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Found 10 results

  1. Steve 'MrTimCaum' O'Dwyer is one of those guys that the casual poker fan might not be too familiar with, but anyone who checks out major tournament results even semi-regularly has seen him at the top of the standings many, many times. His latest triumph: taking the crown at the Asia Championship of Poker Macau $500,000 Super High Roller Event, good for HK $14,050,000, or about USD $1,811,638. PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by William Hill Poker, one of the largest skins on the iPoker Network. The poker room offers a generous welcome package including a 200% deposit bonus up to $2,000 and a superb VIP program. PocketFivers will love playing in the site's €1 million guaranteed iPOPS series, which runs through November 9. Visit William Hill today! --- As one would expect, the final table was full of strong players, including Daniel Colman, Davidi 'legrouzin' Kitai, Joseph 'subiime' Cheong, Ryan Fee, and Connor 'blanconegro' Drinan. Colman eliminated Kitai in eighth place and it was beginning to look like he might take yet another big event, but he soon made the tactical error of moving all-in pre-flop with A-K against O'Dwyer's aces, a move that went exactly how you thought it would. The emotionless poker player was gone in seventh place. Kitson Kho was next out in sixth place, followed an hour later by Cheong in fifth. Four-handed, Pratyush Buddiga had the lead with 17 million in chips, while the other three players – O'Dwyer, Drinan, and Fee – all had in the 11 million range. After being crippled, Drinan was all-in pre-flop, facing both Buddiga and O'Dwyer for his tournament life. Eventually, O'Dwyer was the only one left in the hand, having turned a flush. Drinan had a chance at a better flush on the river, but couldn't get it and was gone in fourth place. Surprisingly, despite how well he was doing, Buddiga was eliminated just minutes later, sending O'Dwyer into heads-up play with a massive chip lead on Fee, 36 million to 15 million. Fee put up a fight, but was unable to get over the top. According to the PokerStars Blog, on the final hand, Fee bet 1.3 million in chips pre-flop, O'Dwyer called, and the two saw a flop of Q-9-7. O'Dwyer checked, Fee bet 1.6 million, and O'Dwyer called. O'Dwyer again checked the 3 on the turn and called when Fee bet 4 million. Another check by O'Dwyer when a 5 was dealt on the river prompted Fee to move all-in for about 10 million. O'Dwyer thought about it for ages before making the call, showing Q-8 for top pair. Fee had just 6-5 for a pair of fives and was knocked out in second place. This was the largest cash of O'Dwyer's live tournament career, beating his $1,604,972 victory in the 2013 European Poker Tour Grand Final. Perhaps surprisingly, despite a large number of final table appearances in big tournaments, he has never won a World Series of Poker bracelet or a WPT title. His more than $7.2 million in live earnings is likely a nice consolation, though. O'Dwyer has also been an excellent online poker tournament player. Playing under the screen name MrTimCaum, he has won over $2 million in publicly tracked tournaments on both PokerStarsand Full Tilt Poker. He has been ranked as high as 155th in the PocketFives Poker Rankings and is currently sitting in 466th place. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  2. The Rio hosted one 2016 World Series of Poker final table – the last Stud event on the schedule and the vaunted $5,000 No Limit Hold’em event brings six players to final table Friday. Registration closed on Day 2 in the $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller, the Tag Team event has nine remaining and two budget-priced, big bet games kicked off for the arriving Main Event crowd. David Prociak Outduels Brandon Shack-Harris and John Monnette for First Bracelet [caption width="640"] David Prociak faced off against two of the best Limit players today and came out on top.[/caption]David Prociak was the short stack at the final table of the $1,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo event with nine players remaining and had two of the game’s best Mixed Game tournament players and a couple guys with 20 WSOP cashes in Calvin Anderson and Jameson Painter ahead of him. Prociak played beyond his experience and battled his way all the way back to his first bracelet and $156,546. “I can’t put it into worlds, there’s nothing I can say,” Prociak said moments after besting Shack-Harris heads-up. “I’m still in shock. I came in to the day with a lead but lost it pretty quick to him (Shack-Harris) in five straight pots.” “I was able to put it all behind me and kept him from putting it on me,” he added. “I’ve been locked in all week – waking up when I’m supposed to and eating healthy." Prociak's win is just his third WSOP cash in his first year at the WSOP. He previously cashed in Colossus II and finished 30th in the $2,500 Omaha/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo Mixed Event. Shack-Harris won his second career bracelet a week ago in the Pot Limit Omaha Championship and recorded his third final table of the summer. He also played the entire final table wearing a hooded polar bear jacket. Monnette’s Series improved to eight cashes with five final tables. He’s made $319,906 for his efforts of a runner-up and third place finishes. Bryan Devonshire finished 10th and Al Barbieri 12th. Final Table Payouts David Prociak - $156,546 Brandon Shack-Harris - $96,750 John Monnette - $66,601 Alex Livingston - $46,652 Louis Russo - $33,263 Gaurav Kalro - $24,148 Jameson Painter - $17,855 Calvin Anderson - $13,452 Yue Due Holds Half the Chips in Play with Six Remaining in $5,000 No Limit Event The penultimate day of the $5,000 No Limit Hold’em event returned with 47 players and the pace of elimination was a bit brisker than planned, so the field played down to six players before stopping. Yue Du holds half the chips in play with 11.73 million in the bag. German standout and three-time bracelet winner Dominik Nitsche is second in chips with 3.66 million and Jason Mercier’s better half, Natasha Barbour, sits in the middle with 2.45 million. Austrian Ismael Bojang, Michael Gentili and Marius Gierse round out the table. Matt O’Donnell (7th), Sertac Turker (8th) and Arne Coulier (9th) made the final table but didn’t survive the day. Kane Kalas bubbled the final table in 10th place as Andy Hwang, Byron Kaverman and Isaac Baron all made deep runs. Final Table Chip Counts Yue Du – 11,730,000 Dominik Nitsche – 3,665,000 Natasha Barbour – 2,455,000 Ismael Bojang – 1,785,000 Michael Gentili – 1,415,000 Marius Gierse – 730,000 Nine Tag Teams Advance, Polk/Fee Lead by Wide Margin Day 2 began with 130 returning teams and ten levels of action has the field trimmed to a final table headlined by Doug Polk and Ryan Fee. They have 1.2 million in the bag and John Gale and TJ Shulman sit second with 606,000. Top pros Mohsin Charania and Marvin Rettenmaier sit third, Jonathan Little has a team with his parents, James Dempsey and Chris Godfrey formed a team and Bart Lybaert, Adam Owen, Benny Glaser and Owais Ahmed formed a four-man squad that returns. Leo Wolpert and Ryan Laplante finished 22nd, Michael, Robert, Eric and Daniel Mizrachi finished in 26th place and Jeff Gross, Brian Rast and Antonio Esfandiari finished in 28th place. Final Table Chip Counts (by Last Player Sitting) Doug Polk – 1,243,000 John Gale – 606,000 Mohsin Charania – 505,000 Michael Padula – 475,000 James Dempsey – 447,000 Niel Mittelman – 425,000 Adam Owen – 293,000 Reuben Peters – 209,000 Larry Little – 113,000 Elite Field of 20 Return in $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller Day 2 returned 95 survivors with chips and 21 player waited until the start of action to get in the event. Ten levels of action trimmed the field down to 20 players with Ludovic Geilich on top with 3,025,000 in the bag. Michael and Robert Mizrachi sit second and third in chips one day after Michael finished fourth in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship and the same day they cashed in 26th place with brothers Eric and Daniel in the Tag Team event. Ryan D’Angelo, Sean Winter and Paul Volpe finished in the top ten with Dan Smith, Cary Katz and Yevgeniy Timoshenko in the second half of the counts. Day 2’s additional entrants that skipped Day 1 pushed the prize pool to $4.37 million. The top 28 players made the money with Sam Stein, Taylor Paur, Rep Porter and Isaac Baron earning a payout before busting. Top Ten Chip Counts Ludovic Geilich – 3,025,000 Michael Mizrachi – 2,435,000 Robert Mizrachi – 2,245,000 Ryan D’Angelo – 1,640,000 Sean Winter – 1,560,000 Paul Volpe – 1,430,000 Chris Lee – 1,245,000 Veselin Karakitukov – 1,215,000 Tommy Le – 1,200,000 Jens Kyllonen – 1,165,000 Event 63: $1,000 No Limit Hold’em The budget No Limit event at 11 am drew a huge crowd of 2,452 entrants and after a long day at the felt 268 players remain. Daniel Weinman missed out on the overall led by a few chips but is one of 15 to bag up six-figure stacks. Matt Jarvis, Hiren Patel, Nick Guagenti, Tony Dunst and Mark Radoja all bagged up above average stacks. The field combined for a $2,206,800 prize pool for the top 368 finishers. All returning players have $1,750 guaranteed but the big money up top nabs all the attention – the top four players earn six-figures with the winner walking with $339,254. Top Ten Chip Counts Frederick Goff – 144,300 Daniel Weinman – 140,400 Raffaele Castro – 130,000 Patricia Kananda – 127,600 Michael Wang – 127,300 Paolo Cusinato – 117,600 Sean Gibson- 117,500 Massoud Eskandari – 114,900 Sergio Cabrera – 114,800 James Salters – 104,900 Event 64: $3,000 Pot Limit Omaha HiLo The afternoon event picked up 478 entrants and ten levels of play reduced the field down to 156 players. Jon Turner built the largest stack but Allan Le, Kyle Bowker and Leif Force all bagged up in the top five spots. 2005 Main Event Champ Joe Hachem landed in the top ten with Ashton Griffin, Ari Engel and Ben Yu with stacks way above average. Richard Ashby, Scott Clements, Ylon Schwartz and David Paredes also return. The field built a $1,291,290 prize pool for a little less than half of the returning field – 71 players. First place earns $294,960 and top three spots earn six-figures. Top Ten Chip Counts Jon Turner – 116,900 Allan Le – 112,700 Tark Abboud – 111,500 Kyle Bowker – 110,700 Leif Force – 110,500 Sirous Jamshidi – 109,800 Anil Gurnaney – 101,300 Terrance Bott – 97,000 Joe Hachem – 95,200 Timothy Vukson – 94,800 Expensive Chairs in the Amazon Room or Playing for a Bracelet in Underwear The $111,111 High Roller for One Drop returns Friday for one of the most expensive buy-ins this side of the Atlantic. The event drew X in 2014 when Tony Gregg earned $x for his first bracelet. For those that prefer much less media attention the online bracelet with unlimited re-entries starts at 1 pm and plays down to the final six for a live final table in the Amazon Room. The Ladies Championship returns with a 90% discount of the $10,000 buy-in for female players. Technically, men can enter but their +EV argument takes a huge hit.
  3. The final day of the 2016 World Series of Poker before the Main Event kicks off buzzed with the arrival of the $111,111 High Roller for One Drop and the final table of the $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller. The Ladies Championship also got underway and three bracelets were awarded for two events while a power couple got a little stronger. Jens Kyllonen, Tommy Le, Dan Smith Return for $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha Day 4 The $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller event returned 20 of the world’s top players for Day 3 on Friday, but fell short of crowning a champion with three players remaining after ten levels of play. Jens Kyllonen leads Tommy Le with Dan Smith as the short stack. Smith doubled up on the last hand of the night with a straight against Le. Kyllonen bagged up 10,925,000, Le with 8,650,000 and Smith with 3,425,000. The final day saw ten full levels of action but with three players remaining there was no option but return for an additional day to play out. They’re all guaranteed nearly $500,000 but it may be a long day with $1,127,035 for the winner. Top Ten Chip Counts Anetta Holley – 117,600 Karen Xiu – 96,400 Barbara Johnson – 88,900 June Jenkins – 86,700 Alexis Sterner – 85,600 Linglin Zeng – 83,800 Donna Dicrescento – 82,400 Courtney Kennedy – 82,200 Vanessa Selbst – 80,800 Marie Acoba – 78,700
  4. One of the most popular products that Doug Polk and Ryan Fee’s new endeavor, UpSwing Poker offers is ‘The Poker Lab’, and with Polk taking down the World Series of Poker $111,111 One Drop tournament earlier this summer for $3.7 million, it’s a training platform that many more people are going to be interested in. So let’s break down what you get when you sign up for UpSwing Poker’s Poker Lab. What’s in the Lab? The Poker Lab consists of 35 learning modules, with a promise of a new module being added every month from here on. These modules include topics like ‘An introduction to being a gangster’, which will teach you how to fight for pots; ‘Ranges quiz’ which will test and improve your knowledge on certain range aspects; and ‘How to play the river’, which is pretty self-explanatory. There are also 40 theory videos from Polk himself, in which ‘WCG|Rider’ explains his thought processes in certain spots and teaches viewers how to put them into practice. A new 30-minute ‘Play and explain’ video will also be added every week, so users can watch Polk and Fee in action. You’ll be able to study dozens of hand ranges, so you can learn how to split your ranges in certain situations both pre-flop and post-flop. And the ‘Foundations’ section is ideal for poker beginners, giving you an introduction to multiple poker concepts. For more experienced players, the ‘Game Elements’ section will no doubt be invaluable. Polk describes it as: “The often overlooked, but perhaps the single biggest separating factor between mediocre/losing players and those that crush the game. Game selection strategy, bankroll management, poker software learning, mental game, and mental biases – all taught by Doug Polk.” Perhaps one of the most valuable sections of the Poker Lab is ‘UpSwing Poker Engaged’; a social platform which users can use to not only engage with each other to discuss strategy, but also with Polk, Fee and many other players who are on hand to provide feedback. How much does it cost? The UpSwing Poker Lab is split into three price-ranges, which break down as follows: The Monthly Plan: This plan normally costs $99 for the first month, and then $49 every month after that. It gives users 100% access to all modules in the Lab. PocketFives members get the first month for just $79 - a $20 savings - and then $49 per month after that. The Yearly Plan: This plan normally runs at $499 a year, which is to be paid in one installment, and it too gives users 100% access to all modules in the Lab. PocketFives members pay only $449 - a $50 savings. The Semi-Annual Plan: This plan costs $299 per six months, so users can limit the amount they have to pay in one go. Compared with the Monthly Plan users will save $40 per year, and it gives users 100% access to all modules in the Lab. PocketFives members pay just $269 for this plan - a $30 savings. To purchase any of these discounted products, use coupon code 'pocket5s' at checkout.
  5. [caption width="640"] Upswing Poker and Fernando Habegger present PLO University, the latest learning module from the website. (Upswing photo)[/caption] Upswing Poker is dominating the poker training site landscape with access to premium content unavailable anywhere else. The No Limit Hold’em cash game and tournament lessons offered by Doug Polk, Ryan Fee, and now, Pratyush Buddiga is a step beyond the competition. No Limit is a heavily demanded game by its audience but Upswing is broadening the options available with the introduction of Pot Limit Omaha and PLO University. Leading this new course is Fernando ‘JNandez87’ Habegger. The Swiss-born Habegger started playing online poker in 2006 and made the transition from No Limit to PLO in 2011. Primarily a cash game player, Habegger carries the extensive background required to take on the large task of teaching hundreds and potentially, thousands of students the way of Pot Limit Omaha. Use coupon code 'pocket5s' to sign up for PLO University for just $949 - a $50 savings. Fernando 'JNandez87' Habegger will teach you his closely guarded secrets and take your PLO skills to the next level. BUY IT NOW! Habegger says that the course will include basic strategy concepts for beginning players and will also contain high-level methods for already established players to take their game to the next level. “Beginners learn the fundamental structure of PLO and develop a strong base to develop strategies from. Mid and high stakes players also get a framework to structure their learning process that helps people to continuously improve after going through the course. Both kinds of player also get access to our private community which is active and supportive.” The private community that Habegger speaks of is the Facebook group available to all users with an Upswing Lab subscription. This group allows players to share hands and ideas with one another and also interact with Upswing’s coaches and get their feedback on various situations. From the time he first started playing PLO, Habegger has been on the cutting edge of how the game is advancing and staying ahead of as many learning curves as possible. There are numerous training sites available to receive PLO training from but Habegger believes what he brings to the table for Upswing is one step above the competition. “The material and data in the PLO University are based on hundreds of hours empirical research. It's also been developed after going through hundreds of coaching hours with players from all parts of the world and abilities, it is a proved and improved method of teaching poker strategy. The course also features the effective and efficient use of the most relevant poker software on the market.” Among the influences that Habegger credits for advancing his own learning of Pot Limit Omaha are Ben ‘ben86’ Tollerene and Jens ‘Jeans89’ Kyllönen. Habegger notes the two PLO standouts “have certainly influenced the way I approach and play the game.” He also says he studied each player’s game for over 100 hours each during his own career. All Upswing PLO University students can be sure to see elements of Tollerene and Kyllonen in Habegger’s training module. No Limit Hold’em remains the most popular form of poker in the world but more card rooms in the United States are offering Pot Limit Omaha than ever. The high-variance action of the game combined with the massive pots that play out always leave first time players wanting to come back for more. The players who have put in the hours grinding away know that there is always an edge and are looking to increase it with every session. So why should a novice and a high-stakes player both find themselves enrolled in PLO University? Let Habegger explain. “The PLO University is the most up to date course, based on researched data and put together in a way that makes sense and provides an effective learning path for players at any level. It also has a greatly supportive community behind it, and is the only course created from start to finish by a player with long-term success in mid and high stakes who has also coached over a hundred students.”
  6. Doug Polk already has one WSOP Tag Team bracelet to his name, after Day 1 of the $10K Championship, he's well positioned for another one. (WPT photo)[/CAPTION] The 2017 World Series of Poker got underway Wednesday with two bracelet events starting and it ended with a familiar face sitting atop the chip counts. Employees Event Opens Things Up, Gallagher Leads Final 11 As has become custom, the first event on the schedule was the $565 Casino Employees event. This year 651 players, all of whom work in the casino or poker industry in some respect, showed up to take their shot at winning a WSOP bracelet. David Tuchman, Erica Lindgren and former November Niner Kenny Hallaert were among some of the recognizable faces in the crowd. After playing 20 30-minute levels on Wednesday, just 11 players remain and a pair of Christopher's sit atop the chip counts, separated by a single small blind. Christopher Gallagher, representing Portland, OR, bagged up 519,000 while Christopher Solomon, out of Jacksonville, FL, finished with 513,000. Vincent Russell, from Bagshot, England, is the only international player still in the tournament. Action resumes at Noon and will play down to a winner. Chip Counts Christopher Gallagher - 519,000 Christopher Solomon - 513,000 Jermel Stephens - 418,000 Alexis Cordova-Nieto - 348,000 Victor Kim - 323,000 Bryan Hollis - 290,000 Adem Arbuckle - 243,000 Vincent Russell - 216,000 Joshua Clanton - 172,000 Haviv Bahar - 145,000 Nathan Bolinger - 77,000 Team Doug Polk Leading $10,000 Tag Team Championship Last year Doug Polk and Ryan Fee teamed up to take down the inaugural $1,000 buy-in Tag Team event. Wednesday they returned with reinforcements and ended up bagging the chip lead. Polk and Fee added Jason Mo and Michael Finstein to their squad and made it through 10 levels of play with 240,600, good enough for the chip lead. The event allows teams of between two and four players, with each player required to play just one set of blinds to qualify as a team. A total of 102 teams made their way into the field and exactly half of the moved on to Day 2. Two players who were picked by PocketFives staff to win their first bracelet this summer, Stephen Chidwick andDan Smith, teamed up and would up with the third largest stack at the end of Day 1. Team Rast, which was comprised of Brian Rast, Jeff Gross, Antonio Esfandiari and Olympian Michael Phelps was unable to make it through Day 1. Andy Bloch and good friend Chris Ferguson barely survived through Day 1, with all but 24,300 being seized by other players. The final 51 teams return at 2 pm PT. Day 1 Top 10 Chip Counts Team Polk - 240,600 Team Staats - 216,400 Team Tran - 207,000 Team Chidwick - 204,500 Team Salter - 192,300 Javier Gomez - 191,100 Team Fast - 187,100 Team Gathy - 183,000 Team Shuchi - 178,400 Team Snead - 157,000 Day 2 Schedule Thursday should see the Casino Employees event will play down to a winner, while the Tag Team Championship is scheduled to play 10.5 levels. Two more events get underway on Thursday. The $3,000 No Limit Hold'em Shootout event begins at 11 am PT while the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8-or-better starts at 4 pm PT.
  7. [caption width="680"] Upswing Poker Co-Founder Doug Polk wants you to become a better poker player by using the Upswing Poker Lab. (Photo c/o Upswing Poker)[/caption] The marketplace for poker training websites is always in flux and the release of Upswing Pokerin 2016 provided a new option for players looking to improve their game. Led by Doug Polk and Ryan Fee, the site contains all the tools necessary for anyone looking to become a better poker player. One of the most appealing parts of UpswingPoker.com for users to take advantage of is the Upswing Lab. For as little as $49 per month, users have unlimited access to the most integral parts of the Upswing Poker system, that includes coaching on online and live strategies for cash games, tournaments, and heads up play. Other sites offer tools similar to the Upswing Lab but none of them can claim to have the same comprehensive guide that provides many hours of content. Similar to Upswing’s Postflop Engine, The Lab offers multimedia tools designed to give users a fully interactive experience that can help improve their game. When comparing The Lab to his popular YouTube series, “Poker Hands,” Polk says, “If you like the type of analysis I’ve been doing, then you’re probably going to enjoy what’s inside The Lab.” When users log onto the Upswing website, right in the middle of the page is a link to the Lab. Once inside the first page of the Lab is the tagline, “This is what we would teach our younger selves, if we could send the course back in time.” Users are given the option of subscribing to a month, semi-annual, and yearly plan, with various pricing options designed for each. All options give full access to all modules within The Lab, but the yearly option is the best value at $499. Sign up for the UpswingPoker Lab here and use the coupon code 'pocket5s' at checkout and you'll get $20 off your purchase.The primary driver of content in The Lab is Polk, who has 40 videos on poker theory waiting for users along with 35 separate learning modules. Fee is also a major part of the Lab and provides content on a regular basis. “Every month we promise to add in a new module of information. What we also add in every week is are ‘play and explain’ videos, so you can see me and Ryan Fee play and we explain what we’re doing,” said Polk. Polk also mentions that all material within the Upswing Lab is designed exclusively by him and Fee, which allows users to gain a familiarity with the teaching methods that the two players offer. The step-by-step process of “Learn, Study, Master” is designed to give all users, regardless of experience, the best tools available to become successful in poker. One of the best features of the modules is the accessibility for players of all skill levels to find information that is relevant to where they are on the learning curve. Depending on where your game stands, you can start with the foundations of the game, mastering how to play preflop, or how to become a postflop savant. From a social media perspective, The Lab is also beneficial in that it allows for all members to join a private Facebook group where they can discuss hands and strategy with Fee and Polk along with other poker professionals frequently providing input. Subscribers have been raving on social media for months about the benefits of The Lab and there are more success stories to follow. Among the groups of players who are paying compliments to their training are World Series of Poker Circuit ring winners, Borgata Poker Open champions, and WPT Deepstacks Main Event winners. Where the Upswing Postflop Engine is designed to be a less-intensive method of training, The Lab is a place for users to move from getting their feet wet to diving in head first. It takes hours to become a great poker player and the time spent in The Lab will do nothing but set up all users for future success.
  8. [caption width="640"] Doug Polk earned his third career bracelet after taking down the 1,111 One Drop High Roller Monday (WSOP photo)[/caption] Doug Polk and Jesse Martin both took home World Series of Poker bracelets on Monday with Polk winning the $111,111 One Drop High Roller and Martin showing off his Triple Draw skills. Monday also saw another busy day in Colossus III and a completely unknown storming to the top of the $1,500 Dealer's Choice event after Day 1. Colossus III Inches Closer to a Champion Just 41 players remain out of the 18,054 that entered Colossus III, with Raul Martinez Requena enjoying the view from the top of the chip counts after Day 2. Requena put 5,270,000 in the bag, which put him barely ahead of Erkut Yilmaz, who wound up with 5,150,000. They were the only two players to bag more than 5,000,000 at the end of the day. Other notables still in the field include Matt Affleck, WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown winner Tony Sinishtaj, Luke Vrabel, Ralph Massey and Alex Masek. Day 3 begins at 2 pm PT Tuesday. Top 10 Chip Counts Raul Martinez Requena - 5,270,000 Erkut Yilmaz - 5,150,000 Pojana Jenne - 4,700,000 Christopher Mitts - 4,680,000 Taylor Black - 4,275,000 Thomas Pomponio - 4,265,000 Hugo Perez - 3,935,000 Ardavan Yazdi - 3,735,000 Gavin O'Rourke - 3,000,040 Matt Affleck - 2,890,000 Doug Polk Outduels Bertrand Grospellier for One Drop High Roller Bertrand Grospellier entered the final table of the $111,111 One Drop High Roller with the chip lead and his eyes clearly set on the $3,686,865 first place prize money. Doug Polk had other ideas. Starting the day with just the sixth biggest stack, Polk worked his way through a final table that included Andrew Robl, Rainer Kempe, Martin Jacobson, Dario Sammartino and Grospellier to win the third bracelet of his career. Last summer Polk and Upswing Poker business partner Ryan Fee teamed up to win the $1,000 Tag Team NLHE event. In 2014, Polk won the $1,000 Turbo NLHE event. This one was a little bit different though. "In those events, the money was really not a very big deal," said Polk. "Whereas this is huge for me. This is a lot of money. Just the fact that it's... I'm sorry, I'm struggling for words right now. It's surreal. To win that much more money against tough people in a real, world-class event. It's way different." At one point during play, Polk and others at the table stopped play over concerns the cards they were playing with were marked. Defending champs Doug Polk and Ryan Fee still managed to find some time to play the event even though Polk was busy winning a bracelet on his own. While they were unable to defend their title on Monday, they did put up a min-cash in the event. From the "You've Got to Be F****** Kidding Me" department, Andy Bloch teamed with Chris Ferguson and Howard Lederer on one team. The trio finished the day with 23,000 chips. Top 10 Chip Counts John Hulett - Deepinder Singh - 146,000 Brian Yoon - Michael Gagliano - 130,400 Kiryl Radzivonau - Mikhail Semin - 116,600 Ben Yu - Jacob Wilson - 115,600 Allyn Shulman - Jessica Horan - Barry Shulman - 109,000 Team Dees - 102,000 Team Green - 90,000 Team Mariz - 80,000 Timothy Rhoda - Errol Massey - 79,900 Brian Pinkus - Michael Pinkus - 71,600 Troy Evans On Top of Dealers Choice Event Giving players their choice of 19 different games to play means only the best all-around players should rise to the top as the $1,500 Dealers Choice event advances. It seems Troy Evans either didn't know this or is the best-kept secret in poker. Evans, who apparently has no previous tournament results at all, bagged up the biggest stack at the end of Day 1, finishing with 76,200. There are fewer surprises in the other 90 players who survived from an original 364. Justin Bonomo is second in chips, defending champ Lawrence Berg is fourth, Marco Johnson is fifth. Others still in contention include Chip Jett, Jeff Madsen, Mark Gregorich, Jon Turner, David Benyamine, Robert Mizrachi, Brandon Cantu, John Racener and Justin Young. The 91 players get back at it 2 pm PT on Tuesday Top 10 Chip Counts Troy Evans - 76,200 Justin Bonomo - 70,900 Raol Encinas - 68,000 Lawrence Berg - 63,300 Marco Johnson - 61,300 Chip Jett - 59,500 Kyle Bowker - 55,400 Jeff Madsen - 49,600 Alan Richardson - 49,500 Mark Gregorich - 49,000
  9. [caption width="640"] Being a successful poker player wasn't enough for Ryan Fee - he wanted more - and found it with Upswing Poker (WPT photo)[/caption] Ryan Fee became one of the best poker players on the planet by honing his craft online. He earned a mainstream poker following, however, by founding Upswing Poker - a training site created by Fee, Doug Polk and Matt Colletta. Fee and Polk are the prominent faces of the site and are both successful, high-stakes poker pros over the last decade. They know each other from gaming ventures before poker, but if it wasn’t for Polk trolling a poker forum in 2008, the two may have never become friends. “Doug hates this story,” said Fee. “But I think it’s hilarious. Let me give you a little back story on this. In high school, Doug got in an argument with a statistics teacher about Martingaling. He thought he solved it and that was it. Boom. Gambling was done. He was just going to take 100 bucks, go start betting 1 dollar on black jack and then just be a millionaire.” Polk posted a story in a prominent online poker forum about how he gambled away his bankroll using the Martingale system. Having already had some history with Polk in other games, Fee felt compelled to help his fellow gamer and up-and-coming poker pro. Use coupon code 'pocket5s' to get the UpswingPoker Postflop Game Plan for just $19 - that's an $8 savings. The Postflop Game Plan is a system that allows you to make quick, high-quality, profitable poker decisions, which translates into more money in your pocket. Buy it now!“He’s like ‘I thought that could never happen.’ Blah, blah blah,” said Fee about Polk’s post in the forums. “I see this thread and I send him a message. I’m like ‘Hey man. I used to play you in Warcraft III. We got to stick together.’ So, I’m like ‘I’ll send you 250 bucks. And I’ll give you some coaching. And try to get you back on your way here.” After that the two became close friends and kept in touch online for the rest of the year while Polk used the money to grind up a roll playing .10/.25 No Limit hold'em. They met up in Las Vegas in 2009 and spent some time living and grinding up the stakes together. A couple years later, however, Fee found out that the story that created their friendship was completely fabricated. “I was stunned when I heard this,” said Fee. “That the story he made up about him Martingaling his roll away in college. [It was] completely made up. Didn’t happen. That was the basis for our friendship, so I’m glad he did it. It worked out for both of us.” The two laughed and joked about the story. It never affected their relationship. Fee chalks it up to how easy it was to pull the wool over people’s eyes back in those days. “So, there was wild shit happening, people posting on the forums, and it would be real,” said Fee about the state of online forums in ’09. “Sometimes it would be bullshit and it was like hard to tell. Whereas, like now, you pretty much always know if somebody’s real or full of shit. It just wasn’t like that 10 years ago.” It wasn’t very long after the two became very close and rapidly moving up the stakes of the online cash game world that Black Friday happened. Like many young online grinders living in America at the time, the duo hit the road and spent most of the time out of the country playing online. After spending several years on the road in Canada, Europe and Southeast Asia, Fee felt like a change of pace was needed. He wanted to come back to the United States. Both him and Polk had already beaten the highest stakes that were being offered online at the time, so they decided to come back to the U.S. and take a shot at playing live tournaments. “From 2011 through ’13, so for three years I was on the road the whole year basically,” said Fee. “I was just sort of like ‘Dude, enough is enough of this shit, right?’ So, I was like ‘I’m just going to sort of change pace.’ And that went into me playing tournaments. In 2014, I played all the tournaments. The majority of my tournament results come from that year.” A year of grinding live tournaments was enough for Fee. Neither him or Polk had any real desire to travel again for online action and they didn’t want to grind live tournaments full time. They decided to move in a different direction. Upswing Poker was born. “Upswing started because of a guy named ‘Scubba,’ who some people may remember,” said Fee. “He’s an old school like legendary cap player.” Steve 'Scubba' Cesaro was playing less poker at the time of Black Friday and moved into the business world after the U.S. government dropped the proverbial hammer on internet poker. He gave them the idea to start a training website, citing the inefficiencies in the current business models of training sites that were available. “He was like ‘Yeah, they’re doing it all wrong. You’ve got to do it this way. If you do it this way, you’ll crush,’” said Fee. “We’d sort of done everything and honestly just looking for new challenges and wanted to spend more time in the U.S.” Fee introduced Polk to Colletta and the three of them got working on developing their own training site. There was just one problem. None of them had any business experience. “It was a good spot because we had all this poker expertise,” said Fee. “But we didn’t know anything about running the business, right? So, it was a spot where, and I think this is sort of true for a lot of businesses. You want to be an expert in one dimension of the business, right? So, for Upswing, we were expert poker players with a lot to offer. But we didn’t know much about the business. “So, that was more of the learning process. Whereas now, if we’re going to do a business, we could do another poker business or we could so something tangentially related. Like something involving like the web based stuff because now we have that expertise. So, it’s learning and growing and stuff.” With the business growing, Fee also grew as a person and, in his opinion, it’s a change for the better. Fee used to spend all of his time grinding out a win rate in front of a computer screen. Now, he’s building a more balanced and complete life for himself. Fee, a Philadelphia native, picked up the game as a senior in high school. He had turned a $300 bankroll into a nice sum of cash by the time he was receiving his diploma. He spent a semester at Drexel University before taking a leave of absence to pursue the game full time. He stayed on the east coast for a little while before making his way west to Vegas and California. He earned an LAPT title and a six-figure score just after turning pro, grinded up the stakes, playing the biggest games on the web, amassed over $3 million in live tournament earnings and even earned a WSOP bracelet with Polk in the $1,000 No Limit Hold’em tag team event last year. Adding Upswing to his life made him a more well-rounded and happier person. He started making decisions on what made him happier as opposed to what was the most plus-EV. “Upswing sort of comes first,” said Fee about balancing poker with his business. “That’s where I get the most joy and satisfaction. And you know what really it is? I think this almost goes back to being the philosophy of sort of teaching people versus keeping everything a secret. What I started doing was I just started making compromises for money. “I was like ‘Yeah, this isn’t going to make me as much money, but it’s going to make me happier.’ And that was honest. I had like a real epiphany last year about that. So, now most of my decisions center around what ads to the greatest life satisfaction rather than what makes the most money.” Fee realized that he was traveling around the world playing online poker, making a lot of money by anybody’s standards, but he was miserable while he was doing it. “I would go to great places, then I would be sitting on my computer 10 hours a day, waiting for a fish to log on and play me,” said Fee. “Or like wait to get in good games or whatever. I’d be happy to take half as much money for ten times as much life.” He’s only a year removed from his first bracelet win, but that won’t change Fee’s outlook when all of the tournaments get underway at the Rio. With the WSOP about to get underway, Fee is still content playing poker when he wants to and working on modules for Upswing. “I think it’s really easy to get wrapped up and lost [in poker],” said Fee. “It’s something I went through and I think that’s why I sort of have that position.”
  10. [caption width="640"] Steve Madara utilized the tools available to him on Upswing Poker and won 9,000 at The Borgata Poker Open as a result.[/caption] The opening and development of Upswing Poker brought a new poker training tool into the marketplace last year. In its relatively short time as an available tool, many customers have walked away satisfied with their experience with the product and are writing rave reviews as a result. Perhaps the most public of Upswing’s happy customers is Steve '7douche' Madara. Last September, Madara won the “Almighty Million” event at the Borgata Poker Open for $169,000. While he was busy winning the title, Madara flaunted the popular Upswing shirt that brings to light the term popularized by Upswing co-founder Doug Polk, “Bad Reg.” Madara wore the shirt in jest and overall has been tremendously pleased with his experience using the site after starting his membership based on name recognition alone. “I first started using Upswing simply after I heard Ryan Fee and Doug Polk were going to be coaches on the site. Being the huge poker nerd that I am, I knew that these two guys were considered top bosses in the game for many years. Then there’s me, an online mid-stakes New Jersey reg winning or losing thousands a day, it was a no-brainer to spend $300 on this new site that had videos made by them with also a chance for them to personally answer your questions.” Like others in his position, Madara realized that his purchase of all the tools that Upswing has to offer was of much better value than seeking out individual coaching, which oftentimes requires students to spend hundreds of dollars per hour. Why spend that much per hour when you can get a much better value that comes at an annual cost? Madara estimates that Fee and Polk’s coaching services were worth four figures each and he was getting a great deal by purchasing the full Upswing Lab, which includes 40 videos made by Polk along with over two dozen available learning modules for players like Madara who are looking to expand their game. RELATED: The Upswing Poker Lab: The Ultimate Poker Training ExperienceBefore he joined Upswing, Madara was climbing the ranks in New Jersey’s online sites but once he fully engaged with the learning material on the website, Madara says he started looking at the game from a whole new perspective. “In poker, there are countless possibilities, but overall, once you categorize all your hands into ranges and start to notice how they play on certain board textures, you begin to be able to build a much more solid framework to build your game around. You begin to feel like you’ve almost been in that spot before even if you’ve never played it simply because you’ve studied enough similar spots,” said Madara. "The lab is all about this core teaching of solid theory and math that once you gain an overall understanding of, there’s really no excuse as to why you can’t be a winning poker player.” There are many options available within the Upswing Lab for what a player can learn and based how much time they are willing to invest, fully grow their knowledge of the game. One aspect of Upswing that Madara particularly enjoys is the familiarity in learning only from Fee and Polk and gaining a comprehensive understanding of their way of thinking. There is still a lot for Madara to learn as he builds his game but he knows that with the tools available to him inside The Lab, the possibilities are endless. Madara may not be the “bad reg” that his shirt advertises and he admits that as he discovers more about the game, his prior understanding was small in comparison. The next Steve Madara is out there. Are you willing to do what it takes to take your game to the next level? Sign up for the UpswingPoker Lab here and use the coupon code 'pocket5s' at checkout and you'll get $20 off your purchase.
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