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Found 5 results

  1. Daniel Negreanu’s hope of defending last year's PokerGO Cup overall title looked a little brighter after he won Event #6 ($25,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup and picked up the $350,000 first-place prize. Prior to his win, Negreanu’s 2022 PokerGO Cup journey had proven to be a frustrating one. Throughout many of the early events, Negreanu had been building large chip stacks on a single bullet during the late registration period, only to be eliminated just before making the money. With only eight events in the series and with no results through five events, it looked to him like he didn’t have much chance of a repeat performance. But with a win in Event #6, Negreanu is back in the race. He picked up 210 points, good for the eighth spot on the leaderboard and trailing Jeremy Ausmus who has 407 points in first. However, should Negreanu do well in the final two events he’s got a shot to get back to the top. “I feel great right now. Now I’m back in it and the key is that I knew the $50K is where it’s at,” Negreanu said. "So today’s event is important, obviously, but it’s really going to be about the $50K.” After the victory, Negreanu spoke with PokerGO and talked about what it was like to turn his fortunes around during the series. “It feels really good. People who play tournament poker get this, especially live…you go through periods where you just feel like the poker gods are spitting on you because they’ll beat you in hands in such ways, like on the river, where it’s the most emotional. And I’m an emotional guy, I don’t hide it very well.” Brock Wilson started the final table in the middle of the pack, third in chips. And just when it looked like the PocketFives Staking favorite was going to jump into the chip lead, a brutal break sent him out the door. With the blinds at 15,000/25,000 (25,000 bb ante), Sean Winter picked up [poker card="ah"][poker card="3h"] in the cutoff. With more than 1.7 million in chips and all three of the short stacks to his left, Winter open-ripped putting max pressure on the table. Negreanu folded the [poker card="ad"][poker card="6d"] on the button and Stephen Chidwick let go of his small blind. But when came to Wilson in the big blind, he looked down at the [poker card="as"][poker card="ac"] and quickly snap-called his 900K stack. Winter was dominated, but when the flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="ts"][poker card="9h"], he found new life, slapping the table and said “What do you think about that, papa?!”. The turn was the [poker card="jh"], bringing Winter the flush and a huge hold on the hand. With Negreanu folded the other ace, only one of two nines would have saved Wilson. The river came the [poker card="5s"] and Wilson stood, put his backpack on, and went to the cage to collect his $61,250 for fifth place and enter Event #7. During four-handed play, Negreanu picked up key hands against Chidwick and Winter, taking the chip lead for the first time. With the blinds at 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) Chidwick was sitting on six big blinds when he moved all-in from the button with the [poker card="tc"][poker card="9d"]. In the big blind, Winter quickly called holding the [poker card="as"][poker card="td"] leaving Chidwick dominated and needing help. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2h"] flop left the door open for a backdoor flush, with Chidwick holding the only club. The turn came the [poker card="4c"] and all of a sudden Chidwick was 25% to win heading into the river. However, the [poker card="qs"] was the right color, wrong suit, and Chidwick was forced to settle for fourth place and a $96,250 payday. Negreanu expanded his chip lead during three-handed play, sparing with Winter and avoiding major all-ins. The blinds were at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante) when Negreanu picked up [poker card="kh"][poker card="kc"] on the button and made it 125,000 to go. Vikenty Shegal was sitting with roughly thirty big blinds, a stack in between Negreanu and Winter, and he looked down at the [poker card="th"][poker card="tc"] and announced he was all-in. Winter folded his [poker card="9c"][poker card="7c"] big blind and Negreanu snap-called putting Shegal at risk. The flop came [poker card="qc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4c"], keeping Negreanu way ahead. The turn came the [poker card="ac"] and Shegal was needing a ten to continue. The river came the [poker card="2s"], ending Shegal’s event in third place for $140,000 and giving Negreanu roughly 80% of the chips in play. With a better than four-to-one chip lead and the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante), Negreanu called on the button with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="jc"]. In the small blind with 900,000 in his stack, Winter made it 180,000 to go with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="tc"]. Back on Negreanu and he moved all-in and Winter made the call. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8d"], giving Negreanu top pair and leaving Winter looking for running cards or a jack to make a straight. The turn was the [poker card="kh"], leaving Winter just three outs. When the river came the [poker card="th"], it was all over. Winter ended up as the runner-up for $227,500 and Negreanu picked up his second PokerGO Cup career victory and the $350,000 first-place prize. PokerGO Cup Event #6 Final Table Results Daniel Negreanu - $350,000 Sean Winter - $227,500 Vikenty Shegal - $140,000 Stephen Chidwick - $96,250 Brock Wilson - $61,250
  2. It’s another win inside the PokerGO Studio for Nick Petrangelo who bested the 41-entry field of Event #5 ($25,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup to take home the $369,000 first-place prize. Petrangelo has been on a bit of a heater in the PokerGO high-stakes events as of late, having cashed four times, including two victories, in January’s Stairway to Millions series. All of his early 2022 high-roller results have him currently sitting atop the PokerGO Tour leaderboard and, with his latest victory, topping more than $2 million in earnings this year. “Everything has been going really well since even, like, September,” Petrangelo told PokerGO after the win. “A little up and down, but yeah, since then pretty much everything has been working out. I’m running great, winning all-ins, and getting hands at the right times. Sometimes you get around the bubble when you have a lot of chips and you lose a couple of hands, but it’s been the opposite for me when I go deep and everything just goes well.” Darren Elias was at his third PokerGO Cup final table of the 2022 series, however, he started this final table on the short stack and with the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) he held just under 10 big blinds. After Nick Schulman opened from under the gun to 100,000, Elias three-bet shoved his final 485,000 holding [poker card="kh"][poker card="qd"]. When the action folded back to Schulman, he quickly called putting Elias at risk. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="9d"][poker card="9c"] giving Schulman top pair and leaving Elias with needing runner-runner to survive. When the turn came the [poker card="2c"], Elias was officially drawing dead to the river. The four-time WPT champ said his goodbye and went to collect his $51,250 sixth-place prize. With the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante), Schulman and 2021 PokerGO Tour champion Ali Imsirovic were both sitting on just over 10 big blinds, with Imsirovic holding a 40,000 chip edge. From the cutoff, Imsirovic raised to 140,000 holding the [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"] and when it got to Schulman in the small blind, he three-bet shipped all-in with his [poker card="js"][poker card="ts"]. Petrangelo folded his big blind and with Imsirovic going nowhere, he snap-called, and the two short stacks put the cards on their backs. Schulman was slightly covered putting his tournament at risk, but it was Imsirovic who was in trouble when the flop came [poker card="tc"][poker card="8c"][poker card="2c"], giving Schulman top pair. The turn was the [poker card="7d"], leaving Imsirovic looking for an ace or king to take out Schulman. But the river was the [poker card="5c"], giving Schulman the full double and leaving Imsirovic with just over a small blind left. Imsirovic was eliminated in fifth place on the very next hand, losing in a four-way pot. Imsirovic collected $82,000 for his efforts. After the first break, the blinds escalated to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante), and with just over 10 bigs in his stack, Sean Winter raised to 375K from the button with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="th"]. After Schulman folded the small blind, Petrangelo looked down at the [poker card="kc"][poker card="qd"] and jammed all-in for 1 million. Winter, with half his stack in the middle quickly called for it all. Winter playfully picked up the [poker card="th"] and said to Petrangelo “Hey, have you seen these coming today?”. Petrangelo, unfazed said no and Winter continued “Have you been watchin’?” Soon the dealer put out a [poker card="qs"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3c"] flop, giving both top pair, but keeping Petrangelo’s kicker in play. “Ten baby!” Winter rooted. “Four of spades, I have a deck read” Petrangelo replied. Close, the turn came the [poker card="4d"] leaving Winter looking for just three outs to survive. The river was the [poker card="6d"] and the good-natured Winter stood and went to the cage to collect his $112,750 cash for fourth place. Playing three-handed at the same level, Schulman raised to 160,000 with the [poker card="as"][poker card="7d"] and when it was Bill Klein’s turn in the big blind, he three-bet shipped his chip lead with the [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"]. After using a time bank, Schulman said “I don’t know what I’m doing here, Bill.” and eventually made the call, wincing when he saw Klein’s hand. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="jd"][poker card="2s"], and Schulman took the lead hitting top pair. “I’m the captain, now,” Schulman joked having come from behind. The [poker card="7c"] turn brought Schulman two pair, but it didn’t change the situation. However, the [poker card="8s"] on the river did, giving Klein a set of eights and shipping him the pot. Schulman tapped the table and “hugged it out” with Bill Klein before he left in third place for $164,000. Klein took a better than 3:2 lead into heads-up play versus Petrangelo. The duo put on one of the longer heads-up battles of the series so far, playing for the better part of an hour. Eventually, Petrangelo. chipped up and took the lead, reversing the situation. At 50,000/100,000 (100,000 ante) Klein picked up [poker card="qd"][poker card="jd"] on the button and made the call. Petrangelo looked at the [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"] and moved all-in. Klein decided to go for it, flipping in a single chip to make the call. There was little drama as the board ran out [poker card="ks"][poker card="6h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="6s"][poker card="8s"] leaving Petrangelo the winner with his ace. Klein scored $246,000 as the runner-up and Petrangelo, who won the PokerGO Stairway to Millions finale, scored another victory in the PokerGO Studio, winning Event #5 for $369,000. PokerGO Cup Event #5 Final Table Results Nick Petrangelo - $369,000 Bill Klein - $246,000 Nick Schulman - $164,000 Sean Winter - $112,750 Ali Imsirovic - $82,000 Darren Elias - $51,250
  3. Jake Daniels eliminated all five of his final table opponents in Event #4 ($10,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup to take home the $200,000 first-place prize and his second career PokerGO Cup victory. Event #3 saw another healthy field make their way to the PokerGO Studio in Las Vegas as 80 entries amassed an $800,000 prize pool. For Daniels, who has become a familiar face in these high roller series, the victory is representative of the work he’s been putting into his game in order to compete. “I’ve hired a couple of coaches and I’ve put in a ton of work in the last five or six months trying to get better because these guys are so stinking good,” Daniels told PokerGO after the win. “I had a nice deep run in Florida for a WPT a couple of weeks ago, make a final table there. I love the competition.” Brock Wilson started the final table as the short stack and with the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante) he picked up [poker card="6s"][poker card="6d"] under the gun and moved his 10 big blind stack all-in. When it folded to Daniels in the small blind with [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"], he three-bet to just over 1 million making sure that Chris Moorman folded his big blind. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="td"][poker card="3d"] flop didn’t provide any extra help to Wilson who was looking for one of the final sixes in the deck. The turn was the [poker card="5h"] and the river came the [poker card="th"], sending Wilson, who had sold action over on the PocketFives Staking marketplace, out the door in sixth place earning $48,000. Not long after, Daniels found a double through Daniel Weinand, who started the day as the chip leader. Daniels and Weinand got it al-in preflop with Daniels holding [poker card="jh"][poker card="jd"] and Weinand with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="ts"]. The board ran out [poker card="kc"][poker card="th"][poker card="7h"][poker card="js"][poker card="3s"] board to give Daniels a commanding chip lead. Daniels then scored a massive double-knockout to take firm control of the table. With the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 ante) a short-stacked Sean Winter raised to 400,000 with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="5d"], leaving himself just 25,000 behind. Next to act, Daniels three-bet to 920,000 holding the [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"]. Immediately after, the former PocketFives #1-ranked Moorman, with just over 12 big blinds, looked down at [poker card="ah"][poker card="qs"] and he moved all-in. Moorman, not knowing that Winter still had a chip behind, showed his hand. Winter threw all his timebanks in the middle and started to do the math on whether he should fold with an expected pay jump. “I’m so bad, it’s so gross…,” Winter said. “I mean, I have a lot of equity.” Ultimately, he put his remaining 25,000 in the middle. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="9c"][poker card="6s"] keeping Daniels in the lead and making it so both Moorman and Winter needed help to survive. The turn was the [poker card="7s"], opening the door for Winters to hit a gutshot straight. But that’s where the drama ended as the [poker card="ks"] completed the board, giving Daniels top pair, a double KO, and an even healthier chip lead. Winter, with the shorter stack, was awarded fifth place and $64,000 and Moorman claimed fourth place and walked with $80,000. The final three battled for nearly 45 minutes as the blinds climbed to 50,000/100,000 (100,000 ante) and Jeremy Ausmus slipped in the chip counts, holding just five big blinds. But while it looked like he might be the next to go, a clash between Daniels and Weinand gifted Ausmus a nice, unexpected ladder. Weinand made it 250,000 to go holding the [poker card="as"][poker card="9d"] and after Ausmus folded, Daniels defended his big blind with the [poker card="js"][poker card="th"]. The flop came [poker card="9h"][poker card="5s"][poker card="2d"], giving Weinand top pair. When it was checked to him, Weinand fired a bet of 175,000 which Daniels check-raised to 625,000. Weinand made the call and the [poker card="td"] hit the turn. Daniels led for 850,000 and with 2.2 million left in his stack Weinand moved all-in. Daniels asked for a count, took some time, and made the call putting Weinand at risk. The river was the [poker card="2s"], ending Weinand’s run in third place for $96,000/ During heads-up play, Ausmus battled back. He chipped up from 500,000 to roughly 2 million. But, in the end, it was Daniels’ day. Daniels raised his [poker card="jh"][poker card="2h"] on the button enough to put Ausmus all-in. Looking at [poker card="as"][poker card="jc"], Ausmus made the call and had Daniels dominated. It looked like Ausmus was about to turn the situation around but the flop came [poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2s"], giving Daniels bottom pair. That pair held through the [poker card="9c"] turn and [poker card="4d"] river. Ausmus collected $144,000 as the runner-up and Daniels added another PokerGO Cup victory to his resume and an even $200,000. PokerGO Cup Event #3 Final Table Results Jake Daniels - $200,000 Jeremy Ausmus - $144,000 Daniel Weinand - $96,000 Chris Moorman - $80,000 Sean Winter - $64,000 Brock Wilson - $48,000
  4. There was a new face in the PokerGO studio for 2021 Poker Masters Event #9 ($25,000 Pot Limit Omaha) and that was California-based entrepreneur Miles Rampel. Rampel, who decided to made his Poker Masters debut in a $25K PLO event, walked away with what was, reportedly, his first-ever tournament cash of $365,500. As told to PokerGO, Rampel, who does play cash games, started playing PLO this year but had never bought into any tournament for more than $100. When his buddies brought him out to Las Vegas he thought “You know what, I’ll take a shot.” And what a shot it was, besting some of the game’s top high rollers and making his first Hendon Mob entry a victory at the Poker Masters. "It hasn't hit me yet, but I feel great, I feel great," Rampel told PokerGO after the win. Five-handed play lasted through the first break, nearly an hour forty-five minutes into the final table. At 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) Jeremy Ausmus, with 10 bigs, opened from the button to 140,000 holding [poker card="as"][poker card="qs"][poker card="jd"][poker card="7s"]. In the big blind, Rampel looked down at [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="2d"]. Rampel, who had assumed the chip lead, quickly three-bet to 440,000. Ausmus took some time, and decided to call, leaving himself with just 15,000 behind. The flop came [poker card="6d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2d"] giving Rampel bottom pair and missing Ausmus entirely. Rampel checked it over to Ausmus who checked back. The turn was the [poker card="4d"] giving Rample diamond flush outs. He led out enough to cover Ausmus’ final few chips. Ausmus took one more look at his hand before tossing them in. The [poker card="8s"] river was no help to Ausmus who tapped the table and went to collect his $86,000 for fifth place. It didn’t take long before another player hit the rail. Ten minutes later, Ben Lamb found himself with just 10 big blinds when he opened from the button to 140,000 holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"][poker card="8h"][poker card="3c"]. From the small blind, Rampel made the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2h"]. The [poker card="9s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2s"] flop gave Lamb a wrap and, once again, brought a pair of deuces for Rampel. Rampel checked it over to Lamb who moved the rest of his 290,000 stack all-in. It wasn’t enough to take Rampel off his hand, and the chip leader made the call. Although technically behind in the hand, with 17 outs twice Lamb was the statistical favorite to win. That changed when the [poker card="qh"] hit, nothing changed except Rampel’s chance of fading Lamb’s outs. He did just that on the [poker card="9d"] river, letting Rampel’s pair of twos hold and sending Lamb out in fourth place for $118,250. The final three players grinded for roughly another hour, passing chips back and forth. Lou Garza, who started the day with the chip lead, took it back, but Rampel stayed close. Sean Winter found his stack dwindling, unable to pick up the key hand that would allow him to get back in the thick of it. His time finally came at the 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante) level. After taking a number of hits to his already short stack, Winter was sitting on just over two big blinds. He raised to 120,000 from the button holding [poker card="qd"][poker card="ts"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8h"] and was called by Garza in the small blind with his [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"][poker card="8c"] and Rampel in the big blind holding [poker card="kh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4c"]. The [poker card="8d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] gave Rampel trip fours, a pair and a flush draw for Winter, and a pair for Garza. It was checked to Winter on the button and he tossed in his final 20,000. Both Garza and Rampel called. The turn was the [poker card="5h"] improving Rampel to a full house and leaving both other players drawing dead to the [poker card="9c"] river. Winter walked with $161,250 for third place. The start of head-up play had Garza holding a slim lead over Rampel, both with more than 40 big blinds. It didn’t take long for Rampel to take the chip lead away from Garza once again, this time he didn’t give it back. He extended his lead to a roughly five-to-one advantage when the final hand went down. Blinds were up to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) when Garza raised it up to 240,000 holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7s"]. Rampel made the call from the big blind with his [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2s"][poker card="2h"]. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="4h"] giving Garza the nut flush draw as well as a straight draw while Rampel hit top pair. Rampel checked it over to Garza who bet full pot, only to be shoved on by Rampel. Garza stuck the rest of his chips in the middle as a favorite. The [poker card="4d"] came on the turn and Rampel needed to once again fade a multitude of outs, this time to win the tournament. And again, he did that when the [poker card="qd"] completed the board. In his third straight final table, Garza again falls just short of his first Poker Masters victory, this time as the runner-up for $236,500. After Garza made his exit, Rampel was mobbed by a few friends on set as they celebrated his victory and $365,500 first-place payday. 2021 Poker Masters Event #9 Final Table Results Miles Rampel - $365,500 Lou Garza - $236,500 Sean Winter - $161,250 Ben Lamb - $118,250 Jeremy Ausmus - $86,000
  5. After taking the final two events of the 2021 Poker Masters to claim the Purple Jacket, Michael Addamo followed that performance up by besting the 21-entry Super High Roller Bowl VI for a resume-topping cash of $3,402,000. After three days of high-stakes tournament action in the PokerGO Studio, Addamo was, once again, the last player standing. “It’s been an incredible week,” Addamo said after the win. “I’ve been running very fortunate in a lot of spots…it’s unreal to be honest.” After Bill Klein and Michael Addamo clashed at the end of Day 2, Klein hit the rail setting the stage for the final five players to return to crown the champion. Addamo held a commanding chip lead with Justin Bonomo also sitting on a healthy stack, while Alex Foxen, Chris Brewer, and Sean Winter were searching for ways to climb up over the million chip mark. Foxen, who ended Day 1 with the chip lead, was the first to hit the rail. After an hour of play, Foxen’s stack had dwindled down to roughly eight big blinds. With the blinds at 15,000/25,000 (25,000 bb ante) the action folded to Foxen in the small blind with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="5c"]. After taking a few moments he moved all in only to be snap-called by Bonomo in the big blind with [poker card="kc"][poker card="th"]. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3h"] keeping Foxen’s ace-high in the lead. That quickly changed with the [poker card="td"] hit the turn, giving Bonomo a pair and leaving Foxen looking for an ace on the river. Instead, it was the [poker card="qh"] on the river, bringing in a straight for Bonomo and sending Foxen out in fifth place, leaving the final four to battle on the stone bubble. After the elimination of Foxen, Bonomo and Addamo had plenty of separation from Brewer and Winter, both of the short stacks sitting on roughly 20 big blinds. Another hour passed and Brewer’s stack fell to roughly 10 big blinds and he was looking for a spot to double. The blinds climbed up to 15,000/30,000 and Bonomo applied pressure from the button with his [poker card="th"][poker card="4h"], raising enough to force Winter or Brewer all-in should they call. Winter let go of the small blind, but Brewer looked down at [poker card="ad"][poker card="qs"] and instantly called. Brewer stood and leaned over the table as the flop came out [poker card="qd"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5h"] giving Brewer top pair but bringing in a flush draw and backdoor straight outs for Bonomo. Brewer looked pained as a smile appeared on Bonomo’s face and the [poker card="js"] appeared on the turn. Brewer just needed to fade a heart, but the [poker card="kh"] hit the river, bursting the million-dollar bubble and sending Brewer out in fourth place. After the bubble burst, Winter picked up some chips and climbed to just under 30 big blinds. During the same level, Addamo put in a raise on the button to 65,000 with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="jc"] and after Bonomo let go of the small blind, Winter picked up the [poker card="th"][poker card="td"] and moved all-in. Addamo made the quick call and Winter was at risk. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"][poker card="5s"] flop kept Winter in the lead but brought Addamo some additional gutshot and backdoor flush outs. The [poker card="ts"] on the turn send Addamo into the lead with a straight, but Winter improved to a set but needed to pair the board to stay alive. The river was the [poker card="7c"] and Winter congratulated Bonomo and Addamo saying ‘good game, good luck guys” as he made his exit in third place for $1,008,000. After a quick break, Addamo and Bonomo returned to play down heads-up with Addamo holding a 35 big blind chip lead. Over the course of roughly an hour, Bonomo’s chip stack fluctuated up and down but he was never able to wrestle the chip lead away from Addamo. With the blinds still at 15,000/30,000, Bonomo, with 2.4 million in his stack, opened the button to 80,000 and Addamo made the call with the [poker card="7d"][poker card="2d"]. The [poker card="4d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2h"] flop brought Addamo a flush draw and bottom pair, which he checked over to Bonomo who checked back. The turn was the [poker card="qd"], bringing Addamo the flush while giving Bonomo top pair. Addamo overbet the pot for 250,000 and Bonomo opted for a call. The [poker card="tc"] completed the board and Bonomo improved to a second-best two pair. Addamo went for it all - moving all-in. Bonomo took his time, used nearly all his time banks while glaring at Addamo. In the end, Bonomo sat up and said “I call” and it was all over. Bonomo and Addamo shook hands as Bonomo falls just one spot short of a fourth SHRB title, settling for second place and his $1,890,000 payday. Addamo completed the hat trick, winning the final two events of the 2021 Poker Masters and his first Super High Roller Bowl championship for a career-high score of $3,402,000.
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