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Found 15 results

  1. Winning a World Series of Poker gold bracelet is widely considered by many to be poker’s ultimate achievement. For some players, it defines his or her career. For others, it’s the one prize eluding some of the game’s best. For years, Stephen Chidwick was considered the best poker player without a WSOP gold bracelet. At the 2019 WSOP, Chidwick bucked that monkey off his back like the most turbulent bull does to a rider at a rodeo when he won the $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller for $1.618 million. Shawn Buchanan was another player in the "best without a bracelet conversation," but, like Chidwick, he broke through at the 2019 WSOP, winning the $800 buy-in WSOP.com Online NL Six-Handed. Now that Chidwick and Buchanan have each won an elusive gold bracelet, let's take a look at who are the best players remaining without a bracelet entering the 2020 WSOP. Patrick Antonius CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 15 2 0 $929,518 Widely considered one of the best all-around players in poker for quite some time, Patrik Antonius is still missing a WSOP gold bracelet from his résumé. He's come close a couple of times, finishing in the top 10 on four occasions and placing at the final table twice, but he's never scored better than third place. Antonius has been known to pass on tournaments for cash games these days, but he's still a threat to win a bracelet in the bigger buy-in WSOP events when he does compete. Niklas Astedt CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 6 0 0 $110,645 Sweden's Niklas Astedt is one of the top-ranked online poker players in the world, but his live success hasn’t been too plentiful, especially at the WSOP. Astedt’s skills should not be overlooked, though. His first WSOP cash came in 2014 and his highest WSOP finish was a 26th-place result in the 2019 WSOP $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller. He's also cashed in the WSOP Main Event on two occasions, with a 182nd-place finish in 2016 and a 899th-place finish in 2019. Mikita Badziakouski CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 4 4 1 $3,161,362 Mikita Badziakouski plays some of the biggest buy-in events around the world, and his career to date includes more than $26.1 million in live tournament earnings. At the WSOP, Badziakouski has four cashes. Each cash has been a final table appearance and each has come at WSOP Europe. If there's a high roller event on the WSOP schedule, Badziakouski will likely be in the field and a threat to win the gold bracelet. Darren Elias CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 28 3 0 $645,659 With four World Poker Tour titles and more than $7.5 million in live tournament earnings, it’s a matter of when, not if, Darren Elias will finally win WSOP gold. His first WSOP cash came in 2009. He has three WSOP final table appearances and two finishes in third place, although he’s never made it to heads-up play. The two times Elias finished in third came from the same event, the $10,000 No Limit Deuce to Seven Championship in 2017 and 2019. Alex Foxen CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 39 4 0 $808,918 Alex Foxen has been around the WSOP for a much shorter time than some of the players on this list, with his first WSOP cash coming in 2015. He has, however, built up quite the reputation as one of the best tournament poker players in the game today and it seems very much just a matter of time before he finds himself in the WSOP winner’s circle with his first gold bracelet. Already, Foxen has racked up 39 WSOP cashes and four final tables ahead of 2020. His highest finish to date was a third-place finish at the 2017 WSOP in a $1,000 No Limit Hold’em event. Matt Glantz CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 61 13 1 $3,232.669 Pennsylvania's Matt Glantz has been around the WSOP block a few times, but he’s still looking for that first gold bracelet. Glantz first cashed in a WSOP in 2000 and he’s been producing everything but wins since, including 13 final table appearances. Glantz has reached heads-up play once and finished third on three occasions. At the 2019 WSOP, Glantz picked up his third WSOP Main Event cash. Mark Gregorich CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 69 11 1 $1,168,497 Mark Gregorich is another player on this list who has been around for quite some time, earning his first WSOP cash back in 1999. He has 69 cashes and 11 final table appearances at the WSOP, with one runner-up finish that came in the 2003 WSOP $5,000 Limit Hold’em event. Gregorich also has a trio of third-place finishes at the WSOP to date. Nick Guagenti CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 37 3 0 $583,181 Ohio's Nick Guagenti has 37 WSOP cashes with the first coming in 2006. He has three final table appearances. Guagenti's highest WSOP result came in 2019 when he took third in the $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. event for $85,265. His best finish in terms of money won came from his 46th-place finish in the 2017 WSOP Main Event, for which Guagenti won $145,733. Guagenti is a regular in mid- and high-stakes cash games in his region, and he also has 15 cashes on the WSOP Circuit. Christian Harder CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 53 2 0 $1,050,784 Christian Harder’s first WSOP cash came in 2009. He’s won titles elsewhere in the poker world, just not at the WSOP just yet. He’s been close before with a pair of fourth-place finishes and is known to put in a high amount of volume in the big bet games of No Limit Hold’em and Pot Limit Omaha. Maurice Hawkins CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 29 3 0 $623,240 Maurice Hawkins has been a longtime grinder of the WSOP and WSOP Circuit, racking up 29 WSOP cashes and 110 WSOP Circuit cashes. He has a whopping 14 WSOP Circuit gold rings, but Hawkins has yet to win a WSOP gold bracelet. Hawkins has three WSOP final tables and they've come in big-field NL tournaments. With as many big-field NL events that are on the WSOP schedule these days, one has to figure that Hawkins is going to break through and win one at some point. Isaac Haxton CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 27 7 1 $2,923,424 Isaac Haxton is widely considered as one of the best minds in poker, and he’s certainly lived up to that with more than $27.6 million in live tournament earnings, millions more won in cash games, and who knows how much won online. The one thing he doesn’t have is a WSOP gold bracelet. Haxton has seven WSOP final table appearances and one runner-up result. The second-place finish came to Vitaly Lunkin in the 2009 WSOP $40,000 No Limit Hold’em. Maria Ho CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 55 5 1 $1,644,554 Maria Ho is another long-time regular at the WSOP, with cashes dating back to 2005. She has five final table appearances and one runner-up finish in WSOP events, and she’s known to mix it up in most of the games. Ho’s runner-up finish came to Allen Bari in the 2011 WSOP $5,000 No Limit Hold’em. Ho has been the last woman standing in the WSOP Main Event on two occasions, 2007 and 2014, and she finished sixth in the 2017 WSOP Europe Main Event. Ali Imsirovic CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 10 3 1 $583,986 Ali Imsirovic is one of the newest kids on the block in all of poker, not just the WSOP, and he’s quickly acquired a reputation of one of the game’s best when it comes to No Limit Hold’em tournaments. Imsirovic’s first WSOP cash came in 2017, so there isn’t a ton of sample to draw from, but he’s already made three WSOP final tables in top-level events and has one runner-up finish. Given his success in his young poker career, Imsirovic is considered one of the favorites any time he enters a high buy-in, No Limit Hold’em event. Rainer Kempe CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 31 3 0 $1,142,997 Rainer Kempe has won more than $21.3 million in his poker career and he’s been in the winner’s circle many times, but he’s yet to win a WSOP gold bracelet. His WSOP career is still pretty young, though. His first WSOP cash came in 2015, but over a short period of time he’s already earned 31 in-the-money finishes and more than $1.1 million in earnings. Kempe has been to a WSOP final table three times to date. Jason Koon CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 42 7 1 $1,789,462 For all of the poker success that Jason Koon has enjoyed over the course of his career, he’s still searching for his first WSOP gold bracelet. Koon has more than $31.1 million in live tournament earnings to date and his first WSOP cash came back in 2009. He has seven WSOP final table appearances and one runner-up result. Koon is similar to Haxton and Imsirovic in the sense that he’ll almost always be one of the favorites any time he enters a high buy-in, No Limit hold’em tournament. Timofey Kuznetsov CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 0 0 0 $0 Timofey Kuznetsov, also known as ‘Trueteller,’ is highly regarded in the poker community as one of the best, especially within the high-stakes community. He has zero WSOP cashes to date, but he simply doesn’t play a lot of tournaments. That said, Kuznetsov is still one of the best players in poker without a WSOP gold bracelet. Maria Lampropulos CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 27 0 0 $136,731 Maria Lampropulos first cashed a WSOP event in 2016 and that first year she walked away with five WSOP cashes in total. She followed that up with six cashes in 2017 and seven cashes in 2018. At the 2019 WSOP and WSOP Europe festivals, she cashed nine time. With partypoker MILLIONS and PCA Main Event wins on her résumé, both for seven-figure paydays, Lampropulos has shown she has the chops to compete in some of the biggest events in the world. Toby Lewis CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 24 0 0 $409,171 Toby Lewis’ first WSOP cash came in 2011 when he took 11th in the $10,000 Pot Limit Hold’em Championship. He’s racked up 24 WSOP cashes to date, but he’s never reached a WSOP final table. Tom Marchese CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 26 4 1 $1,295,638 A player with more than $19.1 million in live tournament earnings, Tom Marchese is often considered one of the better tournament players poker has to offer. He's yet to score a WSOP gold bracelet, though, but he has come close a few times, with four WSOP final tables and one runner-up finish. The time Marchese finished second was at the 2015 WSOP in the $1,500 Pot Limit Hold'em tournament. Steve O‘Dwyer CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 18 2 0 $675,717 Like Haxton and like Koon, Steve O’Dwyer has a ton of live tournament winnings. O’Dwyer has scored more than $30.4 million from the live felt, plus plenty more online, and his first WSOP cash came in 2007. O’Dwyer is a player who put in more WSOP volume at the beginning of his career compared to what he does now, which could be holding him back in terms of winning his first gold bracelet. At this point in his career, it seems that if O'Dwyer does win a gold bracelet, it will come at WSOP Europe or a similar international WSOP stop. Adam Owen CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 34 5 0 $570,961 Adam Owen is another one of the younger guns on this list, but he’s widely regarded as one of the best all-around players in the game these days. Having earned his first WSOP cash in 2014, Owen has racked up 34 WSOP cashes to date, including five final tables and three third-place finishes. Owen has shown a propensity to perform well in the $10,000 buy-in championship events at the WSOP and many think that’s where he’ll earn his first gold bracelet from. Felipe Ramos CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 31 4 0 $526,047 One of best poker players to come out of Brazil is Felipe Ramos, with 31 WSOP cashes dating back to his first in 2009. Ramos is known as a solid player who can compete across all variants, and the more tools you have in your shed, the better when it comes to chasing gold bracelets. Ramos has four WSOP final tables and they've all come in Omaha. Three of those four final tables were in Pot Limit Omaha. Dario Sammartino CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 41 10 0 $9,927,947 Italy’s Dario Sammartino first cashed in a WSOP event in 2011 and he’s been performing very well ever since, except winning a WSOP gold bracelet is something he’s yet to achieve. Sammartino has found the money in WSOP events 41 times to date. Of those, he’s reached the final table on 10 occasions. Sammartino's biggest claim to World Series of Poker fame was a runner-up finish in the 2019 WSOP Main Event for $6 million. He's also one of the few players to have made the final table of both the WSOP Main Event and WSOP Europe Main Event in his career. Sammartino has learned how to play all the games and play them well, so don’t be surprised to see him finally win WSOP gold much sooner than later. Ole Schemion CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 6 1 0 $469,735 Although his WSOP results don’t pop off the page, Ole Schemion is one of the best players out there and an absolute force when it comes to poker tournaments. He’s amassed more than $16.3 million in live tournament earnings, numerous high roller victories, and one World Poker Tour title. He’s still in search of his first WSOP gold bracelet, though. In terms of winning WSOP gold, it’s very likely just a volume game for Schemion. If he puts in the volume, he’ll get it eventually and probably in the near future. It also works to his benefit that WSOP Europe looks as though it will remain at King’s Casino in Rozvadov where Schemion has shown success before, including a sixth-place finish in the 2019 WSOP Europe €100,000 Diamond High Roller for €341,510. Jake Schindler CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 33 4 0 $1,050,644 The first of two players named Jake on this list, Jake Schindler has 33 entries and four final tables at the WSOP entering 2020. His best finish was a third-place result in the 2014 WSOP $3,000 No Limit Hold'em for $212,373. Over his entire poker career, Schindler has more than $25 million in live tournament earnings. Jake Schwartz CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 60 3 1 $658,477 Jake Schwartz earned his first WSOP cash in 2012 and has built up 60 in-the-money finishes since. He was first widely known as a No Limit hold'em player but he's since branched out and has been playing more of the games. In 2013, Schwartz earned the top WSOP finish of his career when he took second in the $1,500 NL Shootout, earning $202,035. To date, he has two other WSOP final table appearances in addition to that one. Shannon Shorr CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 79 9 2 $2,217,846 When is Shannon Shorr going to finally win a WSOP gold bracelet? Shorr first cashed in a WSOP event back in 2006, which seems like ages ago when you consider he’s still very much on the younger side of poker players. Ever since that first WSOP cash, not a year has gone by that Shorr hasn’t racked up multiple WSOP cashes. Plus, he’s been very close on several occasions with nine final table appearances and two runner-up finishes. He also has a pair of third-place finishes. Shorr can play all of the games very well. Before Chidwick winning his bracelet, Shorr was right there at the top of this list with Chidwick. Dan Smith CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 36 10 1 $9,884,615 Another high roller with a knack for all the games, Dan Smith has been close to winning WSOP gold before but it just hasn’t happened for him yet. His first WSOP cash came in 2010. Since then, he’s earned 36 total WSOP cashes and won more than $9.8 million at the WSOP. He has 10 final table appearances, six third-place finishes, and one second-place finish in WSOP events. Like some of the other high rollers on this list, with Smith it feels like more of a volume game than anything. Christoph Vogelsang CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 13 6 0 $8,668,735 Christoph Vogelsang has come close at the WSOP on a handful of occasions, including two third-place finishes in a pair of the biggest events the WSOP has ever offered. In 2014, Vogelsang placed third in the $1 million buy-in Big One for One Drop for $4.48 million. In 2019, he took third in the WSOP Europe €250,000 Super High Roller for more than $1.3 million. If there's a big buy-in event at the WSOP, Vogelsang is considered a threat to win it. Mike Watson CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 63 11 4 $2,917,143 Mike Watson has been knocking at the WSOP gold bracelet door for several years now. His first WSOP cash came in 2007 and he’s put up more than 60 cashes to date since. Of the 11 WSOP final table appearances Watson has on record, four of the times he’s finished runner-up. Interestingly, Watson did win the €50,000 Majestic High Roller at the 2012 WSOP Europe, but it was an added non-bracelet event for the high rollers. Had that event been in a later year, it very likely would have been for a gold bracelet. Watson usually plays a high volume of events and can play all the games, much like Shorr, and it’s only a matter of time before he finally scores a WSOP gold bracelet. Jerry Wong CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 38 7 0 $1,899,225 Jerry Wong may be most well known for reaching the now-defunct WSOP November Nine in 2016, when he finished eighth for more than $1.1 million, but he has plenty of other success at the WSOP. With 38 total WSOP cashes and seven final table appearances, the only thing left for Wong to do is win a gold bracelet. One would think that has to be on the horizon soon for Wong, who has the ability to compete highly in all of the games. His WSOP final table appearances have come in No Limit Deuce to Seven, Pot Limit Omaha, Big Bet Mix, Razz, Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo, H.O.R.S.E., and No Limit Hold'em.
  2. On Saturday, Alex Foxen tweeted that he was looking to make some bracelet bets for the 2019 World Series of Poker. Sifting through the responses, it appears he found a few takers. One of the first players to pop into Foxen’s mentions was recent WPT L.A. Poker Classic winner David 'ODB' Baker, who offered $20,000 per bracelet against Foxen. After a little bit of back and forth between the two, they settled on the original offer from Baker at $20,000 per bracelet. Baker then tweeted that his "shop is open for business" and took in a few "friendly" offers of his own. He booked $2,000 per bracelet with both Brandon Shack-Harris and Brian Hastings. Back to Foxen, Adrian Mateos was one of the players to join in the fun. He asked Foxen if he’d bet on mutual no-limit hold’em events played and it appears Foxen accepted. If they were accepted, the two likely worked out the details out of public view. Rainer Kempe was next in line and offered a similar bet to what Mateos did, for mutual no-limit hold’em events played. If we’re understanding the details correctly, Kempe and Foxen are on for the first bullet of every no-limit hold’em event they both play this summer. A min-cash wins $1,000 from the other person, an official final table appearance wins $5,000, and a bracelet wins $25,000. Dominik Nitsche chimed in at the end and said he’d like the same bet, but there was no visible confirmation from Foxen. Foxen did like the tweet, though. Foxen has yet to win a WSOP gold bracelet, but he's still relatively new to the poker scene. He had some notable live tournament results in 2015 and 2016, but his 2017 is really what put him on the map. That year, Foxen won more than $1.7 million on the felt after having won just over $500,000 in the five years prior combined. In 2018, Foxen had an even bigger year with more than $6.6 million won. In 2019, he’s already won more than $3 million entering the 2019 WSOP. Foxen had just four cashes at the 2018 WSOP, but one of those was a final table to kick off the summer. At the 2017 WSOP, Foxen cashed 14 times and then added two more cashes at WSOP Europe. Among those cashes in 2017 were two final tables and three other top-15 finishes.
  3. After four days of play, Tom Marchese defeated the 536-entry field of the inaugural partypoker MILLIONS Vegas at the ARIA Resort & Casino to take home the $1,000,000 first place prize. Packed with superstar talent, the $10,000 buy-in event exceeded the $5 million guarantee, generating a prize pool of $5.36 million in partypoker’s first foray into Las Vegas during the World Series of Poker. The trip to Sin City paid off for partypoker in what was a dream final table lineup packed with some of the biggest names in the game of poker vying for the MILLIONS title and seven-figure payday. Perhaps the biggest of those names at the final table was that of Chris Moneymaker. The Poker Hall of Fame nominee entered the final table as one of the chip leaders but after losing a clash with Sergio Aido, found himself with a vulnerable stack. After Marchese opened from early position, Moneymaker three-bet from the small blind with [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"]. Marchese made the call holding [poker card="8d"][poker card="8h"]. The flop came [poker card="2c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="5h"]. Moneymaker bet the flop and Marchese called. The turn provided Marchese the [poker card="8s"]. Moneymaker checked and Marchese took the lead putting out a healthy bet, which Moneymaker called. The river was the [poker card="4h"] and after Moneymaker checked for a second time, Marchese moved all-in. Moneymaker quickly called with his overpair but after being shown Marchese’s set, the 2003 World Series of Poker Main Event champion headed for the cage to collect his $80,000 prize for finishing in ninth. Germany’s Tobias Duthweiler was the next to exit the final table after shipping his short stack in holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="js"]. 888poker sponsored pro Ana Marquez reshoved with the [poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"]. The race was on and the board ran out [poker card="ah"][poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"][poker card="th"][poker card="ad"] giving Marquez the hand and Duthweiler $100,000 for finishing in eighth place. Rainer Kempe shipped his stack in holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="ts"] in late position, however Marchese looked down at [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"] in the big blind and made the call to put Kempe at risk. Kempe was going to need some help, but the board of [poker card="7h"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="7s"] provided little drama. Kempe, the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl champion, finished his tournament in seventh place adding $130,000 to his over $20 million in career live earnings. The next elimination happened when Jeremy Ausmus opened the hand with [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"] only to be three-bet all in by UK online phenom Conor ‘1_conor_b_1’ Beresford who picked up [poker card="th"][poker card="tc"]. Ausmus made the call and Beresford saw the bad news. The flop fell [poker card="3d"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6h"] providing little help to Beresford who was going to need to spike a ten or running straight cards. The turn was the [poker card="qs"], leaving Beresford drawing to two outs. The river was the [poker card="7h"] and Beresford exited in sixth place, collecting a career-high live cash of $170,000. Already with a massive chip lead, Marchese added to his stack in a hand with Sergio Aido. Marches raised under the gun with [poker card="as"][poker card="qs"] and Aido put in his remaining chips holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="3d"]. After a short deliberation, Marchese called and the flop came [poker card="6c"][poker card="6s"][poker card="jc"] offering Aido a few extra chop outs. However the turn was the [poker card="9s"] and the river was the [poker card="th"] sending Aido to the rail in fifth place for $230,000. Marchese wasn’t done knocking players out and his next opponent was poker legend Freddy Deeb. Marchese put in a raise holding [poker card="9s"][poker card="9d"] and Deeb made his all in move holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="7h"]. Marchese made the call and the flop came [poker card="7c"][poker card="8h"][poker card="9c"] giving Marchese top set. Deeb needed running cards to get out from under but the turn was the [poker card="2d"] and the river the [poker card="8s"]. Deeb finished in fourth place for $319,200, his largest cash since 2015. After Ausmus picked up chips off Marchese, the two of them had a large chip advance over Ana Marquez. After battling for some time, Marquez’ tournament came to an end in a blind on blind confrontation with Ausmus. From the small blind Marquez put her short stack in holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="2h"] and Ausmus made the quick call with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"]. The [poker card="9s"][poker card="qd"][poker card="8h"] flop gave Ausmus a pair, taking away some outs for Marquez. The turn came [poker card="3s"] and the [poker card="5d"] river saw the 888poker ambassador exit in third place for $445,000. Heads up play began with Marchese holding a sizable chip lead that was quickly equalized by Ausmus. Although he got close to Marchese at one point, Marchese never relinquished the chip lead and Ausmus soon saw the gap widen as Marchese eventually opened up a 4:1 chip advantage. The pair of Aria regulars battled for quite some time until the final hand of the tournament saw Marchese open with [poker card="as"][poker card="jh"] only to be shipped on for 14bbs by Ausmus. Marchese eventually made the call and Ausmus turned over the [poker card="kh"][poker card="ts"]. The board ran out clean for Marchese with a [poker card="5c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="7d"] flop and a turn [poker card="ah"] which left Ausmus drawing dead to the river [poker card="4h"]. Ausmus finished as the runner-up, settling for $650,000. Tom Marchese picked up an even $1,000,000 for first place, the seventh seven-figure score of his career. partypoker MILLIONS Final Table Payouts 1. Tom Marchese - $1,000,000 2. Jeremy Ausmus - $650,000 3. Ana Marquez - $445,000 4. Freddy Deeb - $319.200 5. Sergio Aido - $230,000 6. Conor Beresford - $170,000 7. Rainer Kempe - $130,000 8. Tobias Duthweiler - $100,000 9. Chris Moneymaker - $80,000
  4. The record-setting WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic wrapped up at Bellagio in Las Vegas, with the $10,400 Main Event attracting a huge field of 1,001 entries and featuring some of poker's biggest names. In addition to the Main Event, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule featured several events with five-figure buy-ins and one with a six-figure price of entry. Here are the winners from a tremendous week of poker in Sin City. The biggest winners overall from these high buy-in events, excluding the $10,400 Main Event, were Jake Schindler, Jason Koon, Seth Davies, Chris Hunichen, and Dominik Nitsche. Although he didn't earn the most money, it's certainly worth noting that Sam Soverel cashed in four of these events for a total of $314,500. No one else cashed in more than two. Ladines Wins First $10,000 PLO Event The first two high roller events on the schedule were both $10,000 buy-in pot-limit Omaha tournaments. The first one attracted 35 entries for a $350,000 prize pool and saw the top five places make the money. Joshua Ladines took the event’s title and $128,090 top prize, with both Brian Rast and Sam Soverel finishing in the money. Joshua Ladines - $128,090 John Riordan - $102,910 Jonathan Abdellatif - $56,000 Brian Rast - $35,000 Sam Soverel - $28,000 Soverel Takes Second $10,000 PLO Event In the second $10,000 PLO event, a group of familiar faces was back in the money. Soverel topped the field of 29 entries to win the title and $116,000, Ladines finished third for $46,400, and WPT Five Diamond wonder boy Ryan Tosoc scored fifth for $23,200. Tosoc notably finished second in the Season XV WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic for $1.134 million before going on to win the event in Season XVI for $1.958 million. Sam Soverel - $116,000 Jonathan Depa - $75,400 Joshua Ladines- $46,400 Michael Song - $29,000 Ryan Tosoc - $23,200 Hennigan Captures $10,000 8-Game Mixed Title If you know Bellagio, you know it’s home to the most iconic high-stakes poker room in the world, Bobby’s Room. It’s where the game’s elite compete for astronomical cash-game stakes, but during WPT Five Diamond some of those players shifted their focus to tournament play, specifically in the $10,000 buy-in 8-Game Mixed High Roller. The tournament generated 24 entries, and it was none other than five-time World Series of Poker gold bracelet winner and WPT Champions Club member John Hennigan taking home the top prize of $110,400. John Hennigan - $110,400 Ben Yu - $67,200 Randy Ohel - $38,400 John Racener - $24,000 Loeser and Fox Chop First $25,000 High Roller In the first of three $25,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournaments on this year’s WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic slate, 42 entries were generated to create a prize pool of $1.05 million. The top six places paid, and the top two spots went to Manig Loeser and Elio Fox in a chop that earned each player more than $300,000. Loeser scored first place for $321,300, and Fox took second for $308,700. Manig Loeser- $321,300 Elio Fox - $308,700 Jake Schindler - $168,000 Dan Smith - $105,000 Cary Katz - $84,000 Nick Petrangelo - $63,000 Petrangelo Wins Second $25,000 High Roller The second $25,000 buy-in tournament attracted 47 entries and generated a $1.175 million prize pool. The top seven places reached the money, with several notables cashing. None earned more than Nick Petrangelo, though, who chopped the event heads up with Sergio Aido to take home the winning prize of $289,944. Aido scored $287,634 for second. Petrangelo was coming off a sixth-place result for $63,000 in the first $25,000 event of this series. Soverel, who finished in the money of the first two high rollers on the schedule, including winning one for $116,000, finished sixth in this event for $70,500. Nick Petrangelo - $289,944 Sergio Aido - $287,634 Seth Davies - $256,672 Ben Yu - $117,500 Kazuhiko Yotsushika - $94,000 Sam Soverel - $70,500 Rainer Kempe - $58,750 Davies Victorious in Third $25,000 High Roller The third and final $25,000 high roller tournament on the WPT Five Diamond schedule drew 50 entries for a $1.25 million prize pool. The top eight places reached the money, and it was Seth Davies taking the title and $341,920 in first-place prize money. The win came just days after Davies took third in the previous $25,000 high roller event during the series of $256,672, as you can see above. Davies did a deal with Isaac Haxton in second place, who earned $320,580. The money was filled with notable high rollers, including Alex Foxen taking third for $175,000. Foxen has had himself quite a 2018 and is closing it strong both on the live felt and the virtual felt. In the online world, Foxen recently achieved a new all-time high in the top 100 of the PocketFives Online Poker Rankings. You'll also notice Soverel's name appearing in the in-the-money places once again, this time for fifth place, worth $100,000. Seth Davies - $341,920 Isaac Haxton - $320,580 Alex Foxen - $175,000 David Peters - $125,000 Sam Soverel - $100,000 Christoph Vogelsang - $75,000 Rainer Kempe - $62,500 Elio Fox: $50,000 Schindler Defeats Koon for $100,000 Super High Roller Victory The final big buy-in event from the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule this year was the $100,000 Super High Roller. The event drew 37 entries to Bellagio for a $3.7 million prize pool and the top six spots reached the money. Earning the $1.332 million first-place prize was Jake Schindler. Adding that score to the $168,000 he won earlier in the series for taking third place in one of the $25,000 high rollers, Schindler scored $1.5 million in prize money at Bellagio this December. Schindler beat out Jason Koon for the win, and Koon took home $888,000 for his second-place finish. Jake Schindler - $1,332,000 Jason Koon - $888,000 Chris Hunichen - $592,000 Dominik Nitsche - $370,000 Ben Tollerene - $296,000 Talal Shakerchi - $222,000
  5. [caption width="640"] Sam Panzica is now a two-time WPT winner after taking down the Bay 101 Shooting Star event Friday (WPT photo/Joe Giron)[/caption] When the World Poker Tour Bay 101 Shooting Star final table kicked off Friday afternoon in San Jose, California, the focus was clearly on Chino Rheem. With three WPT titles already to his credit, and over 44% of the chips in play, Rheem seemed to be on the verge of becoming the first player in WPT history to win four titles. Sam Panzica wanted no part of that storyline though and went on to win his second WPT title of Season XV and $1,373,000 while Rheem had to settle for a third place finish. With all eyes on him at the start of the day, Rheem didn’t disappoint, picking up the first three eliminations. Just 37 hands in Rheem went to work at whittling the field. Rheem raised to 225,000 from the cutoff before Rainer Kempe moved all in for 2,190,000 from the small blind. Rheem snap-called and tabled [poker card="kh"][poker card="kd"] while Kempe showed [poker card="as"][poker card="9c"]. The [poker card="7h"][poker card="6h"][poker card="3h"] flop was a great one for Rheem and when the [poker card="3d"] turn and [poker card="8s"] river failed to connect with Kempe, the German was eliminated in sixth place. Kempe was also the last remaining bounty, meaning Rheem picked up an additional $2,500 cash. Just over 90 minutes later, Rheem did it again. From the button Rheem made it 320,000 to go and Dennis Stevermer moved all in from the big blind for 1,425,000. Rheem called and tabled [poker card="ks"][poker card="9h"] but found himself behind Stevermer’s [poker card="ad"][poker card="8d"]. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"] flop flipped the odds in Rheem’s favor and he stayed in front through the [poker card="4h"] turn and [poker card="qh"] river to eliminate Stevermer in fifth. Things went slightly off track 20 minutes later when he clashed with Anthony Spinella in a pot that cost him the chip lead. With 2,775,000 already in the pot and a completed board of [poker card="kd"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="ac"], Spinella check-called Rheem’s 1,500,000 bet and tabled [poker card="ad"][poker card="2d"] for a river pair of aces while Rheem showed and mucked [poker card="kc"][poker card="9s"] for second pair. Following that hand, Spinella had more than half of the chips in play. Five hands after that Rheem was hard at work rebuilding his stack. Rheem raised to 325,000 from UTG and Paul Volpe called from the big blind. The flop was [poker card="8d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="4s"] and Volpe checked, Rheem bet 375,000 and Volpe responded by moving all in fro 2,975,000. Rheem didn’t hesitate to call and tabled [poker card="kh"][poker card="kd"] while Volpe turned over [poker card="qs"][poker card="js"] for a flush draw. The [poker card="2c"] turn and [poker card="8c"] river were no help for the former #1-ranked online poker player in the world and Volpe was out in fourth place. Five hands later, Rheem re-took the chip lead from Spinella. The first 54 hands of three-handed play were all about Rheem and Spinella taking turns as chip leader but once Panzica took his turn with the top spot, he never relinquished it again. Rheem’s run at history took a major hit on the 98th hand of three-handed play. Panzica raised to 500,00 from the button and Rheem defended his big blind. Rheem check-called a 500,000 bet after the [poker card="as"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2c"] flop and then check-called again after the [poker card="ks"] river. The [poker card="qs"] river got Rheem to check a third time, Panzica bet 2,100,000 and after taking some time to think over his decision, Rheem called and mucked after Panzica showed [poker card="ad"][poker card="kd"] for top two pair. A few hands later Spinella doubled up through Rheem, leaving him with just two big blinds. On the very next hand Rheem moved all in for his last 475,000 and Spinella called from the big blind. Rheem was ahead with [poker card="qc"][poker card="th"] to Spinella’s [poker card="5h"][poker card="3h"] but the [poker card="kd"][poker card="ks"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2h"] runout spelled an end to Rheem’s run in third place. Three-handed action took over 3.5 hours but heads-up play took almost no time at all. Five hands after Rheem was shown the door, Panzica picked up his first elimination of the final table. Spinella raised to 650,000, Panzica moved all in Spinella called. Spinella tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"] but found himself behind the [poker card="ah"][poker card="ts"] of Panzica. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="5c"] board kept Panzica ahead for good and eliminated Spinella. Panzica, who already has a $15,000 seat in the upcoming WPT Tournament of Champions, was given the $15,000 seat from this event as cash. Final Table Payouts Sam Panzica - $1,373,000 Anthony Spinella - $786,610 Chino Rheem - $521,660 Paul Volpe - $349,610 Dennis Stevermer - $243,090 Rainer Kempe - $188,460
  6. [caption width="640"] Rainer Kempe won the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl Wednesday (photo courtesy Poker Central/Joe Giron)[/caption] The 2016 Super High Roller Bowl featured 49 of the world’s best poker players and to the surprise of nobody who has been watching the world of high roller poker tournaments the past few years, it ended up being another celebration of German poker excellence. Rainer Kempe beat countryman Fedor Holz to win second annual Super High Roller Bowl and the $5,000,000 first place prize. Holz’s runner-up finish earned him $3,500,000. The two Germans were responsible for every elimination at the final table on Wednesday night. After Holz opened to 140,000, Dan Shak, down to just over 500,000 in chips, moved all in and Holz called. The German pro tabled [poker card="as"][poker card="9d"] and was ahead of Shak who tabled [poker card="kd"][poker card="js"]. The board ran out [poker card="th"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="8s"][poker card="jd"] to give Holz a jack-high straight and send Shak out in seventh place for $600,000. Nearly one hour later two more players went out. The first to go was Bryn Kenney. With action folded to him on the button, Kenney moved all in for 1,300,000 only to have Holz call from the small blind. Kenney got bad news when he found out his [poker card="7d"][poker card="7h"] was up against Holz’ [poker card="jc"][poker card="jd"]. The board ran out [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"] to send Kenney out in sixth place. Despite being on the good side of the first two eliminations, Holz remained in second place behind Kempe. And on the very next hand, Kempe put even more distance between himself and the other players. Matt Berkey called from the button before Kempe raised to 205,000 from the small blind and Holz folded his big blind. Berkey responded by moving all in for 1,300,000 and Kempe called. Berkey showed [poker card="as"][poker card="9s"] and needed to improve against Kempe’s [poker card="7c"][poker card="7d"]. Kempe ended up making a set on the [poker card="7h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3d"] flop, but the [poker card="8s"] turn gave Berkey outs to a flush. The [poker card="4d"] river was no help for Berkey and he was out in fifth place for $1,100,000. The final four players played for over two hours before seeing another elimination. While Kempe and Holz did their best to maintain the top two spots, Poker Hall of Famers Erik Seidel and Phil Hellmuth traded turns as the short stack before the 14-time WSOP bracelet winner saw his tournament end. Holz and Seidel folded to Hellmuth who just called from the small blind. Kempe announced he was all in and Hellmuth quickly called. Kempe turned over [poker card="kd"][poker card="jh"] before Hellmuth stood and showed a dominated [poker card="qd"][poker card="js"]. Hellmuth could do nothing but watch as the [poker card="9s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6d"] flop, [poker card="5d"] turn and [poker card="7s"] river brought him no save and he was eliminated in third place. The $1,600,000 fourth place prize is the second largest of Hellmuth’s career, behind only the $ 2,645,333 he earned for his fourth place finish in the Big One for One Drop in 2012. That left the two young Germans and Seidel in contention and although he spent a good part of the final table fighting off elimination, Seidel eventually did bust. After Holz folded his button, Seidel shoved for 1,200,000 and Kempe called. Seidel held [poker card="ac"][poker card="7d"] but was behind Kempe’s [poker card="ah"][poker card="td"]. Seidel could do nothing but watch the [poker card="9h"][poker card="9s"][poker card="3c"][poker card="ad"][poker card="6d"] run out before exiting the tournament area. The $2.6 million score moved Seidel past Antonio Esfandiari on poker’s all-time earnings list. Seidel has now won $29,283,817 over the course of his career and trails only Daniel Negreanu. While Kempe began the final table with the chip lead and never appeared to have that lead in danger, the heads-up finale proved to be a different story. Kempe and Holz traded the chip lead back and forth over the course of three-and-a-half hours before Kempe finally emerged victorious. The final hand was pocket pair versus pocket pair. Holz raised to 400,000 before Kempe made it 1,200,000 to go. Holz, with just 4,380,000, moved all in and Kempe called. Holz had [poker card="2d"][poker card="2h"] and needed to improve against Kempe’s [poker card="8d"][poker card="8s"]. Holz got no help on the [poker card="th"][poker card="9s"][poker card="5h"] flop, [poker card="4c"] turn or the [poker card="3d"] river and was eliminated in second place as Kempe celebrated the first seven-figure cash of his career. Final Table Payouts Rainer Kempe - $5,000,000 Fedor Holz - $3,500,000 Erik Seidel - $2,400,000 Phil Hellmuth - $1,600,000 Matt Berkey - $1,100,000 Bryn Kenney - $800,000 Dan Shak - $600,000
  7. The schedule is out for the 2020 Aussie Millions Poker Championship at Crown Casino in Melbourne, Australia. The series spans 21 days of consecutive poker action from Saturday, January 4, through Friday, January 24, and features 23 championship poker tournaments. The 2020 Aussie Millions A$10,600 Main Event starts Friday, January 17, and has three starting flights, one each across Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. The final table will be played on Friday, January 24. The winner is said to walk away with an estimated A$1.8 million and champion's bracelet valued at more than A$25,000. The 2019 Aussie Millions Millions Main Event attracted a record-breaking field of 822 entries and was won by one of poker's biggest names, Bryn Kenney. The 2020 Aussie Millions festival opens with the A$1,150 Opening Event on Saturday, January 4. This event has five starting flights and a A$1 million prize pool guarantee. The 2019 Aussie Millions Opening event became the largest-ever tournament at Crown Casino with a,1752 entries. Also returning for 2020 are the A$25,000 Pot Limit Omaha, A$25,000 Challenge, A$50,000 Challenge, and A$100,000 Challenge. 2020 Aussie Millions Schedule DATE TIME EVENT BUY-IN Jan. 4 12:10 pm Opening Event Day 1A A$1,150 Jan. 5 12:10 pm Opening Event Day 1B A$1,150 12:15 pm H.O.R.S.E. A$2,500 Jan. 6 12:10 pm Opening Event Day 1C A$1,150 6:10 pm Opening Event Day 1D A$1,150 Jan. 7 12:10 pm Opening Event Day 1E A$1,150 Jan. 9 12:15 pm Pot Limit Omaha A$1,150 6:10 pm No Limit Hold'em - Mix Max A$1,150 Jan. 10 12:10 pm No Limit Hold'em - Six Max A$1,150 Jan. 11 12:10 pm Pot Limit Omaha A$2,500 2:10 pm No Limit Hold'em 'Deep Freeze' A$1,500 Jan. 12 12:10 pm Shot Clock No Limit Hold'em Six Max A$2,500 Jan. 13 12:10 pm No Limit Hold'em Accumulator Day 1A A$1,150 12:15 pm 8 Game Mixed A$2,500 2:10 pm 25K Pot Limit Omaha A$25,000 Jan. 14 12:10 pm No Limit Hold'em Accumulator Day 1B A$1,150 Jan. 15 12:10 pm No Limit Hold'em Accumulator Day 1C A$1,150 2:10 pm $25,000 Challenge A$25,000 Jan. 16 2:10 pm No Limit Hold'em Bounty A$2,000 Jan. 17 12:30 pm Main Event Day 1A A$10,600 2:10 pm $50,000 Challenge A$50,000 2:30 pm No Limit Hold'em Terminator A$1,150 Jan. 18 12:30 pm Main Event Day 1B A$10,600 2:30 pm Hyper Turbo No Limit Hold'em A$1,150 Jan. 19 12:30 pm Main Event Day 1C A$10,600 Jan. 20 2:10 pm Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo A$1,150 6:10 pm No Limit Hold'em A$2,500 Jan. 21 2:10 pm Aussie Millions Tournament of Champions A$1,150 6:10 pm No Limit Hold'em Six Max A$5,000 Jan. 22 12:10 pm Turbo No Limit Hold'em - Shot Clock A$1,150 2:10 pm $100,000 Challenge A$100,000 "The 2019 Aussie Millions saw records smashed right across the board," said Joel Williams, Crown Melbourne Tournament Director. "We watched the 'Main Event' scale heights previously unseen; we re-established ourselves as an integral stop on the High Roller circuit; total prize pools exceeded A$30 million and overall participation broke through 8,600 - all served to produce arguably the most memorable series in Australian poker history. January 2020 allows us the opportunity to continue to stamp ourselves as an elite poker destination for players right across the globe - and we are more than ready to accept that challenge and remain committed to providing the best experience possible." On Wednesday, January 8, there is a 10-seat guarantee satellite to the Aussie Millions Main Event on the schedule, starting at 2:10 pm local time with a buy-in of A$550. Although Kenney won the 2019 Aussie Millions Main Event, he wasn't the biggest winner from the series. That title belonged to Toby Lewis, who walked away from the 2019 Aussie Millions with A$1,607,654 ($1,149,064) in prize earnings. Cary Katz and Rainer Kempe also had impressive performances.
  8. [caption width="640"] Rainer Kempe leads the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl final table.[/caption] Rainer Kempe might have been one of the least celebrated players in the field when the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl began on Sunday, but the German poker pro now leads the seven-handed final and could be in line for a $5,000,000 score Wednesday night. Kempe finished Day 3 with 5,545,000 chips and the overnight chip lead thanks to a collision with Dan Smith late on Day 3. The final table bubble might go down as one of the most memorable of all time. After Jason Mercier was eliminated in ninth place, the remaining eight players combined to one table. About 30 minutes later Kempe and Smith found themselves playing the biggest hand of the tournament so far. Kempe raised to 110,000 from the cutoff, Smith called from the small blind and Fedor Holz folded the big blind. Smith then checked the [poker card="th"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6s"] flop allowing Kempe to bet 165,000. Smith check-raised to 475,000 and after using one of his time extensions, Kempe moved all in and Smith called. Kempe tabled [poker card="8c"][poker card="8s"] for middle set while Smith showed [poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"] for bottom set. The [poker card="ac"] turn and [poker card="qh"] river changed nothing and Smith was left with just 175,000 while Kempe moved into the lead for the first time. Smith was eliminated just 40 minutes later. Right behind Kempe is fellow German Holz, who bagged up 2,190,000. The former #1 ranked online poker player in the world is just five months removed from winning the $100,000 Alpha8 event at Bellagio and four months from winning the WPT Triton Super High Roller. While the young German contingent sits on top of the chip counts, two members of Poker’s Hall of Fame anchor the bottom. Erik Seidel sits sixth with 1,120,000 while Phil Hellmuth made it through the bubble with the shortest stack, 905,000. Sandwiched in between the Germans and the Hall of Famers is Bryn Kenney (2,085,000), Dan Shak (1,650,000) and the player who started Day 3 with the chip lead, Matt Berkey (1,205,000). All remaining players are guaranteed at least $600,000 with the eventual champion walking away with $5,000,000. The Smith and Mercier eliminations were the two most high-profile of Day 3, but they weren’t the only players sent to the rail. Tom Marchese, Dan Perper, Phil Galfond, Bill Perkins, Phil Laak, Ben Lamb and Andrew Robl also saw their run end on Day 3. Final Table Schedule A special ‘Road to the Final Table’ show airs on Twitch.com/PokerCentral at 6 PM ET with the final table being broadcast live on CBS Sports Network beginning at 7 PM ET. Final Table Chip Counts Rainer Kempe - 5,545,000 Fedor Holz - 2,190,000 Bryn Kenney - 2,085,000 Dan Shak - 1,650,000 Matt Berkey - 1,205,000 Erik Seidel - 1,120,000 Phil Hellmuth - 905,000
  9. [caption width="640"] The Aria is once again hosting the 0,000 buy-in Super High Roller Bowl this May (Aria photo)[/caption] The Super High Roller Bowl is coming back for a third year, and just like years past the highest bankrolled players in the world will be heading to the Aria Resort and Casino in Las Vegas at the end of May, just days before the 2017 World Series of Poker begins. Poker Centralannounced on Tuesday that this year’s installment of the $300,00 buy-in event takes place May 28-31 and just like last year, will be a rake-free tournament. Aria will begin taking deposits from players on February 2 to lock up their spot in the tournament. The field is capped at 50 players and the staff are projecting a $15 million prize pool. Sean McCormack, Director of Poker Operations for the Aria, expects the field to sell out quickly. "Last year’s Super High Roller Bowl sold out in two weeks, well in advance of tournament play," said McCormack. "It was an exciting event for the players and fans who stopped by to watch and we anticipate another successful High Roller Bowl again this year." The field is capped at 50, but Aria has reserved 15 seats for non-professional high rollers and a celebrity guest, meaning only 35 professionals will have the opportunity to take part in the event. Assuming the event sells out its 50 seats, first place will take home $5 million. Last year, Rainer Kempe took home the $5 million first place prize after defeating fellow German pro Fedor Holz heads-up. Brian Rast won the inaugural Super High Roller Bowl in 2015. He earned $7.525 million for his win and defeated Scott Seiver heads-up. The 2015 Super High Roller Bowl was a $500,000 buy-in, however. This year’s field is expected to include many of the game’s best players, including Daniel Negreanu, Antonio Esfandiari, Phil Hellmuth, Tom Marchese, and the aforementioned Rast. The tournament will be played seven-handed and Poker PROductions will be producing the televised episodes. Nothing has officially been announced in terms of this year’s broadcast, but last year’s tournament was shown live on the CBS Sports Network. Joe Kakaty, president of Poker Central, indicated in a press release that this year’s tournament will be accessible for fans to watch. “The Super High Roller Bowl is the world championship of high stakes poker,” said Kakaty. “Fans can now follow the action live, from start to finish.”
  10. For most of 2018, Steve O'Dwyer has been unbeatable in high roller tournaments, both online and live. Roger Teska flipped the script on that narrative late Monday night at the $25,500 buy-in Caribbean Poker Party MILLIONS World, coming back from a 4-1 heads up chip deficit to win $2,000,000 and his first live title in over nine years. Teska started the final table with the third shortest stack and had to battle against the likes of Rainer Kempe, Niall Farrell, Joao Vieira, Ben Tollerene and Andras Nemeth on his way to the title. Teska's last live win came in 2009 when he won a $500 buy-in Bellagio Cup V event. It didn't take long for the first casualty at the nine-handed final table. Paul Tedeschi raised to 2,500,000 from middle position with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ad"] before Vieira moved all in for 17,500,000 from the hijack with [poker card="jh"][poker card="js"]. Tedeschi called and watched the [poker card="qh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="ah"][poker card="ts"] runout keep him in full control and eliminated Vieira in ninth place. Ten minutes later, Farrell became the next victim of the final table. O'Dwyer raised from the button to 2,600,000 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="6h"] and Farrell moved all in for 10,500,000 with [poker card="2c"][poker card="2d"] from the small blind. Roger Teska re-raised all in from the big blind with [poker card="8d"][poker card="8h"]. O'Dwyer folded and Farrell could only watch after the [poker card="as"][poker card="ts"][poker card="3s"] flop kept Teska well ahead. The turn was the [poker card="td"] and the [poker card="qd"] completed the board to send Farrell to the rail with an eighth place finish. O'Dwyer found his first final table victim almost 30 minutes later. O'Dwyer raised to 2,500,000 from UTG+1 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="jc"]. From the button, Kempe moved all in for 15,600,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="jh"] and O'Dwyer called. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="9c"][poker card="5d"] flop gave O'Dwyer complete control as the [poker card="6d"] and [poker card="ks"] hit the turn and river respectively to eliminate Kempe in seventh. It took nearly two hours of play before there was another elimination. Teska and Tollerene tangled in a pre-flop all in hand that saw Teska win with runner-runner flush against Tollerene's pocket pair. Left with just fumes, the next hand was the end of the line for Tollerene. Tollerene moved all in for 10,000,000 from UTG with [poker card="kd"][poker card="2h"] and Nemeth called from the big blind with [poker card="js"][poker card="7c"]. The [qs[poker card="jh"][poker card="5s"] flop gave Nemeth second pair. The turn was the [poker card="6c"] and the river was the [poker card="ad"] to eliminate Tollerene in sixth. Nemeth had plans on putting his newfound big stack to work but ran into the buzzsaw that is O'Dwyer. From the button, O'Dwyer raised to 3,700,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"] and Teska called from the small blind with [poker card="ks"][poker card="qd"] before Nemeth moved all in for 71,500,000 with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9s"] from the big blind. O'Dwyer called and Teska folded. O'Dwyer got great news on the [poker card="ad"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3s"] flop. Neither the [poker card="qc"] turn or [poker card="5c"] river were any help for Nemeth and he was eliminated in fifth place. Tedeschi lost a monster pot to Teska before O'Dwyer finished him off for good. Teska and Charles La Boissonniere both folded and Tedeschi moved all in from the small blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="2d"]. O'Dwyer called from the big blind with [poker card="ks"][poker card="7h"] and then moved ahead with the [poker card="jc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="2c"] flop. The [poker card="ts"] turn and [poker card="3d"] river failed to save Tedeschi and he was out in fourth. As O'Dwyer continued to build his stack, he did so largely at the expense of La Boissonniere. The Canadian had less than 10 big blinds and found himself in the big blind with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9h"]. O'Dwyer folded the button, Teska moved all in from the small blind with [poker card="qs"][poker card="7d"] and La Boissonniere called. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="td"][poker card="th"] flop gave Teska the lead. The [poker card="8s"] turn gave La Boissonniere outs to a straight, but the river was the [poker card="6h"] and he was out in third place. When heads-up play began, O'Dwyer had 79.1% of the chips in play. The tournament was all but over a few minutes later when Teska four-bet all in holding [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"] and O'Dwyer called with [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"]. The [poker card="qs"] on the flop moved Teska in front and neither the turn or river helped O'Dwyer and the stacks were nearly even. Teska's momentum continued and less than an hour later he was posing with the trophy. O'Dwyer button-raised to 9,000,000 holding [poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"] and Teska shoved with [poker card="tc"][poker card="8c"] and O'Dwyer called all in. The [poker card="8h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2h"] moved Teska ahead and the [poker card="qd"] turn and the [poker card="3c"] river sealed O'Dwyer's second place finish. Final Table Payouts Roger Teska - $2,000,000 Steve O'Dwyer - $1,300,000 Charles La Boissonniere - $1,000,000 Paul Tedeschi - $700,000 Andras Nemeth - $550,000 Ben Tollerene - $450,000 Rainer Kempe - $350,000 Niall Farrell - $300,000 Joao Viera - $250,000
  11. There’s a reason that summer in Las Vegas is often called ‘poker player summer camp’ and it’s not just because the World Series of Poker is going on. During the summer bracelet chasing takes center stage in Sin City but over the past decade, many other Las Vegas poker rooms have battled with the WSOP for the hearts and minds of the poker playing public by consistently scheduling competing summer series that offer players excellent value through great structures and big guarantees. Here's a quick look around the city at some of those non-WSOP tournaments keeping poker players in action. ARIA Poker Classic and High Roller Series There are basically two tournament series happening at the same time inside the ARIA. The first is for the everyday player. It's filled with buy-ins right around the $400 and $240 buy-in level, The ARIA Poker Classic. The second is home to the high rollers - small fields, high buy-in, and elite competition - The ARIA Summer High Roller Series. Even though the Rio has offered some big buy-in tournaments early in the WSOP schedule, many of the biggest names in the game have been spending more time in the ARIA this summer simply because it’s where the biggest games are. Before he was embroiled in controversy for folding out of order at the WSOP, Sam Soverel bested the 23 player field in Aria High Roller 11 on May 30 for a $235,880 payday. He was joined in the money by David Peters (runner-up, $189.620), Jake Schindler (3rd, $92,000) and Poker Central founder Cary Katz (4th, $57,500). Australia’s Michael Addamo won the $10,000 buy-in ARIA High Roller 12 on June 4 for $136,000, defeating Germany’s Manig Loeser heads up. Loeser finished in second place taking home $88,400 for his efforts while fellow countryman Rainer Kempe finished in third for $54,400. Spain’s Juan Dominguez is having a nice start to his summer as he went back-to-back at the ARIA. First, he topped the 45 player field of the $10,000 ARIA High Roller 13 for $153,000 and the very next day he won the $10,000 ARIA High Roller 14 for another $126,682. Ben Yu was the official runner-up, taking home $125,318 while the familiar faces of Jake Schindler (3rd, $67,500), Manig Loeser (4th, $45,000) and Ali Imsirovic (5th, $36,000) also made final table appearances. The 2019 Wynn Poker Classic One of the nicer properties on the Las Vegas strip, the Wynn/Encore hosts the Wynn Poker Classic and through the first week and a half, players have been turning up en masse to play in their daily offerings. The Wynn has been offering multiple $1K+ buy-in tournaments and some well-known names have been showing up for them. On June 3, 484 runners showed up for the $1,100 in which the UK’s Louis Salter took home the $98.452 first-place prize and defeated a final table that included Connor Drinan (runner-up, $64,295) and Lily Kiletto (7th, $13,907). The next day 432 players jumped into the $1,600 buy-in which saw Florida’s Evan Teitelbaum hold off one-time WSOP Main Event champion Joe McKeehen to take down the $138,209 first place prize. McKeehen settled for $89,018 as the runner-up. Other notable final table players included Mark Radoja (5th, $31,068) as well as Entourage and Ballers music supervisor Scott Vener (9th, $12,468). Keven Stammen bested the 618 runners of the $550 daily on June 6 for a $50,940 payday while Justin Liberto defeated Germany’s Bart Lybaert on June 8 to win a $1,100 tournament for $94,659. Lybaert’s $61,412 runner-up prize helped push him to over $3M in career earnings. The DeepStack Championship Poker Series at The Venetian The Venetian continues to provide large field tournaments for players looking for action outside the Rio. They have a partnership with the Mid-States Poker Tour for some of their larger events but also provide daily tournaments for players looking for buy-ins under $1,600. Although the Deepstack Series starts in the middle of May, the $1,100 ‘Summer Kickoff ‘ Event from May 27-29 brought out 518 runners where World Poker Tour Champion Brian Altman took home the $90,905 first-place prize. He defeated Robert Kuhn who ended up with $84,390 as the runner-up. The final table included popular Twitch Poker streamer Ricky ‘RatedGTO’ Guan who finished in fourth for $36,364, a top-3 score for his young career. Pot Limit Omaha cash game grinder Sasha Liu outlasted the 144 runners in the $800 Pot Limit Omaha 8-Max Bounty to take down the $20,161 first-place prize. Canadian Kevin Barton fell in second place for a $11,995 payday.
  12. [caption width="640"] Dan Colman defeated a loaded final table to win the Triton Super High Roller Series Six Max event. (PokerStars photo)[/caption] Dan Colman collected his third six-figure cash of 2017 by taking down the HKD$ 250,000 Triton Super High Roller Series Six Max Event on Saturday, beating a final table that included 2016 Super High Roller Bowl champion Rainer Kempe, Erik Seidel, Mustapha Kanit, and Timofey ‘Trueteller’ Kuznetsov. The first elimination of the final table was Italy’s Kanit. With less than 10 big blinds in front of him, Kanit shoved from the small blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"] and Sergio Aido called on Kanit’s left with [poker card="qs"][poker card="8h"]. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3d"] flop was safe for Kanit as was the [poker card="3c"] turn. The [poker card="qc"] river, however, gave Aido a pair and resulted in Kanit’s exit. Kuznetsov followed Kanit out the door over the course of two hands. Over two hours after Kanit’s bust out, Aido opened for a raise and got two callers in Kuznetsov and Seidel out of the blinds. The trio checked the [poker card="ac"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7c"] the flop and Kuznetsov bet 38,000 on the [poker card="3h"] turn. Seidel raised to 83,000 and Aido folded. Kuznetsov found a call and the [poker card="js"] hit the river. Seidel moved all in for 92,000 and Kuznetsov called to see Seidel reveal [poker card="3c"][poker card="3s"] for a turned set. Down to his last nine big blinds, Kuznetsov shoved the next hand from the button with [poker card="kd"][poker card="2d"]. Kempe called with [poker card="8d"][poker card="8s"] out of the big blind and held to eliminated Kuznetsov. Sergio Aido exited in fourth place at the hands of Colman roughly an hour into four-handed play. Aido moved all in for 115,000 from the small blind with [poker card="7h"][poker card="6d"] and was looked up by Colman with [poker card="kd"][poker card="7d"]. The board ran true for Colman and Aido exited with another high roller score in 2017. With roughly 50 big blinds in play, there was little margin for error in three-handed play. Despite getting all of the chips in with the best out of it, Kempe couldn’t out run Colman and was the third place finisher. With blinds of 20,000/40,000, Kempe opened for 90,000 from the button and Colman jammed out of the small blind to put Kempe at risk. Kempe called for his last 350,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qh"] and was in great shape to double up against the [poker card="ac"][poker card="6c"] of Colman. The [poker card="7d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4c"] flop gave Colman a pair along with a backdoor flush draw. The [poker card="6s"] turn put Colman firmly ahead and Kempe hit the rail after missing on the river. Heads up play went back and forth but Colman was able to finish Seidel off to claim victory. Seidel had a little under 1,000,000 in front of him and got all in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="6s"]. Colman had Seidel dominated with [poker card="as"][poker card="js"] and put the championship on ice with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"][poker card="jc"] flop. Colman earned HKD$ 3,641,600 ($469,203 US) for his run and will be gunning for his second title of this week in the HK$ 1,000,000 Main Event which begins Sunday. Final Table Payouts Dan Colman - HKD$ 3,641,600 Erik Seidel - HKD$ 2,326,000 Rainer Kempe - HKD$ 1,466,000 Sergio Aido - HKD$ 1,011,000 Timofey Kuznetsov - HKD$ 708,000 Mustapha Kanit - HKD$ 556,000
  13. There were ten new champions crowned in the High and High Roller tier events last night, as we gear up for the final weekend of the partypoker POWERFEST. Sweden’s Robin "petdet3ctive" Ylitalo was among the winners on Friday, having made several final tables throughout the series. Ylitalo took down Event #131 High Roller: $530 Pot Limit Omaha Six-Max for $13,088.20, following a heads-up deal with Rainer “PartyRainer” Kempe ($12,809.94). The tournament got 102 runners. That win brings Ylitalo, who plays on PokerStars under the name “robinho”, up to a very impressive $9.63 million in online earnings. Speaking of impressive results, yesterday we told you how “Tightguy66” made three final tables in one day. He couldn’t bag a title then, but he wouldn’t have to wait long to redeem himself. “Tightguy66” emerged victorious from Event #128 High: $215 No Limit Hold’em, outlasting 457 others to bank $18,850. Russia’s “pendall” also entered the winner’s circle yesterday, taking down Event #130 High: $215 No Limit Hold’em Mix-Max Progresssive Knock-out for $20,719.73 plus $14,510 in bounties. Other winners on the night include “Level1pro”, “nolet20”, “NutsInMacada”, “BeezaDog”, “Frdaa”, “sluuvtanuuv”, and “NoisiaRadio”. Event #128 High: $215 No Limit Hold’em Entries: 458 Prize pool: $100,000 Tightguy66 - $18,850 InTheZone1411 - $13,420 DuckPork - $9,200 FlestaBus - $6,400 unstoppableMind - $4,540 monze84 - $3,300 Dabledore - $2,350 goldencosty - $1,700 Event #129 High Roller: $530 No Limit Hold’em Mix-Max Progresssive Knock-out Entries: 365 Prize pool: $200,000 nolet20 - $20,837.68 - $13,610 whresmymind - $15,419.75 - $8,094 trucker_ $11,200.15 + $4,954 kalfucii - $7,795.32 + $1,312 FlopTurnGiver - $5,730.31 + $3,055 Level1pro - $3,959.12 + $2,116 Event #129 High: $109 No Limit Hold’em Mix-Max Progresssive Knock-out Entries: 922 Prize pool: $100,000 NutsInMacada - $8,536.43 + $7,022 Fortune334 - $6,276.50 + $376 thehat23 - $4,671.02 + $2,341 Hallegeir72 - $3,263.78 + $642 zadnejodvar - $2,134.01 + $1,855 febolinha - $1,506.36 + $1,850 Event #130 High Roller: $1,050 No Limit Hold’em Six-Max Progresssive Knock-out Entries: 287 Prize pool: $300,000 BeezaDog - $29,681.65* + $18,655 Jacob2201 - $27,708.82* + $19,200 ChanceSeeYou - $16,583.60 + $11,480 AstraIncognita - $12,060.80 + $7,410 TheRepoMan86 - $8,291.80 + $975 Get1nTheBin - $6,030.40 + $975 Event #130 High: $215 No Limit Hold’em Mix-Max Progresssive Knock-out Entries: 737 Prize pool: $200,000 pendall - $20,719.73 + $14,510 shakentucan - $15,844.14 + $1,411 anichaaa - $11,578.41 + $3,652 I_LOVE__YOU - $8,295.99 + $2,372 r4ndal - $5,789.20 + $861 x2fingerz_2u - $3,656.34 + $791 Event #131 High Roller: $530 Pot Limit Omaha Six-Max Entries: 102 Prize pool: $51,000 petdet3ctive - $13,088.20* PartyRainer - $12,809.94* polarizedOMG - $6,120 trucker_ - $4,461.50 realBillPerky - $3,187.50 FelonMusk - $2,167.50 Event #131 High Roller: $109 Pot Limit Omaha Six-Max Entries: 118 Prize pool: $11,800 Frdaa - $2,972.54 drewmscott - $2,006 BuyThaPot - $1,416 ddc2002 - $1,003 NoOnionsBlud - $737.50 catdogfish - $489.70 Event #132 High Roller: $530 No Limit Hold’em Progressive Knock-out Entries: 187 Prize pool: $100,000 Level1pro - $11,267.04 + $13,170 BateBicoPLZ - $8,095.08 + $6,008 Squidskrieg - $5,905.85 + $1,115 MAM0HT_T - $4,225.73 + $2,280 Sr.Penes - $2,952.73 + $1,952 MinusEve - $2,291.06 + $1,189 Event #132 High: $109 No Limit Hold’em Progressive Knock-out Entries: 472 Prize pool: $50,000 sluuvtanuuv - $4,620.77 + $4,476 gjjjo - $3,289.51 + $609 WrathOfRam - $2,255.10 + $909 Adielsson - $1,568.76 + $212 spinner2255 - $1,112.84 + $692 F.Bulsara - $808.89 + $342 Event #133 High: $109 No Limit Hold’em Six-Max Progressive Knock-out Turbo Entries: 287 Prize pool: $30,000 NoisiaRadio - $3,309.14 + $3,093 opportuniste - $2,211.55 + $1,551 AstraIncognita - $1,595.22 + $81 Paklu - $1,160.16 + $498 Raveeee - $797.61 + $27 mauro_09 - $580.08 + $502
  14. [caption width="640"] Both Kara Scott and 888poker will be back as part of the Super High Roller Bowl this year.[/caption] Fifty-six of the world’s best high stakes poker players will make their way to the 2017 Super High Roller Bowl at the end of May, and now the event has a presenting sponsor. And it’s a familiar face. For the second year in a row, 888poker has been named the presenting sponsor for the $300,000 buy-in event. Now in its third year, the SHRB has become one of the most highly anticipated tournaments on the poker calendar with a worldwide audience, one of the factors that got 888poker executives excited about the event. “Poker Central’s productions offer high-level poker action with world-class poker players. The Super High Roller Bowl is an extremely prestigious event which is followed by a wide and varied audience of poker fans around the world,” said Itai Pazner, Senior Vice President of B2C, 888holdings. Poker PROductions will produce the event for NBC Sports Network, with final details on the broadcast dates and times expected to be announced in the coming weeks. 888poker ambassador Kara Scott will also be back in her role as host for the broadcast. RELATED: KARA SCOTT: FROM A SMALL CANADIAN TOWN TO POKER'S BIGGEST STAGES The event runs May 28 – June 1 at the Aria Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. All but one seat in the SHRB has been confirmed. Reigning champion Rainer Kempe, 2016 runner-up Fedor Holz, Jason Mercier, Daniel Negreanu, Phil Hellmuth, Brian Rast, Erik Seidel, Doug Polk and 888poker ambassador Dominik Nitsche will be part of the field. “The Super High Roller Bowl is truly one of the highest quality events out there. Poker Central does a lot of great things for poker and I am thrilled to see 888poker working closely with them,“ said Nitsche. “The Super High Roller Bowl is a unique event you cannot miss, and I am definitely excited to be kicking off the summer with this tournament.” While most poker fans will have to settle for tuning in in from home, 888poker is sending one player to Las Vegas to watch the action live. The package includes travel, accommodation as well as the opportunity to meet some of the players in the Super High Roller Bowl. If you don’t have an 888poker account yet, sign up through this link and you’ll get a 100% bonus up to a maximum of $700. You'll also get a free $10 on top of the first $10 you deposit available to you right away!
  15. The prestigious Aussie Millions AU$100,000 Challenge wrapped up on Saturday with Cary Katz adding another high roller title to his resume. Katz, the founder of Poker Central, bested the 42-entrant field to take home the AU$1,481,760 ($1,074,658 USD) prize and ANTON Championship ring. Although Katz would eventually end up with all the chips, he was in need of some serious help earlier in the tournament after limp-shoving pocket kings against eventual runner-up Johannes Becker’s pocket aces. A king hit the board and Katz doubled through. He then used that bit of good fortune to stay alive and press on to win the fifth seven-figure score of his career. The final table of nine needed three eliminations before players found themselves in the money. Germany’s Manig Loeser fell in ninth place, followed by American Michael Soyza in eighth. Then Alex Foxen, who celebrated his birthday just one day prior, received the unkind gift of being the official bubble boy, busting in seventh place when his [poker card="as"][poker card="2h"] couldn’t spike against Becker’s [poker card="8c"][poker card="8h"]. With six players remaining, Kristen Bicknell shoved her 15 big blinds in from the button holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="2d"]. Rainer Kempe made the call from the small blind with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qh"]. The flop came [poker card="js"][poker card="8h"][poker card="3s"] giving Kempe some backdoor outs plus two overs to bust Bicknell, who just needed to hold. The [poker card="kc"] turn left Bicknell in need of an ace however the [poker card="4h"] river was no help. Bicknell’s run ended in sixth place for AU$288,100. It wasn’t long before the next elimination. Katz opened from under the gun with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qs"] only to be shoved on by Jack Salter who held [poker card="8h"][poker card="8s"]. Katz went into the tank, but eventually made the call. The [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"] flop gave Katz a commanding lead and left Salter searching for one of the final eights in the deck. The turn was the [poker card="3h"] and the river [poker card="js"] sending the UK pro to the rail in fifth place for AU$329,280. Four-handed play took place for nearly an hour before Kempe and countryman Abraham Passet clashed in a big hand. Passet raised small from under the gun with [poker card="kd"][poker card="ks"] and was called by both Katz and Becker. Kempe, in the big blind, pushed all in with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="qd"]. Passet then reshoved, forcing both Katz and Becker out of the hand. The pair of Germans saw a board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="3d"][poker card="7c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="qh"] keeping it clean for Passet’s pocket kings. Kempe, the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl Champion, bowed out in fourth place for AU$452,760. The final three, eager to continue play, shortened their dinner break and pressed on with Passet in the chip lead and Katz sitting on the short stack. However, over the course of the next hour, Katz began chipping up and finally turned the tables. He found double through Passet holding pocket aces versus Passet’s pocket sixes, sending Katz into a chip lead he would not relinquish. Eventually, Passet’s tournament came to an end when Becker’s only called the small blind with [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"] prompting a shove from Passet with [poker card="ad"][poker card="th"]. The flop fell [poker card="9s"][poker card="2c"][poker card="3c"] giving Passet some backdoor straight options along with his single overcard. The turn was the [poker card="9c"] and the river was the [poker card="ts"]. Passet took home AU$617.400 for his third-place finish. Once heads-up play began, Katz went on a run that had him eliminating Becker in just under an hour of play. After winning a series of hands, Becker was crippled and the final hand had the pair get all the chips in the middle with Katz holding [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"] against Becker’s [poker card="kc"][poker card="2c"]. The [poker card="8d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="8s"] flop was clean for Katz. The [poker card="2h"] turn offered some extra outs for Becker but the [poker card="jc"] river sealed his fate and the German finished in second place for AU$946,680. Katz earned AU$1,481,760 for the victory, his first ever result at the Aussie Millions. It marks his second major $100K Super High Roller win having also taken down the 2018 PCA $100K for $1,492,340. Katz now sits at #25 on the All-Time Money List with over $18.3 million in earnings. Aussie Millions AU$100,000 Challenge Payouts Place Player Payout AUD Payout USD 1 Cary Katz $1,481,760 $1,066,867 2 Johannes Becker $946,680 $681,610 3 Abraham Passet $617,400 $444,528 4 Rainer Kempe $452,760 $325,987 5 Jack Salter $329,280 $237,082 6 Kristen Bicknell $288,120 $207,446
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