Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'richard seymour'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Poker Forums
    • Poker Community
    • Poker Advice
    • Poker Legislation
    • Poker Sites
    • Live Poker
  • Other Forums
    • Off Topic
    • Bad Beats
    • Daily Fantasy Sports Community
    • Staking Marketplace
    • PTP Expats - Shooting Off

Calendars

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Real name


Your gender


About Yourself


Your favorite poker sites


Favorite poker hand


Your profession


Favorite place to play


Your hobbies


Favorite Cash Game and Limit


Favorite Tournament Game and Limit


Twitter Follow Name:


Game Types


Stakes


Method(s)


Favorite Site(s)


Table Size(s)


Structure(s)


Hourly Rate

Found 9 results

  1. [caption width="640"] Richard Seymour is back at the WPT Five Diamond after finishing 18th last year (WPT photo)[/caption] Since retiring from the National Football League after the 2012 season, Richard Seymour has become a regular on the live poker tournament scene. As Day 2 of the World Poker Tour Five Diamond Classic gets underway in Las Vegas, Seymour is one of the players unbagging chips. "From playing a while now I'm a lot more selective in the events that I choose and this is just one of the best tournaments of the year," said Seymour, who finished 18th in this event last year. A deep run this year means Seymour, who lives in an Atlanta suburb, won't be able to attend Saturday's Georgia High School football state championship game. The Five Diamond runs through Sunday night. "Yeah, I will have a conflict, but I think I'll have to stay and watch it on TV," laughed Seymour. Seymour's playing career included three Super Bowl titles with the New England Patriots, seven Pro Bowl appearances and a spot on the Patriots' All-2000s team. Seymour played cards as a kid and then played Texas Hold'em with his Patriots teammates. Once his career ended, Seymour was looking for an outlet for his competitive side and found it through poker. Along with making the final two tables last year, Seymour has cashed four other times and has $103,799 in lifetime WPT earnings. He's picked up $36,159 in cashes in other events. The Five Diamond marks his return to the felt after a bit of a break. "I've only played once since the Main Event. Probably a little rusty, but I'm probably one of the only guys I know that comes to Vegas to relax. Most of these poker guys - they're grinding," said Seymour. During his time on the circuit, Seymour has a made a few friends, including Jason Koon. Their friendship is less about poker, and more about their backgrounds. "Me and Jason hit it off outside of poker," said Seymour. "We both busted a tournament at the same time and we went and grabbed a beer and we just had similar stories and were like-minded in a lot of ways. We're just good buddies." Seymour starts Day 2 with 35,000. Richard Seymour’s WPT Cashes EventYearPlaceEarnings Five Diamond World Poker Classic2016-201718$52,174 Rolling Thunder2015-201640$7,329 Bay 101 Shooting Star2015-201644$21,580 bestbet Bounty Scramble2015-201629$11,817 bestbet Bounty Scramble2014-201537$10,899
  2. [caption width="640"] PokerStars returns Prague with a 43-event schedule over 12 days beginning on December 7[/caption] All the presents in the Twelve Days of Christmas are nice and all, but for poker players from around the world twelve days of non-stop poker action is what they really want for the holidays and the PokerStars Championship Series is more than happy to oblige. From December 7-18 the PokerStars Championship series returns to Prague, the largest city in the Czech Republic, for their final stop of the calendar year, PokerStars Championship Prague. The festival includes a little something for everyone in the 43-event schedule, including the €5,300 Main Event. The Hilton Prague Hotel will once again play host to the competition, as it has ever since PokerStars began bringing players to Prague back during the European Poker Tour Season 4 in 2007. One of the more popular winter destinations for players, both for the action and the city that surrounds it, many memorable moments have been made over the years in Prague for the PokerStars crew. In 2009, local grinder Jan Skampa won the main event for over $1 million and two years later the live poker world was introduced to German superstar Martin Finger when he won his EPT Main Event in Prague. Of course, just last year, Dutch player Jasper Meijer was crowned the final EPT champion and as he hoisted the trophy in Prague, the final stop of Season 13, it marked the final stop of the entire tour. It was the end of the EPT era. Now PokerStars is back in Prague for the first time since that emotional finale, ready to start new traditions and anoint new champions in the Golden City. To help with that, PokerStars is bringing out a number of their pros to both mingle with the players as well as test their mettle on the felt. Andre Akkari, Marcin Horecki, Liv Boeree, Igor Kurganov and Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, who makes his home in Prague, have all confirmed to be on hand. While there is plenty to do in the city of Prague like check out the city’s Christmas markets, stroll across the Charles Bridge or visit the St. Vitus Cathedral at Prague Castle, the tournament schedule PokerStars has put together is likely to keep dedicated grinders indoors and on the felt. The massive 43-event line-up hopes to have a number of events for players managing any type of bankroll. From the €330 multi-flight Prague Poker Cup for those looking for a big score on a modest buy-in to the €50,000 PokerStars Championship Super High Roller, which is likely to have big names vying for even bigger payouts and every buy-in level in between. Of course, all eyes will be on the €5,300 Main Event. Registering 1,192 runners in 2016, last years participants were the most the Prague stop had ever seen, making it a benchmark for comparison here at the start of the Championship years. The Main Event gets started on December 12 and has two starting days. Then, if one can't be in Prague, beginning on Day 2, would-be viewers can tune-in to all-star commentators James Hartigan and Joe Stapleton as they host featured-table action from the event on PokerStars.tv. PokerStars also is continuing their PokerStars Championship Player of the Year leaderboard promotion awarding the winner of the Prague tournament leaderboard a chance to win a $17,000 VIP package to the 2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure and a seat at a $100,000 free roll in the winner-take-all 2017 PokerStars Championship Player of the Year Sit & Go. If that sounds like an amazing opportunity, one had better be prepared to bring their “A” game as the list of players that have already qualified include some of the best in the game, including Koray Aledmir, Vladimir Troyanovskiy, Daniel Dvoress, Nick Petrangelo, Chris ‘Big Huni’ Hunichen and high roller regular Bryn Kenney. Online satellites to the Main Event are currently running on PokerStars and, just in case the tournaments scene doesn’t agrehoursth you, PokerStars will be running 24-hour a day cash games with all the action beginning on December 7.
  3. Some of the biggest names in poker will put a target on their back as the World Poker Tour returns to Jacksonville, Florida for the WPT bestbet Bounty Scramble. The WPT’s $5,000 Main Event will take place from October 19-23 at bestbet Jacksonville and feature 24 players with a $2,500 bounty on their head. The Main Event A staple of the WPT Main Tour, the bestbet Jacksonville has been a key stop for the past seven seasons. The Bounty Scramble Main Event carries a $5,000 buy-in ($4,630 + $290 entry fee + $80 staff) and a $1 million guarantee. Players have the option of two starting days beginning on October 19 with both starting days allowing players unlimited re-entry. The four-day structure has the final table playing out on a lifestream on Friday, October 23. Additionally, the WPT has incorporated the big blind ante as well as a 30-second Action clock which starts when the tournament is only one table away from the money. Capture A Bounty The standard structure of a WPT event is normally enough to get players excited to attend an event. However, the bestbet Bounty Scramble gives players an extra incentive to grab a seat and make a loose call. There will be (at least) 24 players in the field that, if they are eliminated of the tournament, will give the player that knocked them out $2,500 on the spot. This year, bestbet Jacksonville has taken a positive step in continuing to promote the game of poker to women. They have doubled the number of women invited to participate as bounties from 2017. In 2018, ten of the 24 players that have been selected as bounties are not only some of the best players on the planet but they also happen to be women. The list includes 2018 World Series of Poker Ladies Champion Jessica Dawley, 2-time WSOP bracelet winner Loni Harwood, Kitty Kuo, Jamie Kerstetter, WSOP Main Event standout Kelly Minkin and more. Joining them are some of poker’s most notable names. A sampling of those with a price tag on their backs includes 4-time WPT Champion Darren Elias, Bryan Kaverman, Martin Rettenmaier, Matt Affleck, 3-time NFL Super Bowl Champion Richard Seymour, actor Kevin Pollack and 2018 World Series of Poker Main Event runner-up Tony Miles among others. A Look Back Bounty tournaments at the highest level come with an extra level of adrenaline. The idea that after taking out an opponent, the tournament director may be giving you four-figures on the spot gives players extra incentive to get in the mix. bestbet Jacksonville has appeared on the WPT schedule since Season 10 (2011-2012). It wasn't until Season 13 that they formally changed the name to the Bounty Scramble and increased the buy-in to $5,000. In that year, Ryan Van Sanford from Colorado Springs, CO took down the field of 461 players to win a career-high cash of $421,668. Tyler Patterson, who returns again as a bounty in 2018, took down the title in 2014 besting Benjamin Zamani heads-up for $375,270. Patterson returned to the final table of the very next year in what was a stacked final table that included Noah Schwartz, Ankush Mandavia and eventual winner Sam Panzica. Panzica won over $350,000 for his first WPT title. He would go on to win a second WPT title in another bounty tournament - the 2017 Bay 101 Shooting Stars for over $1.3 million. Like Patterson before him, Panzica also made the final table the year after he won it. Just last year, Panzica finished runner-up to Paul Petraglia. Petraglia, a Florida local, defeated the 323 player field for a cash of over $315,000. Prior to his win, his largest recorded cash was for just over $3,000. What To Watch For It’s still early in WPT season 17 with WPT bestbet Bounty Scramble as only the fifth event, but the WPT Player of the Year race is in full swing. After his victory in the WPT Maryland Live! Main Event, two-time WPT Champion Tony Ruberto has taken the POY lead. If he makes the trip to Jacksonville, he will be looking separate him from the field of other Season 17 winners. Keep an eye on the core group of bounties as well. The WPT has chosen a refreshing group of young pros as well as players who have traditionally done well in this event. Minkin, Miles and Dawley will be mixing it up with players who have multiple WPT titles like Elias and Rettenmaier to vie for the title of last bounty standing. With so much talent, it’s not altogether unlikely that a bounty (maybe two) will make it to the final table of six. Finally, the industry will be watching for the number of runners bestbet Jacksonville will register in 2018. Over the past three years, entries and the prize pool have been on the decline in Jacksonville. The $1 million guarantee placed on the Main Event is the lowest guarantee on tour (WPT Choctaw also had a $1 million guarantee which was more than doubled). Even though there’s $60,000 taken out for the bounties, the hopes are that there is an uptick at the Bounty Scramble. A prize pool of over $1.5 million, exceeding 2017, should be considered a win. Follow Along Live updates for the event will be provided by the World Poker Tour on their website. Also, the final table will be broadcast on a live streamed on Tuesday, October 23. The final table will start at 4:00 pm ET on a 30-minute delay. Complete List of Bounties $2,500 Bounty Player Allison Hollander Byron Kaverman Darren Elias Ester 'Etay' Taylor James Calderaro Jamie Kerstetter Jessica Dawley Jo Kim Kelly Minkin Kevin Pollack Kitty Kuo Lacey Jones Lexy Gavin Loni Harwood Marvin Rettenmaier Matt Affleck Matt Glantz Matt Savage Nabil (Doc) Hirezi Paul Petraglia Richard Seymour Tony Miles Tristan Wade Tyler Patterson
  4. Evan Mathis is no stranger to big money and impressive accolades. The former offensive lineman spent 12 years in the NFL, earning millions, making the Pro Bowl twice, and winning a Super Bowl title with the Denver Broncos from the 2015-16 season. Mathis was drafted by the Carolina Panthers in the third round of the 2005 NFL Draft, the team that the Broncos beat when Mathis won his Super Bowl ring, and he also played for the Miami Dolphins, Cincinnati Bengals, Philadelphia Eagles, and Arizona Cardinals. Now, Mathis lives a life of cards, and less than a year ago, in April 2018, Mathis he landed a $2.88 million score. The multi-million dollar payday didn’t come from poker, though. It came from another form of cards. Trading cards. “Ever since I was like six years old, I’ve been drawn to trading cards, collecting, and things like that,” Mathis told PocketFives.com. “I’ve always been a gambler, and I love the fact that there’s so much skill involved in poker. You’re able to gamble and you’re able to apply your skill and discipline to the game. It’s always been a lot of fun, as is the [trading] card industry. I do things that are fun, obviously. I choose to play football for a living. That was fun. Now I do trading cards for a living and that’s fun. Doing this kind of thing (poker) as a hobby, that’s fun. I’ve always been drawn to things like that. Whatever makes my dopamine receptors fire, I go to.” The card Mathis auctioned off was a 1952 Topps rookie card of Mickey Mantle. He sold it at auction after trading away an enormous chunk of his collection to acquire the rare item, then flipped it for nearly $3 million through Heritage Auctions. “What was exciting about that one was having the most expensive item I own, which was [the Mickey Mantle baseball card], and I sent it to auction without a reserve,” Mathis said. “So whatever it sold for, it sold for. It was ultimately one of the biggest gambles I’ve ever taken, so it was exciting in that aspect.” The result of the auction made it the second most expensive price tag for a baseball card ever, with a 1909 Honus Wagner card that sold for $3.12 million being the first. In the Bahamas, Mathis was chasing more millions, only on the poker felt at the PokerStars Players NL Hold’em Championship. “I got into poker in college playing with friends,” Mathis said. “Then, I started playing a little bit online - partypoker, Full Tilt, a few years later PokerStars and Ultimate Bet. I got most of my experience playing online cash games and online tournaments. Then, throughout the years when I’ve had some free time I’ve just done it as a hobby.” Mathis shares the professional football connection with another player partaking in the poker action at Atlantis. That’s Richard Seymour, a three-time Super Bowl winner whose career overlapped with a good portion of Mathis’. Seymour played from 2001 to 2012 and Mathis played from 2005 to 2016. Now, they’re sharing another competitive overlap with poker. “I think what’s really cool about it is that Richard was such a high-caliber player in football and you hear people talking about him at these events, how much respect they have for him as a poker player,” Mathis said of seeing an NFL peer of his, Seymour, compete in poker. “So he’s not just some dumb, dead money coming here, or some rich guy blowing his money. He’s actually a really good tournament poker player. It’s fun to see someone who’s able to go from taking that on-the-field discipline to the poker room. These events, it takes a lot of discipline over the course of time, and I think playing football might definitely help to have some of that discipline. Having to weather things like training camp and things like that.” Mathis made the money in the PSPC on Day 3 and advanced to Day 4 with just 38 players remaining from the record-setting field of 1,039. For many, it’d be a career poker highlight to simply get this far in this event, outlast more than 1,000 players, and earn no less than $86,000 in prize money, but Mathis wants more. Much more. “I didn’t come here just to have fun,” Mathis said. “I came here with the intention to win. I’m not celebrating anything yet. I want to go pretty deep into this thing. Surviving each day has been great and all, but the most rewarding thing would be finishing the entire thing. “I think I might be more excited about just getting first place and getting the trophy amongst this very competitive field. The money obviously would be incredibly exciting, but it would be really cool to win an event of this caliber against such a good field.” As it turned out, Mathis’ run would go no further than Day 4, as he busted in 35th place for $86,400. On his final hand, Mathis was all in with the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Jh"] against the [poker card="Qs"][poker card="8s"] for opponent Yiannis Liperis. Liperis went on to best Mathis with two pair and send Mathis to the payout desk. Mathis does still have a sweat left, that being his friend that he traveled to the Bahamas with, Jason Koonce, who was still in as the prize payouts hit six figures.
  5. Season XVII of the World Poker Tour has reached another final table on Tuesday, this time down in South Florida for the WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown. From a booming field of 1,360 entries, just six competitors remain, and they’re on break until playing out the final table on May 30 in Las Vegas. Leading the way is WPT Champions Club member James Carroll. The final six players have each locked up $148,380. When they return to action in a month and a half, they’ll be chasing the $715,175 first-place prize and seat into the Baccarat Crystal WPT Tournament of Champions. Joining Carroll at the final table was Maria Ho, Ami Alibay, Eric Afriat, Chad Eveslage, and Jerry Wong. Carroll boasts a stack of 18.525 million, which is just about 2 million ahead of Ho’s second-place stack of 16.65 million. WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown Final Table Seat 1: Maria Ho - 16,650,000 Seat 2: Chad Eveslage - 3,350,000 Seat 3: Jerry Wong - 3,225,000 Seat 4: Eric Afriat - 4,425,000 Seat 5: Ami Alibay - 8,175,000 Seat 6: James Carroll - 18,525,000 Numbers Never Lie With 1,360 entries, the Season XVII WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown generated a prize pool of $4.352 million and produced the fourth largest WPT Main Tour field size in history. The event with the largest turnout was the Season XII WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown that attracted 1,795 entries. In second is the Season XIII WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown, and then it’s this season’s WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open with 1,415 entries. Interestingly, the winner of the largest-ever WPT Main Tour event was Afriat and he’s now reached this final table. Reaching the Final Table The money line was set at 170 players, and entering Day 2 of the tournament there were 524 remaining. After a few hours of play, 171 players remained and the money bubble had come. Brandon Hall, who recently took fourth in the Season XVII WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open, found himself all in with the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ks"] against the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ah"] of Alibay, according to the WPT coverage. The board ran out clean for Alibay’s aces which meant Hall was out the door as the "bubble boy." From there, players began filling up the payout line. Busting before the end of Day 2 were Anthony Zinno (96th), Faraz Jaka (103rd), Victor Ramdin (112th), Tyler Patterson (118th), David Baker (122nd), Scotty Nguyen (125th), Dylan Wilkerson (132nd), Sam Panzica (133rd), and Dylan Linde (134th). When the day was all said and done, 90 players remained with Keith Ferrera leading the pack. Day 3 saw the returning field of 90 players whittled down to 18. Darren Elias and Frank Stepuchin when out early, Aaron Mermelstein, Erik Seidel, and Will Failla fell later, and then Ferrera’s run came to an end in 19th place. On Ferrera’s final hand, he, like Hall before him, ran ace-king into the pocket aces of an opponent. Ferrera’s opponent was Eveslage who went on to bag the chip lead entering Day 4. [caption id="attachment_623684" align="alignnone" width="800"] Former NFL star Richard Seymour had a deep run that resulted in a 15th-place finish (photo: WPT)[/caption] On Day 4, the goal was to play down to the official WPT final table of six. Former NFL star Richard Seymour was still in the field, but his time ran out with a 15th-place finish for $29,690. On his final hand, Seymour was all in with the [poker card="As"][poker card="6s"] against the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Td"] for Alibay. The board ran out [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3d"] and Seymour was eliminated. With 11 players left, Carroll won a big pot off Afriat that gave him a stack that was right up there with Alibay’s for the chip lead. After raising and calling a three-bet in position, Carroll was faced with a bet of 400,000 on the [poker card="8s"][poker card="7c"][poker card="3h"] flop. He called and the turn was the [poker card="2s"]. Afriat fired 750,000 this time, but Carroll stuck around with a call. The river completed the board with the [poker card="5h"] and Afriat checked. Carroll fired 1.45 million and Afriat eventually folded. Carroll showed the [poker card="Js"][poker card="Tc"] for jack high. From there, Carroll continued to build his stack as players busted out. On the final hand of Day 4, Jason Marshman went out in seventh place when Ho made trip jacks against him with the [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jd"] versus the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"]. WPT Champion Carroll in Dominating Position James Carroll is no stranger to the WPT winner’s circle and he’s now in a dominating position to score his second World Poker Tour title. Back in Season XII, Carroll won the WPT Bay 101 Shooting Stars event for a huge score of $1.256 million. In that event, he topped a field of 718 entries. The final table included fellow WPT Champions Club members Dylan Wilkerson and Nam Lee, who finished in second and fifth places, respectively, and Season XII WPT Player of the Year Mukul Pahuja. Carroll boasts career live tournament earnings of more than $3.2 million, of which he’s won $1.556 million on the World Poker Tour. He has six WPT cashes, including this one, and three other top 10 finishes outside of his Bay 101 victory and this event. This season, Carroll finished seventh in the WPT L.A. Poker Classic for $155,900. With a 18.525 million, Carroll has 34% of the chips in play entering the final table. [caption id="attachment_623681" align="alignnone" width="800"] Eric Afriat seeks a third WPT title (photo: WPT)[/caption] Afriat Seeks Third WPT Title Eric Afriat could be the story of the whole event. The two-time WPT Champions Club member won the largest-ever WPT Main Tour event in Season XII, which was this very event that attracted a massive 1,795 entries. Afriat entered that final table fourth in chips, and that’s the position he’ll come in this time around, too. He scored $1.081 million for that victory, but his WPT success didn’t end there. In fact, it was only just beginning really. Afriat has racked up 12 WPT Main Tour cashes, including this one, and in Season XVI he won his second World Poker Tour title when he topped another huge field at Borgata in Atlantic City. In the Season XVI WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open, Afriat finished in first place above a field of 1,244 entries to win $651,928. Needless to say, Afriat knows a thing or two about winning large-field WPT events. In addition to that success, Afriat has three additional trips to WPT final tables in previous events. He came sixth in the Season IX WPT Bellagio Cup for $118,950, third in the Season XV WPT Playground for $82,716, and fifth in the Season XVI WPT Montreal for $75,043. A third WPT title would tie Afriat with the likes of Carlos Mortensen, Gus Hansen, Chino Rheem, and Anthony Zinno, who each have three titles and are one behind the leader, Darren Elias, who has four. [caption id="attachment_623683" align="alignnone" width="800"] Maria Ho has her eyes on his first major tournament title (photo: WPT)[/caption] Ho Seeking First Major Title For all of the success Maria Ho has enjoyed in the poker world, both on the felt as a player and off it as a broadcaster and personality, she’s yet to snag herself a major tournament title. Ho is second in chips entering this final table and it could very well be the one that allows her to grab that first major victory. Ho has had deep runs on the World Poker Tour before. She reached the Season XIV WPT Bay 101 Shooting Stars final table and finished in sixth place for $179,930. She also finished 10th in the Season IX WPT Bellagio Cup that Afriat took sixth in, earning $40,783 for that finish. She also has two World Series of Poker final tables under her belt, including a runner-up finish to Allen Bari in the $5,000 No-Limit Hold’em event at the 2011 WSOP. “It would mean so much,” Ho told WPT.com when asked what it would mean to win a WPT title. “I’ve been playing poker professionally for 14 years now, and unfortunately I’m still lacking that one major win. I know that it doesn’t define my career, but the World Poker Tour is very prestigious so it would mean a lot.” In October of 2018, she did win the WPTDeepStacks Johannesburg Main Event for $69,166. Ho had more than $3.2 million in live tournament earnings ahead of this event. Don’t Sleep On Wong Jerry Wong may be the shortest stack at the final table to start, but he’s been on the biggest of stages before. In 2016, Wong reached the WSOP Main Event final table and finished eighth for $1.1 million. For Wong, he’s yet to win a WPT title and it’s his first World Poker Tour final table. His position on the leaderboard isn’t an advantageous one, but if Wong’s able to generate some momentum early then he could really put some pressure on his opponents given the experience he has. We’ve seen a short stack come back to win many times, so don’t be surprised if Wong maneuvers his way to a victory. The Season XVII WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown will resume action on Thursday, May 30, 2019, at the HyperX Esports Arena in Las Vegas at the Luxor Hotel & Casino.
  6. Richard Seymour’s run in the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event was one for the ages. He finished 131st out of 8,569 entries, resulting in the top finish for a major professional athlete. Late on Day 5, Seymour moved all in for 725,000 in Level 26 with the blinds at 25,000-50,000 with a 50,000 big blind ante. The player in the small blind, Zhen Cai, called, and then the player in the big blind, Anuj Agarwal, moved all in for around 2.7 million total. Cai quickly called to create a three-way all-in pot. Seymour had the [poker card="Kh"][poker card="4d"], Cai had the [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qh"], and Agarwal had the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="3d"]. The flop came Seymour the lead with the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="6h"][poker card="2d"] falling, but the turn was the [poker card="Qs"] to give the hand to Cai. The [poker card="Ks"] on the river meant nothing. Seymour’s run earned him $59,295. After starting Day 5 with 2.75 million and in 35th place among the 354 players left, the three-time Super Bowl champion and seven-time Pro Bowl selection jumped out to a hot start. Seymour was seated with another former NFL player, Eric Stocz, to begin the day. After Stocz busted early, Seymour went to work building. He moved to 3 million about 15 minutes into the day, then hit 3.8 million another 15 minutes later. That’s where he stayed until he was moved to the main televised table. Once moved, things started to go the other way for Seymour. "As a competitor, you always want to still be in it," Seymour said following his elimination. "You know, sometimes you just try to go out and make the best decisions possible and today was just a day where I had to fold a lot of hands. Just some pretty sick spots. It just happens that way sometimes. I'm happy with a lot of my decisions and that's all you can do in this game. You let the cards fall where they may and it just didn't go my way today." Seymour called his run "bittersweet." A couple of days prior, he told The Fives Poker Podcast that he was elated to cash on his sixth time competing in poker’s greatest tournament. The result also gave Seymour his second best payout from a live poker tournament, behind the $376,360 he earned for finishing third in the 2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $25,000 High Roller. "I got a ton of outpour and support from a lot of friends of mine and I’m very grateful for that," Seymour said. "As a competitor, you always want to win. In tournament poker, it’s really only going to be a handful of guys that are truly happy at the end of the day, but that’s what we signed up for. I knew that coming in. It was a tremendous event and I’m very happy with coming out and playing." Right before his run in the 2019 WSOP Main Event, Seymour competed in the $400 buy-in Colossus tournament that drew a field of 13,109 entries. In that one, Seymour finished 300th. "I may be one of the only guys who played in the $400 Colossus and the $10K at ARIA and the $10K here," Seymour said. "I just really enjoy this and playing the game, and that won’t change. So we’ll just go back to the drawing board and see what’s next." Tournament poker can result in plenty of disappointment, as often deep runs don’t result in winning the tournament, and that’s the ultimate goal. While his fierce competitiveness is highly evident when he tackles the felt, the enjoyment of playing on poker’s biggest stage wasn’t lost on Seymour. "I thoroughly enjoyed it," Seymour said. "My family and friends enjoyed it. It was a fun time. Obviously, like I said, I’m disappointed that it didn’t finish the way that I wanted it to, but there are a lot of positives that I can take away from it as well. It’s a huge field. At the end of the day, if you think you’re going to final table, that’s a sucker bet and I’ll probably bet against you. But, you just come out and play the best and hopefully you can put yourself in the position to make a run. I’m just grateful and humbled." Seymour may not have found the winner’s circle he ultimately dreamed of, and we won’t be seeing him at the televised final table on ESPN starting Sunday, but we’ll be seeing plenty of Richard Seymour in the poker world. His first live tournament cash came in July 2014, so he’s spent a fairly short time in the poker world. He’s befriended some of the best poker players in the world and given a lot of focus to improving his game. "For me, a lot of people always talk about how I go from football to poker or whatever the case, and I just believe at the end of the day that if you’re a champion at heart it doesn’t matter what field you’re in, period," Seymour said. "Being a champion means you just prepare in everything that you do relentlessly as you need to. Just those qualities in life in general I feel like separates good from being great. My time will come for sure."
  7. After Day 5 of the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event, just 106 players remain in contention for the $10 million top prize. Antonio Esfandiari is among them, as is Sam Greenwood, Alex Foxen, and former PocketFives #1 Chris Hunichen, but it's Timothy Su leading the way. Newcomer Su in the Lead Su bagged 19.235 million in chips and is hands down making the biggest splash of his poker career. Not only has Su never cashed in the WSOP Main Event before, but he’s never played it. He’s a software engineer by trade, not a professional poker player. Prior to the 2019 WSOP Main Event, Su had just three cashes on record and a combined $2,467 in live tournament earnings. His largest cash to date was for $1,080. He did place in the money in the $400 Colossus at the 2019 WSOP, but the $927 that he earned for his 814th-place finish is a far cry from the $59,295 he’s guaranteed. Although that’s what Su is guaranteed, he’s favored to earn a lot more due to his towering chip position. Immediately following up Su on the leaderboard at the conclusion of Day 5 were Greenwood (11.95 million), Duey Duong (11.765 million), Warwick Mirzikinian (11.43 million), and Luke Graham (11.28 million). Top 10 Chip Counts Timothy Su - 19,235,000 Sam Greenwood - 11,950,000 Duey Duong - 11,765,000 Warwick Mirzikinian - 11,430,000 Luke Graham - 11,280,000 Nicholas Marchington - 10,835,000 Milos Skrbic - 10,715,000 Romain Lewis - 10,600,000 Laurids Nielsen - 9,955,000 Ian Pelz - 9,635,000 [caption id="attachment_625562" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Antonio Esfandiari (left) and Garry Gates both advanced to Day 6 in the 2019 WSOP Main Event[/caption] Esfandiari "Feels Great" Reaching Day 6 Antonio Esfandiari has won a lot in his career. He has more than $27.7 million in live tournament earnings and has won three WSOP gold bracelets. His best result in the WSOP Main Event came in 2009 when he took 24th for $352,832. Outside of that result, Esfandiari has never finished in the top 150 of the WSOP Main Event. That’s where he finds himself this year and he’ll be headed to Day 6 with 6.63 million in chips. "It feels great," Esfandiari told PocketFives. "I think I’ve only made it to Day 6 one time and that was a long time ago, so to come back and have a chance at making the final table, it feels pretty good." Hunichen and Dzivielevski Representing Former PocketFives #1 Joining Esfandiari on the Day 6 run will be a couple of former PocketFives #1 players, Hunichen and Yuri Dzivielevski. Hunichen bagged 6.28 million, with Dzivielevski coming in at 3.53 million. Hunichen received a nice boost to his stWSOPack when start-of-day chip leader and 888poker qualifier Dean Morrone five-bet shoved into him with the [poker card="As"][poker card="9d"]. Hunichen was waiting with the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kd"]after he had four-bet and made the call. An ace flop, but a king also flopped, and Morrone was eliminated as the board ran out [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kh"][poker card="4s][poker card="5h"][poker card="8c"]. Hunichen did lose some chips towards the end of the night when Foxen doubled through him, but he was still able to bag a very healthy stack for Thursday. Foxen bagged 2.655 million for Day 6. Down To Four from Pennsylvania Pennsylvania online poker is just about ready to go. It’s been legalized and the launch date is coming up soon. When things get up and running, four players left in the field of the 2019 WSOP Main Event are going to have some extra money to deposit thanks to deep runs and could even become representatives of PA online poker rooms. Chad Power is the one with the most chips for Day 6 at 7.48 million, and then it’s Thomas Parkes with 7.31 million. Kenny Smaron has 2.505 million and Jake Schindler has 1.39 million. Former NFL Players Seymour and Stocz Bow Out Starting Day 5 was a group of 354 players. Plenty of them hit the rail on the way to 106, including former NFL players Richard Seymour and Eric Stocz. Seymour and Stocz started at the same table and it was Stocz to bust first when his pocket tens couldn’t hold up against the king-ten of Chance Kornuth for a 347th-place finish. Seymour made it a bit deeper but ultimately came to the same fate. Seymour’s exit happened in 131st place. He was all in against Zhen Cai and Anuj Agarwal on the same hand. Seymour had the [poker card="Kh"][poker card="4d"], Cai had the [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qh"], and Agarwal had the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="3d"]. The flop came Seymour the lead with the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="6h"][poker card="2d"] falling, but the turn was the [poker card="Qs"] to give the hand to Cai. The [poker card="Ks"] on the river meant nothing. Seymour’s run earned him $59,295. Also hitting the rail on Day 5 were Scott Bohlman (146th - $59,295), Mike Matusow (199th - $50,855), Matt Glantz (205th - $50,855), Matt Stout (217th - $50,855), and Allen Kessler (320th - $38,240). Jill Bryant was this year’s last woman standing in the WSOP Main Event. The Illinois native went out in the late stages of Day 5 with a 116th-place exit. She earned $59,295 for the result to add to the near $200,000 in live tournament earnings she had entering the event. Day 6 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event starts at 12 pm PT on Thursday, July 11 at the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino.
  8. The 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event went from 1,286 players down to 354 on Tuesday Those left are deep in the money and guaranteed $34,845, and it’s Dean Morrone holding the chip lead entering Day 5. Former NFL star Richard Seymour was one of the big stacks to advance. Morrone Leads the Way Morrone is a Canadian player and a qualifier from 888poker. He’s making his first career WSOP cash with his run in this year’s WSOP Main Event and it’s also his largest live tournament score to date as he entered the tournament with just $10,138 in live earnings. Morrone entered Day 4 with 365,000 before he went on to finish with 4.98 million and the lead. Other big stacks in the group behind Morrone on the leaderboard were Lars Bonding (4.04 million), Michael Messick (3.925 million), Warwick Mirzikinian (3.9 million), and Henrik Hecklen (3.862 million) to round out the top five. Morrone’s fellow 888poker qualifier Mihai Manole finished the day with a very healthy 3.781 million. Top 10 Chip Counts Dean Morrone - 4,980,000 Lars Bonding - 4,040,000 Michael Messick - 3,925,000 Warwick Mirzikinian - 3,900,000 Henrik Hecklen - 3,862,000 Mihai Manole - 3,781,000 Robert Heidorn - 3,700,000 Sean Mills - 3,692,000 Christopher Wynkoop - 3,563,000 Andrew Brokos - 3,518,000 Former NFL Star Richard Seymour On the Rush Former NFL star and three-time Super Bowl champion Richard Seymour was among those to advance to Day 5. He spoke with The Fives Poker Podcast at the end of Day 3 about his sixth time playing the WSOP Main Event being a charm and things only got sweeter on Tuesday. Seymour came into the day with 275,000 and quickly got his stack up to 400,000. It wasn’t long before he reached 1 million in chips and then the progression only continued after he was moved to one of the secondary features tables. Seymour bagged up 2.75 million in chips, but he wasn’t the only former NFL player to move on. Eric Stocz, who spent time in the NFL with the Detroit Lions, reached the money in the WSOP Main Event for the second time in his poker career. He’s already outperformed the 402nd-place finish he netted in 2011 that earned him $30,974 and will only be looking for more. Stocz bagged 350,000 for Day 5. Former PocketFives #1 Players Performing Well A handful of former PocketFives #1 players are performing well and have advanced to Day 4 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event. Fabrizio Gonzalez bagged 2.916 million, Chris Hunichen finished with 2.617 million, and Yuri Dzivielevski ended with 1.79 million. Hunichen bagged those chips despite losing one of the biggest pots of the tournament so far. He got involved in a big one with David Guay and Guay flopped a set of tens against Hunichen’s pocket kings. The hand resulted in a full double for Guay and took a dent of about 1.2 million out of Hunichen’s stack. Eight from Pennsylvania Still Alive Pennsylvania online poker has been legalized and the launch date is coming up soon. When sites do go live there will be a handful of players with some extra money to deposit thanks to deep runs in this WSOP Main Event. Eight players from Pennsylvania remain, with Thomas Parkes of Alburtis finishing Day 4 with the most chips at 3.172 million. Pittsburgh’s Chad Power is next with 2.78 million, and then it’s Matthew Sabia (1.81 million), Kenneth Smaron (1.806 million), Edward Pham (1.43 million), Jake Schindler (1.168 million), Donald Dombach (799,000), and Matt Glantz (690,000). Yoon, Esfandiari, Cheong Among Bracelet Winners Remaining In addition to all the names that have been mentioned, Brian Yoon (2.622 million), Antonio Esfandiari (2.583 million), Craig McCorkell (2.5 million), Chris Wallace (1.98 million), and Joseph Cheong (1.958 million) represent some of the WSOP gold bracelet winners still in the field. Yoon and Esfandiari are both three-time gold bracelet winners who have had some deep runs in the WSOP Main Event before. Yoon has finished in the top 60 on three separate occasions (2018, 2016, and 2011), and Esfandiari finished 24th in 2009. McCorkell took 13th in 2014, and Wallace finished 32nd in 2017. We also know very much about Cheong’s third-place finish behind Jonathan Duhamel and John Racener in 2010 that earned him $4.13 million. All Former Main Event Champs Gone Of course, not every player could advance. Three former WSOP Main Event champions began the day, with Johnny Chan, Chris Moneymaker, and Qui Nguyen still in the field, but all three of them busted out on Day 4. Moneymaker finished 687th for $20,200, Chan took 560th for $24,560, and Nguyen went out 455th for $30,780. Nguyen’s bust came when he got the last of his chips in with pocket fives only to lose out to an opponent’s two sixes. With no former WSOP Main Event champions in the field, we will see a brand new winner in 2019. Others to bust on Day 4 were Ricky Guan (362nd - $34,845), Scott Lazar (388th - $34,845), Jean-Robert Bellande (415th - $30,780), Bryan Campanello (435th - $30,780), Josh Arieh (485th - $27,390), Adam Owen (570th - $24,560), and Cliff Josephy (759th - $20,200). Day 5 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event starts at 12 pm PT on Wednesday, July 10 at the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino.
  9. The Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity will be a record setter when action kicks off Thursday. The £1,050,000 buy-in tournament will make it the biggest buy-in in poker history, and the event comes with a unique format. It's a freezeout where recreational/businessmen players can enter via invite only. Those invited can then issue one invite of their own to a guest/professional players. As of Wednesday morning, 26 pairings had been named, but it's the 'what could have beens' that are equally as intriguing. Let's take a look at a handful of recreational-professional pairings that we would've liked to have seen compete in the Triton Million. Chamath Palihapitiya and Phil Hellmuth It's no secret that Chamath Palihapitiya and Phil Hellmuth have a close relationship. We've seen it on Hellmuth's social media accounts all too often. A former Facebook executive and now a successful investor, Palihapitiya fits the mold of the perfect recreational poker player to enter this field. He's played poker in the past, including the first-ever World Series of Poker Big One for One Drop that cost $1,000,000 to enter, and has three WSOP cashes and two World Poker Tour cashes. Being good friends with Hellmuth makes Hellmuth the perfect invitee for Palihapitiya, and getting the polarizing 15-time gold bracelet winner in the field would be very entertaining. Isai Scheinberg and Daniel Negreanu Now this, this is a pairing, and we'll call it 'getting the band back together.' The founder of PokerStars, Isai Scheinberg, paired with the company's former golden boy, Daniel Negreanu. It would be absolutely tremendous to see, and we all know both parties have enough money to afford the gigantic £1,050,000 buy-in. We all know how skillful and experienced of a poker player Negreanu is, but Scheinberg has conquered the felt before, too. He won the UKIPT Isle of Man High Roller in the same year that Negreanu finished second in the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. Tiger Woods and Antonio Esfandiari How can we not want to have Antonio Esfandiari, 'the magician,' the first-ever $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop winner, in the field? In order to make this happen, he needs a recreational player to invite him. Who bigger and better than Tiger Woods? You may be asking yourself, does Woods play poker and what's the connection here? Yes, Woods plays poker. He might not be entering the priciest tournaments in the world as some of these other recreational players are, but he’s the host of Tiger's Poker Night as part of Tiger Jam, held in partnership with the World Poker Tour each year, so he knows the game. On more than one occasion, Esfandiari has been one of the celebrity professionals to attend Tiger's Poker Night. Dan Fleyshman and Phil Ivey How do we get Phil Ivey in this field? We pair him with Dan Fleyshman, that’s how. Fleyshman doesn’t dabble in poker as he once did, but he’s still around the game enough that he could perform well in this tournament. One of his claims to fame is being the youngest founder of a publicly traded company and he's an active businessman and investor. Ivey is Ivey. His star power alone is worthy of entry into a £1,050,000 buy-in tournament, and we all know he has the chops to perform on the felt. He knows Fleyshman, so the pairing works, and we’d absolutely love to see Ivey in the field. David Einhorn and Erik Seidel Investor and hedge fund manager David Einhorn may not be a professional poker player, but he’s as avid a recreational player as they come. He's been known to compete in the highest buy-in poker tournaments the world has to offer, and he took third place for $4,352,000 in the first-ever $1,000,000 buy-in poker tournament the world has ever seen. With Einhorn being a New York guy, a perfect pairing would be Erik Seidel. Seidel is currently third on poker’s all-time money list with more than $35,000,000 in winnings, he’s an eight-time WSOP gold bracelet winner, and also a WPT champion. Although he’s of an older generation of players, Seidel continues to be a crusher on the high-stakes poker scene and has plenty of experience against the fellow professional players in the field. Haralabos Voulgaris and Daniel Colman Since Haralabos Voulgaris' new gig with the Dallas Mavericks, he hasn't been around the poker scene much. Not that the former professional sports bettor was grinding every tournament under the sun before he became the NBA team's Director of Quantitative Research and Development, but Voulgaris was known to get down in the high-stakes arena. Having played a couple million-dollar buy-ins before, this event is right in his wheelhouse. Voulgaris and Daniel Colman have a relationship that saw Voulgaris on Colman’s rail when Colman won the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. It would also be fitting to see Colman return to poker’s public stage in the largest buy-in event in the game’s history. Evan Mathis and Alex Foxen Maybe we’re reaching here, maybe we’re not, but these are dream scenarios so let’s keep rolling with it. Evan Mathis spent 12 years in the NFL and was one of the league’s top offensive lineman. He won a Super Bowl with the Denver Broncos and reached the Pro Bowl on two occasions. According to Spotrac, Mathis has estimated career earnings from football at more than $21,000,000. He recently grabbed headlines when he sold a 1952 Topps rookie card of Mickey Mantle for nearly $3 million. That’s enough to pay for his entry, his guest’s entry, and have plenty left over. Sticking with the football tie-in, Mathis’ guest could be Alex Foxen, a former football player for Boston College. These two would be quite the presence on and off the felt and both have the skills to compete. Richard Seymour and Ryan Riess Another fantasy Triton Million pairing is Richard Seymour and Ryan Riess. This would give us who is arguably poker’s strongest mainstream connection, Seymour, in the field and the three-time Super Bowl winner has plenty of experience on the felt. He just came off a 131st-place finish in the WSOP Main Event. A huge sports enthusiast and a player friendly with Seymour is Ryan Riess, winner of the 2013 WSOP Main Event and also a WPT champion. Steve Aoki and Brian Rast The last dream pairing we'll look at involves superstar DJ Steve Aoki and top poker player Brian Rast. The two know each other, so the connection works for the invite, and Aoki has been known to play a bit of poker in his spare time. With Aoki being billed as one of the richest DJs in the world, the cake-tossing music maker should have enough cash to enter. If not, Rast can certainly front or find the money to get Aoki in so that he can play in the event. How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.