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Found 5 results

  1. According to his Twitter account, the boisterous ChicagoJoey(pictured) will be live-streaming PLO on Twitch for 750 straight days. Yes, that's more than two years. A week ago, he Tweeted, "Will be streaming some form of PLO on @Twitch for the next 750 days straight (no joke)." No joke indeed. He added that most of what he'd be playing was "as Level 1 as it gets." On March 27, last Friday, ChicagoJoey Tweeted, "Day 4 of 750 straight day challenge is in the books. Thanks to the hardcores for making it fun! Back tomorrow." Monday is Day #7. He did an interview with NutBlocker and said of the current state of PLO streaming, "I do not see many players who play 1/2 and up streaming and giving out high-quality strategy while doing it." He added, "I want to help get the wonderful game of PLO out there to as many people as I can. I think it is such a fun game and many others will feel the same about it." As for why he'd want to tackle 750 straight days of streaming as opposed to a more rational number, ChicagoJoey told NutBlocker, "I was motivated to do it because I saw guys like JCarver and Jamie Staples putting in some really sick work ethic when it came to streaming, and I pride myself on being one of the sickest grinders in poker when it comes to work ethic." JCarver, aka Jason Somerville (pictured), recently signed with PokerStarsand started 70 straight days of streaming poker on Twitchfrom his base in Canada. He helped in part to pioneer poker on Twitch, which had been traditionally used for video games. If you're not familiar with ChicagoJoey, he has released a series of highly entertaining and informative poker-related podcasts with guests like Brian Hastings, Dan Cates, Daniel Negreanu, and Todd Anderson. He often sits, sometimes for hours, and shoots the breeze with his guests in a very relaxed fashion. This author met him at the American Poker Awards in Los Angeles and he was quite a character. Visit Joey's Twitch channel. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  2. In recent weeks, Mads Bertelsen (pictured), known on PocketFives as Mr Longhit, finished second in the PartyPoker $200K Guaranteed and put back $22,000. He was the highest finishing member of the PocketFives community in the tournament and logged his fourth largest score to date. "I'm just trying to grind a lot of MTTs now when I'm running good in these," Bertelsen told PocketFives. "I usually play PLO H/L cash games, but there is not a lot of action anymore. So, now I'm playing poker as an MTT pro instead." Why has the action dried up at the PLO H/L tables? We asked Bertelsen for his take and he told us, "For starters, the rake is insane. There will be a lot of post-flop pots and a lot of split pots, and they take rake from split pots. That means most regulars will lose playing each other heads-up, so it's hard to get games started." If you've never played PLO H/L, Bertelsen called the game "fun" and added, "Equity tends to be close, so fish can play lots of hands and not get punished as much as in Hold'em. Also, there are not as many videos and stuff about the game, so people have to play to improve. The only thing killing the game is the rake." Back to tournament poker now. So far in 2015, Bertelsen has finished fifth in the Sunday Million for $57,000, finished ninth in the Sunday Million for $10,000, and taken third in a PartyPoker Pokerfest event for $30,000. The two Sunday Million final tables took place on back-to-back weekends, a pretty incredible feat. "To get a second chance a week later was insane," he said of his Sunday Million performance. "It made me want to play more. Poker can get boring sometimes. I like to mix it up and play both MTTs and cash games. But now when it's going well in MTTs, I want to play a lot more of them." The #18 ranked player in Denmark got started in poker playing freerolls like many other PocketFivers. Then, he transitioned to small-stakes MTTs. "As I got better, it became more and more fun," he said. "I think we all need to be good at something. It gives us pleasure to know we are good and I guess that's why I kept on playing and improving." Away from the game, Bertelsen has a small boat and enjoys fishing, although he's not able to go very often. "Hopefully I will if summer is good in Denmark this year," he said. You can find him at #317 worldwide in the PocketFives Rankings, four spots off his all-time high. He is the top-ranked player in the Danish city of Vejle. Don't have a PartyPoker account? Sign up through PocketFives by clicking hereto get a 100% bonus up to $500 along with one free month of Tournament Poker Edge or CardRunners training, a $30 value. Get started here! Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  3. A new week meant a new game for the players in 888poker's Super XL Series. Monday's action shifted away from Hold'em, offering up two separate Pot Limit Omaha tournaments. The big buy-in Omaha tournament cost $109 to play and drew 164 players. The turnout resulted in a more than $24,000 prizepool, way above the $15,000 guarantee on the event. 'Xp3ctNoMerc1' topped the six-handed event to net the biggest payday of the day, $5,365. Two of the tournaments ended in heads-up chops. One chop resulted in two of the biggest paydays of the day for ‘Slipknott14’ and ‘Gagagawa’. The two chopped the $55 Snap event heads-up for respective paydays of $3,737.06 $3,583.47. The other chop came in the Mini Omaha event, where ‘Der_Baron32’ and ‘h12star’ made a deal from $1,249.63 and $1,151.86 paydays. One tournament offered a four-way deal. The $22 Monday Flush ended with ‘alwaysstrapp’ getting the win, but ‘KellerA’, ‘alexeiv2009’, and ‘relyinonluck’ also taking home just a hair over $2,000 each. Alexeiv2009 finished third, but took home the biggest payday of $2,366.43 The player named ‘nitur’ won the Mini Snap event, parlaying a $5 buy-in into a more than $1,300 payday. 'Tuanpham81' won the $22 Monday Royal for over $3,400. The action was great and the guarantees all hit, but there was little movement on the Super XL Series leaderboard. ‘PuntSonPunt’ picked up some more cashes to move over 728 points total and to maintain control of the top spot. Two-time winner ‘mindcrushers’ holds on to the second spot and ‘GoFighTer’ rounds out the top three after taking fourth in Event #24. Tuesday the Super XL Series continues with four more events, including a $2,100 buy-in High Roller tournament at 7 p.m. GMT. If that is a little too steep for your budget, the $215 buy-in Mini High Roller kicks off at the same time. At 7;35 p.m. there will be a $109 No Limit Hold’em “Tuesday Challenge” event. Action wraps with the fast-paced $160 Turbo High Roller at 9 p.m.. The full schedule of events is available on 888poker.com. Here is a look at all the final table results from Monday: Event #22 - $109 Pot Limit Omaha 1. Xp3ctNomMerc1 - $5,635.00 2. EvnomiYa - $3,920.00 3. PARARANGE - $2,940.00 4. Brttyy - $1,960.00 5. Hajniak - $1,470.00 6. Utex77 - $1,004.50 Event #23 - $12 Pot Limit Omaha 1. Der_Baron32 - $1,249.63* 2. h12star - $1,151.86* 3. MuhubanaShek - $758.96 4. quaha - $524.37 5. theslothpack - $382.93 6. magigydra - $244.93 *denotes a heads-up deal Event #24 - $22 No Limit Hold’em “Monday Royal” 1. Tuanpham81 - $3,484.80 2. Mkyplain - $2,516.80 3. Razvyb - $1,877.92 4. GoFighTer - $1,403.60 5. TOP1LTU - $975.74 6. Foreverpunk - $774.40 Event #25 - $22 No Limit Hold’em “Monday Flush” 1. alwaysstrapp - $2,243.22* 2. KellerA - $2,023.15* 3. alexeiv2009 - $2,366.43* 4. relyinonluck - $2,046.15* 5. Sirkarev - $912.24 6. BYLIA - $731.24 7. Kikasarzv - $550.24 8. Erik_Ajax - $371.05 9. Nzol888 - $226.25 *denotes a four-way deal Event #26 - $55 No Limit Hold’em “Snap” 1. Slipknott14 - $3,737.06* 2. Gagagawa - $3,583.47* 3. NevilleWeeee - $2,333.45 4. gandalf_mrs - $1,755.25 5. Srdn77 - $1,197.70 6. jnboye - $929.25 7. PonyDarker - $722.75 8. HappyHour4U - $516.25 9. krystek1212 - $392.35 *denotes a heads-up deal Event #27 - $5 No Limit Hold’em “Mini Snap” 1. nitur - $1,332.51 2. tassenusen - $949.78 3. Torreli1111 - $710.67 4. v1966 - $533.00 5. Berilius - $370.14 6. PumpkinKing - $296.11 7. heldoor - $222.08 8. Boyisbad888 - $148.05 9. dvakuba - $88.83
  4. Later this week, the 2018 World Series of Poker will reach the halfway point on the schedule. While a lot of the schedule each year is focused on No Limit Hold'em, the fans of four-card poker will rejoice this week as Pot Limit Omaha events highlight the 17 events on the schedule. Big Buy-in Pot Limit Omaha The two biggest buy-in PLO events on the WSOP schedule both take place this week, but not in their normal order. Traditionally, the $10,000 PLO Championship has always preceded the $25,000 PLO High Roller. This year, thanks to ESPN needing to set up the main stage for the Main Event broadcasts, the $25,000 buy-in event comes first. Running June 20-23, that event brings out the best PLO players in the world plus a mix of a few businessmen who love the four-card game. James Calderaro beat out 204 other players last year to win his first WSOP bracelet and $1,289,074. On the same day that final table begins, the $10,000 PLO Championship event kicks off. Attendance in this event has been on the rise each of the last two years, going from 387 in 2015 to 428 in 2017. The three-day event runs June 23-25. Don't Forget the Button Clickers The live felt isn't the only place where PLO bracelets will be up for grabs this week. For the first time in WSOP history, players will be able to play PLO on WSOP.com with a bracelet on the line. The $565 buy-in event is a one-day event on Friday, June 22. 2018 WSOP Week 3 Schedule Day Event # Event Name Defending Champion Monday 37 $1,500 NL Hold'em Christopher Frank Monday 38 $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship Mike Wattel Tuesday 39 $1,500 NL Shootout Ben Maya Tuesday 40 $2,500 Mixed Big Bet Jens Lakemeier Wednesday 41 $1,500 Limit Hold'em Shane Buchwald Wednesday 42 $25,000 PLO 8-Handed High Roller James Calderaro Thursday 43 $2,500 NL Hold'em Gaurav Raina Thursday 44 $10,000 Limit Triple Draw Lowball Championship Ben Yu Friday 45 $1,000 Big Blind Antes NONE Friday 46 $2,500 Omaha Hi-Lo/Stud Hi-Lo Smith Sirisakorn Friday 47 $565 WSOP.com Online PLO None Friday 6D $365 Giant Saturday 48A $1,500 Monster Stack Brian Yoon Saturday 49 $10,000 PLO Championship Tommy Le Sunday 48B $1,500 Monster Stack Sunday 50 $1,500 Razz Jason Gola Sunday 11D $365 PLO Giant Get Your Popcorn Ready for Streaming Madness The $50,000 Poker Players Championship event always attracts an amazing field and this year is no different. The final 12 players will be battling on Twitch with Phil Ivey, Michael Mizrachi and Brian Rast highlighting a storyline-filled penultimate day of action. Tuesday's final table moves to PokerGO in what promises to be an amazing showcase of some of poker's best playing a tough rotation of eight games. There are two other $10,000 Championship events (Seven Card Stud & Triple Draw) and the $25,000 PLO High Roller set for live streaming action this week. Date Time (ET) Event Outlet June 18 6:00 PM $50,000 Player Championship Day 4 Twitch June 19 6:00 PM $50,000 Players Championship FT PokerGO June 19 6:00 PM $10,000 Stud Day 2 Twitch June 20 4:00 PM $1,500 NL FT Twitch June 20 6:00 PM $10,000 Stud FT PokerGO June 21 4:00 PM $1,500 NL Shootout FT Twitch June 22 6:00 PM $25,000 PLO 8-Max FT PokerGO June 23 4:00 PM $2,500 NL FT Twitch June 23 6:00 PM $10,000 NL 2-7 FT PokerGO June 24 6:00 PM $2,500 Omaha Hi-Lo/Stud Hi-Lo FT Twitch  
  5. The 2019 World Series of Poker is on the horizon, with action slated to begin on Wednesday, May 29, at the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. Much has been made of the revamped tournament structures that the WSOP has implemented for the 50th annual WSOP, and players should expect more chips and more play across the board. Now, let’s take a look at the new-look Pot Limit Omaha events for 2019. PLO at the Sub-$1,000 Buy-In Level The first thing that can be noticed when comparing the 2018 schedule to 2019 specific to pot-limit Omaha events is that the 2019 schedule does not have the $365 Pot-Limit Omaha GIANT or $565 Pot-Limit Omaha tournaments. Instead, there is the $600 Pot-Limit Omaha Deepstack event that is at a similar price point. The $565 buy-in PLO event from 2018 is closer to the bone, so that’s the event we’ll use to compare to the $600 PLO Deepstack in 2019. In 2018, the $565 PLO event had a starting stack of 5,000 in chips, unlimited re-entry during the eight-level registration period, and was a three-day event. This event had 30-minute levels on Day 1 and 60-minute levels on Day 2 and Day 3. In 2019, the $600 PLO Deepstack has a starting stack of 30,000 in chips, unlimited re-entry during the 12-level registration period, and is scheduled as a two-day tournament. This event has 30-minute levels on Day 1 and 40-minute levels on Day 2. In 2018, the $565 buy-in PLO event had a 11.5% rake, as $65 of the $565 was taken out for fees and staff. In 2019, the rake is listed at 12.5%, so $75 of the $600 buy-in will be taken out. Here's a look at the 2019 $600 PLO Deepstack structure compared to the 2018 $565 PLO structure over the registration levels. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 25-50 100 66.67 2019 50-100 300 200 - 2 2018 25-50 100 66.67 2019 75-150 200 133.33 - 3 2018 50-100 50 33.33 2019 100-200 150 100 - 4 2018 75-150 33.33 22.22 2019 150-300 100 66.67 - 5 2018 100-200 25 16.67 2019 200-400 75 50 - 6 2018 150-300 16.67 11.11 2019 250-500 60 40 - 7 2018 200-400 12.5 8.33 2019 300-600 50 33.33 - 8 2018 250-500 10 6.67 2019 400-800 37.5 25 - 9 2018 300-600 8.33 5.56 2019 500-1,000 30 20 - 10 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 600-1,200 25 16.67 - 11 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 800-1,600 18.75 12.5 - 12 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,000-2,000 15 10 - 13 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,000-2,500 12 8.57 As you can see, the 2019 structure is a bit deeper throughout the earlier levels. That's good news for players. Where the structure makes up for it will be on Day 2 when the levels are only 40 minutes compared to 2018's 60 minutes. $1,000 and $1,500 PLO Events At the $1,000 and $1,500 buy-in levels, we also see an increase in starting chips. The $1,000 Pot-Limit Omaha event in 2018 had a starting stack of 5,000. In 2019, the starting stack has been increased to 20,000. In the $1,500 Pot-Limit Omaha event in 2018, the starting stack was 7,500. In 2019, it’s be upped to 25,000. Both events in 2019 are listed as three-day events, which is the same as in 2018, and the rake is the same at 10%. At the $1,000 level, late registration lasts two levels longer. At the $1,500 level, it lasts three levels longer. Here's a look at the structure for the $1,000 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 25-50 100 66.67 2019 50-100 200 133.33 - 2 2018 50-100 50 33.33 2019 75-150 133.33 88.89 - 3 2018 75-150 33.33 22.22 2019 100-200 100 66.67 - 4 2018 100-200 25 16.67 2019 150-300 66.67 44.44 - 5 2018 150-300 16.67 11.11 2019 200-400 50 33.33 - 6 2018 200-400 12.5 8.33 2019 250-500 40 26.67 - 7 2018 250-500 10 6.67 2019 300-600 33.33 22.22 - 8 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 400-800 25 16.67 - 9 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 500-1,000 20 13.33 Here's a look at the structure for the $1,500 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 25-50 150 100 2019 50-100 250 166.67 - 2 2018 50-100 75 50 2019 75-150 166.67 111.11 - 3 2018 75-150 50 33.33 2019 100-200 125 83.33 - 4 2018 100-200 37.5 25 2019 150-300 83.33 55.56 - 5 2018 150-300 25 16.67 2019 200-400 62.5 41.67 - 6 2018 200-400 18.75 12.5 2019 250-500 40 26.67 - 7 2018 250-500 15 10 2019 300-600 41.67 27.78 - 8 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 400-800 31.25 20.83 - 9 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 500-1,000 25 16.67 - 10 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 600-1,200 20.83 13.89 As you can see in both of these events, the added chips to the starting stack provide much deeper play. $10,000 PLO Championship Structure The $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship (8-handed) is back for 2019. In 2018, this event’s starting stack was 50,000. In 2019, it’s up to 60,000. Late registration is open until the start of Day 2 and there is no re-entry, which is the same as in 2018. The rake is also the same as it was in 2018. The blind levels are nearly the exact same except for a few spots where the small blind is larger. Here's a look at the structure for the $10,000 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 100-200 250 166.67 2019 100-200 300 200 - 2 2018 100-200 250 166.67 2019 100-200 300 200 - 3 2018 150-300 166.67 111.11 2019 200-300 200 120 - 4 2018 200-400 125 83.33 2019 200-400 150 100 - 5 2018 250-500 100 66.67 2019 300-500 120 75 - 6 2018 300-600 83.33 55.56 2019 300-600 100 66.67 - 7 2018 400-800 62.5 41.67 2019 400-800 75 50 - 8 2018 500-1,000 50 33.33 2019 500-1,000 60 40 - 9 2018 600-1,200 41.67 27.78 2019 600-1,200 60 33.33 - 10 2018 800-1,600 31.25 20.83 2019 800-1,600 37.5 25 - 11 2018 1,000-2,000 25 16.67 2019 1,000-2,000 30 20 In the $10,000 PLO event, you can see that the added chips allow for a deep structure throughout, even despite the two spots early on in the structure when the small blind is higher. The small blind being higher in Level 3 and Level 5 allow the tournament to remove the T25 chips sooner, which should speed up play a little bit. Players who opt to skip Day 1 of this event entirely and buy in for Day 2 will start with five more big blinds and with a greater M when compared to last year. $25,000 PLO High Roller Structure Like the $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship (8-handed), the 2019 version of the $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha High Roller (8-handed) is pretty much identical to what it was in 2018. The one big change is that the starting chips have gone up from 125,000 to 150,000. Other than that, late registration is the same 12 levels, there is one re-entry allowed per player, the rake is the same 5%, and the event is scheduled for four days - all of these things are the same as in 2018. Also like the $10,000 PLO event, there are a few minor tweaks to the blind structure for the small blind in a few spots, but it’s nothing major. Here's a look at the structure for the $25,000 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 150-300 416.67 277.78 2019 200-300 500 300 - 2 2018 200-400 312.5 208.33 2019 200-400 375 250 - 3 2018 250-500 250 166.67 2019 300-500 300 187.5 - 4 2018 300-600 208.33 138.89 2019 300-600 250 166.67 - 5 2018 400-800 156.25 104.17 2019 400-800 187.5 125 - 6 2018 500-1,000 125 83.33 2019 500-1,000 150 100 - 7 2018 600-1,200 104.17 69.44 2019 600-1,200 125 83.33 - 8 2018 800-1,600 78.13 52.08 2019 800-1,600 93.75 62.5 - 9 2018 1,000-2,000 62.5 41.67 2019 1,000-2,000 75 50 - 10 2018 1,200-2,400 52.08 34.72 2019 1,200-2,400 62.5 41.67 - 11 2018 1,500-3,000 41.67 27.78 2019 1,500-3,000 50 33.33 - 12 2018 2,000-4,000 31.25 20.83 2019 2,000-4,000 37.5 25 - 13 2018 2,500-5,000 25 16.67 2019 2,500-5,000 30 20 The starting stack for 2019 is 25,000 chips more than in 2018. It's not a massive increase when compared to the other PLO events on the schedule, but it's an increase that allows more deeper play throughout the competition.
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