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Found 9 results

  1. [caption width="640"] James Romero earned almost million and etched his name on the WPT Champions Cup with his Season XV Five Diamond Win.(WPT photo/Joe Giron)[/caption] The World Poker Tour Five Diamond Poker Classic is one of the tougher WPT fields each year. The Bellagio event draws some of the best poker players in the world to Las Vegas each December and the list of previous champions is a testament to that. Daniel Negreanu, Gus Hansen, Mohsin Charania, Dan Smith and Antonio Esfandiari are just a few of the players who have captured the title. The record-sized field that showed up in Las Vegas this past week for the Season XV Five Diamond Classic was star-studded, but in the end it was a relatively unknown player, playing his first WPT event, that managed to capture the title and the nearly $2,000,000 first place prize. James Romero topped a final table that included Justin Bonomo, Igor Yaroshevskyy and Jake Schindler to earn the first live win of his career. Romero came in to the final table with over 40% of the chips in play and never relinquished his lead, eliminating four of the five players that stood between himself and the title. Yaroshevskyy was one of just two players at this final table and came in*with the fourth largest stack, but that didn't stop him from being the first*player eliminated. With blinds at 50,000/100,000, Yaroshevskyy moved all in*from UTG for 1,420,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ts"] and Romero called from the big blind with*[poker card="qd"][poker card="qs"]. The [poker card="7h"][poker card="2h"][poker card="2d"] flop left Romero ahead and when Yaroshevskyy failed* to connect with the [poker card="9c"] turn or [poker card="3d"] river he was out in sixth place. The*$268,545 sixth place cash is he third biggest of his career, falling behind his*second place in a 2015 World Series of Poker $5000 NLHE Turbo ($303,767) and a*fourth place finish at the 2015 WPT LA Poker Classic ($333,680). Two hands later Justin Bonomo joined Yaroshevskyy in the payouts line.*Schindler raised to 225,000 from the cutoff before Bonomo moved all in for*995,000. Schindler called and tabled [poker card="7c"][poker card="7d"] while Bonomo showed [poker card="5h"][poker card="5s"]. The*[poker card="qc"][poker card="jc"][poker card="7s"] flop left Bonomo needing runner-runner fives. The turn was [poker card="ad"] to*officially seal Bonomo's fate before the [poker card="ah"] hit the river. Three hands later Romero found himself another victim. Action folded to Alex*Condon on the button and he moved all in for 1,170,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="9c"] and Romero*called from the big blind with [poker card="5c"][poker card="5s"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="jh"][poker card="8h"] flop gave Condon*extra outs but neither the [poker card="as"] turn or [poker card="7d"] *were any help and he was*eliminated in fourth place. After three eliminations in the span of five hands, the pace slowed down but at no point Romero continued to build up his lead. After 2.5 hours of three-handed play, and with Romero holding almost 75% of the chips, he used his overwhelming lead to bust another player. Ryan Tosoc folded his button, Romero called from the small blind before Schindler moved all in for just over 4,000,000 from the big blind. Romero called and tabled [poker card="kh"][poker card="jc"] while Romero showed [poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"]. The board ran out [poker card="kd"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2c"][poker card="8d"][poker card="2s"] to give Romero the pot and eliminate Schindler, the only other player with a WPT final table appearance, in third place. Heads up action between Romero and Tosoc began with Romero holding a 7-1 lead. Tosoc managed a nearly full double early, but it only took 16 hands for Romero to end the party. Down to just 2,000,000, Tosoc moved all in pre-flop and Romero called. Tosoc tabled [poker card="5c"][poker card="5s"] but found himself up against Romero’s [poker card="kd"][poker card="kh"]. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="jd"][poker card="9c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="6c"] run out made the elimination official and crowned Romero as champion, eliminating Tosoc in second place for $1,124,051. The $1,938,118 first place score doesn’t even push Romero’s lifetime live tournament earnings over $2,000,000. The 27 year old was previously focused on online poker and Las Vegas cash games. The event drew a field of 791 players, a record for this event. The previous largest Five Diamond field was in 2007 when 664 players entered the then-$15,000 buy-in event. The buy-in was lowered to $10,000 in 2010. The next WPT event is the Borgata Winter Poker Open in January. Final Table Payouts James Romero - $1,938,118 Ryan Tosoc - $1,124,051 Jake Schindler - $736,579 Alex Condon - $494,889 Justin Bonomo- $345,272 Igor Yaroshevskyy - $268,545
  2. [caption width="640"] Ryan Tosoc beat Alex Foxen to win the WPT Five Diamond Poker Classic (Joe Giron/WPT photo)[/caption] One year ago Ryan Tosoc outlasted everybody but James Romero to win the World Poker Tour Five Diamond Classic. Sunday night at the Bellagio he did one better, beating Alex Foxen heads-up to win the WPT Five Diamond and $1.9 million. It took just over 90 minutes for the first elimination of the final table. Richard Kirsch raised to 150,000 from the cutoff, Mike Del Vecchio re-raised to 500,000 from the small blind. Kirsch moved all in for 1,180,000 and Del Vecchio called. Kirsch tabled [poker card="tc"][poker card="ts"] but found himself behind Del Vecchio's [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"]. The board ran out [poker card="8d"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6d"][poker card="ad"][poker card="kc"] to eliminate Kirsch in sixth place. Just 30 minutes later, another player was sent to the rail. Sean Perry, who came into the final day with the chip lead, raised to 120,000 from the button and Ajay Chabra called from the big blind. After the [poker card="jh"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8s"] flop, Chabra check-called Perry's 220,000 bet. The turn was the [poker card="8s"]. Chabra checked again and Perry bet 500,000. Chabra eventually check-raised to 1,450,000. Perry moved all in for 7,765,000 and Chabra called all in. Perry tabled [poker card="as"][poker card="ts"] while Chabra had [poker card="7c"][poker card="2c"]. The river was the [poker card="8h"] and Chabra was eliminated in fifth place. A few hands after giving up the chip lead to Alex Foxen, Perry's attempt at winning the tournament that began the day he turned 21 was cut short. Foxen opened to 180,000 from UTG, Del Vecchio made 520,000 from the button, Perry moved all in for 3,345,000 from the small blind and Tosoc called from the big blind. Foxen and Del Vecchio both folded and Perry tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="9c"] while Tosoc showed [poker card="ad"][poker card="js"]. The flop came [poker card="jd"][poker card="9h"][poker card="3d"] to hit both players to keep Tosoc ahead. The turn was the [poker card="5c"] and the [poker card="5s"] river completed the board, and eliminated Perry in fourth. Del Vecchio, the only previous WPT champion to make the final table, was eliminated just 15 minutes later. Foxen raised to 200,000 from the button and Del Vecchio moved all in for 2,280,000 from the small blind. Tosoc called from the big blind and Foxen folded. Tosoc tabled [poker card="ah"][poker card="qc"] while Del Vecchio was live with [poker card="kc"][poker card="jd"]. The [poker card="8s"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4h"] flop changed nothing and neither did the [poker card="2s"] turn or [poker card="ts"] river to send Del Vecchio out in third place. Heads up play began with Tosoc holding about 60% of the chips in play. While the first four eliminations of the final table took 75 hands, it took Tosoc another 49 to pick up the final elimination and secure his victory. Tosoc raised to 500,000 from the button, Foxen moved all in for 2,900,000 and Tosoc called. Foxen was ahead with [poker card="ah"][poker card="tc"] to Tosoc's [poker card="qc"][poker card="th"] but the [poker card="kd"][poker card="9h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="jh"][poker card="jc"] runout gave Tosoc a king-high straight to end the tournament and make the Tosoc the final WPT champion of 2017. Final Table Payouts Ryan Tosoc - $1,958,065 Alex Foxen - $1,134,202 Mike Del Vecchio - $752,196 Sean Perry - $504,090 Ajay Chabra - $350,500 Richard Kirsch - $271,736
  3. Take a quick look at Isaac Haxton's live tournament results over the past few years and you might be surprised by the lack of first place finishes. Considered by many on the high roller scene to be one of the best poker players on the planet, Haxton hasn't won a tournament since January 2017. Haxton's streak of 32 High Roller event cashes without a win came to an end on Tuesday though as Haxton took down Event #4 ($10,000 Short Deck Hold'em) of the 2018 Poker Masters. The win, coupled with a sixth and a fourth place finish in two previous Poker Masters events, have put Haxton just 30 points behind Brandon Adams for the Purple Jacket. “It would be very satisfying to win this whole thing, I have a track record of doing pretty well, but with a lot of second through fifth-place finishes," said Haxton. "Actually winning something is very satisfying.” Dominik Nitsche started the final table with a narrow chip lead over Andrew Robl, but just 45 minutes after the final table began, Nitsche was on his way to the payouts window with the sixth place ticket. Nitsche open-shoved for 1,440,000 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="jh"] from first position, Isaac Haxton re-shoved for 3,180,000 with [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"] from the cutoff and after some time, Andrew Robl folded [poker card="th"][poker card="9h"] from the button. The board ran out [poker card="qs"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6c"] to give Haston a rivered ten-high straight and eliminate Nitsche in sixth with a $33,000 payout. Some 40 minutes later, Haxton found yet another victim. Cary Katz limped from early position with [poker card="kh"][poker card="qh"] and Haxton moved all in for 3,880,000 behind him with [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"]. When action folded back to him, Catz called. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="6s"] flop was a friendly one for Katz, but the [poker card="ah"] turn put Haxton back in the lead. The [poker card="ts"] river gave Haxton an unnecessary two pair and eliminated Katz in fifth for $44,000. Robl spent the next 30 minutes working a short stack and despite two straight double ups, found no further success. Robl open-shoved for 900,000 with [poker card="td"][poker card="9c"] and Ryan Tosoc moved all in over the for 3,970,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="js"], forcing the rest of the table to fold. The [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"][poker card="th"] flop put Tosoc in the driver's seat and the [poker card="jd"] gave him a full house to eliminate Robl. The fourth place finish came with a $55,000 score. Tosoc, Haxton and Maurice Hawkins battled for almost a full hour before finding the next elimination. Tosoc was down to just 490,000 and decided to open shove with [poker card="ac"][poker card="th"] but Haxton called with [poker card="ah"][poker card="jd"] and stayed ahead through the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qc"][poker card="qh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7s"] runout to bust Tosoc in third for $77,000. Despite never having played short deck before and having zero Poker Masters cashes to his credit, Hawkins got heads up with Haxton with the chip lead. Unfortunately for the 11-time WSOP Circuit ring winner, that's as far as he could go. Hawkins open-shoved 4,775,000 with [poker card="9d"][poker card="7d"] and Haxton called with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qd"]. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="8c"][poker card="8h"] flop kept Haxton in the lead but also gave Hawkins a straight draw. The [poker card="kc"] changed nothing and when the [poker card="qh"] completed the board, Haxton eliminated Hawkins to win his first Poker Masters title and $176,000. Final Table Payouts Isaac Haxton - $176,000 Maurice Hawkins - $115,500 Ryan Tosoc - $77,000 Andrew Robl - $55,000 Cary Katz - $44,000 Dominik Nitsche - $33,000
  4. The record-setting WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic wrapped up at Bellagio in Las Vegas, with the $10,400 Main Event attracting a huge field of 1,001 entries and featuring some of poker's biggest names. In addition to the Main Event, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule featured several events with five-figure buy-ins and one with a six-figure price of entry. Here are the winners from a tremendous week of poker in Sin City. The biggest winners overall from these high buy-in events, excluding the $10,400 Main Event, were Jake Schindler, Jason Koon, Seth Davies, Chris Hunichen, and Dominik Nitsche. Although he didn't earn the most money, it's certainly worth noting that Sam Soverel cashed in four of these events for a total of $314,500. No one else cashed in more than two. Ladines Wins First $10,000 PLO Event The first two high roller events on the schedule were both $10,000 buy-in pot-limit Omaha tournaments. The first one attracted 35 entries for a $350,000 prize pool and saw the top five places make the money. Joshua Ladines took the event’s title and $128,090 top prize, with both Brian Rast and Sam Soverel finishing in the money. Joshua Ladines - $128,090 John Riordan - $102,910 Jonathan Abdellatif - $56,000 Brian Rast - $35,000 Sam Soverel - $28,000 Soverel Takes Second $10,000 PLO Event In the second $10,000 PLO event, a group of familiar faces was back in the money. Soverel topped the field of 29 entries to win the title and $116,000, Ladines finished third for $46,400, and WPT Five Diamond wonder boy Ryan Tosoc scored fifth for $23,200. Tosoc notably finished second in the Season XV WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic for $1.134 million before going on to win the event in Season XVI for $1.958 million. Sam Soverel - $116,000 Jonathan Depa - $75,400 Joshua Ladines- $46,400 Michael Song - $29,000 Ryan Tosoc - $23,200 Hennigan Captures $10,000 8-Game Mixed Title If you know Bellagio, you know it’s home to the most iconic high-stakes poker room in the world, Bobby’s Room. It’s where the game’s elite compete for astronomical cash-game stakes, but during WPT Five Diamond some of those players shifted their focus to tournament play, specifically in the $10,000 buy-in 8-Game Mixed High Roller. The tournament generated 24 entries, and it was none other than five-time World Series of Poker gold bracelet winner and WPT Champions Club member John Hennigan taking home the top prize of $110,400. John Hennigan - $110,400 Ben Yu - $67,200 Randy Ohel - $38,400 John Racener - $24,000 Loeser and Fox Chop First $25,000 High Roller In the first of three $25,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournaments on this year’s WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic slate, 42 entries were generated to create a prize pool of $1.05 million. The top six places paid, and the top two spots went to Manig Loeser and Elio Fox in a chop that earned each player more than $300,000. Loeser scored first place for $321,300, and Fox took second for $308,700. Manig Loeser- $321,300 Elio Fox - $308,700 Jake Schindler - $168,000 Dan Smith - $105,000 Cary Katz - $84,000 Nick Petrangelo - $63,000 Petrangelo Wins Second $25,000 High Roller The second $25,000 buy-in tournament attracted 47 entries and generated a $1.175 million prize pool. The top seven places reached the money, with several notables cashing. None earned more than Nick Petrangelo, though, who chopped the event heads up with Sergio Aido to take home the winning prize of $289,944. Aido scored $287,634 for second. Petrangelo was coming off a sixth-place result for $63,000 in the first $25,000 event of this series. Soverel, who finished in the money of the first two high rollers on the schedule, including winning one for $116,000, finished sixth in this event for $70,500. Nick Petrangelo - $289,944 Sergio Aido - $287,634 Seth Davies - $256,672 Ben Yu - $117,500 Kazuhiko Yotsushika - $94,000 Sam Soverel - $70,500 Rainer Kempe - $58,750 Davies Victorious in Third $25,000 High Roller The third and final $25,000 high roller tournament on the WPT Five Diamond schedule drew 50 entries for a $1.25 million prize pool. The top eight places reached the money, and it was Seth Davies taking the title and $341,920 in first-place prize money. The win came just days after Davies took third in the previous $25,000 high roller event during the series of $256,672, as you can see above. Davies did a deal with Isaac Haxton in second place, who earned $320,580. The money was filled with notable high rollers, including Alex Foxen taking third for $175,000. Foxen has had himself quite a 2018 and is closing it strong both on the live felt and the virtual felt. In the online world, Foxen recently achieved a new all-time high in the top 100 of the PocketFives Online Poker Rankings. You'll also notice Soverel's name appearing in the in-the-money places once again, this time for fifth place, worth $100,000. Seth Davies - $341,920 Isaac Haxton - $320,580 Alex Foxen - $175,000 David Peters - $125,000 Sam Soverel - $100,000 Christoph Vogelsang - $75,000 Rainer Kempe - $62,500 Elio Fox: $50,000 Schindler Defeats Koon for $100,000 Super High Roller Victory The final big buy-in event from the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule this year was the $100,000 Super High Roller. The event drew 37 entries to Bellagio for a $3.7 million prize pool and the top six spots reached the money. Earning the $1.332 million first-place prize was Jake Schindler. Adding that score to the $168,000 he won earlier in the series for taking third place in one of the $25,000 high rollers, Schindler scored $1.5 million in prize money at Bellagio this December. Schindler beat out Jason Koon for the win, and Koon took home $888,000 for his second-place finish. Jake Schindler - $1,332,000 Jason Koon - $888,000 Chris Hunichen - $592,000 Dominik Nitsche - $370,000 Ben Tollerene - $296,000 Talal Shakerchi - $222,000
  5. The World Poker Tour will close out 2018 action with the prestigious WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic. The tournament, held at the iconic Bellagio Resort & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, will be the eighth WPT Main Tour stop of Season XVII. It’s an event that comes with a $10,400 buy-in and has been a part of the World Poker Tour schedule since the very first season. The WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic $10,400 Main Event kicks off Tuesday, December 11, 2018, and runs through Saturday, December 15. The format calls for 40,000 in starting chips, big blind ante, registration until the start of the 12th level, and unlimited reentry until the close of registration. Levels will be 60 minutes long on Day 1 and 90 minutes long on Day 2, 3, and 4. The final table will be played with 60-minute levels until heads-up play. The full tournament festival begins Thursday, November 29. Rich Prizes, Storied History, and Legendary Champions The WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic was the very first event on the World Poker Tour, held all the way back in 2002 when the WPT got its start. In that inaugural event, 146 players ponied up the $10,000. The one and only Gus Hansen emerged victorious to claim the $556,460 top prize and his first of three WPT titles. In Season III, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic had a $15,300 buy-in and an incredible first-place prize of more than $1.77 million. Winner the event was none other than Daniel Negreanu after he defeated the popular Humberto Brenes in heads-up play. Season V of the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic attracted 583 entries and awarded a first prize of more than $2.2 million. Walking away with the title was Joe Hachem, who had just won the World Series of Poker Main Event one year prior. With the WPT Five Diamond victory, Hachem became the fourth player in poker history to own both WSOP Main Event and WPT titles, alongside Doyle Brunson, Scotty Nguyen, and Carlos Mortensen. More stars of the game captured WPT Five Diamond titles in Season VI, Season VII, and Season VIII of the World Poker Tour. First, it was Eugene Katchalov winning in Season VI for $2.482 million. In Season VII, Chino Rheem took the title and $1.538 million. For Rheem, it was his first of three WPT titles. In Season VIII, Daniel Alaei scored first place for $1.428 million. As if the likes of Hansen, Negreanu, Hachem, Katchalov, Rheem, and Alaei weren’t enough, Antonio Esfandiari earned his second WPT title when he won the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic in Season IX for $870,124. Esfandiari returned to the final table the following season and earned a sixth-place finish worth $119,418. Then in Season XI, Esfandiari was back at the final table, taking fourth for $329,339. To date, Esfandiari has cashed six times in the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Bellagio, earning more than $1.4 million in total from the event through its first 16 editions. Dan Smith earned the WPT Five Diamond title for $1.161 million in Season XII. Then in Season XIII and Season XIV, both Mohsin Charania and Kevin Eyster won WPT Five Diamond for their second World Poker Tour titles. Charania won for $1.177 million, and Eyster won for $1.587 million. Record-Breaking Turnouts and Tosoc’s Back-To-Back Success In Season XV, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic drew a mammoth field of 791 entries, setting a new record for the WPT Five Diamond tournament and tying the all-time record for a $10,000 buy-in event in WPT history. That tournament created an enormous prize pool of more than $7.67 million and saw the top two places walk away with seven-figures scores - first place earned $1.938 million and second place won $1.124 million. James Romero defeated Ryan Tosoc in heads-up play to win the event. The following season, an even larger field turned out for the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic, with 812 entries setting new records for the largest turnout in the WPT Five Diamond event and a $10,000 buy-in WPT event. Nearly $7.9 million was up for grabs, and once again the top two places earned seven figures - first place took home $1.958 million and second place earned $1.134 million. In a jaw-dropping back-to-back run, Tosoc, who placed second the year before for $1.124 million, won the event for $1.1958 million. From the two-season WPT Five Diamond run, Tosoc earned $3.082 million in total prize money. Big Buy-In Events Galore In addition to the $10,400 Main Event, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule features several big buy-in tournaments. Included in the Season XVII schedule are seven other events with buy-ins of $10,000 or more. They are, as follows. - Wednesday, December 5, at 2 p.m.: $10,000 buy-in Bellagio 10K PLO 02 - Thursday, December 6, at 2 p.m.: $10,000 buy-in Bellagio 10K PLO 03 - Friday, December 7, at 2 p.m.: $15,000 buy-in Bellagio 15K 8-Game 01 - Saturday, December 8, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 01 - Monday, December 10, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 02 - Friday, December 14, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 03 - Saturday, December 15, at 2 p.m.: $100,000 buy-in Bellagio 100K 01 There are also two $5,200 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournaments on the schedule. The first starts on Sunday, December 9, at 1 p.m., and the second starts on Thursday, December 13, at 1 p.m. *Photo courtesy of the World Poker Tour.
  6. Prior to last year, the Bay 101 Shooting Star Main Event was a staple of the World Poker Tour schedule. After a one-year hiatus, the Shooting Star returned to the poker calendar this week, just without the WPT TV cameras in tow. That didn't prevent the final table from being a star-studded affair, though. Sandeep Pulusani beat out a final table that included two-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner Loni Harwood, WPT Five Diamond winner Ryan Tosoc and Super High Roller regular Dan Shak to win $354,400 and the third live title of his career. Only five players remained at the start of the final day of play Friday, with Harwood on top with 34.4% of the chips in play. Early action wasn't kind to Harwood as she lost 25% of her chips to Tosoc and then doubled up Pulusani. She got a chunk of those chips back through John Andress before the Pennsylvania-based poker pro met his demise. Andress was down to 80,000 in the big blind. With the tournament using the Big Blind Ante format, Andress was all in for 80,000 before seeing a card. Shak called the 40,000 from the button and Tosoc completed from the small blind. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"] and Tosoc checked. Shak bet 50,000, forcing Tosoc to fold, and tabled [poker card="qd"][poker card="2d"]. Andress turned over [poker card="7d"][poker card="2s"]. The turn was the [poker card="4s"] to officially end Andress' run in fifth place. The river was the [poker card="5s"]. Harwood managed to hang around another 90 minutes before losing a flip in heartbreaking fashion. Tosoc raised to 125,000 from the button before Harwood moved all in for just over 1,000,000 from the big blind. Tosoc called and turned over [poker card="8d"][poker card="8c"] while Harwood showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="qd"]. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="9c"][poker card="6s"] flop kept Tosoc ahead. The [poker card="ks"] turn, however, gave Harwood top pair but the [poker card="7c"] river filled Tosoc's straight and eliminated Harwood in fourth place. It took nearly an hour for the next elimination to occur. Shak raised to 150,000 from the button, Tosoc called from the small blind and Pulusani folded his big. Tosoc checked after the flop came [poker card="ks"][poker card="qh"][poker card="5h"] and Shak continued for 200,000. Tosoc raised to 725,000 and then called when Shak moved all in for 3,760,000. Tosoc tabled [poker card="kd"][poker card="qs"] for top two pair while Shak showd [poker card="kh"][poker card="jh"] for top pair with a flush draw. Neither the [poker card="9d"] turn or [poker card="jd"] river were of any help for Shak and he was out in third place. Tosoc started heads up play with a 2.5-1 chip lead over Pulusani and it took just over 15 minutes for the final two players to agree to a deal. Pulusani was guaranteed $304,300 and Tosoc locked up $336,500 with an additional $50,100 for the eventual champion. It took another two hours before Pulusani finished off his comeback. Tosoc raised to 300,000 from the button, Pulusani re-raised to 900,000 and Tosoc announced he was all in and Pulusani called. Tosoc showed [poker card="ad"][poker card="9s"] while Pulusani was well ahead with [poker card="ac"][poker card="as"]. The board ran out [poker card="ah"][poker card="qh"][poker card="5s"][2][poker card="8c"] to give Pulusani top set and eliminate Tosoc. The $354,400 score for Pulusani is the second six-figure score of his career and his first since he won a $3,000 NLHE event at the 2013 WSOP for $592,684. Despite not being a part of the WPT, the Shooting Star still drew 440 players for a total prize pool of $2,156,000. Final Table Payouts Sandeep Pulusani - $354,400* Ryan Tosoc - $336,500* Dan Shak - $200,055 Loni Harwood - $142,440 John Andress - $103,710 Steve Kim - $76,850 Hiroaki Harada - $57,980 Antonios Roungeris - $57,980 John Ko - $44,555
  7. Not many players can show up to the World Poker Tour Tournament of Champions and double their career WPT cashes total. Ole Schemion did exactly that on Monday night, winning the WPT TOC for $440,395 by beating Tony Dunst heads up. Prior to the TOC, Schemion's only cash on the WPT came when he won the WPT European Championship in January, 2018. Two cashes, two wins and $696,000 in total earnings. Schemion started the six-handed final table with over 40% of the chips in play and eliminated the final three players in his way before picking up the title and becoming just the fourth winner of this event. Simon Lam opened to 17,000 from middle position and Nick Schulman called from the cutoff. Ryan Tosoc then shoved for 651,000 from the big blind, forcing Lam to fold. Schulman tank-called all in. Tosoc tabled [poker card="kc"][poker card="qh"] which put him behind Schulman's [poker card="ac"][poker card="js"]. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2c"] flop put Tosoc in front. The [poker card="2d"] turn was no help for Schulman and he failed to connect with any of his three outs on the [poker card="td"] river and was eliminated in sixth place. It wasn't until nearly two hours later before the next elimination occurred. Griffin Paul raised from UTG to 25,000 and Dunst called from the button. After the [poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5s"] flop, Paul bet 18,000. Dunst moved all in for 523,000 sending Paul into the tank. Paul called and turned over [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"] for the second nut flush draw but Dunst had flopped bottom set with [poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"]. The turn was the [poker card="3h"] and the river was the [poker card="tc"] to send Paul out in fifth. As if by clockwork, another two hours passed and there was a player sent to the rail. Schemion raised from UTG to 35,000 and Lam defended his big blind. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4c"] and Lam check-raised all in for 178,000 in response to Schemion's bet of 50,000. Schemion called and turned over [poker card="6c"][poker card="5c"] for a monster draw while Lam was slightly behind with [poker card="kc"][poker card="7d"] even though he had middle pair. The [poker card="tc"] turn gave Schemion his flush but gave Lam outs to a bigger flush. The river was the [poker card="ah"] however and Lam was sent packing in fourth. Schemion continued to apply pressure three-handed and it took roughly 90 minutes for him to find another victim. Tosoc called from the button, Dunst folded his small blind and Schemion checked. The flop came [poker card="6d"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3h"] and Schemion bet 40,000 and Tosoc responded by moving all in for 505,000. Schemion called and turned over [poker card="kh"][poker card="2h"] which put him ahead of Tosoc's [poker card="qh"][poker card="7h"]. The [poker card="9d"] turn gave Tosoc some extra outs but the [poker card="js"] river wasn't one of them, giving Schemion the pot and eliminating Tosoc in third place. Schemion started heads-up play the same way he started the final table; with the chip lead. Schemion had Dunst outchipped 2.1M-1.7M. It took just 17 hands a little less than an hour for Schemion to finish things off. Schemion opened to 60,000 before Dunst raised to 250,000. Schemion called and the flop fell [poker card="kh"][poker card="jh"][poker card="ts"]. Dunst check-called Schemion's bet of 200,000. The turn was the [poker card="4s"] and Dunst checked again. Schemion fired out a bet of 420,000 and Dunst responded by moving all in for 785,000. Schemion called quickly and turned over [poker card="qs"][poker card="9s"] for a flopped straight and Dunst showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="5d"]. The [poker card="td"] river gave Dunst a meaningless two-pair, eliminating him in second place and giving Schemion his first live win since he took down the PokerStars PCA National Championship in the Bahamas in Janaury. The first event of Season XVIII, the WPT Gardens Poker Festival, is scheduled for the Gardens Casino in Hawaiian Gardens, California in from July 20 - 25. The $5,000 buy-in event got 584 entries when it made its WPT debut last summer. Simon Lam took home $565,055 for the win. Final Table Payouts Ole Schemion - $440,395 Tony Dunst - $250,265 Ryan Tosoc - $166,845 Simon Lam - $115,945 Griffin Paul - $84,140 Nick Schulman - $63,890
  8. The 2019 World Series of Poker is quickly coming to a close but that isn’t stopping plenty of players from heading back to the Rio for one last shot at gold plated glory. In addition to the spectacle of the Main Event final table, the WSOP has some of their biggest stars battling in the final events of the schedule including a super-sized field in the WSOP’s final online bracelet event of the summer, won by one of online poker’s best. Summer Saved: Taylor ‘Galactar’ Paur Wins $500 Online Event Former PocketFives #1-ranked online player Taylor ‘taypaur’ Paur earned his second career World Series of Poker gold bracelet after winning Event #88 ($500 ONLINE NLHE Summer Saver) for $149,240.52. With the win, Paur continues to prove that he’s a prolific poker player in both the online and live arenas. He first hit the #1-ranking back in 2010 and then did it again in 2011 en route to a career online earnings mark of over $5M. Back in 2013, Paur picked up the first of his two bracelets by taking down a $1,000 No Limit Hold’em event for over $340,000. Even though his Sunday victory was an online event, it will be added to his career WSOP scores, pushing his live career earnings up over $4.8M. The victory marks Paur’s fifth WSOP cash of the summer, which included a 627th place finish in the Main Event for over $22,000. The final online event of the summer proved to be popular and followed suit with the live post-lims, drawing a massive field of 1,325 players looking to wrap up their summer with a win. Final Table Payouts 1. Taylor ‘Galactar’ Paur - $149,240 2. Francois ‘4everrekt’ Evard - $91.267 3. Satish ‘jfksbh’ Surapaneni - $65,250 4. John ’SquatCobbler’ Parker - $47,181 5. Jason ‘JadedJason’ James - $34,549 6. David ’SobBaget’ Liebman - $25,598 7. Joseph ‘Obamacare’ Harrahan - $19,240 8. Timothy ‘TruthBeTold7’ Rutherford - $14,555 9. Brian ‘Penny6’ Mancilla - $11,209 Tam Nguyen Bags Big On Day 1C of The Closer It was the last chance for players to fire in The Closer and the third of three starting flights saw 1,613 entries attempt to join the 75 players from the first two starting flights in moving on to Day 2. In the end, just 121 of the 1,613 bagged at the end of the night with Tam Nguyen finishing the night as the only player to top 1M in chips, good for the top stack of the flight. Other notable names moving on to Day 2 include former #1-ranked PocketFiver Fabrizio ‘SixthSenSe19’ Gonzalez, Eric Cajelais, Justin Young, Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, Mark Radoja, Ryan Tosoc, Dylan Linde, JC Tran, and Phil Hellmuth. Day 2 of The Closer will resume at noon local time with 196 players battling for one of the final bracelets of the summer. Top 10 Chip Counts 1. Tam Nguyen - 1,284,000 2. Steve Yea - 924,000 3. Anton Wigg - 850,000 4. Wai Kiat Lee - 826,000 5. Kevin Killeen - 760,000 6. Fabrizio Gonzalez - 754,000 7. Lawrence Kiang - 748,000 8. Jason Reels - 740,000 9. Ian Simpson - 698,000 10. Shale Khalili - 683,000 Final Table Set For $3K Pot-Limit Omaha 6-Handed Millard Hale finished Day 2 of the $3K PLO 6-Handed with a healthy chip lead and his eyes on his first gold bracelet and the $448,392 first-place prize. However, John Richards, who stared Day 2 with the chip lead, has kept pace and sits right behind Hale on the leader board. Two-time WSOP Circuit ring winner Alan Sternberg will also have a seat at the table, hoping to add a WSOP bracelet to his WPT Shooting Star trophy. Also, Joseph Cheong could become the second two-time bracelet winner of the summer should he spin up his short stack and take down the tournament. Final Table Chip Counts 1. Millard Hale - 5,400,000 2. John Richards - 4,800,000 3. Alan Sternberg - 2,625.000 4. Evangelos Kokkalis - 2,525,000 5. Ka Kwan Lau - 695.000 6. Joseph Cheong - 650.000 16 Remain In $10,000 NLHE 6-Handed Championship Sixteen players are headed to Day 3 of the $10K NLHE 6-Handed Championship with Anuj Agarwal holding the overnight chip lead. The tournament was packed with top-tier talent in what is undoubtedly one of the toughest fields of the entire summer. Despite holding a sizable chip lead the road to the $630,746 first-place prize will still be a difficult one fore Agarwai with players like Markus Gonsalves, Lauren Roberts, Kahle Burns, Ben Heath, and Simon Deadman still in the field. Plenty of big names made the money before busting including Max Silver (38th, $15,111), Yuri Dzivielevski (35th, $16,926), Paul Volpe (29th, $19,565), Jennifer Tilly (24th, $23,315), Jason Koon (23rd, $23,315) and Shaun Deeb (17th, $28,618). Top 10 Chip Counts 1. Anuj Agarwai - 2,171,000 2. Markus Gonsalves - 1,777,000 3. Jeffrey Trudeau - 1,651,000 4. Eric Kurtzman - 1,311,000 5. Vicent Bosca Ramon - 1,125,000 6. Alan Goehring - 1,102.000 7. Lauren Roberts - 1,100,000 8. Kahle Burns - 1,056.000 9. Ben Heath - 937.000 10. James Romero - 936.000 Bracelet Winners Contents In $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. Day 1 of the $3K H.O.R.S.E. saw 127 players from the original 301 entries survive to make Day 2 with Harold Klein holding the overnight chip lead. The remaining field is absolutely packed with talent as 40 of the players headed into Day 2 are bracelet winners, including Daniel Negreanu, Brian Hastings, Chris Ferguson, Greg Mueller, Max Pescatori, Dominik Nitsche, Jeff Lisandro, Scott Clements, Mike Matusow, and Paul Volpe just to name a few. Top 10 Chip Counts 1. Harold Klein - 123,200 2. Justin Liberto - 116,900 3. Yueqi Zhu - 115,000 4. David Lavi - 108,200 5. Christopher Wallace - 102,200 6. Nicolas Milgrom - 101,500 7. Andrey Zaichenko - 97,200 8. Brian Hastings - 95,500 9. John Monnette - 93,500 10. Denis Strebkov - 92,000
  9. The Season XVIII World Poker Tour Five Diamond World Poker Classic crowned its winner on Saturday, with Alex Foxen topping the record-breaking field of 1,035 entries to win the $1.694 million first-place prize. "It feels, I don't know… surreal," Foxen said in the moments following the win. "It’s kind of hard to put into words, but it feels amazing. The last time I got to this spot, I was a little bit disappointed in the way that I played heads up. It’s just incredible to get the opportunity again and be fortunate enough to pull out the win. I don’t have words." Back in Season XVI, Foxen found himself heads up with Ryan Tosoc in this very event. Tosoc had finished runner-up the year before and was back in heads-up play with a chance to better his previous result. Back then, Foxen couldn’t overcome Tosoc in what was a very lighthearted heads-up battle with plenty of fun had between the two and he had to settle for a second-place payout of $1.134 million. "I do feel like I was so excited about having that opportunity," Foxen said of the difference between his two WPT Five Diamond heads-up appearances. "I think that score I locked up was already five or six times my biggest score to date at that point, so there was an element of me feeling like I lost a little bit of focus and maybe didn’t take it as seriously as I should have because, regardless of the outcome of heads-up play, it was such an amazing result that in the moment I didn’t see the severity of that situation. I definitely didn’t make that same mistake twice." Much like Tosoc had redeemed his second-place finish with a victory the following season, Foxen came back two seasons after his runner-up finish to get the job done and capture the WPT Five Diamond throne. The victory gave Foxen his first WPT title. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Final Table Results 1st: Alex Foxen - $1,694,995 2nd: Toby Joyce - $1,120,040 3rd: Seth Davies - $827,285 4th: Peter Neff - $617,480 5th: Danny Park - $465,780 6th: Jonathan Jaffe - $355,125 Foxen came into Saturday’s final table in second position on the leaderboard with six players remaining. In fewer than 30 hands, Foxen had improved to the chip lead. Shortly after gaining the top spot, he knocked out WPT Champions Club member Jonathan Jaffe in sixth place. Although others did some damage of their own, such as Toby Joyce knocking out start-of-day chip leader Danny Park in fifth place and Seth Davies busting Peter Neff in fourth place, Foxen never gave up the lead once he had it. Three-handed play between Foxen, Joyce, and Davies lasted for quite some time. Even though both Joyce and Davies scored double ups during the battle, things never appeared to get away from Foxen as he stayed strong behind the wall of chips he built. Eventually, Davies’ stack shrunk and he got the last of his money in against Foxen in a dominated position. Foxen had the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"] to Davies’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"]. Davies, a WPT Champions Club member, did flop some outs to a chop but he was ultimately done in thanks to the [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="3s"][poker card="As"][poker card="8d"] board. Entering heads-up play with Joyce, Foxen had the chip lead with 29.5 million to Joyce’s 11.9 million, and the match was never really close. Joyce narrowed the gap ever so slightly at the beginning of the duel, but Foxen’s dominance was too much and he quickly started to distance himself. On the final hand, Foxen had limped on the button with the blinds at 200,000/400,000 with a 400,000 big blind ante. Joyce checked and the dealer fanned the [poker card="Jc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3d"] flop. Joyce checked, Foxen bet 400,000, and then Joyce check-raised to 1.1 million. Foxen put in a raise of his own and made it 2 million to go. Joyce called to see the [poker card="Kc"] land on fourth street. Joyce checked and Foxen shoved all in, for what was effectively 4.5 million because he had Joyce covered. Joyce tanked and used four 30-second time extensions to think things through. Joyce eventually made the call with the [poker card="Jh"][poker card="9c"] for a pair of jacks, but Foxen had him out-kicked with the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Js"]. The river was the [poker card="4c"] to seal the deal for Foxen. For his runner-up finish, Joyce scored $1.12 million in prize money. Fourth Consecutive Record Turnout for Five Diamond It was the fourth consecutive record-setting turnout for WPT Five Diamond, and this season’s 1,035 entries topped last season’s 1,001. The seasons prior to that were 812 entries for Season XVI and 791 entries for Season XV. In this event, the top 130 finished reached the money. Included in those to cash were Eric Afriat (9th - $168,005), Darren Elias (14th - $107,840), Chino Rheem (22nd - $60,435), Cary Katz (44th - $37,670), Kitty Kuo (67th - $26,220), Cliff Josephy (74th - $23,830), and Maria Ho (116th - $19,345). Also running deep was Timo Kamphues, who placed seventh in the Season XVIII WPT Five Diamond for $273,695. He has had quite the week of poker in Las Vegas, as just a few days prior to his run at Bellagio, Kamphues won the Wynn Poker Winter Classic $1,100 NL $500,000 Guarantee tournament for $202,787. Foxen Takes Player of the Year Lead With the victory, Foxen moved to first place in the Hublot WPT Player of the Year standings. Both Foxen and Joyce have the same amount of points, 1,400, but Foxen holds the tiebreaker of most money won. Joyce earned his second cash of the season and is currently second in the race. 1st: Alex Foxen - 1,400 points 2nd: Toby Joyce - 1,400 points 3rd: Donald Maloney - 1,300 points 4th: Aaron Van Blarcum - 1,275 points 5th: Geoffrey Hum - 1,250 points 6th: Milen Stefanov - 1,200 points 7th: Kevin Albers - 1,200 points 8th: Simon Brandstrom - 1,200 points 9th: Peter Neff - 1,150 points 10th: Seth Davies - 1,100 points WPT Gardens Poker Championship Up Next Up next for the WPT Main Tour is the WPT Gardens Poker Championship at the Gardens Casino in Southern California. The $10,000 buy-in event kicks off January 9, 2020, and runs through January 13.
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