play, Hellmuth limped the button for 800 with [poker card="8c"][poker card="5c"] and Wright checked with [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"][poker card="5s"] flop gave both players a flush draw and Wright check-called Hellmuth's bet of 2,000. The [poker card="tc"] turn completed both flush draws and Wright checked again. Hellmuth bet 3,000 and Wright called, leaving himself 22,000 behind. The river was the [poker card="8d"] and Wright checked for a third time. Hellmuth bet 7,400 into the 13,200 pot and Wright moved all in for 22,000. Hellmuth called and tabled the winner to capture his seventh straight High Stakes Duel victory. While Esfandiari and Negreanu were both quick to invoke the rematch option provided to the loser of the match, Wright indicated after the match that he wanted to think about it and consider his options before deciding if he will be back to play Hellmuth in a $100,000 buy-in.
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