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Found 6 results

  1. Take a quick look at Isaac Haxton's live tournament results over the past few years and you might be surprised by the lack of first place finishes. Considered by many on the high roller scene to be one of the best poker players on the planet, Haxton hasn't won a tournament since January 2017. Haxton's streak of 32 High Roller event cashes without a win came to an end on Tuesday though as Haxton took down Event #4 ($10,000 Short Deck Hold'em) of the 2018 Poker Masters. The win, coupled with a sixth and a fourth place finish in two previous Poker Masters events, have put Haxton just 30 points behind Brandon Adams for the Purple Jacket. “It would be very satisfying to win this whole thing, I have a track record of doing pretty well, but with a lot of second through fifth-place finishes," said Haxton. "Actually winning something is very satisfying.” Dominik Nitsche started the final table with a narrow chip lead over Andrew Robl, but just 45 minutes after the final table began, Nitsche was on his way to the payouts window with the sixth place ticket. Nitsche open-shoved for 1,440,000 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="jh"] from first position, Isaac Haxton re-shoved for 3,180,000 with [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"] from the cutoff and after some time, Andrew Robl folded [poker card="th"][poker card="9h"] from the button. The board ran out [poker card="qs"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6c"] to give Haston a rivered ten-high straight and eliminate Nitsche in sixth with a $33,000 payout. Some 40 minutes later, Haxton found yet another victim. Cary Katz limped from early position with [poker card="kh"][poker card="qh"] and Haxton moved all in for 3,880,000 behind him with [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"]. When action folded back to him, Catz called. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="6s"] flop was a friendly one for Katz, but the [poker card="ah"] turn put Haxton back in the lead. The [poker card="ts"] river gave Haxton an unnecessary two pair and eliminated Katz in fifth for $44,000. Robl spent the next 30 minutes working a short stack and despite two straight double ups, found no further success. Robl open-shoved for 900,000 with [poker card="td"][poker card="9c"] and Ryan Tosoc moved all in over the for 3,970,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="js"], forcing the rest of the table to fold. The [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"][poker card="th"] flop put Tosoc in the driver's seat and the [poker card="jd"] gave him a full house to eliminate Robl. The fourth place finish came with a $55,000 score. Tosoc, Haxton and Maurice Hawkins battled for almost a full hour before finding the next elimination. Tosoc was down to just 490,000 and decided to open shove with [poker card="ac"][poker card="th"] but Haxton called with [poker card="ah"][poker card="jd"] and stayed ahead through the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qc"][poker card="qh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7s"] runout to bust Tosoc in third for $77,000. Despite never having played short deck before and having zero Poker Masters cashes to his credit, Hawkins got heads up with Haxton with the chip lead. Unfortunately for the 11-time WSOP Circuit ring winner, that's as far as he could go. Hawkins open-shoved 4,775,000 with [poker card="9d"][poker card="7d"] and Haxton called with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qd"]. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="8c"][poker card="8h"] flop kept Haxton in the lead but also gave Hawkins a straight draw. The [poker card="kc"] changed nothing and when the [poker card="qh"] completed the board, Haxton eliminated Hawkins to win his first Poker Masters title and $176,000. Final Table Payouts Isaac Haxton - $176,000 Maurice Hawkins - $115,500 Ryan Tosoc - $77,000 Andrew Robl - $55,000 Cary Katz - $44,000 Dominik Nitsche - $33,000
  2. The World Series of Poker continued with its piece-by-piece announcements of the 2019 WSOP schedule on Tuesday, dropping the full schedule for all events with a $10,000-or-higher buy-in. Highlights include a $10,000 Short Deck event, a $50,000 High Roller in celebration of the 50th WSOP, and the WSOP Main Event being played with big blind ante format. "We are proud to be the only tournament series offering such a wide variety of poker variants," WSOP Vice President Jack Effel said in the press release. "Players at this buy-in level should continue to expect terrific structures, with registration open until Day 2 in most cases and plenty of play to determine the champion in each discipline." The announcement comes one week after the WSOP released a batch of 13 events for the 2019 WSOP. There are 20 events with a buy-in of $10,000 or higher, starting with the $10,000 Super Turbo Bounty on May 29, 2019, that features 20-minute levels. The $50,000 buy-in 50th Annual High Roller kicks off May 31 at 3 p.m. PT. Players in this new four-day event start with 300,000 in chips and are allowed one re-entry. The $10,000 Short Deck tournament is a four-day event starting on June 2. Players are allowed one re-entry in this event. For those unfamiliar with short deck poker, it is a variant of no-limit hold’em that has quickly risen in popularity in the last couple of years. The game is largely played in high-stakes cash games, but it has been making its way to the tournament scene more recently. With this variant of no-limit hold’em, deuces through fives are removed from the standard 52-card deck, leaving a new 36-card deck that includes only sixes through aces. The 2019 WSOP Main Event kicks off July 3 and plays through July 16, featuring three opening flights and an increased starting stack of 60,000 in chips. As part of this new announcement, the WSOP Main Event will be played using the big blind ante format and registration will remain open until the start of Day 2, which is either July 6 or July 7 at 12 p.m. PT. The WSOP's $100,000 High Roller and $10,000 6-Handed No-Limit Hold’em events will be played as post-lim tournaments, starting after the WSOP Main Event is well underway on July 11 and July 13, respectively. DATE EVENT BUY-IN CHIPS LEVELS RE-ENTRY TIME 5/29 Super Turbo Bounty $10,000 60,000 20 minutes None 12 p.m. 5/31 50th Annual High Roller $50,000 300,000 60 minutes 1 3 p.m. 6/2 Short Deck NL $10,000 60,000 60 minutes 1 6 p.m. 6/5 Heads-Up NL $10,000 60,000 20 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/6 Omaha Hi-Lo $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/8 NL 2-7 Draw $10,000 60,000 60 minutes 1 3 p.m. 6/11 H.O.R.S.E. $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/14 Dealers Choice 6-Handed $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/17 Seven-Card Stud $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/19 High Roller PLO $25,000 150,000 60 minutes 1 3 p.m. 6/20 Limit 2-7 Triple Draw $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/22 PLO 8-Handed $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/24 Poker Players Championship $50,000 300,000 100 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/26 Razz $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/28 PLO Hi-Lo $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/30 Seven-Card Stud Hi-Lo $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 7/2 Limit Hold'em $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 7/3 WSOP Main Event 1a $10,000 60,000 120 minutes None 12 p.m. 7/4 WSOP Main Event 1b $10,000 60,000 120 minutes None 12 p.m. 7/5 WSOP Main Event 1c $10,000 60,000 120 minutes None 12 p.m. 7/11 High Roller $100,000 600,000 60 minutes 1 3 p.m. 7/13 6-Handed NL $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m.
  3. The 2019 Triton Poker Super High Roller Series Montenegro is in the books, and several huge winners emerged from the high-stakes poker series held at the Maestral Resort & Casino along the Adriatic Sea. Chief among them was Bryn Kenney, who won more than $4.1 million total and jumped to No. 4 on poker's all-time money list, per Hendon Mob. Kenney only cashed twice in the series, but both times he won the tournament. In the first, Kenney topped a field of 79 entries to win the HK$500,000 Six-Handed No-Limit Hold’em event for HK$11.23 million ($1.43 million). In the second, he topped a field of 75 entries in the HK$1 million Main Event to win HK$21.3 million ($2.71 million). With those two wins, Kenney improved to just shy of $34.8 million in career live tournaments earnings, of which he's won more than $9.1 million in 2019 alone. Kenney’s previous best year on the live tournament felt was in 2017 when he won more than $8.5 million. Other big winners to come out of the 2019 Triton Poker Super High Roller Series Montenegro include Rui Cao ($3.61 million), Paul Phua ($3.59 million), Nikita Badziakouski ($2.91 million), and Daniel Dvoress ($2.71 million). Both Phua and Dvoress cashed five times in the series and a total of 12 players earned combined prizes of more than $1 million. Top 10 Triton Poker Series Montenegro Money List Bryn Kenney - $4,145,235 Rui Cao - $3,611,013 Paul Phua - $3,594,983 Nikita Badziakouski - $2,912,467 Daniel Dvoress - $2,717,155 Arnaud Romain - $2,130,372 Daniel Tang - $1,976,217 Sam Greenwood - $1,943,613 Peter Jetten - $1,865,303 Ben Lamb - $1,192,009 Just outside of the top 10 were Kenneth Kiang and Seng 'Ivan' Leow, who cashed for $1.08 million and $1.06 million from the series, respectively. Triton Poker Series Montenegro Results HK$250,000 Eight-Handed NL Turbo Entries: 45 Prize Pool: HK$10,575,000 Steve O'Dwyer - HK$3,708,784 ($472,788) Isaac Haxton - HK$2,901,216 ($369,841
) Linus Loeliger - HK$1,720,000 ($219,262) Kok Beh - HK$1,240,000 ($158,073) Sam Greenwood - HK$1,005,000 ($128,115) [caption id="attachment_624174" align="alignnone" width="1354"] Bryn Kenney won two tournaments at the recent Triton Poker Series in Montenegro (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] HK$500,000 Six-Handed NL Entries: 79 Prize Pool: HK$37,130,000 Bryn Kenney - HK$11,230,000 ($1,431,376) Daniel Dvoress - HK$7,430,000 ($947,028) Seng 'Ivan' Leow - HK$5,070,000 ($646,222) Sergio Aido - HK$3,820,000 ($486,897) Jason Koon - HK$2,970,000 ($378,556) Christoph Vogelsang - HK$2,300,000 ($293,158) Richard Yong - HK$1,820,000 ($231,977) Daniel Tang - HK$1,410,000 ($179,719) Cheong Ieng - HK$1,080,000 ($137,657) HK$100,000 Short Deck NL Ante Only Entries: 70 Prize Pool: HK$6,580,000 Winfred Yu - HK$2,040,000 ($259,952) Isaac Haxton - HK$1,370,000 ($174,576) Peter Jetten - HK$920,000 ($117,233) Leon Tsoukernik - HK$700,000 ($89,199) Steffen Sontheimer - HK$540,000 ($68,811) Ihor Shkliaruk - HK$420,000 ($53,520) Tam Lon - HK$330,000 ($42,051) Jordi Urlings - HK$260,000 ($33,131) HK$1,000,000 NL Main Event Entries: 75 Prize Pool: HK$70,500,000 Bryn Kenney - HK$21,300,000 ($2,713,859) Daniel Tang - HK$14,100,000 ($1,796,498) Peter Jetten - HK$9,600,000 ($1,223,148) Nikita Badziakouski - HK$7,260,000 ($925,005) Sam Greenwood - HK$5,650,000 ($719,873) Paul Phua - HK$4,440,000 ($560,609) Erik Seidel - HK$3,460,000 ($440,842) Matthias Eibinger - HK$2,680,000 ($341,462) Jason Koon - HK$2,050,000 ($261,193) HK$250,000 NL Turbo Entries: 37 Prize Pool: HK$8,972,500 Henrik Hecklen - HK$3,410,000 ($434,500) Alex Foxen - HK$2,200,000 ($280,323) Timothy Adams - HK$1,460,000 ($186,032) Daniel Dvoress - HK$1,052,500 ($134,109) Michael Watson - HK$850,000 ($108,306) HK$1,000,000 Short Deck NL Main Event Entries: 98 Prize Pool: HK$92,120,000 Rui Cao - HK$26,300,000 ($3,351,130) Paul Phua - HK$17,100,000 ($2,178,871) Arnaud Romain - HK$11,800,000 ($1,503,549) Daniel Dvoress - HK$9,070,000 ($1,155,694) Kenneth Kiang - HK$7,200,000 ($917,420) Ming Liu - HK$5,620,000 ($716,097) Choon Siow - HK$4,400,000 ($560,645) Isaac Haxton - HK$3,400,000 ($433,226) Timofey Kuznetsov - HK$2,630,000 ($335,113) Nikita Badziakouski - HK$2,300,000 ($293,065) Guang Lu - HK$2,300,000 ($293,065) HK$200,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Entries: 37 Prize Pool: HK$6,956,000 Hing Chow - HK$2,640,000 ($336,383) Ben Lamb - HK$1,706,000 ($217,375) Viacheslav Osipov - HK$1,130,000 ($143,982) Henrik Hecklen - HK$820,000 ($104,483) Wai Chan - HK$660,000 ($84,096) HK$200,000 Short Deck NL Ante Only Turbo Entries: 64 Prize Pool: HK$12,032,000 Quek Sheng - HK$3,700,000 ($471,416) Peter Jetten - HK$2,500,000 ($318,524) Paul Phua - HK$1,700,000 ($216,596) Kenneth Kiang - HK$1,292,000 ($164,613) Wai Chan - HK$980,000 ($124,861) John Gabe Patgorski - HK$770,000 $98,105) Daniel Dvoress - HK$610,000 ($77,720) Rui Cao - HK$480,000 ($61,157) [caption id="attachment_624175" align="alignnone" width="1354"] John Juanda was among the winners at the recent Triton Poker Series in Montenegro (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] HK$250,000 Short Deck NL Ante Only Entries: 65 Prize Pool: HK$15,275,000 John Juanda - HK$4,720,000 ($601,358) Daniel Dvoress - HK$3,160,000 ($402,604) Wai Yong - HK$2,150,000 ($273,924) Peter Jetten - HK$1,620,000 ($206,398) Sergey Lebedev - HK$1,250,000 ($159,258) Daniel Cates - HK$980,000 ($124,858) Christopher Soyza - HK$780,000 ($99,377) Paul Phua - HK$615,000 ($78,355) HK$750,000 Short Deck NL Ante Only Entries: 52 Prize Pool: HK$38,122,500 Nikita Badziakouski - HK$13,300,000 ($1,694,397) Sam Greenwood - HK$8,600,000 ($1,095,625) Qiang Wang - HK$5,700,000 ($726,170) Paul Phua - HK$4,400,000 ($560,552) Andrew Robl - HK$3,422,500 ($436,021) Xuan Tan - HK$2,700,000 ($343,975) [caption id="attachment_624173" align="alignnone" width="1354"] Ben Lamb was another big name to score a victory at the recent Triton Poker Series in Montenegro (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] HK$500,000 Short Deck NL Ante Only Entries: 42 Prize Pool: HK$20,080,000 Ben Lamb - HK$7,650,000 ($974,634) Arnaud Romain - HK$4,920,000 ($626,823) Seng 'Ivan' Leow - HK$3,250,000 ($414,060) Xuan Tan - HK$2,350,000 ($299,397) Timofey Kuznetsov - HK$1,910,000 ($243,340) HK$300,000 NL/Short Deck Mix Entries: 27 Prize Pool: HK$7,857,000 Daniel Cates - HK$3,930,000 ($500,682) Jason Koon - HK$2,367,000 ($301,556) Rui Cao - HK$1,560,000 ($198,744) Effect On Poker’s All-Time Money List The big results coming out of the Triton Poker Super High Roller Series Montenegro caused plenty of shifting towards the top of poker’s all-time money list. As already mentioned, Kenney jumped to No. 4 overall. Jason Koon, who cashed three times in Montenegro for just under $1 million, slid up one spot ahead of Antonio Esfandiari to be No. 8. Isaac Haxton, who, like Koon, won just under $1 million from this series, is now No. 13 and Badziakouski jumped to No. 15. John Juanda, who won an event in Montenegro for just more than $600,000, actually dropped back to No. 14. Then, looking a bit further down the leaderboard, Phua can now be found at No. 62 on the list after winning $3.59 million in Montenegro. High roller and super high roller events are as plentiful as they have ever been on the poker circuit. Numerous stops have $25,000 or $50,000 buy-in events, and some even push the envelope even further with $100,000 price tags on the schedule. Then, there are several festivals a year that are solely dedicated to ultra high-stakes players, such as the Triton Poker Series festivals. If there was ever a 'steroid era' in poker, similar to what baseball went through for an extended period of time, most commonly referred to as the latter half of the 1990s and into the 2000s. It's not that poker players are using performance-enhancing drugs to boost their earnings, but rather that there’s such an injection of these super high buy-in small-field events that are causing grand shifts in money lists. It doesn’t appear that these events and festivals are going anywhere, so poker will need to go through a bit of a market correction and rankings adjustments to correctly account for the juiced results.
  4. Short deck hold'em continues to grow in popularity, both in cash game and tournament format. This summer, the World Series of Poker added a $10,000 buy-in short deck hold'em event to its schedule of gold bracelet events, plus a handful of other venues around town are including the game in their summer offerings. Here are where and when you can play short deck hold’em in Las Vegas this summer. Short Deck Hold'em Events in Vegas This Summer Date Time (PT) Venue Buy-In Guarantee 6/1 2 p.m. Planet Hollywood $200 None 6/1 6 p.m. The Orleans $200 $20,000 6/2 6 p.m. World Series of Poker $10,000 None 6/5 7 p.m. ARIA $240 None 6/14 11 a.m. Golden Nugget $250 $5,000 6/20 10 a.m. Golden Nugget $360 $5,000 In addition to the tournaments listed in the table above, players may be able to find short deck hold'em cash games around Las Vegas this summer. One venue that is open to spreading it is ARIA Resort & Casino, who said they would be open to dealing the game at any limit they have in place for regular no-limit hold'em. What Is Short Deck Hold’em and How Do You Play? Also known as "six-plus hold’em," short deck hold'em is the new game in town that's quickly risen in the ranks of popularity. Players such as Phil Ivey, Tom Dwan, and Jason Koon are playing the game for astronomical stakes throughout Asia, and it's coming to the WSOP for the first time ever in 2019. Compared to regular no-limit hold'em, short deck hold'em is still extremely young and, therefore, not as widely known. Its rise in popularity has it almost on par with pot-limit Omaha. So, how does one play short deck hold'em? Short deck hold'em plays just like regular no-limit hold'em. Everyone is dealt two cards and there is a flop, turn, and river, with betting action taking place preflop and after each street of community cards. Also just like hold'em, players use their two hole cards combined with the five community cards on the board to make the best five-card poker hand. The deck being played with is different, though, and this is the first major difference between short deck hold'em and regular hold'em. Instead of the normal 52 cards that make up your regular poker deck, a deck used for short deck hold'em is only made up of 36 cards. Removed from the deck to cut it from 52 to 36 are the twos, threes, fours, and fives, hence the alternate name "six-plus hold’em." An ace remains a two-way card that can be used as both a high card and a low card. The second major difference is how the hands are ranked. It's become commonplace that flushes rank ahead of full houses in short deck hold'em. Some rules allow for three of a kind to beat straights, as well, but this is not the case for the $10,000 Short Deck tournament at the 2019 WSOP. Due to the shorter deck that's used in short deck hold'em, the odds for making certain hands change. It's easier to make a full house than it is a flush, which is why flushes rank higher than full houses in short deck hold'em. Below is a table of the most commonly used hand ranking system for short deck hold’em. Short Deck Hold'em Hand Rankings Royal Flush Straight Flush Four of a Kind Flush Full House Straight Three of a Kind Two Pair One Pair High Card Preflop, both blind and ante structures have been used for short deck hold'em.When blinds are used, the two players to the left of the button post the small blind and big blind, just as they would in regular hold'em, but some short deck hold'em games are played ante-only with no blinds.
  5. For the first time at the 2019 World Series of Poker, there were two bracelets awarded in a single day as Ben Heath and Dan Zack each picked up the first WSOP title of their careers on Monday. Those were just two of the seven events on the schedule that included another Day 2 in the Big 50, an influx of players in the $10,000 Short Deck, and another massive No Limit Hold'em tournament. And it just wouldn't be the WSOP if there wasn't a drama bomb in the first week. Ben Heath Avoids Controversial Ending, Wins $50K High Roller Ben Heath started the final table of the $50,000 High Roller event on Monday with the chip lead and while he didn't hold onto it the entire night, he had it when it mattered most; at the end. Heath beat a final table that included Chance Kornuth, Nick Petrangelo, Sam Soverel and finally Andrew Lichtenberger heads-up to claim the $1,484,085 first place prize and the first bracelet of his career. “It feels a lot better than I thought it would,” Heath said. “When I was younger, I was shy and didn't really want to win the bracelet. I would have rather just taken second place. But now that it has happened, it feels great!” The final table provided the first controversial moment of the WSOP though. Down to four players, Soverel folded out of turn while waiting for Heath to respond to an all-in shove for Yurasov. The moment soon caught the eye of high roller regular Isaac Haxton who took to Twitter. Haxton's tweet set off a firestorm of responses on both sides of the issues from players who have played against Soverel in tournaments around the world. Final Table Payouts Ben Heath $1,484,085 Andrew Lichtenberger - $917,232 Sam Soverel - $640,924 Dmitry Yurasov - $458,138 Nick Petrangelo - $335,181 Chance Kornuth - $251,128 Dan Zack Takes Down $2,500 Mixed Triple Draw Experience pays off at the WSOP and as the final table of the $2,500 Mixed Triple Draw event played down to a winner, Dan Zack relied heavily on his experience playing a lot of short-handed Triple Draw games over the past few years. It paid off handsomely for the 26-year-old New Jersey poker player as he beat Sumir Mathur heads-up to win $160,447 and the first bracelet of his career. “Draw games are my favorite games and probably my best games. I’ve probably played more hands of three-handed and heads-up draw than I’ve played of anything else in the last couple of years. I’ve played a ton of short-handed triple draw and Badugi online, so this is a cool event to take down,” Zack said after his win. There were 13 players at the start of the day that felt like they had a shot at the bracelet. Bryce Yockey, Andrew Brown, Mark Gregorich and Mike Gorodinsky were just some of the talented players that busted before the final table. Jake Schwartz, who started Day 2 with the chip lead, busted in sixth. Final Table Payouts Dan Zack - $160,447 Sumir Mathur - $99,153 Brayden Gazlay - $65,217 Jon Turner - $43,984 Jesse Hampton - $30,437 Jake Schwartz - $21,625 Saya Ono Gets Through Big 50 Day 1C on Top Saya Ono, a Southern California cash game regular, went from all in on the bubble to end-of-day chip leader on Tuesday. Ono bagged up 3,810,000 and is one of just two players who finished with more than 3,000,000 in chips. The other is Britain's Benjamin Dobson (3,560,000). The day started with 1,504 players and ended with 404 players putting chips in a bag. Notables who are still alive include Isaac Baron, Asher Conniff, Men Nguyen, Rex Clinkscales, Ari Engel, Eric Baldwin, Matt Stout, and Jared Griener. Those players moving on to Day 3, will now wait until Wednesday to resume play as the Day 1D survivors get their shot to move on to Tuesday. Prize pool information for the Big 50 should be announced early Tuesday morning. Top 10 Chip Counts Saya Ono - 3,810,000 Benjamin Dobson - 3,560,000 Nelson Rose - 2,915,000 Ubaid Habib - 2,600,000 Danny Ehrenberger - 2,440,000 Catherine Valdes - 2,430,000 Renato Manalo - 2,360,000 Samuel Welbourne - 2,275,000 Janae Pham - 2,250,000 Jiehao Zhu - 2,230,000 $10,000 Short Deck No Limit Hold'em Gets Boost A lot of the talk on Day 1 of the $10,000 Short Deck event was centered around the lack of turnout. Just 61 players showed up on Sunday for the opening day but with two hours of late registration on Monday, another 53 entries boosted the field to 114 total players. Some of the players who took advantage of the late registration included Shaun Deeb, Ryan Riess, Ben Yu, Daniel Negreanu, Alex Foxen, Rainer Kempe, Andrew Robl, and Phil Hellmuth. Busting out of the $50,000 High Roller didn't seem to impact Chance Kornuth too much. He walked right over to this event and ran up his stack to 2,163,000 and heads into Wednesday's final table as the chip leader. Alex Epstein and Yong Wang sit second and third respectively and were the only other players to finish with a seven-figure stack. Pennsylvania poker pro Thai Ha has the shortest remaining stack and will have his work cut out for him if he hopes to spin it up on Tuesday. Players who cashed on Monday but failed to advance to Tuesday include Bill Perkins, Kane Kalas, Alex Foxen, Justin Bonomo, and Galen Hall. The event was originally scheduled to run four days but given the light Day 1 turnout and the rapid pace of eliminations on Day 2, tournament organizers decided to shorten the event by one day. The final table gets underway at 2 PM PT. Final Table Chip Counts Chance Kornuth - 2,163,000 Alex Epstein - 1,275,000 Yong Wang - 1,176,000 Anson Tsang - 975,000 Rene van Krevelen - 563,000 Andrew Robl - 406,000 Thai Ha - 283,000 Big Field Shows for $600 No Limit Hold'em Deepstack If you thought the days of long line-ups were going to be restricted to the Big 50, you'd be wrong. The first Deepstack event of the 2019 WSOP attracted 6,151 players, many of them coming from the Big 50 after busting out. The event, which features 20-minute levels, is scheduled to be a two-day event but with 581 players advancing to Day 2, it seems more likely that a third day will be added. Paul Dhaliwal finished as the chip leader with 1,612,000 chips going in the bag at the end of the night. Some of the notables who advanced to Day 2 include Jake Schwartz, Bart Lybaert, Daniel Negreanu, Maurice Hawkins, Matt Stout, Ylon Schwartz, and Erik Seidel. Action gets underway at Noon PT. Top 10 Chip Counts Paul Dhaliwal - 1,612,000 Michael Morhaime - 1,275,000 David Elet - 1,255,000 Mohammad Saadeghvazri - 1,215,000 Christopher Battenfield - 1,190,000 Zachary Vankeuren - 1,032,000 Kyle Dover - 951,000 Richard Smith - 922,000 Edvinas Gruzdas - 896,000 Roman Kroupa - 893,000 Jim Collopy Leads $1,500 Dealers Choice After Day 1 A lot of the focus at the WSOP over the past few days has been on No Limit Hold'em, but mixed game aficionados were out in full force Monday afternoon for the $1,500 Dealers Choice event. Jim Collopy bagged up 84,300 and leads the 178 players who managed to survive Day 1. The event drew 470 players. Other familiar faces who are moving on to Day 2 include Robert Mizrachi, Dan Shak, WSOP Circuit crusher Valentin Vornicu, Greg Mueller, Ryan Hughes, David 'ODB' Baker, Marco Johnson and Dzmitry Urbanovich. Top 10 Chip Counts Jim Collopy - 84,300 Danny Noam - 81,100 Jason Stockfish - 79,500 Al Barbieri - 65,800 Nikolai Yakovenko - 63,600 Ryan Leng - 62,800 Tamon Nakamura - 61,100 Cole Jackson - 56,800 Robert Campbell - 56,400 Todd Barlow - 54,900 Dan Smith Leads $5,000 No Limit Hold'em Straight forward No Limit Hold'em was on the menu as the final event to get underway on Monday. 343 players entered the $5,000 No Limit Hold'em event and the high end of the Day 1 chip counts include a who's who of NLHE bosses. Dan Smith sits on top of that impressive list with 321,000. Simon Deadman, Darryll Fish, and Faraz Jaka take up the second - fourth place spots behind Smith. Online poker crusher Arsenii 'josef_shvejk' Karmatckii bagged up the fifth biggest stack. There's a plethora of well-known players outside of the top 10 chip counts. Dietrich Fast, Niall Farrell, Antoine Saout, Ali Imsirovic, Adrian Mateos, Chris Hunichen, Daniel Strelitz, Ian O'Hara, and Joao Vieira all still have chips and a shot at winning the bracelet. Registration remains open until the end of Level 12 on Tuesday. Top 10 Chip Counts Dan Smith - 321,100 Simon Deadman - 267,000 Darryll Fish - 254,400 Faraz Jaka - 224,600 Arsenii Karmatckii - 221,900 Andreas Eiler - 171,200 Emile Schiff - 170,200 Brett Bader - 158,400 Georgios Kitsios - 154,000 Pedro Oliveira - 137,900
  6. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters, The Fives Poker Podcast runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. The opening week of the 2019 World Series of Poker has had a bit of madness in the opening week. Lance and Donnie are joined by Maria Ho, Victor Ramdin, and Nathan Manuel to get player reaction to the record-sized field in the Big 50. They also recap the bracelets awarded to Nicholas Haynes and Derek McMaster and talk about the somewhat disappointing turnout for the debut of Short Deck on the WSOP schedule. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
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