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Found 5 results

  1. Sean Perry went wire-to-wire with the chip lead at the final table of Event #8 ($50,000 NLHE) to take down the 2022 PokerGO Cup finale, his second win in the series, for $640,000. At the same time, Jeremy Ausmus, who started the day as the short stack, advanced to finish in third-place for $256,000 and earned enough points to lock down this year’s PokerGO Cup overall championship and the $50,000 leaderboard prize. “It’s tough, I mean it’s very grueling too,” Ausmus said after winning the PokerGO Cup championship. “A lot of the best players in the world are here. It’s only eight events but, I went deep in a lot of them obviously, but I was playing ten to fourteen hours a day for the last six, seven days. I was worn out, tired…I didn’t know it could be so grueling.” “When I played this before I bricked everything and I was getting good sleep…home by dinner,” he said right before hoisting the trophy. There were plenty of storylines to keep an eye on during the last day of the series as every player at the final table had a chance to elevate up the series leaderboard for a shot at the Cup. Four of the five players, including Perry, Ausmus, Daniel Negreanu, and Brock Wilson had already won a prior event while Nick Schulman was at his third final table of the series. The dynamics of the overall series leader could be seen throughout the final table as the day wore on, giving an added touch of strategy to the table dynamics. Negreanu was going to need everything to go right for him to repeat at the PokerGO Cup overall champion. He needed Ausmus to bow out in fifth and he needed to win it all. However, in some respects, everything went wrong for ‘Kid Poker’ at this final table. He stared the day third in chips, but after an early confrontation with Wilson in which he lost a healthy pot holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="qs"] against Wilson’s [poker card="td"][poker card="tc"] on a [poker card="qc"][poker card="ts"][poker card="5h"][poker card="7h"][poker card="8s"] board, Negreanu slipped to the short stack. With the blinds at 15,000/30,000 (30,000 ante) Negreanu picked up [poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"] and with just 550,000 chips remaining, he opened from under the gun to 250,000. Wilson, on the button, once again had [poker card="th"][poker card="td"] and three-bet to 450,000. When it folded to Negreanu, he decided to just call the three-bet and leave himself with a little less than three big blinds behind. The flop came [poker card="kh"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5s"] and Negreanu took a moment, talked it out, and put in the rest of his stack. Wilson quickly called and Negreanu was looking for help to survive. A path opened when the [poker card="ks"] hit the turn, giving Negreanu backdoor spades outs. But the [poker card="8d"] river spelled the end for Negreanu’s run, eliminating him in fifth place for $112,000. With four players left, Ausmus was on the short stack. However, he found a double through the chip leading Sean Perry to climb back over 35 big blinds. Schulman slipped to the short stack and help a little over fifteen big blinds at 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante). When it folded to Ausmus in the big blind, he looked at the [poker card="kc"][poker card="6c"] and open-ripped on Schulman’s big blind. Schulman snapped Ausmus off with the [poker card="ts"][poker card="tc"] and put himself at risk with the dominating hand. The flop came [poker card="js"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2c"], keeping Schulman out front and leaving Ausmus looking for a favorable turn card. The [poker card="5c"] was exactly that, adding both flush and straight outs for Ausmus. And when the [poker card="9c"] completed the board, Schulman was out in fourth place for $176,000. Additionally, with Ausmus advancing to the top three, Perry’s shot at the overall series title evaporated leaving just Ausmus and Wilson to battle for the Cup. Perry applied maximum pressure with three left, building his chip stack to more than 4.5 million. Both Ausmus and Wilson slipped below 1 million as the blinds climbed to 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante). After Wilson folded his button, Perry open-shipped his [poker card="ts"][poker card="7d"] on Ausmus in the big blind. Ausmus looked down at [poker card="ah"][poker card="2c"] and went deep in the tank. After roughly a minute, Ausmus made the call looking for a double. The flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"], putting Perry in a position to eliminate Ausmus who needed some help on the turn. The [poker card="8s"] made it so Ausmus needed an ace and an ace only to remain in play. However, the [poker card="5h"] hit the river and Ausmus was eliminated in third place for $256,000 and now had to sweat to see if he would win the Cup. After the elimination, Perry held a 7:1 chip lead over Wilson, who needed to come back and win in order to win the series leaderboard. However, Perry was not going to be denied his second 2022 PokerGO Cup victory. It took just a few hands for the pair to get it all in the middle. Perry made it 125,000 to go with his [poker card="js"][poker card="jc"] and Wilson shipped all-in for 810,000 holding the [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"]. Perry made the call, flipping for the win. The board ran out [poker card="th"][poker card="8d"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4h"][poker card="8c"], giving Perry his second win of the series. Wilson, who was staked by more than 100 backers in the PocketFives Staking marketplace, ended up with a $416K score. Perry walked away with a $640,000 payday. With the elimination of Wilson in second place, Ausmus, who was sweating the action, was named the 2022 PokerGO Cup champion with a victory, a runner-up finish, and two third-place finishes over the eight events. PokerGO Cup Event #8 Final Table Results Sean Perry - $640,000 Brock Wilson - $416,000 Jeremy Ausmus - $256,000 Nick Schulman - $176,000 Daniel Negreanu - $112,000 PokerGO Cup Leaderboard Top 5 Jeremy Ausmus - 658 points Sean Perry - 616 points Brock Wilson - 570 points Cary Katz - 346 points Ali Imsirovic - 300 points
  2. Sean Perry put on a show as he battled back from just two big blinds to score the victory in Event #2 ($10,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup for $200,000. High roller final tables can often be a serious affair with top players battling in silence in search of a big-time payday. However, this particular final table was one of the most entertaining of the year with its loose and engaging vibe and plenty of table talk. There were side bets, all-in blind raises and shoves, and improbable comebacks. In fact, PokerGO founder Cary Katz and Bryn Kenney even agreed to swap outfits if they got heads-up. In addition to the pure entertainment of this table, there was another storyline that had emerged. Kenney was tracking down Justin Bonomo to retake the top spot on the Hendon Mob’s All-Time Money List. Kenney needed a third-place finish or better to make it happen. The final table fireworks started on just the second hand of the day. With the blinds at 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) Kenney opened from under the gun to 80,000 with the [poker card="jc"][poker card="9c"]. Next to act was Dan Shak who three-bet shipped his 1 million chip stack with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"]. It folded around to Perry in the big blind who woke up with [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"]. Perry re-shipped all-in for 1.3 million forcing a fold from Kenney. Shak, at-risk and dominated, needed help in order to survive however the board ran out [poker card="8s"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2h"] keeping kickers in play. Perry received a near full double-up and Shak made his way to the cage to collect his $48,000 sixth-place prize. During the 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) level, Elias, who had made back-to-back PokerGO Cup final tables played a pivotal pot with Kenney. Kenney made it 100,000 to go from the cutoff holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"] and Elias, who had just doubled through Kenney, defended his big blind with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="th"][poker card="2s"] giving Elias top pair and he quickly checked it over to Kenney who continued for 60,000, which Elias called. The turn was the [poker card="jh"], bringing in the gutshot straight for Kenney who, when checked to, fired again - this time for 210,000. Elias called once again. The river came the [poker card="7d"] and this time when Elias checked, Kenney put together a hefty 785,000 bet. Elias only had 900,000 left in his stack. After burning through multiple time banks, Elias made the call. Kenney surged to the chip lead and Elias was left with just over two big blinds. Elias went out on the very next hand, finishing in fifth place for $64,000. The dynamics changed quite a bit with four left. Katz went from the short stack to the chip lead after tripling through Ball and Kenney. Then Ball took back the lead, after sending Kenney to the bottom of the chip counts. With the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 ante) Kenney remained active and doubled up when his [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"] got it in the middle against Perry holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="qd"] and the board ran out [poker card="kh"][poker card="8s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="ac"][poker card="5h"] leaving Perry with just two big blinds. But Perry battled back, doubling in multiple hands to not only get back in the game but bring all four chip counts effectively even. The wild swings continued when Perry and Kenney agreed that if it folded to Perry in the small blind, the two would go all-in blind. With that on the table, both Ball and Katz folded. Perry made good on his word, sticking in 1.6 million (20 big blinds) with the [poker card="td"][poker card="2h"] and Kenney made the call with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="5h"]. The board ran out [poker card="4d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"] giving Perry a pure double up with his pair of deuces and sending him to the top of the chip counts. Things got even more hectic when, at 50,000/100,000 (100,000 ante), Ball opened from under the gun to 200,000. When it folded to Perry in the small blind, he looked down at [poker card="9s"][poker card="4c"]. Normally, this might be an uneventful fold. However the final four players were playing the "nine-four" game (the equivalent of the popular seven-deuce game) where if someone won a hand with any nine-four combo, the rest of the table would pay that player a $5K bounty. So, with that in mind - Perry shoved his chip lead, and Ball snap-called. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="td"][poker card="9c"] giving Perry the lead with his pair of nines. The turn was the [poker card="3c"] and Ball was left with just ten outs. The river was the [poker card="4d"] shipped Perry the hand and the $15,000 side bet from the other players. Ball, who finished in fifth place in Event #1, fell in fourth place for $80,000. That wasn’t the only other significant result from that hand, with Ball eliminated, Kenney was guaranteed to retake the top spot on the Hendon Mob All-Time Money List. Soon thereafter, Kenney slipped in the chip counts and found himself chasing Katz and Perry, both of who had more than 40 big blinds. But after doubling through Perry once, Kenney and Perry got it all in again with Perry just barely covering Kenney. Perry raised the button to 200,000 with the [poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and Kenney shipped 2.7 million in the small blind with his [poker card="qs"][poker card="jh"]. After Katz folded, Perry pretty quickly made the call and put Kenney at risk. The flop came [poker card="8s"][poker card="6h"][poker card="3c"] giving Perry middle set and leaving Kenney with just a 2% chance to survive. The turn was the [poker card="kd"] and the new All-Time Money List leader was drawing dead to the [poker card="5h"] river. Kenney did what he needed to do, finishing in third place for $96,000, besting Justin Bonomo on the ATML by a little more than $10,000. After a short break, Perry and Katz returned to finish the tournament with Perry holding a slight chip lead. Within just a couple of hands Perry, extended that lead and looked to close it out. On the ninth hand of head-up play, Perry moved all-in from the button with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="3h"] and Katz, with roughly 10 big blinds behind, called for it all holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="kc"]. The [poker card="ks"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2h"] flop kept Katz in the lead to double up but brought Perry both flush and backdoor straight outs. The [poker card="jd"] turn was safe for Katz, but the river came the [poker card="3c"], pairing Perry's kicker and eliminating Katz as the runner-up for $144,000. PokerGO Cup Event #2 Final Table Results Sean Perry - $200,000 Cary Katz - $144,000 Bryn Kenney - $96,000 Scott Ball - $80,000 Darren Elias - $64,000 Dan Shak - $48,000
  3. Nick Petrangelo touched the final step of PokerGO’s inaugural 2022 Stairway to Millions, going back-to-back in the final two events of the series and winning the $100,000 buy-in NLHE finale for $1,026,000, the fourth seven-figure cash of his career. Petrangelo finished the series with four final tables, three of which came in the final three events. Just after his victory, Petrangelo talked with Maria Ho about the importance of momentum and confidence in his game. “I think when you’re running good and making hands and timing is working well it obviously breeds confidence,” Petrangelo said. “That’s important to play well because you gotta be able to make the right play when you know it’s correct and if you’re running bad and always running into it sometimes it’s hard to do that. Running good helps you be confident and helps you play better” Of the 19 entries in the last event, just three players made the money and returned to play out the final table. Petrangelo started the day with the chip lead, Sean Perry sat in second with nearly half of Petrangelo’s chips, and David Peters a distant third place holding just under 20 big blinds. Both Peters and Perry chipped away at Petrangelo’s lead in the early goings and roughly 40 minutes in, Perry even took over the chip lead. However just before the end of the first hour, Petrangelo took back the lead, and right after the break, Peters won a significant pot off Perry putting himself and Perry essentially even in chips. A pivotal hand took place in the 15,000/30,000 (30,000 ante) level when Petrangelo opened on the button to 60,000 holding the [poker card="ac"][poker card="9c"]. Peters, with roughly 25 big blind in his stack, three-bet to 400,000 with the [poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"]. Perry let go of the big blind and Petrangelo moved all-in for nearly 2 million total and Peters made the call for his remaining 300,000. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4c"] flop kept Peters hand in the lead, but with 15 outs twice Petrangelo was the favorite. The [poker card="kh"] turn was no help to Petrangelo and neither was the [poker card="2h"]. The pot was shipped to Peters and with the double, Peters assumed the chip lead for the first time all day. Petrangelo and Perry were both looking up at Peters when they went to battle. After Peters folded his button, Perry, with a slight chip lead over Petrangelo, put in a raised from the small blind with the [poker card="9d"][poker card="4c"]. Petrangelo made the call with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="td"] and the pair saw a flop of [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"]. Perry continued with a bet of 180,000 and Petrangelo made the call. The turn was the [poker card="8c"], giving Petrangelo and double gutter to go with his second pair. Perry fired again, putting 220,000 in with just 415,000 behind. Once again, Petrangelo called. The river brought the [poker card="ah"], and after a moment Perry moved all-in for his final 415,000 putting Petrangelo to the test. Petrangelo burnt his final time extension and eventually correctly clicked call to drag the 1.7 million chip pot and leave Perry on just 100,000. Perry was eliminated on the very next hand when he put it in with the [poker card="qd"][poker card="9c"] and Peters made the call from the big blind with [poker card="8d"][poker card="5h"] and the board came [poker card="7h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="ks"][poker card="3h"]. Perry picked up $304,000 for third place. The levels dropped to 10 minutes at heads-up and Peters has a 2.1 million to 1.7 million chip advantage over Petrangelo. Petrangelo almost immediately took back the lead and within 10 minutes the pair had all the chips in the middle. Peters, covered, held [poker card="6h"][poker card="6d"] and Petrangelo, once again, was trying to take him out with a suited ace of clubs, the [poker card="ac"][poker card="tc"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="4s"], nearly the same set up as when Peters doubled earlier in the day. However, this time the clubs came in as the [poker card="qc"] hit the turn, leaving Peters drawing dead to the [poker card="5s"] river. As the runner-up, Peters added $570,000 to his more than $38 million in lifetime live earnings, and with that score climbed into 4th on the All-Time Money List surpassing Erik Seidel. With the win, Petrangelo picked up the $1,026,000 first-place prize and became the first Stairway To Millions “Main Event” champion. PokerGO Stairway to Millions $100K Final Table Nick Petrangelo - $1,026,000 David Peters - $570,000 Sean Perry - $304,000 The finale completed the inaugural eight-tournament series which offered players the chance win their way up the escalating buy-ins. Every time a player cashed in a Stairway to Millions tournament, they were given a ticket to the next event, along with their payout. As long as they continued to cash, they’d continue to play - of course, direct buy-ins were also available. Not unlike the tried-and-true online poker satellite tree where players start at a low buy-in but, as long as they continue to win, they earn a spot in the next event. The series started with a $1,100 event at the Aria that drew 190 entries and saw 28 players advance to Event #2. The next $2,150 buy-in event brought in 129 entries where three-time WSOP bracelet winner Chance Kornuth took down the title. In fact, Kornuth did it again in Event #3 ($4,000 NLHE), earning back-to-back titles (and three cashes in a row) for a series total of just over $136,000. As the buy-in increased, the fields began to narrow with 12 players from Event #3 advancing to Event #4. The $8,000 buy-in drew a total field of 56 entries from which Salim Admon earned his first PokerGO win for $138,880. Just eight players advanced from Event #4 to make up the 43-entry field of Event #5 ($15,800 NLHE). In the end, Michael Wang walked away with the $219,300 first-place prize. Jake Schindler, who is no stranger to winning in the Aria, scored the victory in Event #6 ($25,000 NLHE) where just seven of the 25 entries were from the previous tournament. The foursome of Schindler, Nick Petrangelo, Alex Foxen, and Sean Winter earned entry into Event #7 ($50,000 NLHE). Petrangelo topped the 21-entry field, coming back from a single big blind, and walked away with another $567,000 in his bankroll prior to his win in Event #8. Next up for PokerGO is the PokerGO Cup taking place from February 2-10.
  4. After two more tournaments closed out the 2021 World Series of Poker, there was late drama across the Rio. Michael Addamo claimed the High Roller victory that confirms 2021 as the ‘Year of Addamo’, Boris Kolev won his first-ever bracelet and there was late drama in the WSOP Player of the Year race, which was over, not over, then done for good. Addamo Claims Huge High Roller Win Australian high roller crusher Michael Addamo won his fourth WSOP bracelet after taking down the $100,000-entry Event #87 High Roller after a final table performance that confirmed his greatness in 2021. Addamo has crushed the year, winning more in the past 11 months than many great players have in their entire careers. His quest for his fourth bracelet began looking down from a great height at the top of the leaderboard. Nevertheless, Addamo would have been surprised that his closest challenger when play began, Danish player Henrik Hecklen, busted in fifth place for $434,523. Sam Soverel had chipped up in the early exchanges at the table, and his raise pre-flop saw Hecklen call off his 14 big blind stack with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jd"]. Soverel called it off with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="3d"] and managed to ride home his better hand, with the board playing out [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Js"][poker card="5d"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8d"] for a flopped top pair to almost double his stack. Soverel was on a mini heater and doubled through the chip leader Addamo to take the lead when he was all-in and at risk with top pair against the Aussie’s two pair on the turn, only for the river to give him a better two pair and stun the table. If Addamo was running bad, could it be anyone’s tournament? Sean Perry certainly hoped so when he moved all-in with [poker card="6h"][poker card="6s"] against the [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"] belonging to Kevin Rabichow. The board of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8c"][poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qd"] saw Rabichow make trips and slay Perry’s chances, the result worth $590,344. Down to three players, Rabichow was still the short stack, but over an extended period of play without an elimination, Soverel first spiked as chip leader, but then plummeted in two hands as Addamo delivered him from the tournament in brutal fashion, his [poker card="As"][poker card="Jd"] dominating Soverel’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Td"] on a board of [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="Th"]Ks][poker card="2c"] and sending Soverel home with $830,992. Heads-up, it was that hand that propelled Addamo into a dominant position. With 28 million to Rabichow’s 5 million, the Australian needed no time at all to wrap up the event and claim his fourth WSOP bracelet of an already astounding poker career. Rabichow was all-in pre-flop for his last 12 big blinds with [poker card="As"][poker card="6h"] and although he began the final hand ahead of Addamo’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="2c"] the board of [poker card="5h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="7h"] saw the most successful Australian tournament player in history add yet more glory to a stunning poker CV. Kevin Rabichow won over $1.2 million for a great run to runner-up but it was Michel Addamo who lost the lead yet won it all back and more to take down Event #87 and claim a famous victory worth $1.95m WSOP 2021 Event #87 $100,000 High Roller Final Table Results: Michael Addamo - $1,958,569 Kevin Rabichow - $1,210,487 Sam Soverel - $830,992 Sean Perry - $590,344 Henrik Hecklen - $434,523 Sorel Mizzi - $331,806 Sam Grafton - $263,227 Mikita Badziakouski - $217,274 Bill Klein - $186,909 Fedor Holz - $167,869 Kolev the King as WSOP Closes Rio Events With Maiden Win In the final event of the WSOP 2021, Boris Kolev became the answer to a thousand poker quizzes of the future as he won the last physical bracelet inside the Rio. Kolev had come into play just outside the top 10 chipcounts with 30 players remaining and for some time, the day was about Ben Yu in more ways than one. Yu, who led the field heading into the final day, was actually in the running to win the WSOP Player of the Year as Justin Bonomo of all people revealed. Eventually, thanks in no small part to Shaun Deeb’s amusing asides and general great play, Yu could not prevent Josh Arieh from celebrating - again - the Player of the Year title that was re-confirmed upon Yu’s exit in 10th place, as we wrote about right here in more detail. Yu’s exit in 10th place saw the final table of eight almost there and when Justin Liberto crashed out in ninth place with [poker card="As"][poker card="Jc"] unable to beat Niko Koop’s [poker card="9s"][poker card="9h"] across a thrilling run out of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Js"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="9d"] that gave the latter a full house on the river, the race was on to win the final bracelet of the series. Lee Markholt busted in eighth place for $49,107 when his shove with [poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"] was overtaken by Kolev’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="3d"] as the board played out [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9c"][poker card="2d"][poker card="Qs"]Kh] to give the eventual winner trips, and George Wolff lost his stack to Huy Nguyen when [poker card="Qh"][poker card="8h"] didn’t hold against Nguyen’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="3d"] as a board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Th"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="Tc"] saw Wolff cash for $64,207. With six players remaining, Koop made his bow in sixth place for $85,411 as his shove with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5s"] ran into the dominating [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"] belonging to Uri Reichenstein. The board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="Kh"] saw Reichenstein win that important pot to climb the ranks and send the dangerous Koop to the rail. It was the turn of Z Stein to bust in fifth place as his check-call for his stack on the turn of a board showing [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="Qc"] doomed his [poker card="Jh"][poker card="8c"] with Reichenstein holding [poker card="Js"][poker card="9h"]. The river of [poker card="Jc"] confirmed a full house for the Israeli and sent Stein home with a result worth $115,558 his final result of the Autumn WSOP. It was some time before the next elimination, but when it came, it belonged to Ramon Colillas. The PokerStars player busted with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="6h"] when Kolev’s [poker card="9s"][poker card="7c"] got there on a board of [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="6s"], Colillas cashing for $158,972. It wasn’t long before Huy Nugyen was on the rail too, his short stack of 12 big blinds going into the middle with [poker card="KS"][poker card="Ts"] unable to hold against Reichenstein’s [poker card="Jc"][poker card="8h"]. The board of [poker card="9h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="6d"][poker card="8d"] was a killer, too, rivering Nguyen’s chances of a vital double and instead condemning him to a third-place finish worth $222,310. Heads-up, Kolev had a marginal lead over Reichenstein, the Bulgarian’s stack of 13.7 million a little ahead of Israeli Reichenstein’s 12.8 million. Kolev opened up a lead, however, and on a flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"][poker card="As"], check-called to the turn holding [poker card="Jc"][poker card="6c"]. The turn of [poker card="Ks"] saw the same pattern, Kolev check-calling Reichenstein, who held only [poker card="Qd"][poker card="7s"] for a total bluff. Reichenstein ran that bluff for his whole stack on the river, but it was the [poker card="4c"] that came and Kolev called it off, showed his flush and became a first-time winner in the final ever WSOP Event at the Rio, winning the $511,184 top prize and leaving Reichenstein with another consolation prize of a deep run to a final table and $315,936. WSOP 2021 Event #88 $5,000 8-Handed NLHE Final Table Results: Boris Kolev - $511,184 Uri Reichenstein - $315,936 Huy Nguyen - $222,310 Ramon Colillas - $158,972 Z Stein - $115,558 Niko Koop - $85,411 George Wolff - $64,207 Lee Markholt - $49,107 Justin Liberto - $38,222 With the final events playing out at the Rio, most of the players had left the building...but perhaps for some, most importantly, the car park. https://twitter.com/jeffplatt/status/1463271505911947269 Not everyone believes the Rio was the ideal place to play poker, of course, and they were nobly represented by the viral sensation of videos that has fuelled so many Twitter Poker laughs over the last years of the home of the WSOP. https://twitter.com/SrslySirius/status/1463214257772761092 Matt Glantz neatly summed up Josh Arieh’s two-time triumph in the WSOP Player of the Year race. https://twitter.com/MattGlantz/status/1463307122909880321 Legendary WSOP font of all knowledge Kevin Mathers, known to us all as ‘Kevmath’ signed off his look at the old venue with one last short of the Rio’s lights burning bright as the shadows took the building one last time. https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1463392728289406978 Finally, how could we close out the series without a glimpse into the bizarre, amazing world of Phil Hellmuth. Answer: we couldn't. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1463277999353069568 It’s been an immense end to the World Series of Poker at the Rio and a WSOP never to be forgotten in 2021. The best news of all is that in six months time, the poker world will be ready to do it all over again at Bally’s and Paris... we can’t wait!
  5. Sean Perry was never really in any danger of elimination during the final table of the 2021 Poker Masters Event #2 ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em). He started the day with the chip lead, held on to it by taking out four of his final five opponents, and, in under three hours, walked out of the PokerGO studio with $206,400 for the win. The tournament was slightly larger than Event #1, as 86-entries created an $860,000 prize pool. For Perry, the victory, plus his eighth-place finish in the first event for $32,800, has made him the early points leader for the Purple Jacket something he said, “would mean the world to me.” Just six players returned to the PokerGO studio to battle for the Event #2 title, including John Riordan, fresh off his sixth-place finish in Event #1 for $49,200. Roughly 30 minutes into play, with the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante), Riordan found himself on the short stack with just eight big blinds. From the hijack, he moved all-in holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="qd"] and Jake Schindler, next to act, made the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="js"]. The rest of the table got out of the way and the pair watched as the board ran out [poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7d"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2s"] giving Schindler a straight and, for the second tournament in a row, ending Riordan’s day in sixth place for $51,600. With the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) Sam Soverel clashed in a big pot against Daniel Negreanu. All-in before the flop, Negreanu held the [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"], and Soverel, with the slightly larger stack, had the [poker card="ad"][poker card="qc"]. The flop came [poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2d"], keeping Negreanu in good shape. It got even better for "Kid Poker" when the [poker card="kd"] hit the turn leaving Soverel drawing dead to the [poker card="8d"] river. After the hand, Soverel was left with roughly two big blinds. Although he hung around for fifteen minutes, Soverel could build it back up when his [poker card="5d"][poker card="5c"] eventually lost to Perry’s [poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"] on the [poker card="th"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8c"][poker card="kd"][poker card="7c"] run out. Soverel, who won the Poker Masters Purple Jacket back in 2019, finished in fifth place for $68,800. Perry grabbed a commanding chip lead with four players left and began to apply the pressure. From the button, Perry made it 160,000 to go with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="4h"]. Negreanu bowed out in the small blind and then Schindler, with seven big blinds left, three-bet all-in holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="2s"]. Perry took some time to consider and ended up making the call. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4c"] flop gave Perry bottom pair which held through the [poker card="5c"] turn and [poker card="2d"] river. Schindler fell in fourth place and picked up $86,000 on the day. The final three then went to break. On the first hand back, with blinds up to 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante), there was only one big blind due to the prior elimination. First to act, Perry made it 225,000 holding [poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and Negreanu quickly moved all-in on the button for 1.425 million with his [poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"]. Jeremy Ausmus folded the single big blind and Perry wasted no time in calling. The flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"] keeping Perry’s sixes ahead, but not the favorite to Negreanu’s over cards, flush outs, and back door straight outs. The turn came the [poker card="9d"] giving Negreanu 16 outs one time. But that was simply too many outs, as Negreanu missed them all when the [poker card="ad"] completed the board. “He had half the deck and missed somehow,” Perry shouted as Negreanu collected his things and went to collect his $103,200 prize for third place. Unlike in Event #1, the heads-up match between Perry and Ausmus didn’t take very long. With a two-to-one chip lead, Perry kept control for the roughly 25-minute match. On the final hand, Ausmus raised to 200,000 holding the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"] and Perry raised it to 825,000 with his [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"]. Ausmus called and the flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="2c"] and Perry led for 400,000. In position, Ausmus opted for a call and the turn came the [poker card="kh"]. Perry checked it to Ausmus and Ausmus bet 800,000. After taking some time, Perry made the call. The [poker card="6d"] hit the river and Perry once again checked to Ausmus. Having missed all his outs, Ausmus moved all-in for just over 2 million. Perry went into the tank and eventually called the bluff with his pair of kings and ended the tournament. Ausmus was eliminated as the runner-up for $146,200 and Sean Perry took home the win and $206,400. Poker Masters Event #2 Final Table Results Sean Perry - $206,400 Jeremy Ausmus - $146,200 Daniel Negreanu - $103,200 Jake Schindler - $86,000 Sam Soverel - $68,800 John Riordan - $51,600
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