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Found 14 results

  1. On Tuesday, just two weeks away from the start of the 2014 World Series of Poker, WSOP officials held a conference call to preview the event and field questions from reporters. PocketFives was on the call and learned that we'll see Frisbee dogs before the "Shuffle up and deal" command at some point this summer. Who doesn't like Frisbee dogs? Answer: Everyone loves Frisbee dogs. 2014 marks the tenth consecutive year the WSOP has been held at the Rio after moving from Binion's in Downtown Las Vegas. WSOP Vice President Ty Stewart started the call by saying, "We hope to make summer in Vegas the happiest season of all. It's time to make poker big again. It's time to make poker fun again." A total of 15,000 WSOP virgins are expected this year and the series anticipates over 70,000 total entrants for the fifth straight year. The WSOP appears to be shooting for the "fun" angle this year, trying to move away from any staleness that has occurred. Officials teased additional cage staff, additional cage windows, new chairs in every playing area, a new zip line attraction, the High Roller Ferris Wheel on the Strip, fresh carpet in the convention center, live music, indoor blimps, and Frisbee dog shows. As most of us know by now, the 2014 WSOP Main Event will guarantee $10 million to the winner, with Stewart saying, "Eight-figures for a poker tournament – it's something that can't be accomplished in any other event in the world. It's something that has had people talking for months." WSOP Tournament Director Jack Effel added that the entire series was "our Olympics. This is our Woodstock. This is our celebration." In changes from 2013, the 5:00pm events will now start at 4:00pm to allow for more play on Day 1. The first day will run for 10 levels, ending around 3:00am. Moreover, players will be able to compete on WSOP.com, a regulated online poker site in Nevada, in a special Grind Room that will be set up at the Rio featuring computers, plenty of power outlets, and a segregated wireless network. WSOP tournaments will largely feature six levels of late registration, with the exception of the Main Event (six hours), Poker Player's Championship (start of Day 2), and Shootout events (two levels or until the tournament sells out). Speaking on the internet situation outside of the Grind Room, Stewart(pictured) told the media, "We have free WiFifor everyone in the convention center. We believe we have enough bandwidth to service all of our guests… Unlike some other poker tournaments, we encourage players to Tweet, post, Instagram, sign autographs, and not have to rush back to their seats for the 'first card off the deck.'" One topic discussed at length was the absence of an Open Face Chinese Poker event, which does not grace the 2014 WSOP schedule. Officials reasoned, "This is the World Series of Poker. While we're not afraid to be innovative, is Open Face Chinese, without betting, raising, and bluffing, a poker tournament? We decided it was too gray to have that bracelet sit side by side with [other bracelets] that help determine a person's place in poker." Finally, 2013 Main Event champion Ryan Riess (pictured) was in the house for the call, saying, "I can't wait. I am super excited… I am playing about 15 to 20 tournaments this year." He added that his game might have gotten sharper in recent months: "I've been working on my game a lot the last few months. I have been fine-tuning my game, so I am excited for the summer." Last year, Riess was a guest on the ESPN football program "College GameDay," which he said was the highlight of his reign as Main Event champion: "I was invited to be on 'College GameDay' along with Joey Chestnut. The Spartans luckily beat Ohio State and I was fortunate enough to be there." The game was held in Indianapolis. Stay tuned to PocketFives for 2014 WSOP news and results. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  2. Last week, World Series of Poker Big One for One Drop champ Dan Colman (pictured) provoked another firestorm of controversy after popping into a 2+2 thread and laying heavy criticism on 13-time bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth. After watching his comments spread like wildfire through the poker community, the 24-year-old softened his stance on the "Poker Brat" and issued an apology of sorts. In the same post, though, Colman couldn't help but speak his mind and praised 2014 Main Event winner Martin Jacobson, while chiding his predecessor, Ryan Riess. --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by William Hill Poker, one of the largest skins on the iPoker Network. The poker room offers a generous welcome package including a 200% deposit bonus up to $2,000 and a superb VIP program. Visit William Hill today! --- In his original remarks, Colman blasted Hellmuth, calling his table behavior "truly pathetic," while referring to him as "spineless" and "a cancer to this world". He also questioned the "Poker Brat's" association with Ultimate Bet, his refusal to answer questions regarding the site's cheating scandal, and implied that Hellmuth would do "anything for a payday." But the young grinder apparently didn't anticipate the way his post would be scrutinized by the media. Hellmuth himself even Tweeted about the insult, saying that "it was personal and it hurts." That's when Colman decided to take things down a notch and posted a lengthy response in the original thread. "I admit to being too harsh in my initial post. Phil didn't deserve that hateful of a message," he said. "I was a bit heated in the moment and it showed in my writings. I underestimate how much the poker world amplifies anything I have to say now that I have god-moded a few live tournaments." Colman continued by reiterating his decision to not become an ambassador for the game. "I am sorry, but I'm not going to be that guy," he said. "Luckily for you guys, there's an abundance of players out there who I am sure can bring good attention to poker and cast it in a good light." One of his favored candidates for that role seems to be 2014 WSOP Main Event bracelet winner Martin Jacobson (pictured). "Look to the new Main Event champ… unlike the last champ, he doesn't have to go around saying he's the best in the world after winning," he said. "He plays phenomenal poker and carries himself exceptionally well, so his peers are happy to do the talking for him." With that statement, he took a shot at 2013 Main Event winner Ryan Riess, the 24-year-old poker pro who often claimed that he was the best poker player in the world. That said, Coleman heaped more praise on this year's Main Event winner while continuing to criticize Hellmuth (pictured). "I think I can speak for any legitimate pro when I say that I want someone like Martin representing the game of poker to the casual fan over an obnoxious brat like Phil Hellmuth, who I think makes a complete mockery out of the game with his antics," he continued. "If you want poker to be taken seriously and seen as a sport, I think we should all be condemning PH for his conduct." While he may have apologized to Hellmuth initially, Coleman went right back on the attack, questioning the controversial pro's involvement in Ultimate Bet. "As much as some of you guys want to give him a pass on his table behavior because you think it draws in people to poker, sites like UB, which he represented, do the exact opposite and put a stain on poker that is hard to remove," he said. "In my view, he is a terrible ambassador for the game and I think it's despicable that with all the money he made as the face of UB, he has never even sat down and engaged the poker community about his involvement." Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  3. This week, with just several days to go before a winner is crowned in this year's tournament, reigning World Series of Poker Main Event champion Ryan Riess (pictured) talked stocks on "Street Signs" on CNBC. You might recall that Riess officially won $8.3 million in the 2013 Main Event. However, he told CNBC that he ended up with about $2 million after taxes and expenses. Watch the video. --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by William Hill Poker, one of the largest skins on the iPoker Network. The poker room offers a generous welcome package including a 200% deposit bonus up to $2,000 and a superb VIP program. PocketFivers will love playing in the site's €1 million guaranteed iPOPS series, which runs through November 9. Visit William Hill today! --- Riess has apparently taken a chunk of his residual $2 million and funneled it into the stock market, giving the following insight to viewers on how he chooses what stocks to buy: "It's all independent research. I have really smart people I am talking to constantly and getting advice on what stocks to possibly jump into or what stocks to sell." If you want to piggyback on Riess' portfolio, then gobble up Apple(AAPL), Disney(DIS), Union Pacific (UNP), and Facebook(FB), the latter of which he noted "has had a rough day or two." CNBC hosts then asked why Riess would purchase shares of Union Pacific, one of the largest railway companies in the United States. "In my opinion, it's the best railroad in the country and they're everywhere," Riess replied about his affinity for the Omaha-based company. "On the way driving to the studio, we saw a couple of Union Pacific tracks. I don't know. It's my favorite railroad of them all." No stock talk would be complete without discussing the pandemic that is Ebola. When asked if stocks like Southwest(LUV) would be lucrative to dive into, Riess remarked, "Ebola is kind of hurting all of the cruise ship and airline stocks, but eventually, as long as we can get it under control, they should rebound." Others who have dabbled into the world of poker and stock trading include former WPT Player of the Year and JP Morgan Chase trader Andy Frankenberger as well as hedge fund manager David Einhorn, who took third in the 2012 WSOP Big One for One Drop. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  4. [caption width="640"] Ryan Riess captured his first World Poker Tour title on Thursday night at the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Finale (WPT photo / Joe Giron)[/caption] The final table of the World Poker Tour Seminole Hard Rock Poker Finale had an amazing group of players with storylines galore; Two former #1-ranked players on PocketFives, a World Series of Poker Main Event champion, a WPT Champions Club member, one of the hottest players on the planet, and a relative unknown. In the end though it was 2013 WSOP Main Event champion Ryan Riess who outlasted the likes of Cliff Josephy, Tim West, Alan Sternberg and Jason Koon to win his first WPT title and $716,088, including a seat in the upcoming WPT Tournament of Champions. “It feels amazing. The final table was so hard, it feels really good to beat a final table with Cliff Josephy, Jason Koon and Alan (Sternberg) played great. He's very tough, very aggressive and put me in a lot of hard spots. It feels really good,” Riess said. The win marks the first for Riess since 2015 when he won a side event at Seminole Hard Rock and his first six-figure or bigger cash since taking down the WSOP Main Event. While comparing anything to that win might sound crazy, earning his first WPT title was still special for Riess. "I didn't start crying this time but I got very close. It just feels great, because I've been playing a lot of them,” said Riess. “I run really good in 10Ks and it brings all the best players out so to win the tournament with such a stacked field where all the best players in the world, minus a few that are in Macau, are all here, it feels really good.” Josephy started the final table with the third smallest stack but ended up as the first one to hit the rail. West raised to 150,000 from UTG and Josephy moved all in from the button for 1,290,000 before Alan Sternberg called from the big blind. West folded and Josephy turned over [poker card="as"][poker card="jc"] and Sternberg showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"]. The board ran out [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"][poker card="5d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="3c"] and failed to save Josephy, eliminating him in sixth place. Just 20 minutes later another player found himself out of the tournament. Jason Koon raised to 70,000 from the button and Terry Schumacher called from the big blind. Schumacher then check-called Koon’s 45,000 bet after the [poker card="ad"][poker card="jh"][poker card="4c"] flop and then check-called another 225,000 bet from Koon after the [poker card="7h"] turn. The river was the [poker card="8h"] and Schumacher checked for a third time. Koon moved all in for 715,000 and Schumacher tank-called. Koon showed [poker card="qh"][poker card="td"] for a missed straight draw and Schumacher showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="6c"] for top pair to eliminate Koon in fifth. The next elimination took almost two hours and it meant the end of the line for the former #1-ranked players at the final table. With blinds of 25,000/50,000 (5,000), action folded to West in the small blind and he moved all in for 505,000 and Riess called from the big blind. West showed [poker card="kh"][poker card="jd"] and Riess showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="ts"]. The [poker card="qh"][poker card="js"][poker card="2s"] flop put West ahead before the [poker card="kd"] turn gave Riess broadway. The [poker card="7h"] river didn’t fill West up and he was out in fourth place. Riess claimed another victim just 30 minutes later. Sternberg raised to 120,000 from the button, Riess called from the small blind before Terry Schumacher moved all in from the big blind for 1,355,000. Sternberg folded, but Riess called and showed [poker card="9c"][poker card="9d"]. Schumacher needed help with [poker card="jh"][poker card="7h"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5c"][poker card="kd"][poker card="4h"] runout did nothing for Schumacher and he was out in third place, leaving Sternberg and Riess to play heads up for the title. Sternberg began heads up play with a 5-4 chip lead over Reiss, but over the course of the next three hours of play, the chip lead changed five times before Riess was finally able to end it. Riess raised to 450,000 and Sternberg re-raised to 1,150,000 before Riess move all in. Sternberg called and showed [poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"] and found out he was racing against Riess’ [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="6d"][poker card="6s"] flop put Riess ahead and the the [poker card="kd"] turn ended it all before the meaningless [poker card="tc"] river. Final Table Payouts Ryan Riess - $716,088 Alan Sternberg - $491,081 Terry Schumacher - $315,726 Tim West - $204,466 Jason Koon - $157,599 Cliff Josephy - $130,370
  5. DOWNLOAD THIS EPISODE IN ITUNES In this episode of The Fives, PocketFives President and Editor in Chief Lance Bradley and writer Matt Clark are joined by 2013 World Series of Poker Main Event champion Ryan Riess to talk about his deep run in the World Poker Tour Seminole Hard Rock Finale and if he still believes he's the best player in the world. The guys also talk about former #1-ranked Griffin Benger taking down the Irish Poker Open, the High Roller dominance of Steve O'Dwyer and the decision of the WSOP to move the One Drop High Roller event and not tell anybody. Other topics include: the Super High Roller Bowl moving to NBC Sports, the Bicycle Casino raid and an update on the PocketFives Rankings. Remember to subscribe to The Fives on iTunes and give us a five-star rating!
  6. On Sunday, Ioannis Angelou-Konstas topped won the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK Main Event for a whopping £940,000. Despite entering the final day with the chip lead, the road to the winner’s circle wasn’t an easy one for Angelou-Konstas, who had to defeated a field of 1,015 entries and top a final table that included Alex Foxen, Tom 'Jabracada' Hall, and Sam 'TheSquid' Grafton, among others. The victory proved by far the largest of Angelou-Konstas’ career, as previously the Greek player with two WPTDeepStacks titles had $874,921 in live tournament earnings. Angelou-Konstas defeated Foxen in heads-up play to claim the title. Angelou-Konstas took out Antoine Labat in third place and entered heads-up play with a lead of 880 million in chips to Foxen’s 132 million. After a double up by Foxen, the two struck a deal that saw Angelou-Konstas take £840,000 and Foxen £720,000, with £100,000 left to play for. Shortly thereafter, the two got the money in on what would be the final hand. According to reporting on partypokerlive.com, Foxen raised and Angelou-Konstas called to see the flop come down [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="4c"]. Angelou-Konstas checked, Foxen bet 13 million, and Angelou-Konstas called to see the [poker card="3h"] on the turn. Both players checked and the river was the[poker card="Ts"]. Angelou-Konstas checked, Foxen bet 46 million, and then Angelou-Konstas check-raised all in to put Foxen all in. Foxen tanked for a bit, then called. When Angelou-Konstas turned up the [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jh"], Foxen saw the bad news and was eliminated holding the [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"]. Final Table Payouts 1. Ioannis Angelou-Konstas - £940,000* 2. Alex Foxen - £720,000* 3. Antoine Labat - £440,000 4. Tom 'Jabracada' Hall - £300,000 5. Sam 'TheSquid' Grafton - £205,850 6. Michael 'Miw210' Wang - £140,000 7. John Haigh - £100,000 8. Dara 'Doke' O'Kearney - £70,000 9. Ryan Riess - £50,000 *Denotes a heads-up deal. Ryan Riess, winner of the 2013 World Series of Poker Main Event and recent "bubble boy" in the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK £25,000 Super High Roller, busted first at the final table in ninth place. Dara 'Doke' O'Kearney was next out the door in eighth, and then John Haigh was knocked out in seventh. Both O’Kearney and Haigh were eliminated in three-way pots. Michael 'Miw210' Wang went out in sixth place for £140,000. He was busted at the hands of Angelou-Konstas, who shoved the river of an [poker card="8d"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ts"] board holding pocket aces. Wang tank-called with the [poker card="Tc"][poker card="7d"] to try and pick off Angelou-Konstas, but he was eliminated instead. Next out was Grafton in fifth place, who was also busted by Angelou-Konstas. Angelou-Konstas then sent Hall packing in fourth place when his [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kh"] held up against the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qs"] for Hall. Falling in third place was Labat, also busted by Angelou-Konstas, and that set up the heads-up battle between Angelou-Konstas and Foxen. As previously mentioned, the final two players struck a deal before Angelou-Konstas went on to earn the title. With the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK £5,300 Main Event attracting 1,015 entries, the top 127 places were set to reach the money. A few of the notables to finish in the money included Patrick 'Pleno1' Leonard (23rd - £25,000), Max Silver (42nd - £17,500), Maria Lampropulos (53rd - £15,000), and Tom Middleton (79th - £12,500). Photo courtesy of My partypoker LIVE.
  7. A little over 14 months ago, Jack Sinclair made his way to the World Series of Poker Main Event final table only to finish in eighth place. On Friday, the 27-year-old Brit avoided a similar fate and outlasted one of online poker's toughest players to win the World Series of Poker Europe Main Event and the first bracelet of his career. Sinclair beat Laszlo 'omaha4rollz' Bujtas heads-up to pick up the title and the €1,122,239 ($1,277,013 US) score. That narrowly edges out his Main Event final table performance, where he earned $1,200,000, for the largest score of his career. Ihor Yerofieiev started the final table as the shortest stack and lasted just 45 minutes. Yerofieiev moved all in from UTG with [poker card="6d"][poker card="6s"] and Milos Skrbic called with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qd"] from his direct right. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="kc"][poker card="qh"] flop gave Skrbic two pair and when neither [poker card="3c"] turn and [poker card="5d"] river failed to give Yerofieiev a set of sixes, he was eliminated in sixth. That hand increased Skrbic's overall chip lead but that's where the wheels fell off for the Serbian. He first dropped 4,600,000 to Krasimir Yankov and then doubled up Sinclair in aces versus queens hand. About 20 minutes later, his run at the bracelet was over. Down to just 3,625,000, Skrbic shoved from the button with [poker card="kd"][poker card="jh"] and Bujtas called from the big blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"]. Skrbic could only watch in horror after the [poker card="ah"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5c"] flop gave Bujtas top pair and the [poker card="6d"] turn left him Skrbic drawing dead. After the meaningless [poker card="2c"] completed the board, Skrbic was officially eliminated in fifth. It was just a few minutes that 2013 WSOP Main Event champion Ryan Riess followed Skrbic to the payout window. Riess limped his button with [poker card="7c"][poker card="7s"] and Bujtas completed his small blind holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="4h"] before Yankov raised to 1,000,000 from the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="as"]. Riess responded by moving all in for 5,590,000, Bujtas folded and Yankov called. The [poker card="9h"][poker card="8s"][poker card="4c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="2d"] runout did nothing to keep Riess alive and he was eliminated in fourth place. It took nearly two hours of three-handed play to get the tournament to heads-up. From the button, Yankov opened to 500,000 with [poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"] and Sinclair and Bujtas called with [poker card="7c"][poker card="7h"] and [poker card="2c"][poker card="2d"] respectively. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="7d"][poker card="5d"] to give Yankov bottom set and Sinclair middle set. The blinds checked and Yankov bet 650,000. Sinclair raised to 2,000,000, Bujtas folded and Yankov called. Sinclair then checked the [poker card="ks"] turn and Yankov bet 2,300,000. Sinclair check-raised again, this time all in and Yankov called off the last of his stack. The [poker card="6s"] river completed the board and made Yankov's third place result official. Heads-up play began with Sinclair holding small edge over Bujtas but the first 30 minutes of heads-up play saw Bujtas climb to a 2-1 lead. That lead was gone just 30 minutes later and Sinclair never really looked back. After another 90 minutes of play, Sinclair put and end to the tournament and won his first bracelet. Having had stack down to just eight big blinds, Bujtas moved all in with [poker card="jd"][poker card="7c"] and Sinclair called with [poker card="qh"][poker card="9c"]. The [poker card="kd"][poker card="qc"][poker card="3h"] flop gave Sinclair second pair and the [poker card="6h"] left Bujtas drawing dead. The meaningless river was the [poker card="7c"]. https://www.pocketfives.com/profiles/kraskata85/ Final Table Payouts Jack Sinclair - €1,122,239 Laszlo Bujtas - €693,573 Krasimir Yankov - €480,028 Ryan Riess - €337,778 Milos Skrbic - €241,718 Ihor Yerofieiev - €175,965
  8. All of the final tables at the 2019 US Poker have been stacked and Friday's $50,000 No Limit Hold'em event was a perfect example of that. A former World Series of Poker Main Event champion, two former GPI Players of the Year, and one of the two hottest players at the USPO all fell by the wayside as Koray Aldemir picked up the win and the second biggest score of his career - $738,000. Seth Davies started the final table with a little more than 10 big blinds and it took just eight minutes for him to find a hand to seek a double up with. Unfortunately for Davies, it had a terrible outcome. From the hijack, Davies moved all in for 270,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="qd"] and Alex Foxen called from the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"][poker card="6d"] flop left Davies hoping for a chop. The [poker card="5s"] turn was a safe one for Davies but the [poker card="2c"] river gave Foxen a flush and eliminated Davies in sixth place. Nearly 45 minutes later, Foxen went back to work as table executioner. David Peters opened to 60,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"] before Foxen re-raised to 255,000 from the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kd"]. Peters responded by moving all in for 815,000 and Foxen called. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="7s"][poker card="3c"] flop put Foxen ahead and he stayed there following the [poker card="qc"] turn and [poker card="qd"] river to send Peters out in fifth place. Despite being responsible for two eliminations in the first hour, the next two hours didn't go so well for Foxen. Down to just 11 big blinds, Foxen moved all in from the button for 880,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"] only to have Ryan Riess call from the big blind with [poker card="ah"][poker card="9h"]. The board ran out [poker card="as"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="jc"] to keep the kickers in play and eliminate Foxen in fourth. Riess kept the pressure up and 40 minutes later sent another player to the rail. Sean Winter, who was at his fifth final table of the 2019 USPO, raised to 430,000 from the button with [poker card="js"][poker card="9s"]. Ryan Riess moved all in from the button with [poker card="ad"][poker card="kc"] and Winter called all in for his last 430,000. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="th"][poker card="3d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="4s"] runout meant Winter's run was over with a third place finish. Despite picking up two eliminations, Riess began heads up play trailing Aldemir by 1,000,000 chips. Over the next half hour, Aldemir never relented and eventually busted Riess to win the event. With 10 big blinds left, Riess moved all from the button with [poker card="kh"][poker card="7s"] and Aldemir looked him up with [poker card="kc"][poker card="qh"]. The [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"][poker card="6h"] flop opened up some chop possibilities for Riess but the [poker card="jh"] turn and [poker card="qs"] river were of no help and he was out in second place. Final Table Payouts Koray Aldemir - $738,000 Ryan Riess - $492,000 Sean Winter - $328,000 Alex Foxen - $205,000 David Peters - $164,000 Seth Davies - $123,000 Winter's third-place finish moved him into a tie with Stephen Chidwick for total USPO points earned with just the $100,000 No Limit Hold'em still left on the schedule. USPO Top 10 After Event #9 PLAYER CASHES PRIZE MONEY POINTS 1. Sean Winter 5 $747,400 540 2. Stephen Chidwick 4 $705,950 540 3. Nick Schulman 2 $390,000 410 4. Brandon Adams 3 $314,750 365 5. Koray Aldemir 2 $897,200 340 6. Cary Katz 3 $580,200 340 7. Bryn Kenney 2 $477,000 240 8. Lauren Roberts 2 $263,400 240 9. Jordan Cristos 2 $206,200 240 10. Ali Imsirovic 1 $442,500 200   The final table for the final event, Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold’em, takes place on Saturday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  9. David Peters, one of the game's top tournament poker players, emerged victorious atop the 33-entry field in the 2019 US Poker Open $100,000 Main Event. Peters was the last man standing from an elite field of players and claimed the $1.32 million first-place prize. With the victory, Peters grabbed 350 points at surged to the top of the US Poker Open Championship leaderboard, beating out Sean Winter by just 10 points to win the overall title and an additional $100,000 in prize money. Final Table Results David Peters - $1,320,000 Chris Hunichen - $858,000 Keith Tilston - $528,000 Martin Zamani - $330,000 Ryan Riess - $264,000 To claim the overall USPO Championship, Peters cashed three times in the high-stakes series. He placed second in Event #4: $10,000 Short Deck for $100,800 and fifth in Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em for $164,000 ahead of his Main Event victory. All told, Peters earned $1.584 million from his three USPO cashes this year and $1.684 million total when you include the $100,000 championship prize. Peters entered the final day fourth in chips with nine players remaining in the $100,000 Main Event. Leading the way was Chris Hunichen, and Keith Tilston, last year's USPO Main Event winner, was in second. Only the top five places were set to reach the money, but that wasn't the story. Sean Winter entered the 2019 USPO Main Event as the leaderboard frontrunner. He'd need to cash and fade Nick Schulman. If he failed to cash, Winter would be sweating both Schulman and Peters if they were still in. First to bust was Schulman, though, knocking him out of contention for the USPO Championship. He entered the day as the shortest stack and couldn't make anything happen on the final day. Schulman was eliminated in ninth place by Hunichen. With Schulman's bust, all Winter needed to do was cash and he'd lock up the overall USPO title. If he didn't cash, Peters could overtake him by the narrow margin of 10 points if Peters were to win the event. As it turned out, Winter went bust in eighth place when his [poker card="Ac"][poker card="tc"] couldn't win a flip against Tilston's [poker card="5s"][poker card="5d"]. That left Winter without a payday in the $100,000 buy-in Main Event and sitting and waiting to see how Peters would perform. Peters got a boost when he knocked out Jason Koon in seventh place, and then Ryan Riess took out Justin Bonomo in sixth place to send the final five players into the money. After Bonomo's bust, Peters found a double through Hunichen and found himself sitting second in chips heading into a break. Falling in fifth was Riess. He went out at the hands of Tilston and took home $264,000 for his efforts. It was then Martin Zamani hitting the rail in fourth for $330,000. Zamani was also knocked out by Tilston, as the 2018 USPO Main Event winner stretched his lead. After Zamani busted, Peters played an incredibly important pot with his tournament life on the line. He was all in preflop with the [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qc"] against Tilston, who had the [poker card="8d"][poker card="8c"]. Not only was Peters sweating his tournament life in the 2019 USPO Main Event, but Winter had a lot on the line, too. Peters flopped a queen and held from there to score a big double and move into the chip lead. From that point on, Peters never relinquished the lead. He busted Tilston in third place with his [poker card="Ac"][poker card="6c"] held up against Tilston's [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qs"] and took a chip lead of 4.855 million to 1.745 million into heads-up play against Hunichen. Heads-up play didn't last long. Just a few hands in, Hunichen limped the button with the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8c"] at blinds of 40,000-80,000 with an 80,000 big blind ante. Peters raised out of the big bling to 320,000 with the [poker card="9c"][poker card="9c"]. Hunichen responded by three-bet jamming for 2.65 million and Peters quickly made the call. The flop, turn, and river ran out [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="8d"][poker card="6d"] and that was the end of the line for Hunichen, who earned $858,000 for his runner-up performance. USPO Final Standings PLAYER CASHES PRIZE MONEY POINTS 1. David Peters 3 $747,400 550 2. Sean Winter 5 $705,950 540 3. Stephen Chidwick 4 $390,000 540 4. Nick Schulman 2 $314,750 410 5. Brandon Adams 3 $897,200 365 6. Koray Aldemir 2 $580,200 340 7. Cary Katz 3 $477,000 340 8. Chris Hunichen 2 $263,400 285 9. Martin Zamani 3 $206,200 280 10. Keith Tilston 2 $442,500 255 2019 US Poker Open Event Recaps Stephen Chidwick Wins US Poker Open Event #1 for $216K Jordan Cristos Takes Down US Poker Open Event #2 for $179K Lauren Roberts Comes From Behind to Win US Poker Open Event #3 Sean Winter Wins U.S. Poker Open Short Deck Event for $151K Ali Imsirovic Cruises To Victory in US Poker Open Event #5 Stephen Chidwick Wins Second 2019 USPO Event; Now Leads USPO Race Bryn Kenney Crushes US Poker Open Event #7 For $450,000 Nick Schulman Wins 2019 US Poker Open 8-Game Mix Title Koray Aldemir Tops Ryan Riess to Win US Poker Open Event #9, $738K
  10. Final tables have no set end time. At times, Saturday's European Poker Tour Main Event final table in Monaco felt like it might never end. After playing for nearly 14 hours, Manig Loeser stood tall, having beaten a final table that included 2013 World Series of Poker Main Event champ Ryan Riess. The early stages of the final table didn't hint at any sort of upcoming marathon. It took less than an hour to go from six to five players. Down to just six big blinds, Luis Medina decide to move all-in for 485,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="3c"] after Loeser opened to 160,000 from UTG holding [poker card="7h"][poker card="7s"]. Loeser called and then avoided any real danger on the [poker card="9d"][poker card="8h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="4c"][poker card="th"] board to send Medina out in sixth place. That's when the madness started. It took nine more hours of play for another player to hit the rail. During that time, four of the five remaining players each took a turn as the chip leader, including Loeser. Action folded to Nicola Grieco on the button and he moved all in for 1,475,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="kh"]. Loeser called from the button with [poker card="8c"][poker card="7h"]. The [poker card="8h"][poker card="7s"][poker card="3c"] flop spelled doom for Grieco and he got no help on the [poker card="jd"][poker card="ad"] runout to end his tournament with a fifth place finish. Riess was only able to last another half hour. Left with just 4.5 big blinds, Riess moved all in from the small blind with [poker card="qc"][poker card="3s"] and Wei Huang called from the big with [poker card="jd"][poker card="6d"]. Riess got what he thought was an easy reprieve on the [poker card="ad"][poker card="ah"][poker card="qs"] flop. But the [poker card="td"] turn followed by the [poker card="kh"] on the river gave Huang Broadway and ended Riess' day in fourth place. Loeser, Huang and Viktor Katzenberger played three-handed for an hour before beginning talks of a deal. After one hour of fine tuning the numbers, the final three players agreed to a chop that left just €78,061 and the trophy to play for. Wei Huang - €552,056 Viktor Katzenberger - €529,707 Manig Loeser - €525,716 It took just 30 minutes of play to get heads-up. After dropping nearly all of his stack to Loeser one hand earlier, Katzenberger moved all in from the small blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="8c"] after Huang limped from the button with [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"]. Riess folded the big blind and Huang called. The [poker card="6d"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"] runout sent Katzenberger out in third place. Huang and Loeser played for 80 minutes before Loeser put the finishing touches on the win. Huang raised to 1,200,000 and Loeser called. Both players then checked through the [poker card="jd"][poker card="9c"][poker card="5s"] flop. The turn was the [poker card="tc"] and Loeser bet 1,400,000 and then called after Huang moved all in for 8,205,000. Huang tabled [poker card="ks"][poker card="8c"] and Loeser happily turned over [poker card="qh"][poker card="8h"] for a turned queen-high straight. The river was the [poker card="ad"] and Huang was eliminated, leaving Loeser to pose for winner photos and collect just over €600,000. Final Table Payouts Manig Loeser - €603,777 Wei Huang - €552,056 Viktor Katzenberger - €529,707 Ryan Riess - €265,620 Nicola Grieco - €206,590 Luis Medina - €152,800
  11. The Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity will be a record setter when action kicks off Thursday. The £1,050,000 buy-in tournament will make it the biggest buy-in in poker history, and the event comes with a unique format. It's a freezeout where recreational/businessmen players can enter via invite only. Those invited can then issue one invite of their own to a guest/professional players. As of Wednesday morning, 26 pairings had been named, but it's the 'what could have beens' that are equally as intriguing. Let's take a look at a handful of recreational-professional pairings that we would've liked to have seen compete in the Triton Million. Chamath Palihapitiya and Phil Hellmuth It's no secret that Chamath Palihapitiya and Phil Hellmuth have a close relationship. We've seen it on Hellmuth's social media accounts all too often. A former Facebook executive and now a successful investor, Palihapitiya fits the mold of the perfect recreational poker player to enter this field. He's played poker in the past, including the first-ever World Series of Poker Big One for One Drop that cost $1,000,000 to enter, and has three WSOP cashes and two World Poker Tour cashes. Being good friends with Hellmuth makes Hellmuth the perfect invitee for Palihapitiya, and getting the polarizing 15-time gold bracelet winner in the field would be very entertaining. Isai Scheinberg and Daniel Negreanu Now this, this is a pairing, and we'll call it 'getting the band back together.' The founder of PokerStars, Isai Scheinberg, paired with the company's former golden boy, Daniel Negreanu. It would be absolutely tremendous to see, and we all know both parties have enough money to afford the gigantic £1,050,000 buy-in. We all know how skillful and experienced of a poker player Negreanu is, but Scheinberg has conquered the felt before, too. He won the UKIPT Isle of Man High Roller in the same year that Negreanu finished second in the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. Tiger Woods and Antonio Esfandiari How can we not want to have Antonio Esfandiari, 'the magician,' the first-ever $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop winner, in the field? In order to make this happen, he needs a recreational player to invite him. Who bigger and better than Tiger Woods? You may be asking yourself, does Woods play poker and what's the connection here? Yes, Woods plays poker. He might not be entering the priciest tournaments in the world as some of these other recreational players are, but he’s the host of Tiger's Poker Night as part of Tiger Jam, held in partnership with the World Poker Tour each year, so he knows the game. On more than one occasion, Esfandiari has been one of the celebrity professionals to attend Tiger's Poker Night. Dan Fleyshman and Phil Ivey How do we get Phil Ivey in this field? We pair him with Dan Fleyshman, that’s how. Fleyshman doesn’t dabble in poker as he once did, but he’s still around the game enough that he could perform well in this tournament. One of his claims to fame is being the youngest founder of a publicly traded company and he's an active businessman and investor. Ivey is Ivey. His star power alone is worthy of entry into a £1,050,000 buy-in tournament, and we all know he has the chops to perform on the felt. He knows Fleyshman, so the pairing works, and we’d absolutely love to see Ivey in the field. David Einhorn and Erik Seidel Investor and hedge fund manager David Einhorn may not be a professional poker player, but he’s as avid a recreational player as they come. He's been known to compete in the highest buy-in poker tournaments the world has to offer, and he took third place for $4,352,000 in the first-ever $1,000,000 buy-in poker tournament the world has ever seen. With Einhorn being a New York guy, a perfect pairing would be Erik Seidel. Seidel is currently third on poker’s all-time money list with more than $35,000,000 in winnings, he’s an eight-time WSOP gold bracelet winner, and also a WPT champion. Although he’s of an older generation of players, Seidel continues to be a crusher on the high-stakes poker scene and has plenty of experience against the fellow professional players in the field. Haralabos Voulgaris and Daniel Colman Since Haralabos Voulgaris' new gig with the Dallas Mavericks, he hasn't been around the poker scene much. Not that the former professional sports bettor was grinding every tournament under the sun before he became the NBA team's Director of Quantitative Research and Development, but Voulgaris was known to get down in the high-stakes arena. Having played a couple million-dollar buy-ins before, this event is right in his wheelhouse. Voulgaris and Daniel Colman have a relationship that saw Voulgaris on Colman’s rail when Colman won the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. It would also be fitting to see Colman return to poker’s public stage in the largest buy-in event in the game’s history. Evan Mathis and Alex Foxen Maybe we’re reaching here, maybe we’re not, but these are dream scenarios so let’s keep rolling with it. Evan Mathis spent 12 years in the NFL and was one of the league’s top offensive lineman. He won a Super Bowl with the Denver Broncos and reached the Pro Bowl on two occasions. According to Spotrac, Mathis has estimated career earnings from football at more than $21,000,000. He recently grabbed headlines when he sold a 1952 Topps rookie card of Mickey Mantle for nearly $3 million. That’s enough to pay for his entry, his guest’s entry, and have plenty left over. Sticking with the football tie-in, Mathis’ guest could be Alex Foxen, a former football player for Boston College. These two would be quite the presence on and off the felt and both have the skills to compete. Richard Seymour and Ryan Riess Another fantasy Triton Million pairing is Richard Seymour and Ryan Riess. This would give us who is arguably poker’s strongest mainstream connection, Seymour, in the field and the three-time Super Bowl winner has plenty of experience on the felt. He just came off a 131st-place finish in the WSOP Main Event. A huge sports enthusiast and a player friendly with Seymour is Ryan Riess, winner of the 2013 WSOP Main Event and also a WPT champion. Steve Aoki and Brian Rast The last dream pairing we'll look at involves superstar DJ Steve Aoki and top poker player Brian Rast. The two know each other, so the connection works for the invite, and Aoki has been known to play a bit of poker in his spare time. With Aoki being billed as one of the richest DJs in the world, the cake-tossing music maker should have enough cash to enter. If not, Rast can certainly front or find the money to get Aoki in so that he can play in the event. How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  12. James Chen returned to the final table of the World Series of Poker Europe €250K Super High Roller with the shortest stack among the seven remaining players on Friday while Dominik Nitsche stood alone atop the chip counts. Over 6.5 hours of play, Chen overcame his short stack to go on to win his first career bracelet and a €2.8 million score while Nitsche suffered through an almost unimaginable turn of events. Nitsche, who won the €111,111 High Roller for One Drop event at WSOP Europe 2017, couldn't have had more go wrong for him just after cards were in the air. Christoph Vogelsang and Chen each doubled through the German poker pro in the opening hands of play and then an hour later, Nitsche became the first player to hit the rail. Down to just under 15 big blinds, Nitsche moved all in from middle position with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ks"] and Chin Wei Lim looked down at [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"] on the button moved all in over the top. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2d"] flop left Nitsche drawing to one of four jacks for Broadway. The [poker card="2h"] turn gave Lim a full house and Nitsche was out one spot before the bubble. The river was the [poker card="6d"]. Tony G considers poker his hobby, but for a brief time on Friday, he was the Table Captain of this event and he seemed to enjoy throwing Ryan Riess overboard on the bubble. Riess moved all in from the cutoff with [poker card="ah"][poker card="jc"] and G moved all in behind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"]. The board ran out [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"][poker card="9h"][poker card="th"] and despite picking up a sweat along the way, Riess was eliminated in sixth place leaving the remaining five players all in the money. G continued to run things and 45 minutes after busting Riess, he found another victim. From the hijack, G raised to 3,500,000 and Cary Katz called from the big blind. After the [poker card="js"][poker card="jd"][poker card="9h"] flop, Katz moved all in for 5,300,000 and G called. Katz showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"] for top pair with a straight draw which put him ahead of Katz's [poker card="jh"][poker card="6h"]. Neither the [poker card="7c"] turn or [poker card="2c"] river improved either player's hand and Katz was eliminated in fifth place. G's time as the Table Captain was relatively short-lived though. Just 40 minutes after busting Katz, G tangled with Chen and ended up walking the plank. Chen raised to 3,200,000 from the cutoff and G called from the big blind. After the [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"][poker card="8c"] flop, G checked and allowed Chen to bet 3,000,000. G check-raised all in for 27,900,000 before Chen called. G showed [poker card="jh"][poker card="9c"] for an open-ended straight draw while Chen showed [poker card="as"][poker card="td"] for top two pair. The [poker card="8h"] turn was no help for G and neither was the [poker card="kc"] river, sending him home in fourth place. Three-handed play lasted just 45 minutes before Lim sent another player to the rail. Lim raised to 6,000,000 from the button with [poker card="ac"][poker card="tc"] and Vogelsang called all in with [poker card="5h"][poker card="5s"]. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7h"] flop moved Lim ahead and Vogelsang was unable to find help on the [poker card="8h"] turn or [poker card="8c"] river and was out in third place. Heads-up play began with Chen holding 63% of the chips in play and over the course of two hours, Lim only briefly held the chip lead before Chen was able to close the deal on his first career WSOP bracelet. Chen moved all in from the button with [poker card="ad"][poker card="4d"] and Lim called all for his last eight big blinds with [poker card="ah"][poker card="5c"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="jh"][poker card="9s"] flop gave Lim hope of winning the pot outright. The [poker card="3d"] turn was a safe one for Lim but the [poker card="4c"] river gave Chen two pair and eliminated Lim in second place to give Chen a bracelet and a €2,844,215 score. Final Table Payouts James Chen - €2,844,215 Chin Wei Lim - €1,757,857 Christoph Vogelsang - €1,185,161 Tony G - €799,045 Cary Katz - €538,722
  13. Nominations for the second annual Global Poker Awards were announced on Friday with popular poker personality Joey Ingram leading the way with four nominations. The Global Poker Awards, slated to take place at the PokerGO Studio in Las Vegas on March 6, celebrates the poker industry by recognizing the game of poker's top talent both on the felt and behind the scenes. This year, awards will be handed out in 19 different categories including two that are voted on by the fans. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="GG Poker"][ptable zone="BetMGM NJ"] Multiple Nods Sixteen former award winners are back in contention this year with a number of them recognized in multiple categories. Poker personality and podcast/video producer Joey Ingram picked up nominations in the People’s Choice for Poker Personality of the Year, Podcast of the Year (Poker Life Podcast), Journalist of the Year and Media Content of the Year for his extensive work investigating the Mike Postle cheating allegation story. PocketFives’ own three-time GPI award winner Lance Bradley earned another three nominations for Journalist of the Year, Media Content of the Year, and Podcast of the Year for The FIVES Poker Podcast, alongside PocketFives own Managing Editor Donnie Peters. Daniel Negreanu, Jamie Kerstetter, Lex Veldhuis, Hayley Hochstätter and tournament director Matt Savage each earned two nominations. Alex Foxen, Andrew Neeme, Barny Boatman, Brad Owen, Bryn Kenney, Cary Katz, Joe Giron, Joe Stapleton, Kevin Mathers, Nick Schulman, and Paul Campbell join Bradley, Ingram, Negreanu, Savage, and Veldhuis as previous award winners who find themselves back in the running for even more hardware at the upcoming ceremonies. In addition to the 18 awards that will be voted on and the Global Poker Index Player of the Year awards, the PocketFives Legacy Award will once again be handed out to a PocketFives player who has shown success in both the online and live poker arenas. Previous award winners include Ari Engel, Cliff Josephy and Chris Moorman. 2019 Global Poker Award Nominees GPI BREAKOUT PLAYER OF THE YEAR Robert Campbell (AUS) Ramon Colillas (ESP) Ben Farrell (UK) George Wolff (USA) FINAL TABLE PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR Hossein Ensan (GER), WSOP Main Event William Alex Foxen (USA), WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Phillip Hui (USA), WSOP Poker Players Championship Bryn Kenney (USA), Triton Poker Super High Roller Series Montenegro TWITTER PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR Barny Boatman (UK) Jamie Kerstetter (USA) Kitty Kuo (TAI) Kevin Mathers (USA) PLAYERS CHOICE FOR TOUGHEST OPPONENT Michael Addamo (AUS) Kahle Burns (AUS) Stephen Chidwick (UK) Ali Imsirovic (BIH) STREAMER OF THE YEAR Hristivoje Pavlovic (AUS) Benjamin Spragg (UK) Matthew Staples (CAN) Lex Veldhuis (NED) VLOGGER OF THE YEAR Jaman Burton (USA) Andrew Neeme (USA) Daniel Negreanu (CAN) Brad Owen (USA) PODCAST OF THE YEAR DAT Poker Podcast: Terrence Chan, Ross Henry, Adam Schwartz, Daniel Negreanu (CAN) Poker Life Podcast: Joey Ingram (USA) The Fives, a PocketFives Podcast: Lance Bradley (CAN), Donnie Peters (USA) The Grid: Jennifer Shahade (USA) INDUSTRY PERSON OF THE YEAR Phil Galfond (USA), Run it Once Poker Cary Katz (USA), Poker Central/PokerGO Paul Phua (MAS), Triton Poker Matt Savage (USA), WPT/TDA TOURNAMENT DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR Tony Burns (USA), Seminole Hard Rock Paul Campbell (USA), Aria Jack Effel (USA), World Series of Poker Matt Savage (USA), WPT/TDA EVENT OF THE YEAR PokerStars Players Championship Bahamas Triton London Million for Charity World Series of Poker Main Event World Series of Poker BIG 50 MID-MAJOR TOUR/CIRCUIT OF THE YEAR Road to PSPC RUNGOOD Poker Series WPTDeepStacks WSOP Circuit JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR Lance Bradley (CAN) Haley Hintze (USA) Joey Ingram (USA) Nick Jones (UK) BROADCASTER OF THE YEAR Jamie Kerstetter (USA) Jeff Platt (USA) Nick Schulman (USA) Joseph Stapleton (USA) MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: WRITTEN A Fight for Fatherhood: The Biggest Win of Jason Young’s Life, Lance Bradley (CAN) for PoketFives Kevin Roster Spread Sarcoma Awareness at WSOP, Wants to End Life on His Terms, Aleeyah Jadavji (CAN), Hayley Hochstetler (USA) for PokerNews Poker and Pop Culture, Martin Harris (USA) for D+B Publishing The Unabridged Story of The Hendon Mob, Paul Seaton (UK) for PokerNews MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: PHOTO Antonio Abrego (USA): Ryan Laplante in deep thought at the WSOP (PokerNews) Drew Amato (USA): Dario Sammartino folds at the WSOP (Poker Central) Joe Giron (USA): WPT Champion Frank Stepuchin is lifted in victory (WPT) Hayley Hochstetler (USA): Doyle Brunson and Jack Binion at WSOP celebration (WSOP) MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: VIDEO Investigating Mike Postle Hand Histories from Stones Live, Joey Ingram (USA) Legends of the Game – Stu Ungar (PokerGO) The Big Blind w/Jeff Platt featuring Mike Matusow, Normand Chad, Sarah Herring (PokerGO) Who Makes Money from Professional Poker, Sam Rega (USA) for CNBC PEOPLE’S CHOICE FOR POKER PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR Joey Ingram (USA) Jonathan Little (USA) Ryan DePaulo (USA) Lex Veldhuis (NED) PEOPLE’S CHOICE FOR HAND OF THE YEAR Bryce Yockey takes a historic hit against Josh Arieh in the WSOP Poker Players Championship Ryan Riess makes 10-high all-in call at EPT Monte Carlo final table Sam Trickett makes Stephen Chidwick fold best hand at Triton London 1M event Thi Xoa Nguyen folds full house to Athanasios Polychronopoulos at PSPC
  14. Ireland’s Daniel Smyth won his way into the World Poker Tour Online Knockout Championship for just $33 and ended up turning that into a score of $413,392.75, a ticket to the WPT Tournament of Champions, and a date to have his name engraved on the WPT Mike Sexton Champions Cup. Smyth, who has a little more than just $47,000 in live recorded earnings, topped the 1,035-entry field by leaning on his online experience that led him to a win in the PokerStars Sunday Million back in 2010. But even though Smyth may have been in his element playing online, getting the win was no easy feat as he was surrounded by some of today’s brightest stars at the final table. World Series of Poker Main Event champion Ryan Reiss, Russian crusher Artur ‘marathur1’ Martirosian, and German superstar Manig Loeser were just a few of the final eight players that stood in his way. It took nearly thirty minutes of final table play to lose the first player. Brazil’s Joao Mauteli opened under the gun holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"] and was prompty shipped on with the short stack of fellow countryman Matheus Resende and his [poker card="qd"][poker card="qs"]. Maureli made the quick call and took the lead when the flop came [poker card="kd"][poker card="7c"][poker card="6h"]. The [poker card="5h"] turn and [poker card="5s"] river couldn’t help Resende’s pocket queens and he exited in ninth place for $19,483.87 and $13,242.18 in bounties. With fewer than 10 big blinds, Kazakhstan’s Shyngis Satubayev shipped his stack holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="8h"] from the hijack. Pedro Marques made the call from the button holding [poker card="as"][poker card="6s"] and both blinds let their hands go. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4d"] giving Marques top pair and leaving Satubayev looking for running cards. The [poker card="td"] turn left Marques drawing dead to the [poker card="6h"] river. Satubayev was eliminated in eighth place for $23,504.85 and just $750 in bounties. Forty-five minutes later Smyth found himself with just 10 big blinds and he moved all-in on the button holding [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] and was snap called for less by Ryan Riess in the big blind who had [poker card="7d"][poker card="7d"]. Riess, all in for his tournament, needed help instantly as the [poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5c"] flop gave Smyth a flopped flush. The [poker card="6h"] turn gave Riess some full house outs, but the [poker card="2d"] was not one of them and the one-time WSOP Main Event champ fell in seventh place for $29,699.32 and $18,562.50 in bounties. It only took a few hands after Riess’s departure for Martirosian to find himself all-in. The Russian raised for half his 12 big blind stack from under the gun holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="ts"]. Marques three-bet shipped his 30 big blind stack on the button with [poker card="8d"][poker card="8h"] and when folded back to him, Martirosian called for his tournament life. The board ran out [poker card="5h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="kd"][poker card="jh"][poker card="5d"] missing all of Martirosian’s outs. He adds $47,281.38 and another $16,593.75 in bounties to his significant 2020 online earnings. After nearly an hour-and-a-half of five-handed play, Portugal’s Marques put in a raise with [poker card="ad"][poker card="js"] on the button and Loeser promptly three-bet him from the small blind holding [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"]. When it folded back to Marques he put in the rest of his 20 big blind stack and Loeser made the call. The flop came [poker card="2c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="td"] leaving Marques searching for a lot of help to stay alive. The turn came the [poker card="qh"], opening up a gutshot straight for Marques. The [poker card="9d"] hit the river, and Marques turned his $320 satellite win into $66,687.63 and another $22,382.80 in bounties. It didn’t take long for Loeser to claim another bounty. From the small blind Loeser put in a small raise with [poker card="ah"][poker card="td"], which opened the door for the Netherlands’ Pim Gieles to three-bet holding [poker card="as"][poker card="7d"]. Back on Loeser, he wasted no time in four-bet shipping his big stack and, dominated, Gieles committed the last of his stack. The duo watched as the board ran out [poker card="ad"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="8s"][poker card="9h"] and Gieles falls in fourth for $95,502.03 and $23,478.51 in bounties. Like Smyth, Maureli was also in this $3,200 buy-in tournament for a fraction of the cost. The Brazilian, who entered the final table as the chip leader, won his way in by taking down the $22 buy-in Mini Masters which gave him not only a $4.2K score but also a free $3,200 ticket. He used that on the Knockout, hoping to pick up some bounties should he not cash. But he found himself three-handed with a six-figure score guaranteed. With 20 big blinds, Maureli moved all-in from the small blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="4d"]. Smyth snapped him off holding [poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"] in the big blind and the two satellite winners saw a [poker card="tc"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5d"] flop which kept Smyth in the lead. The [poker card="8d"] turn changed nothing and the [poker card="9d"] river send Maureli to the rail in third place, turning his original $22 buy-in into $142,061.51 and $32,449.23 in bounties. The heads-up battle between Smyth and Loeser lasted over an hour with the chip lead passing back-and-forth between the two players multiple times. After winning a critical flip for his tournament life, Smyth came roaring back and seized the chip lead. On the final hand, with just 15 big blinds left, Loeser shoved on the button with [poker card="8d"][poker card="7d"] which put Smyth to a decision with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="9h"]. After taking a few extra seconds, Smyth made the call with the championship on the line. The flop came [poker card="ts"][poker card="as"][poker card="4c"] keeping Smyth in the lead. The [poker card="9d"] gave Smyth a pair, but opened a backdoor for Loeser to hit and open-ended straight draw. The [poker card="4d"] was no help to the German high roller and Manig Loeser finished in second place for $208,492.98 plus an additional $70,866.22. As the winner of the World Poker Tour Online Knockout Championship, Daniel Smyth earned the $208,803.83 first-place prize, an additional $204,588.92 in bounties, and the honor of having his name engraved on the WPT Mike Sexton Champions cup. Final Table Payouts Daniel Smyth - $208,803.83 + $204,588.92 in bounties Manig Loeser - $208,492.98 + $70,866.22 in bounties Joao Maureli - $142,061.51 + $32,449.23 in bounties Pim Gieles - $95,502.03 + $23,478.51 in bounties Pedro Marques - $66,687.63 +$22,382.80 in bounties Artur Martirosian - $47,281.38 + $16,593.75 in bounties Ryan Riess - $29,699.32 + $18,562.50 in bountes Shyngis Satubayev - $23,504.85 + $750 in bounties Matheus Luiz - $19,483.87 + $13,242.18 in bounties
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