Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'stephen chidwick'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Poker Forums
    • Poker Community
    • Poker Advice
    • Poker Legislation
    • Poker Sites
    • Live Poker
  • Other Forums
    • Off Topic
    • Bad Beats
    • Daily Fantasy Sports Community
    • Staking Marketplace
    • PTP Expats - Shooting Off

Calendars

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Real name


Your gender


About Yourself


Your favorite poker sites


Favorite poker hand


Your profession


Favorite place to play


Your hobbies


Favorite Cash Game and Limit


Favorite Tournament Game and Limit


Twitter Follow Name:


Game Types


Stakes


Method(s)


Favorite Site(s)


Table Size(s)


Structure(s)


Hourly Rate

Found 38 results

  1. The story of the World Series of Poker just wouldn’t be the same without the United Kingdom. Some of the most memorable players in its 51-year history have come from ‘across the pond’ to pit themselves against the toughest poker competition the world has to offer. David ‘Devilfish’ Ulliott, former #1-ranked PocketFiver Chris Moorman, Roland de Wolfe, Luke Schwartz, Max Silver, and Liv Boeree are just some of the high-profile players that count themselves among the players who have helped the UK accumulate 51 WSOP gold bracelets, third-most of any country in the world. In 2020, the UK is poised perfectly to add to their WSOP trophy case with players from the UK dominating the online poker scene. York resident Conor ‘1_conor_b_1’ Beresford has had a stranglehold on the worldwide #1 rank for the better part of two months. His countryman Patrick ‘pleno1’ Leonard sits right behind him, ranked #2 in the world. In total 12, of the current top 100 hail from the UK and that doesn’t even include the UK native considered one of the most feared tournament players, online or live, in the game today. In addition to Beresford and Leonard, here’s a look at some of the top-ranked talent of the United Kingdom who very well could be in the mix to win a World Series of Poker bracelet during the 2020 WSOP. Stephen Chidwick Stephen Chidwick is the aforementioned most-feared tournament player on the circuit. How good is Chidwick? His high-roller tournament peers gave him the award for “Toughest Opponent” at the 2020 Global Poker Awards and by any measure, he's generally considered the favorite in any given event he decides to play in. He’s sixth on the Hendon Mob All-Time Money List with over $34 million in career live cashes and has (at least) another $5 million in online earnings. There’s seemingly no award Chidwick hasn’t won - he was the inaugural U.S. Poker Open champion, the first-ever Australian Poker Open champion, he has WCOOP and SCOOP titles, and, yes, a World Series of Poker bracelet. In 2019, after missing most of the series, Chidwick won the very first event of the summer he entered in which happened to be the $25K PLO High Roller for $1,618,417. Should Chidwick decided to grind the entire WSOP schedule on GGPoker, he might just be the first person to win multiple online gold bracelets. Sam Grafton London grinder Sam Grafton may be known as a hilarious guy to hang out with off the felt, but when he’s playing poker he’s serious competition. It was just last year that Grafton hit a career-high score when he finished as the runner-up in the EPT Barcelona €100,000 Super High Roller for $1,453,517. That score helped him leap to more than $4.1 million in career live earnings on a resume that dates back to 2009 and includes results in over 10 countries around the world. In 2020, 'TheSquid' has been putting up big numbers online as well. A runner-up finish in the PokerStars High Rollers Series Main Event brought him a $343,095 score, a career-high online cash. He also notched two more six-figure scores this year including a victory in the PokerStars Summer Series High PKO Main Event for $128,497. Tom Hall Long-time poker pro Tom ‘Jabracada’ Hall is rapidly approaching $4 million in total online earnings thanks to consistent results that date back joining PocketFives back in 2010. Add to that his $2.75 million in life earning and you have a picture of a player who consistently puts himself in position to win tournaments. Hall has attended WSOP events dating back to 2013 and has over $180,000 in cashes over 24 results including a deep run in the 2017 Colossus where he finished in 27th place out of 18,054 runners proving he knows how to navigate through massive fields. That same year, Hall booked a win at the 888poker LIVE London Main Event for $104,170 less than a year after taking down the EPT Prague High Roller for $205,204. If Hall continues his bracelet chase on GGPoker, look for him to be making runs in the mid-stakes large field events. Tyler Goatcher The truth is, if you look at Tyler Goatcher’s live results, you might not be terribly impressed. He has just five total cashes on his Hendon Mob profile and zero experience at the World Series of Poker. But if you look up his screen name of ‘Wonderboy222’ you’ll see why he’s one of the UK’s most exciting players. Currently the #10-ranked player in the world, Goatcher has earned $3 million in career online earnings and is on a heater that any poker pro would die for. In March, he earned back-to-back partypoker POWERFEST titles right before he captured a May PokerStars SCOOP title in Event #54-H ($1,050 NLHE) for a career-high score of $107,504. Lately, Goatcher has been spending time racking up results in bounty event on GGPoker under his screen name ‘HELLODARKNESS’. Jack Sinclair London’s Jack Sinclair already has one bracelet, and it’s a big one. He took down the 2018 World Series of Poker Europe Main Event for a career-high score of $1,277,012 but most poker fans might remember him from his eighth-place finish in the 2017 WSOP Main Event in Las Vegas where he won $1,200,000 on the televised final table. Despite all of that success, there’s no doubt that Sinclair would love to add some more WSOP to his collection. He’s been making the trek to Las Vegas and WSOP Europe since 2017 and has 18 cashes for a total of $2.8 million. Sinclair also grinds online, under the PokerStars screen name ‘Swaggersorus’ and has locked up a Spring Championship of Online Poker title.
  2. The 2020 World Series of Poker on GGPoker is less than two weeks away and on Sunday some of the game's brightest stars appeared more than ready to get after a bracelet a two. Stephen Chidwick dominated on partypoker, earning wins in the High Roller Club The Big Game and $10,300 High Roller Club Mix-Max 2nd Chance beating 165 and 44 players respectively to win a total of $367,727.71. Chidwick wasn't the only high stakes regular who picked up a pair of wins on Sunday. Artur 'mararthur1' Martirosian beat out 99 other entries in the PokerStars $5,200 High Roller to win $88,459.85 and then another 39 in the PokerStars $2,100 High Roller Club Sunday High Roller to earn $34,653.40. In both events, fellow Russian 'hello_totti' finished runner-up and was left to console himself with $110,606.71. The biggest single score on the day belonged to Ali Imsirovic. Beating 37 other entries in the partypoker High Roller Club Main Event, Imisorovic banked $387,125. Runner-up Rob Yong walked away with $251,750 while Martirosian added another $156,750 to his Sunday haul after coming in third place. 'mathouse' defeated 'Martin Pineiro' heads-up to win the GGPoker GGMasters outright for $71,947.50. The event had a $35,768 overlay on the $500,000 guarantee after drawing 3,364 players. PokerStars High Roller Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 100 Prize pool: $500,000 Artur 'mararthur1' Martirosian - $115,217.45 hello_totti - $88,459.85 Malaka$tyle - $67,916.35 PokerStars High Roller Club Sunday High Roller Buy-in: $2,100 Entries: 40 Prize pool: $80,000 Artur 'mararthur1' Martirosian - $34,653.40 hello_totti - $22,146.86 WATnlos - $14,153.98 PokerStars Bounty Builder Buy-in: $109 Entries: 3,051 Prize pool: $305,100 exitonlyKK - $18,791.21 + $10,649.42 in bounties yAAwn - $18,787.99 + $5,191.15 in bounties Marto115 - $11,005.78 + $3,499.16 in bounties partypoker High Roller Club Main Event Buy-in: $25,500 Entries: 38 Prize pool: $950,000 Ali Imsirovic - $387,125 Rob Yong - $251,750 Artur Martirosian - $156,750 partypoker High Roller Club Mix-Max 2nd Chance Buy-in: $10,300 Entries: 44 Prize pool: $440,000 Stephen Chidwick - $176,000 Dan Shak - $112,615.80 Jake Schindler - $57,200 partypoker High Roller Club The Big Game Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 165 Prize pool: $866,370 Stephen Chidwick - $191,727.71 Thomas Boivin - $137,752.83 Michael Watson - $100,498.92 GGPoker GGMasters Buy-in: $150 Entries: 3,364 Prize pool: $500,000 ($35,768 overlay) mathouse - $71,947.50 Martin Pineiro - $50,874.60 eggt8rt - $35,973.80 GGPoker Global MILLION$ Buy-in: $100 Entries: 1,639 Prize pool: $1,000,000 1kkwinner - $82,359.39* BigToeJoeBeiso - $78,579.86* Drupada - $109,484.08* Raisetwice1994 - $70,795.17* GGPoker Bounty Hunters Main Event Buy-in: $210 Entries: 1,910 Prize pool: $382,000 michael79 - $43,612.13* + $21,133.19 in bounties BanBang! - $23,522.92* + $3,888.28 in bounties NocturnalSagitario - $27,957.93* + $6,619.84 in bounties
  3. Winning a World Series of Poker gold bracelet is widely considered by many to be poker’s ultimate achievement. For some players, it defines his or her career. For others, it’s the one prize eluding some of the game’s best. For years, Stephen Chidwick was considered the best poker player without a WSOP gold bracelet. At the 2019 WSOP, Chidwick bucked that monkey off his back like the most turbulent bull does to a rider at a rodeo when he won the $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller for $1.618 million. Shawn Buchanan was another player in the "best without a bracelet conversation," but, like Chidwick, he broke through at the 2019 WSOP, winning the $800 buy-in WSOP.com Online NL Six-Handed. Now that Chidwick and Buchanan have each won an elusive gold bracelet, let's take a look at who are the best players remaining without a bracelet entering the 2020 WSOP. Patrick Antonius CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 15 2 0 $929,518 Widely considered one of the best all-around players in poker for quite some time, Patrik Antonius is still missing a WSOP gold bracelet from his résumé. He's come close a couple of times, finishing in the top 10 on four occasions and placing at the final table twice, but he's never scored better than third place. Antonius has been known to pass on tournaments for cash games these days, but he's still a threat to win a bracelet in the bigger buy-in WSOP events when he does compete. Niklas Astedt CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 6 0 0 $110,645 Sweden's Niklas Astedt is one of the top-ranked online poker players in the world, but his live success hasn’t been too plentiful, especially at the WSOP. Astedt’s skills should not be overlooked, though. His first WSOP cash came in 2014 and his highest WSOP finish was a 26th-place result in the 2019 WSOP $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller. He's also cashed in the WSOP Main Event on two occasions, with a 182nd-place finish in 2016 and a 899th-place finish in 2019. Mikita Badziakouski CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 4 4 1 $3,161,362 Mikita Badziakouski plays some of the biggest buy-in events around the world, and his career to date includes more than $26.1 million in live tournament earnings. At the WSOP, Badziakouski has four cashes. Each cash has been a final table appearance and each has come at WSOP Europe. If there's a high roller event on the WSOP schedule, Badziakouski will likely be in the field and a threat to win the gold bracelet. Darren Elias CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 28 3 0 $645,659 With four World Poker Tour titles and more than $7.5 million in live tournament earnings, it’s a matter of when, not if, Darren Elias will finally win WSOP gold. His first WSOP cash came in 2009. He has three WSOP final table appearances and two finishes in third place, although he’s never made it to heads-up play. The two times Elias finished in third came from the same event, the $10,000 No Limit Deuce to Seven Championship in 2017 and 2019. Alex Foxen CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 39 4 0 $808,918 Alex Foxen has been around the WSOP for a much shorter time than some of the players on this list, with his first WSOP cash coming in 2015. He has, however, built up quite the reputation as one of the best tournament poker players in the game today and it seems very much just a matter of time before he finds himself in the WSOP winner’s circle with his first gold bracelet. Already, Foxen has racked up 39 WSOP cashes and four final tables ahead of 2020. His highest finish to date was a third-place finish at the 2017 WSOP in a $1,000 No Limit Hold’em event. Matt Glantz CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 61 13 1 $3,232.669 Pennsylvania's Matt Glantz has been around the WSOP block a few times, but he’s still looking for that first gold bracelet. Glantz first cashed in a WSOP in 2000 and he’s been producing everything but wins since, including 13 final table appearances. Glantz has reached heads-up play once and finished third on three occasions. At the 2019 WSOP, Glantz picked up his third WSOP Main Event cash. Mark Gregorich CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 69 11 1 $1,168,497 Mark Gregorich is another player on this list who has been around for quite some time, earning his first WSOP cash back in 1999. He has 69 cashes and 11 final table appearances at the WSOP, with one runner-up finish that came in the 2003 WSOP $5,000 Limit Hold’em event. Gregorich also has a trio of third-place finishes at the WSOP to date. Nick Guagenti CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 37 3 0 $583,181 Ohio's Nick Guagenti has 37 WSOP cashes with the first coming in 2006. He has three final table appearances. Guagenti's highest WSOP result came in 2019 when he took third in the $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. event for $85,265. His best finish in terms of money won came from his 46th-place finish in the 2017 WSOP Main Event, for which Guagenti won $145,733. Guagenti is a regular in mid- and high-stakes cash games in his region, and he also has 15 cashes on the WSOP Circuit. Christian Harder CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 53 2 0 $1,050,784 Christian Harder’s first WSOP cash came in 2009. He’s won titles elsewhere in the poker world, just not at the WSOP just yet. He’s been close before with a pair of fourth-place finishes and is known to put in a high amount of volume in the big bet games of No Limit Hold’em and Pot Limit Omaha. Maurice Hawkins CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 29 3 0 $623,240 Maurice Hawkins has been a longtime grinder of the WSOP and WSOP Circuit, racking up 29 WSOP cashes and 110 WSOP Circuit cashes. He has a whopping 14 WSOP Circuit gold rings, but Hawkins has yet to win a WSOP gold bracelet. Hawkins has three WSOP final tables and they've come in big-field NL tournaments. With as many big-field NL events that are on the WSOP schedule these days, one has to figure that Hawkins is going to break through and win one at some point. Isaac Haxton CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 27 7 1 $2,923,424 Isaac Haxton is widely considered as one of the best minds in poker, and he’s certainly lived up to that with more than $27.6 million in live tournament earnings, millions more won in cash games, and who knows how much won online. The one thing he doesn’t have is a WSOP gold bracelet. Haxton has seven WSOP final table appearances and one runner-up result. The second-place finish came to Vitaly Lunkin in the 2009 WSOP $40,000 No Limit Hold’em. Maria Ho CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 55 5 1 $1,644,554 Maria Ho is another long-time regular at the WSOP, with cashes dating back to 2005. She has five final table appearances and one runner-up finish in WSOP events, and she’s known to mix it up in most of the games. Ho’s runner-up finish came to Allen Bari in the 2011 WSOP $5,000 No Limit Hold’em. Ho has been the last woman standing in the WSOP Main Event on two occasions, 2007 and 2014, and she finished sixth in the 2017 WSOP Europe Main Event. Ali Imsirovic CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 10 3 1 $583,986 Ali Imsirovic is one of the newest kids on the block in all of poker, not just the WSOP, and he’s quickly acquired a reputation of one of the game’s best when it comes to No Limit Hold’em tournaments. Imsirovic’s first WSOP cash came in 2017, so there isn’t a ton of sample to draw from, but he’s already made three WSOP final tables in top-level events and has one runner-up finish. Given his success in his young poker career, Imsirovic is considered one of the favorites any time he enters a high buy-in, No Limit Hold’em event. Rainer Kempe CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 31 3 0 $1,142,997 Rainer Kempe has won more than $21.3 million in his poker career and he’s been in the winner’s circle many times, but he’s yet to win a WSOP gold bracelet. His WSOP career is still pretty young, though. His first WSOP cash came in 2015, but over a short period of time he’s already earned 31 in-the-money finishes and more than $1.1 million in earnings. Kempe has been to a WSOP final table three times to date. Jason Koon CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 42 7 1 $1,789,462 For all of the poker success that Jason Koon has enjoyed over the course of his career, he’s still searching for his first WSOP gold bracelet. Koon has more than $31.1 million in live tournament earnings to date and his first WSOP cash came back in 2009. He has seven WSOP final table appearances and one runner-up result. Koon is similar to Haxton and Imsirovic in the sense that he’ll almost always be one of the favorites any time he enters a high buy-in, No Limit hold’em tournament. Timofey Kuznetsov CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 0 0 0 $0 Timofey Kuznetsov, also known as ‘Trueteller,’ is highly regarded in the poker community as one of the best, especially within the high-stakes community. He has zero WSOP cashes to date, but he simply doesn’t play a lot of tournaments. That said, Kuznetsov is still one of the best players in poker without a WSOP gold bracelet. Maria Lampropulos CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 27 0 0 $136,731 Maria Lampropulos first cashed a WSOP event in 2016 and that first year she walked away with five WSOP cashes in total. She followed that up with six cashes in 2017 and seven cashes in 2018. At the 2019 WSOP and WSOP Europe festivals, she cashed nine time. With partypoker MILLIONS and PCA Main Event wins on her résumé, both for seven-figure paydays, Lampropulos has shown she has the chops to compete in some of the biggest events in the world. Toby Lewis CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 24 0 0 $409,171 Toby Lewis’ first WSOP cash came in 2011 when he took 11th in the $10,000 Pot Limit Hold’em Championship. He’s racked up 24 WSOP cashes to date, but he’s never reached a WSOP final table. Tom Marchese CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 26 4 1 $1,295,638 A player with more than $19.1 million in live tournament earnings, Tom Marchese is often considered one of the better tournament players poker has to offer. He's yet to score a WSOP gold bracelet, though, but he has come close a few times, with four WSOP final tables and one runner-up finish. The time Marchese finished second was at the 2015 WSOP in the $1,500 Pot Limit Hold'em tournament. Steve O‘Dwyer CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 18 2 0 $675,717 Like Haxton and like Koon, Steve O’Dwyer has a ton of live tournament winnings. O’Dwyer has scored more than $30.4 million from the live felt, plus plenty more online, and his first WSOP cash came in 2007. O’Dwyer is a player who put in more WSOP volume at the beginning of his career compared to what he does now, which could be holding him back in terms of winning his first gold bracelet. At this point in his career, it seems that if O'Dwyer does win a gold bracelet, it will come at WSOP Europe or a similar international WSOP stop. Adam Owen CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 34 5 0 $570,961 Adam Owen is another one of the younger guns on this list, but he’s widely regarded as one of the best all-around players in the game these days. Having earned his first WSOP cash in 2014, Owen has racked up 34 WSOP cashes to date, including five final tables and three third-place finishes. Owen has shown a propensity to perform well in the $10,000 buy-in championship events at the WSOP and many think that’s where he’ll earn his first gold bracelet from. Felipe Ramos CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 31 4 0 $526,047 One of best poker players to come out of Brazil is Felipe Ramos, with 31 WSOP cashes dating back to his first in 2009. Ramos is known as a solid player who can compete across all variants, and the more tools you have in your shed, the better when it comes to chasing gold bracelets. Ramos has four WSOP final tables and they've all come in Omaha. Three of those four final tables were in Pot Limit Omaha. Dario Sammartino CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 41 10 0 $9,927,947 Italy’s Dario Sammartino first cashed in a WSOP event in 2011 and he’s been performing very well ever since, except winning a WSOP gold bracelet is something he’s yet to achieve. Sammartino has found the money in WSOP events 41 times to date. Of those, he’s reached the final table on 10 occasions. Sammartino's biggest claim to World Series of Poker fame was a runner-up finish in the 2019 WSOP Main Event for $6 million. He's also one of the few players to have made the final table of both the WSOP Main Event and WSOP Europe Main Event in his career. Sammartino has learned how to play all the games and play them well, so don’t be surprised to see him finally win WSOP gold much sooner than later. Ole Schemion CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 6 1 0 $469,735 Although his WSOP results don’t pop off the page, Ole Schemion is one of the best players out there and an absolute force when it comes to poker tournaments. He’s amassed more than $16.3 million in live tournament earnings, numerous high roller victories, and one World Poker Tour title. He’s still in search of his first WSOP gold bracelet, though. In terms of winning WSOP gold, it’s very likely just a volume game for Schemion. If he puts in the volume, he’ll get it eventually and probably in the near future. It also works to his benefit that WSOP Europe looks as though it will remain at King’s Casino in Rozvadov where Schemion has shown success before, including a sixth-place finish in the 2019 WSOP Europe €100,000 Diamond High Roller for €341,510. Jake Schindler CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 33 4 0 $1,050,644 The first of two players named Jake on this list, Jake Schindler has 33 entries and four final tables at the WSOP entering 2020. His best finish was a third-place result in the 2014 WSOP $3,000 No Limit Hold'em for $212,373. Over his entire poker career, Schindler has more than $25 million in live tournament earnings. Jake Schwartz CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 60 3 1 $658,477 Jake Schwartz earned his first WSOP cash in 2012 and has built up 60 in-the-money finishes since. He was first widely known as a No Limit hold'em player but he's since branched out and has been playing more of the games. In 2013, Schwartz earned the top WSOP finish of his career when he took second in the $1,500 NL Shootout, earning $202,035. To date, he has two other WSOP final table appearances in addition to that one. Shannon Shorr CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 79 9 2 $2,217,846 When is Shannon Shorr going to finally win a WSOP gold bracelet? Shorr first cashed in a WSOP event back in 2006, which seems like ages ago when you consider he’s still very much on the younger side of poker players. Ever since that first WSOP cash, not a year has gone by that Shorr hasn’t racked up multiple WSOP cashes. Plus, he’s been very close on several occasions with nine final table appearances and two runner-up finishes. He also has a pair of third-place finishes. Shorr can play all of the games very well. Before Chidwick winning his bracelet, Shorr was right there at the top of this list with Chidwick. Dan Smith CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 36 10 1 $9,884,615 Another high roller with a knack for all the games, Dan Smith has been close to winning WSOP gold before but it just hasn’t happened for him yet. His first WSOP cash came in 2010. Since then, he’s earned 36 total WSOP cashes and won more than $9.8 million at the WSOP. He has 10 final table appearances, six third-place finishes, and one second-place finish in WSOP events. Like some of the other high rollers on this list, with Smith it feels like more of a volume game than anything. Christoph Vogelsang CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 13 6 0 $8,668,735 Christoph Vogelsang has come close at the WSOP on a handful of occasions, including two third-place finishes in a pair of the biggest events the WSOP has ever offered. In 2014, Vogelsang placed third in the $1 million buy-in Big One for One Drop for $4.48 million. In 2019, he took third in the WSOP Europe €250,000 Super High Roller for more than $1.3 million. If there's a big buy-in event at the WSOP, Vogelsang is considered a threat to win it. Mike Watson CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 63 11 4 $2,917,143 Mike Watson has been knocking at the WSOP gold bracelet door for several years now. His first WSOP cash came in 2007 and he’s put up more than 60 cashes to date since. Of the 11 WSOP final table appearances Watson has on record, four of the times he’s finished runner-up. Interestingly, Watson did win the €50,000 Majestic High Roller at the 2012 WSOP Europe, but it was an added non-bracelet event for the high rollers. Had that event been in a later year, it very likely would have been for a gold bracelet. Watson usually plays a high volume of events and can play all the games, much like Shorr, and it’s only a matter of time before he finally scores a WSOP gold bracelet. Jerry Wong CASHES FINAL TABLES RUNNER-UPS WINNINGS 38 7 0 $1,899,225 Jerry Wong may be most well known for reaching the now-defunct WSOP November Nine in 2016, when he finished eighth for more than $1.1 million, but he has plenty of other success at the WSOP. With 38 total WSOP cashes and seven final table appearances, the only thing left for Wong to do is win a gold bracelet. One would think that has to be on the horizon soon for Wong, who has the ability to compete highly in all of the games. His WSOP final table appearances have come in No Limit Deuce to Seven, Pot Limit Omaha, Big Bet Mix, Razz, Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo, H.O.R.S.E., and No Limit Hold'em.
  4. Any conversation about who the best high roller poker player in the world that doesn't include Stephen Chidwick is wasted energy. Chidwick proved it again this week by winning the inaugural Australian Poker Open Championship against some of the toughest fields in recent memory. On his way to the title, Chidwick cashed in three of the seven APO events, including a win, a runner-up finish and very important Main Event min-cash. All told, Chidwick earned won $949,000 (AUD). Mike Watson Opens Things With a Win The opening event of the APO, a $10,000 No Limit Hold'em event, drew 59 entries with Canadian pro Mike Watson beating all of them to win $177,000 and take the early lead in the Australian Poker Open Championship. "I'm thrilled to have won it," Watson said. "Especially in these series, it's great to get off to a good start and set the tone, get your confidence high, and try to make a run for that player of the series title. It's also the first live event I've won a little while, so that monkey's off my back." A pair of Australian's filled the other two spots on the podium. Michael O'Grady finished second for $118,000 and Benjamin Shannon came in third for $82,600. Other players who picked up a cash were Orpen Kisacikoglu, Ben Lamb, Luc Greenwood, Andras Nemeth, and Elio Fox. Event #1 Payouts Mike Watson - $177,000 Michael O'Grady - $118,000 Benjamin Shannon - $82,600 Orpen Kisacikoglu - $59,000 Jamie Lee - $47,200 Andras Nemeth - $35,400 Elio Fox - $29,500 Ben Lamb - $23,600 Luc Greenwood - $17,700 Former #1 PocketFiver Andras Nemeth Wins Event #2 After finishing sixth in the opening event, former #1-ranked PocketFiver Andras Nemeth beat out the 42 other entries in Event $2, $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha, but still couldn't ascend to the very top of the Australian Poker Open Championship standings. "It's nice to not only play one thing, so that keeps me motivated, but I also love to play poker and that keeps me motivated and my fiancée is my biggest motivation," Nemeth said. "She, and our families, are very supportive and she travels with me to big events and that makes a big difference for me." Nemeth beat Najeem Ajez heads-up to claim the $146,200 first place prize and 300 APO points while Ajez took home $93,600 and 210 points. Nemeth had 340 points. Unfortunately for Nemeth, Watson actually extended his Championship lead, finishing third for $64,500 and 150 points to bump his two-event total to 450. Others who managed to pick up a cash in this event were Sean Winter, Chino Rheem, and Poker Hall of Famer Erik Seidel. Event #2 Payouts Andras Nemeth - $146,200 Najeem Ajez - $93,600 Mike Watson - $64,500 Joni Jouhkimainen - $43,000 Sean Winter - $34,400 Erik Seidel - $25,800 Chino Rheem - $21,500 Timothy Adams Beats Stephen Chidwick for Event #3 Title Chidwick's march towards the APO Championship began in earnest in Event #3, a $25,000 No Limit Hold'em event with 49 entries. Chidwick managed to outlast all of them except one. Canadian Timothy Adams beat Chidwick heads-up to earn $416,500 and 300 points. "This final table was really tough with all guys I'm used to playing against," Adams said." At the high stakes you play mainly against all the same players and those guys are all really great and I'm very happy that I won. To win a tournament a lot of things have to go your way and today that happened to me." Chidwick picked up a $269,500 score and his first 210 APO Championship points. Australian Andy Lee ended up with a $183,850 payday. Also cashing in this event was Steve O'Dwyer, Orpen Kisacikoglu, and for the second time in two events, Chino Rheem posted a seventh place finish. Event #3 Payouts Timothy Adams - $416,500 Stephen Chidwick - $269,500 Andy Lee - $183,750 Steve O'Dwyer - $122,500 Orpen Kisacikoglu - $98,000 Aaron Van Blarcum - $73,500 Chino Rheem - $61,250 Farid Jattin Stays Hot with $25K PLO Victory Farid Jattin has had himself an amazing start to 2020. Just one week after winning the Aussie Millions $25K Challenge and finishing runner-up in the Aussie Millions $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha event, Jattin topped the 29-player field in Event #4, a #25,000 PLO event. "I came from Melbourne with a nice win and today I came in with a big chip lead and I'm lucky that things worked out again," Jattin said. "Today was a special situation because all their stacks were very even, and I could apply a lot of pressure on them. This favored me a lot, but there's a lot of luck in PLO, but it felt like I played flawlessly and I'm happy with my performance." Runner-up Jouhkimainen ended up pocketing $188,500 while third place finisher George Wolff earned $116,000. The APO Championship lead changed hands after this event. Nemeth ended up in fourth place and added 120 points to his total to move past Watson by 30 points. Event #4 Payouts Farid Jattin - $290,000 Joni Jouhkimainen - $188,500 George Wolff - $116,000 Andras Nemeth - $72,500 Alex Foxen - $58,000 Stephen Chidwick Beats Erik Seidel for $25K NLHE Win Chidwick took the APO Championship lead in dramatic fashion after beating Seidel heads-up in Event #5, $25,000 NLHE. The $399,500 winner's share also added 300 APO Championship points to his total to move him past Nemeth. Following the win, Chidwick talked about the Open Championship format and how he always seems to do well in them. "I really like this format of playing a week of tournaments, one every day, and battling against some of the best players to see who can run the best," Chidwick said. "It also feels nice to be in contention for the Australian Poker Open title, it seems like I'm in contention in most of these series that I play." Seidel earned $258,500 while Seth Davies banked $176,250 for his bronze medal performance. Also cashing in this event were Michael Addamo, Jorryt van Hoof, Matthias Eibinger, and Jattin. Event #5 Payouts Stephen Chidwick - $399,500 Erik Seidel - $258,500 Seth Davies - $176,250 Michael Addamo - $117,500 Jorryt van Hoof - $94,000 Farid Jattin - $70,500 Matthias Eibinger - $58,750 Canadian Luc Greenwood Ships Event #6 It wouldn't be a high roller series if at least one of the Greenwood brothers didn't ship something. Luc Greenwood did the family proud by besting the 35-player field in Event #6, a $50,000 NLHE event. Greenwood earned $700,000 for the win. "I was having a really rough trip to Australia so far with only one min-cash so far," Green admitted after his win. "This was a tough field and a big battle, and even though it looked like I was gonna run away with it three-handed, I really had to fight for it and I'm glad that I won. I think I played quite well overall." Mikita Badziakouski finished in second for $455,000 while Nemeth added $280,000 in earnings and another 150 Championship points to his total to move past Chidwick for the lead. Nemeth had 630 points while Chidwick had 510. Rheem picked up a third APO cash by coming in fourth place while Addamo earned a min-cash of $140,00 for coming in fifth. Event #6 Payouts Luc Greenwood - $700,000 Mikita Badziakouski - $455,000 Andras Nemeth - $280,000 Chino Rheem - $175,000 Michael Addamo - $140,000 Michael Addamo Wins Main Event, Stephen Chidwick Earns Championship Michael Addamo did his native Australia proud in the $100,000 Main Event, topping the 28-player field to win $1,288,000. That win was overshadowed however by Chidwick's fourth place finish which propelled him to the Championship victory. Aaron Van Blarcum finished in second for $784,000 while two-time reigning GPI Player of the Year Alex Foxen finished in third for $448,000. Chidwick rounded out the in-the-money finishers, coming in fourth place for $280,000 and 140 Championship points - enough to push him past Nemeth at the last possible moment. “Hopefully these style of events continue because I think it’s a bit more of an achievable accolade to win a multiple of or, over time, determine who the best player is rather than looking at a single tournament," Chidwick said. "Obviously there’s a lot of luck involved in this too, but over the course of seven, eight, or ten events you’re going to see the better players win more often and it would be fun to see who can collect the most titles like this.” Chidwick adds the Australian Poker Open title to the US Poker Open Championships that he earned in 2018. “I would love to complete the collection, get the whole set,” Chidwick said. In 2019, Chidwick finished second to Sam Soverel in the British Poker Open. Australian Poker Open Main Event Payouts Michael Addamo - $1,288,000 Aaron Van Blarcum - $784,000 Alex Foxen - $448,000 Stephen Chidwick - $280,000 Australian Poker Open Championship Standings Stephen Chidwick - 650 Andras Nemeth - 630 Michael Addamo- 560 Mike Watson - 450 Luc Greenwood - 360 Farid Jattin - 360 Joni Jouhkimainen - 330 Aaron Van Blarcum - 305 Timothy Adams - 300 Erik Seidel - 270
  5. Nominations for the second annual Global Poker Awards were announced on Friday with popular poker personality Joey Ingram leading the way with four nominations. The Global Poker Awards, slated to take place at the PokerGO Studio in Las Vegas on March 6, celebrates the poker industry by recognizing the game of poker's top talent both on the felt and behind the scenes. This year, awards will be handed out in 19 different categories including two that are voted on by the fans. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="GG Poker"][ptable zone="BetMGM NJ"] Multiple Nods Sixteen former award winners are back in contention this year with a number of them recognized in multiple categories. Poker personality and podcast/video producer Joey Ingram picked up nominations in the People’s Choice for Poker Personality of the Year, Podcast of the Year (Poker Life Podcast), Journalist of the Year and Media Content of the Year for his extensive work investigating the Mike Postle cheating allegation story. PocketFives’ own three-time GPI award winner Lance Bradley earned another three nominations for Journalist of the Year, Media Content of the Year, and Podcast of the Year for The FIVES Poker Podcast, alongside PocketFives own Managing Editor Donnie Peters. Daniel Negreanu, Jamie Kerstetter, Lex Veldhuis, Hayley Hochstätter and tournament director Matt Savage each earned two nominations. Alex Foxen, Andrew Neeme, Barny Boatman, Brad Owen, Bryn Kenney, Cary Katz, Joe Giron, Joe Stapleton, Kevin Mathers, Nick Schulman, and Paul Campbell join Bradley, Ingram, Negreanu, Savage, and Veldhuis as previous award winners who find themselves back in the running for even more hardware at the upcoming ceremonies. In addition to the 18 awards that will be voted on and the Global Poker Index Player of the Year awards, the PocketFives Legacy Award will once again be handed out to a PocketFives player who has shown success in both the online and live poker arenas. Previous award winners include Ari Engel, Cliff Josephy and Chris Moorman. 2019 Global Poker Award Nominees GPI BREAKOUT PLAYER OF THE YEAR Robert Campbell (AUS) Ramon Colillas (ESP) Ben Farrell (UK) George Wolff (USA) FINAL TABLE PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR Hossein Ensan (GER), WSOP Main Event William Alex Foxen (USA), WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Phillip Hui (USA), WSOP Poker Players Championship Bryn Kenney (USA), Triton Poker Super High Roller Series Montenegro TWITTER PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR Barny Boatman (UK) Jamie Kerstetter (USA) Kitty Kuo (TAI) Kevin Mathers (USA) PLAYERS CHOICE FOR TOUGHEST OPPONENT Michael Addamo (AUS) Kahle Burns (AUS) Stephen Chidwick (UK) Ali Imsirovic (BIH) STREAMER OF THE YEAR Hristivoje Pavlovic (AUS) Benjamin Spragg (UK) Matthew Staples (CAN) Lex Veldhuis (NED) VLOGGER OF THE YEAR Jaman Burton (USA) Andrew Neeme (USA) Daniel Negreanu (CAN) Brad Owen (USA) PODCAST OF THE YEAR DAT Poker Podcast: Terrence Chan, Ross Henry, Adam Schwartz, Daniel Negreanu (CAN) Poker Life Podcast: Joey Ingram (USA) The Fives, a PocketFives Podcast: Lance Bradley (CAN), Donnie Peters (USA) The Grid: Jennifer Shahade (USA) INDUSTRY PERSON OF THE YEAR Phil Galfond (USA), Run it Once Poker Cary Katz (USA), Poker Central/PokerGO Paul Phua (MAS), Triton Poker Matt Savage (USA), WPT/TDA TOURNAMENT DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR Tony Burns (USA), Seminole Hard Rock Paul Campbell (USA), Aria Jack Effel (USA), World Series of Poker Matt Savage (USA), WPT/TDA EVENT OF THE YEAR PokerStars Players Championship Bahamas Triton London Million for Charity World Series of Poker Main Event World Series of Poker BIG 50 MID-MAJOR TOUR/CIRCUIT OF THE YEAR Road to PSPC RUNGOOD Poker Series WPTDeepStacks WSOP Circuit JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR Lance Bradley (CAN) Haley Hintze (USA) Joey Ingram (USA) Nick Jones (UK) BROADCASTER OF THE YEAR Jamie Kerstetter (USA) Jeff Platt (USA) Nick Schulman (USA) Joseph Stapleton (USA) MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: WRITTEN A Fight for Fatherhood: The Biggest Win of Jason Young’s Life, Lance Bradley (CAN) for PoketFives Kevin Roster Spread Sarcoma Awareness at WSOP, Wants to End Life on His Terms, Aleeyah Jadavji (CAN), Hayley Hochstetler (USA) for PokerNews Poker and Pop Culture, Martin Harris (USA) for D+B Publishing The Unabridged Story of The Hendon Mob, Paul Seaton (UK) for PokerNews MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: PHOTO Antonio Abrego (USA): Ryan Laplante in deep thought at the WSOP (PokerNews) Drew Amato (USA): Dario Sammartino folds at the WSOP (Poker Central) Joe Giron (USA): WPT Champion Frank Stepuchin is lifted in victory (WPT) Hayley Hochstetler (USA): Doyle Brunson and Jack Binion at WSOP celebration (WSOP) MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: VIDEO Investigating Mike Postle Hand Histories from Stones Live, Joey Ingram (USA) Legends of the Game – Stu Ungar (PokerGO) The Big Blind w/Jeff Platt featuring Mike Matusow, Normand Chad, Sarah Herring (PokerGO) Who Makes Money from Professional Poker, Sam Rega (USA) for CNBC PEOPLE’S CHOICE FOR POKER PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR Joey Ingram (USA) Jonathan Little (USA) Ryan DePaulo (USA) Lex Veldhuis (NED) PEOPLE’S CHOICE FOR HAND OF THE YEAR Bryce Yockey takes a historic hit against Josh Arieh in the WSOP Poker Players Championship Ryan Riess makes 10-high all-in call at EPT Monte Carlo final table Sam Trickett makes Stephen Chidwick fold best hand at Triton London 1M event Thi Xoa Nguyen folds full house to Athanasios Polychronopoulos at PSPC
  6. As 2019 draws to a close, PocketFives takes a look back at the year that was in poker news, going month-by-month through the biggest and most important stories of the year. In June, all eyes were on the 2019 WSOP, which kicked off with a bang that included the largest live poker tournament ever and Phil Ivey's return. WSOP Big 50’s Gigantic Turnout The first installment of the World Series of Poker $500 buy-in 'Big 50' tournament was one for the record books, literally. The tournament that was marketed to give comers from all levels a shot at WSOP glory did that and more, becoming the largest live poker tournament in history. The event attracted a field size of 28,474 entries, crushing the previous record of 22,374 entries set by the 2015 WSOP Colossus. Lance Bradley took a look at the record-breaking event to see how it stacks up against another monstrous tournaments, the number of unique entries versus reentries, and more. Nigerian-born Femi Fashakin turned a $500 entry into $1.147 million in the Big 50 and will forever be remembered for such an achievement. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Controversy at the WSOP The $50,000 High Roller tournament at the 2019 WSOP drew a lot of attention. Understandably so, given it’s huge buy-in and star-studded field. The resulting headlines were less than what was desired, though, as a bit of controversy came about. With four players left in the tournament, Sam Soverel opened with a raise, Dmitry Yurasov moved all in, Andrew Lichtenberger folded, and then Ben Heath asked for a count. While thinking, Heath tossed in a time bank card and Soverel, who might’ve thought the time bank card was Heath’s actual playing cards, quickly folded his hand. This allowed Heath to think through his decision without having to worry about what Soverel was going to do as the original raiser. Yurasov was not happy with Soverel’s play, as were many people on Twitter, including Isaac Haxton. Phil Ivey Returns Guess who’s back? Phil Ivey’s back! It seems that every summer the poker world is waiting to see if Phil Ivey will return to the WSOP tournament tables or not. In 2019, he returned a week into June, kicking things off with the $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo Championship. The poker world was buzzing with his return to the series, but it’d have to until about a week later for him to get back on the WSOP scoreboard by cashing in the $800 NL Deep Stack. Ivey went on to cash five times at the WSOP in the summer and twice more at the 2019 WSOP Europe festival in Rozvadov. His best finish in Las Vegas was an eighth-place result in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship for $124,410. Biggest Win of Jason Young’s Life Jason Young has had his fair share of success on the poker felt, with more than $1.2 million in live tournament earnings and a World Series of Poker gold bracelet to his credit. Despite all of that, it was a victory off the felt that proved to be the biggest win of his life. After Young and his girlfriend welcomed their daughter, Kaeley, into the world, things took a turn for the worse. His girlfriend abruptly moved to Florida, away from their home in New York, and she took the daughter with her. Young’s restaurant was lost and he fell into big debt. Through it all, Young kept fighting. He was fighting for his daughter and fighting to get his life back in order. Along the way, poker helped Young get things back together, and the story on Young by Lance Bradley is an absolute must-read. Chidwick, Engel, Schwartz All Wins Bracelets The conversation of who is the best player without a WSOP gold bracelet lost three key figures in the summer of 2019. That’s when Stephen Chidwick, Ari Engel, and Luke Schwartz all claimed their first pieces of WSOP hardware and can no longer be referred to as the "Best Player Without a Bracelet." To make things even more exciting, all three won their first gold bracelet on the same day.
  7. The Imperial Ballroom at the Atlantis Resort & Casino in the Bahamas is full of some of the best poker players on the planet for the start of Day 2 of the PCA $100,000 Super High Roller. Of the original 56 entries, 33 players survived Day 1. With registration open through the beginning of Day 2, a number of pros who went broke in the first eight levels decided to fire another $100K bullet including Daniel Negreanu and Super High Roller defending champion Cary Katz. We decided to take a quick look around the room at some of the players who are taking part in the nosebleed tournament action. [caption id="attachment_622243" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Jason Koon (left) and Daniel Negreanu have combined lifetime earnings of over $63 million.[/caption] Jason Koon and PokerStars pro Daniel Negreanu are settled in and keeping the conversation casual. [caption id="attachment_622244" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Hungary's #1-ranked online pro Andras 'probirs' Nemeth has been seen playing the highest stakes live as of late.[/caption] PocketFives #4-ranked Andras ‘probirs’ Nemeth has over $2.7 million in live earnings along with his $9.6 million in online cashes. Nemeth had a breakout year in 2018 playing high rollers, winning the EPT Barcelona €25,000 Event for a career-high cash of $692,882. [caption id="attachment_622245" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Nick Petrangelo (left) took down the $100K Super High Roller at the WSOP in 2018 for $2.9 million.[/caption] Nick Petrangelo and U.S. Poker Open Champion Stephen ‘stevie444’ Chidwick survey their tough table. [caption id="attachment_622246" align="alignnone" width="1024"] GPI #1-ranked player Alex Foxen is off to a fast start in 2019.[/caption] Stare master Alex Foxen is looking to build on his impressive 2019 PCA campaign. So far he's cashed in the $25K Single Day event and finished as the runner-up in the $50K for $651,980. Foxen is now less than a half million away from $10 million in career scores. [caption id="attachment_622247" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Patrik Antonius (left), Talal Shakerchi (center) & Sam Greenwood.[/caption] Murderers row: Rail Heaven’s Patrik Antonius, PSPC eighth place finisher and regular high roller Talal Shakerchi and PocketFives #46-ranked Sam Greenwood battle it out on one side of a tough table. [caption id="attachment_622248" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Justin Bonomo (left) is looking to continue the massive success he found in 2018.[/caption] Chris Hunichen tries to get a read on the GTO sitting style of Justin Bonomo. Hunichen is coming off a third place finish in the WPT Five Diamond $100,000 Super High Roller for a live career-high $592,000 score. [caption id="attachment_622249" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Canadian Christopher Kruk finds the fun in high rollers.[/caption] Despite the massive stakes, Chris Kruk is still able to have a little fun. The prize pool for the $100,000 Super High Roller is over $5.9 million. For updates on the $100K as well as everything from the 2019 PCA, subscribe to The FIVES Poker Podcast.
  8. [caption width="640"] Maria Lampropulos won the partypokerLIVE MILLIONS on Sunday at Dusk Till Dawn (partypoker photo)[/caption] The European Poker Tour waited until Season 3 to crown their first female champion. The World Poker Tour didn’t have a woman win an open event until Season XV. PartypokerLIVE, the new live tournament series backed by partypoker, only had to wait until their second event. Maria Lampropulos beat Jacob Mulhern heads up to win the partypokerLIVE MILLIONS Dusk Till Dawn event and earn a cool £1,000,000 ($1,284,000 US). The £5,000 buy-in event attracted a field 1,240 players for a total prize pool of £6,017,395 - just a little over three buy-ins greater than the £6 million guarantee. The final table of eight actually included two female players. Lampropulos began the day third in chips, while Katie Swift was right behind her in fourth. It took just under an hour for the first elimination and it marked the start of Lampropulos’ incredible run to the title. With blinds of 2.5M/5M (500K), Lampropulos raised to 11,000,000 from the cutoff before Neel Murthy raised to 31,000,000 from the big blind. Lampropulos called to see a flop of [poker card="th"][poker card="9h"][poker card="2h"]. Murthy lead out for 22,000,000 and Lampropulos called. The turn was the [poker card="4c"] and Murthy moved all in for 83,500,000. Lampropulos called and tabled [poker card="kd"][poker card="kh"] while Murthy showed [poker card="7h"][poker card="5d"]. The river was the meaningless [poker card="ac"], giving Lampropulos the pot and sending Murthy home in eighth place. Just 30 minutes later Swift moved all in for 37,900,000 from UTG+1. Action folded to Jeremy Pantin in the small blind and he moved all in over the top for just over 128,000,000. Swift table [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"] but was behind the [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"] of Pantin. The [poker card="as"][poker card="6c"][poker card="4c"][poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"] runout was no help for Swift and she was eliminated in seventh. After the very next hand, Stephen Chidwick found himself on the outside looking in. Pantin raised to 11,000,000 and Chidwick raised to 146,500,000 from the small blind before Mateusz Rypulak came over the top of 192,300,000. Pantin folded, Chidwick showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="qh"] before Rypulak turned over [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"]. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5d"] flop was no help for Chidwick and the [poker card="6c"] turn and [poker card="6h"] river only served to give Rypulak a full house and eliminate Chidwick in sixth. The first three eliminations came rather quickly, but five-handed play lasted a little over 90 minutes. With blinds now at 3M/6M (600K) Lampropulos raised to 14,000,000 from the button, Pantin called from the small blind and Jon Spinks moved all in for just over 53,000,000. Lampropulos folded,m but Pantin called and turned over [poker card="ah"][poker card="7s"] while Spinks showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="kd"]. The [poker card="as"][poker card="jd"][poker card="8h"] flop put Pantin ahead with a pair of aces and the [poker card="2s"] turn and [poker card="5h"] river failed to change anything, sending Spinks to the rail in fifth. Lampropulos picked up another elimination just over an hour later. Blinds were now 4M/8M (800K) and Mulhern opened to 16,000,000 from early position, Lampropulos called from the button and Rypulak also called from the big blind. The flop was [poker card="td"][poker card="7c"][poker card="5h"], Rypulak and Mulhern both checked, allowing Lampropulos to bet 26,000,000. Rypulak moved all in for 124,000,000, Mulhern folded and Lampropulos called. Rypulak had [poker card="8s"][poker card="7s"] for middle pair but got bad news when Lampropulos showed [poker card="qh"][poker card="th"] for top pair. The [poker card="ts"] turn sealed the deal for Lampropulos, sending Rypulak out in fourth place while the dealer dealt the meaningless [poker card="5d"] river. She wasn’t done there. Lampropulos limped and Pantin raised to 28,000,000, Lampropulos called and then checked after the [poker card="qd"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3h"] flop. Pantin bet 22,000,000 and Lampropulos called. The turn was the [poker card="ac"] and both players checked. The river was the [poker card="2s"] and Lampropulos fired out 35,000,000 before Pantin moved all in for 117,300,000. Lampropulos called and turned over [poker card="ah"][poker card="3s"] for two pair while Pantin showed [poker card="ks"][poker card="jh"] for a missed straight draw and a third place finish. When heads-up play began, Mulhern had 630M to the 617M of Lampropulos. The two players played for two hours, with Mulhern turning down talk of a deal because he wanted the £1 million score. The final hand basically played itself. Lampropulos raised to 20,000,000, Mulhern raised to 50,000,000 before Lampropulos moved all in for just over 840,000,000. Mulhern called and showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="qc"] while Lampropulos showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"]. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3h"] flop kept Lampropulos ahead and after the [poker card="5s"] turn and [poker card="4s"] river, Mulhern was out and Lampropulos was showered in confetti as the winner. Final Table Payouts Maria Lampropulos -1,000,000 Jacob Mulhern - 650,000 Jeremy Pantin - 450,000 Mateusz Rypulak - 320,000 Jon Spinks - 220,000 Stephen Chidwick - 150,000 Katie Swift - 100,000 Neel Murthy - 72,395
  9. The Triton Super High Roller Series returned with a seven-event series this past week, offering some of the best players in the world the ability to compete at the highest stakes offered on the tournament circuit. Live from Jeju, South Korea the live-streamed action did not disappoint as every event featured some of the biggest names in poker battling for career-defining scores. Justin Bonomo Takes Down Event #1 Justin Bonomo continued to do what he does - take down big- buy-in tournaments for massive amounts of money. This time, Bonomo survived the 65-entry field of Event #1: HK$250,000 Short-Deck Ante-Only to claim his first ever recorded short deck cash of $586,000 USD. By besting the star-studded final table that included Ben Lamb, John Juanda, and David Benefield, Bonomo adds the over half-million score to his All-Time Money List leading sum of over $44 million and takes home his first Triton trophy. Event #1 Final Table Payouts: 1. Justin Bonomo - HK$4,600,000 ($586,114) 2. Yeu Wei Hsuang - HK#3,300,000 ($420,473) 3. Sergey Levedev - HK$2,140,000 ($272,671) 4. David Benefield - HK$1,620,000 ($206,414) 5. Tong Siox Choon - HK$1,250,000 ($159,270) 6. Ying Lin Chua - HK$975,000 ($124,231) 7. Ben Lamb - HK$780,000 ($99,385) 8. John Juanda - HK$610,000 ($77,724) Devan Tang Runs Hot In Event #2 Hong Kong high-roller Devan Tang turned a one-outer into over one million dollars by taking down Event #2: HK$500K Short-Deck Ante-Only for over $1.2 million. Earlier in the tournament Tang was in a tough spot on the turn, when his pocket sixes turned a set and he was facing a bet for his tournament life against Mikita Badziakouski’s flopped set of queens. Tang made the call and had one foot on the rail when his 4% came through and the case six hit the river. The one-outer gave Tang new life in the tournament and he rode a wave of run good to help him defeat Peter Jetten heads-up and take home the Triton title. The victory marks the second-highest score in Tang’s career, pushing him to over $6.2 million in career recorded live earnings. Event #2 Final Table Payouts: 1. Devan Tang - HK$9,730,000 ($1,239,758) 2. Peter Jetten - HK$7,040,000 ($897,009) 3. Romain Arnaud - HK$4,540,000 ($578,469) 4. Jason Koon - HK$3,435,000 ($437,674) 5. Isaac Haxton - HK$2,660,000 ($338,926) 6. Leong Chan Wai - HK$2,075,000 ($264,388) 7. Mikita Badziakouski - HK$1,650,000 ($210,236) 8. Paul Phua - HK$1,300,000 ($165,640) Michael Soyza Hits Career-High Cash In Event #3 Malaysia’s Michael Soyza picked up the first seven-figure score of his career by winning Event #3: HK$500,000 No Limit Hold’em Six Handed for $1,420,581 USD. Souya has a pair of obstacles to overcome in order to hit his new career high. The first was a broken left hand he suffered from a recent snowboarding accident two weeks prior to the tournament. The second was a final table full of some of the world’s best players including Jason Koon, Byrn Kenney, Ivan Leow, and eventual runner-up, high stakes crusher, Sam Greenwood. “Feels pretty good, it’s nice to win something,” Soyza said after his victory. “You just play your hands and hopefully it works out well. Win flips, you know? That’s how you do it.” With the new million-dollar score, Soyza soars over $5 million in lifetime recorded cashes. Event #3 Final Table Payouts 1. Michael Soyza - HK$11,150,000 ($1,420,581) 2. Sam Greenwood - HK$8,000,000 ($1,019,251) 3. Ivan Leow - HK$5,200,000 ($662,513) 4. Bryn Kenney - HK$3,921,000 ($499,560) 5. Beh Kok Weng - HK$3,040,000 ($387,315) 6. Jason Koon - HK$2,360,000 ($300,679) Jason Koon Wins His Second Triton Title In Event #5 Superstar high roller Jason Koon is quickly becoming known as the king of Short Deck after taking down his second seven-figure Triton Poker payday in the variant. Koon bested the field of 81 entries, including eventual runner-up and Triton founder Paul Phua, in Event #4: HK$1,000,000 Short Deck Ante Only for a $2,840,945 first place prize. The multi-million dollar score marks the seventh seven-figure cash in Koon’s remarkable career and his second largest haul of all time. With the victory, Koon rises to just under $27M in lifetime earnings ($26.938M). In May 2018, Koon took home the title in the same event during the Triton Super High Roller Series in Montenegro where he won a career-high cash of $3,579,836. To date, over $7.5 million of Koon’s career recorded cashes comes from Short Deck events, making him the unofficial leader of the short deck all-time money leader. Event #5 Final Table Payouts 1. Jason Koon - HK$22,300,000 ($2,840,945) 2. Paul Phua - HK$15,900,000 ($2,025,607) 3. Furkat Rakhimov - HK$10,440,000 ($1,330,021) 4. Jun Wang - HK$7,900,000 ($1,006,434) 5. Gabe Patgorski - HK$6,100,000 ($777,120) 6. Richard Yong - HK$4.700.000 ($598,764) 7. John Juanda - HK$3,700,000 ($471,368) 8. Wai Kin Yong - HK$2,900.000 ($369,450) Timothy Adams Takes Down Main Event Timothy Adams and Byrn Kenney navigated their way through an 'insanely tough' final table of the HK$2Million Triton Jeju Main Event to face off in heads-up play at which time the duo negotiated a deal that locked up career-high cashes for both high rollers. Adams would take home the title of 2019 Triton Jeju Main Event champion and a $3.54 million haul. Kenney also secured just over $3 million for second place. Adams entered the day with the largest stack with Kenney not too terribly far behind him. The rest of the final table, however, needed to find a way to spin up their short stacks. On the first hand of play, Isaac Haxton fell in a clash with Kenney. On the second hand of play, David Peters busted to Peter Jetten. Eventually, Kenney sent both Jetten and Dan Smith, who made a last-minute decision to fly to Asia to play in the Main Event, to the rail. Adams and Kenney secured their multi-million dollar chop and left $500,000 on the table to battle over. Adams ended up on the right side of a cooler for all the chips. Adams, holding [poker card="8d"][poker card="5s"] and Kenney holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="4s"] saw a board run out [poker card="4d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"] and in the end, the pair put all the chips in the middle and Adams ended up with the trophy and the half-million on top. While Adams has earned plenty of six-figure paydays, nothing in his career compared to this accomplishment. It’s his first million dollar score and sends his career earnings to over $14 million. Kenney’s lifetime total now surpasses $30 million as he jumped to sixth place on the All-Time Money List. Triton Jeju Main Event Final Table Payouts 1. Timothy Adams - HK$27,760,500* ($3,540,000) 2. Bryn Kenney - HK$24,039,500* ($3,060,000) 3. Dan Smith - HK$10,390,000 ($1,700,000) 4. Peter Jetten - HK$10,390,000 ($1,300,000) 5. David Peters - HK$8,150,000 ($1,040,000) 6. Isaac Haxton - HK$6,300,000 ($803,000) Koon Outduels Chidwick In Event #7 For Second Jeju Victory Red-hot Jason Koon won Event #7: NLHE Triton Refresh for his second victory of the week. The event was supposed to be a two-day affair however organizers and the 25-entry field agreed that the tournament could be completed in one day. The final four players made the money. After Michael Addamo’s departure in fourth place, Paul Phua was looking to get some revenge for Event #5 where he lost heads-up to Koon. It wasn’t meant to be as Chidwick eliminated Phua in third and then the regular high-rollers struck a money deal, leaving only the trophy to play for. Although Koon eventually won the trophy, Chidwick takes home the largest payday of Event #7, locking up $1.13 million in the deal. Koon officially took first place and walked with $973,000. Event #7 Final Table Payouts 1. Jason Koon - HK$7,640,160* ($973,306) 2. Stephen Chidwick - HK$8,858,840 ($1,128,685) 3. Paul Phua - HK$4,200,000 ($535,052) 4. Michael Addamo - HK$2,800,000 ($356,702)
  10. Triton Poker set out to make poker history this week and they most certainly will and in more ways than one. Not only does the Triton Million’s £1,050,000 buy-in ($1,273215) make it the largest buy-in tournament in history, but with 54 players helping generate a prize pool of £54,000,000 ($65,611,361) the first place prize of £19,000,000 ($23,085,479) makes it the largest single tournament payout of all time. Million Dollar Payouts It’s not just first place that is going to find themselves flush after the Triton Million comes to an end. With an astronomical buy-in, Triton officials decided to flatten out the payouts opting to award 11 of the 54 registered players (20%) some piece of the prize pool. Granted, the players that just squeak into the money will be earning little more than their money back ($1,335,923) but a final table finish, resulting in a payday of $1,457,371 would make for a career-high cash for 20 of the participants including pros Andrew Robl, Vivek Rajkumar, Michael Soyza, and Matthias Eibinger. Triton Million Official Payouts Place Approx USD 1 $23,074,354 2 $14,176,836 3 $8,743,966 4 $5,355,679 5 $3,643,319 6 $2,671,767 7 $2,088,898 8 $1,700,266 9 $1,457,371 10 $1,335,923 11 $1,335,923 Eight-Figure Paydays The massive payouts of the Triton Million will add two more players into the extremely elite club of poker players who have earned themselves an eight-figure payday at the poker table. The addition of the first and second place scores makes for a total of ten $10M+ paydays in history and offers the current All Time Money List leader Justin Bonomo and the UK’s Sam Trickett the honor of being the first player to accomplish that remarkable score twice in their career. Until the Triton Million only the World Series of Poker’s $1 Million buy-in Big One For One Drop and the WSOP Main Event offered players the opportunity to hit such heights. The only exception was the 2016 Big One For One Drop Monte-Carlo Extravaganze one-off where Elton Tsang took home over $12.2 million in the invite-only tournament that excluded all of the world’s top players. History of Eight-Figure Paydays Year Event Place Player Payout 2019 Triton Million 1st TBD $23,085,479 2012 WSOP Big One For One Drop 1st Antonio Esfandiari $18,346,673 2014 WSOP Big One For One Drop 1st Daniel Colman $15,306,668 2019 Triton Million 2nd TDB $14,176,836 2016 Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza 1st Elton Tsang $12,248,912 2006 WSOP Main Event 1st Jaime Gold $12,000,000 2012 WSOP Big One For One Drop 2nd Sam Trickett $10,112,001 2014 WSOP Main Event 1st Martin Jacobson $10,000,000 2018 WSOP Big One For One Drop 1st Justin Bonomo $10,000,000 2019 WSOP Main Event 1st Hossein Ensan $10,000,000 All Time Money List Possibilities With so much money in the prize pool, there are bound to be some major ramifications to the ever-shifting All Time Money List. At the start of the Triton Million, there were seven players that could possibly surge to the top of the list and overtake current list leader Justin Bonomo. Bonomo himself could put an amazing amount of distance between himself and the rest of the field as he currently holds a roughly $3.1 million lead over the #2-ranked Daniel Negreanu and over $9 million from the #3-ranked Erik Seidel, neither of which are in the Triton Million field. Here’s a look at the players that could make major moves on the ATML should Bonomo not be able to hold them off. Bryn Kenney - With over $34.9 million in total earnings, Kenney could become the new king of the ATML with a win or even a second-place finish. A third-place finish and he will leapfrog Negreanu for second place on the list and any cash will vault him over Seidel in third place, where he only sits $716,117 behind the legend. Jason Koon - The Triton ambassador has been steadily climbing the ATML, currently sitting in 8th place with $28,925,059 in earnings. A victory would send him north of $51 million and into first. A second-place finish in the event is not good enough to take over the top spot but it would put him in second place and within striking distance of #1 at $43 million. Dan Smith - A last-second invite from Bill Perkins puts Smith into the ATML leader mix, where he currently sits at #9 with $27,921,940. His situation is identical to Koon's - a win and he soars to over $50 million. Mikita Badziakouski - The nosebleed crusher from Belarus recently climbed into the #15 spot on the ATML and a win could put him in the top spot with over $48 million. A second-place finish would put him at just over $39 million, currently good for third place. Stephen Chidwick - Generally considered one of the very best tournament players on the planet, the UK savant has the exact same situation as Badziakouski as he only sits less than $3,000 behind him on the ATML. David Peters and Fedor Holz - Peters currently sits at #5 on the ATML and the German phenom, Holz sits right behind him at #6. Both players were among the first five players eliminated from the tournament ending their bid to climb the ATML ladder. Becoming An Instant Legend To say that first place in the Triton Million is massive is an understatement. But just how big is it? To put this first-place prize in perspective, had a player never cashed before, the first place prize alone would put you ranked at #19 on the All-Time Money List. That’s ahead of one of the most famous poker players on the planet, Phil Hellmuth, who has spent over 30 years accumulating his career total of $22,999,083. Second place also puts you in the midst of legends. The over $14 million payday would slot you in at #41 all-time, just ahead of recent bracelet winner Joseph Cheong and right behind 2009 WSOP World Champ Joe Cada. Finally, if the Triton Million third-place prize of over $8.7 million was your first Hendon Mob entry, you would just make it inside the top 100. You start your career at #100 all-time and you’d be the player to knock poker legend Johnny Chan out of the top 100.
  11. Aaron Zang has done it! On Saturday, he captured the title in poker's richest-ever tournament, winning the £1,050,000 buy-in Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity for £13,779,791 in prize money. Zang topped a mixed field of 54 businessmen, recreational players, and the game’s top professionals to capture the title. Entering the Triton Million, Zang, who is known as a high-stakes cash game player, had less than $900,000 in live tournament earnings. Originally set to pay the winner £19,000,000, a heads-up deal was struck between Zang and his final opponent, Bryn Kenney, that saw Zang take £13,779,791 and Kenney take £16,890,509. With a conversion rate that puts Kenney's prize north of $20,400,000, Kenney is now the holder of poker's largest single score from a live tournament. That is rather fitting as Kenney now sits atop poker's all-time money list, as recorded by Hendon Mob, as a result of the finish. Triton Million Results 1st: Aaron Zang - £13,779,791* 2nd: Bryn Kenney - £16,890,509* 3rd: Dan Smith - £7,200,000 4th: Stephen Chidwick - £4,410,000 5th: Vivek Rajkumar - £3,000,000 6th: Bill Perkins - £2,200,000 7th: Alfred DeCarolis - £1,720,000 8th: Timothy Adams - £1,400,000 9th: Wai Leong Chan - £1,200,000 10th: Chin Wei Lim - £1,100,000 11th: Winfred Yu - £1,100,000 *First and second prizes as a result of a heads-up deal. Zang began the third and final day of the tournament in sixth place on the leaderboard with eight players remaining, but the early story of the final table was the demise of Vivek Rajkumar, who entered with a big chip lead over the rest of the field. First, Bill Perkins scored a double through Rajkumar when his pocket nines held up against Rajkumar’s pocket fours on Hand #9. Perkins then doubled again through Rajkumar on Hand #30 when his pocket sevens held up against Rajkumar’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kh"]. Despite the two hits to his stack, Rajkumar maintained his lead. Not too long after Perkins scored his second double up of the day, Zang took his turn doubling through Rajkumar. Both players had the same hand, ace-jack, but it was Zang’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Jh"] that made a flush against Rajkumar’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jd"] after the board ran out [poker card="Ts"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3h"][poker card="Th"]. That brought Rajkumar back to the pack and his closest competitor was Kenney, who had rather quietly worked his way up to an eight-figure chip stack. Rajkumar was able to get things moving in the right direction when, on Hand #49, he knocked out Timothy Adams in eighth place. Right after that, on Hand #50, Stephen Chidwick scored a double up through Rajkumar, forcing Rajkumar to give a good chunk of the chips he had just won to someone else. Chidwick used those newly acquired chips to then knock out Alfred DeCarolis on Hand #51, closing out quite the exciting three-hand run of action. Things only got worse for Rajkumar on Hand #56. On the [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9s"][poker card="4h"] flop, Dan Smith held the [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jc"] to Rajkumar’s [poker card="Th"][poker card="9h"]. All the money went in and it was Smith’s overpair up against Rajkumar’s top two pair. It was a good spot for Rajkumar, but the turn was the [poker card="3d"] and the river the [poker card="Js"] to give Smith the huge double into the chip lead. Rajkumar was knocked down to the second shortest stack with six players remaining. Perkins grabbed another double up through Rajkumar on Hand #66, which knocked Rajkumar down to the bottom of the pack. Rajkumar fought on, though, and it was eventually Perkins who busted in sixth place. Kenney was the one to bust Perkins, holding the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ad"] to Perkins’ [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Td"]. With six players left and the blinds at 150,000-300,000 with a 300,000 big blind ante on Hand #88, Zang shoved all in for 11,375,000 from the small blind with the [poker card="8d"][poker card="7d"]. Kenney was in the big blind with a stack of 7,775,000 and called holding the [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"]. The flop, turn, and river ran out [poker card="Jh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="6d"][poker card="Qs"] and Kenney survived a big sweat to score the double. Rajkumar was next out, busting in fifth place on Hand #91. Like Perkins, Rajkumar also ran into the aces of Kenney. That allowed Kenney to take the chip lead, but it didn’t last long because Zang flopped top two pair versus Kenney’s top pair on Hand #100 and doubled through Kenney. Despite Zang doubling through him, Kenney powered on and began to run away with the lead for some time. It looked like it really was going to be Kenney’s tournament, and even more so after he busted Chidwick in fourth place. Kenney didn’t stop there, busting Smith in third and taking quite a large chip lead into heads-up play. Heads-up play didn’t last too long, but it was the underdog Zang who stormed back in the match. First, Zang found a double up with pocket sixes against Kenney’s [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qd"] to close the gap. Then, Zang moved into the chip lead after he made a full house and allowed Kenney to bluff off some chips to him. Shortly after that, it was all over. On the final hand, the two found the money in the middle on the [poker card="8s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3c"] flop. Kenney had the [poker card="As"][poker card="6s"] for a flush draw, and Zang had the [poker card="8d"][poker card="5d"] for top pair. The turn was the [poker card="9c"] and the river was the [poker card="Kd"] to secure Zang the win.
  12. Each of the last five years, Dan Smith has organized a charity drive that pledges to match a portion of what is donated. This year, Smith, along with a group of poker and daily fantasy sports (DFS) pros, pledged to match up to $1.29 million. The drive is officially called the Double Up Drive and benefits 10 different charities, with eight focused on near-term causes and two focused on the long-term. "Poker is an inherently selfish game," Smith said about using his platform in poker to raise awareness and give back. "For me to win, that means somebody else directly has to lose. After a lot of years of it, I thought there was more to life than just playing cards, and I think it's cool that I was able to use my favorite thing to make a difference in the world." Every year, the drive receives a large amount of support from the gambling world, with both the poker and DFS communities heavily participating. Smith works with Tom and Martin Crowley on the drive, and this year Tom pledged half of his winnings from the DraftKings World Championship Final to the Double Up Drive. Known as 'ChipotleAddict' in the DFS world, Tom incredibly went on to win the event for a haul of $2 million and between that event and the FanDuel $2M WFFC Finals, Tom pulled in $2.254 million. That means $1.127 million is being donated to the Double Up Fund. "It's pretty surreal," Smith said of Crowley winning after pledging 50 percent. "When you're playing super high roller (poker tournaments), sometimes you just go completely numb to the value of a dollar. Like, we're playing a $300K tournament, that’s thousands of lives that are going to be literally saved. It's really hard to comprehend. It's a very cool thing, and I couldn’t be happier that it’s been so successful." One of the biggest elements leading to the success of Smith's drive has been the involvement of the poker and DFS communities, and Smith spoke to how much that’s meant to the drive. "Motivating people to do good I think is an unbelievable achievement," Smith said. "Fedor (Holz) last year, Stephen Chidwick this year made very large donations to the drive. It’s just really wonderful to get support. The charity drive is one of the big parts of my life now, and having people whom I respect - I'm great friends with Stevie - getting supported like that means a lot." The seven-figure charity drive is, as he admits, a big part of Smith's life, and with lots of moving parts, people involved, and tons of donations to be handled, both big and small, Smith said he and the group started putting everything together in October, but overall it might not take as much time as one might believe. "It takes a lot less time than you might think," Smith said. "We started brainstorming some charities in October, discussing numbers. We did a handful of one-hour calls. The most challenging thing, I suppose, was getting people to agree on which charities to include, but it makes sense if you’re divvying up what started as $1.3 million. It should take some time. There were a fair bit of logistics, but fortunately, the people at REG Charity were very helpful. They created the website, they’re entering the emails this year. As far as a multi-million dollar fundraiser would go, it takes a lot less time than you might think." Whereas Tom Crowley won more than $2 million from DFS and will be donating more than $1 million of it to the Double Up Drive, Smith hopes he can also make a large contribution from winning an event. Smith is currently in Las Vegas competing in the $300,000 buy-in Super High Roller Bowl. With nearly 40 entries in the field, the prize pool is well north of $10 million. First place is more than $3.6 million. Smith is playing in the event with five percent of his winnings pledged, and he’s not the only one. "Myself and Nick Petrangelo are playing five percent for charity," Smith said. "So that's $15,000, plus hopefully some skill edge, and I am hopeful that it spreads awareness and if people see it on the stream or television then they are encouraged to do good. Even though we talk a lot about the big numbers, I want to clarify that any amount makes a difference. People in Uganda are living off 65 cents a day, an amount we don’t even consider at all." If you're interested in donating to the Double Up Drive, or simply would like to learn more, you can do so at DoubleUpDrive.com. The Super High Roller Bowl Smith is competing in is being aired on PokerGO, and you can get $10 off an annual subscription through using the code "Pocket5s" when signing up.
  13. One might think that with the holidays on the horizon December would be a quiet month of people spending time with their family. Not for the world of poker. December 2018 was full of record-breaking tournaments and huge headlines. Here are some of the names that made the news in December. Dan Smith Makes A Difference For the past five years, regular high-roller Dan Smith has been collecting donations for various charities at Christmas time. This year, Smith and his collaborators amassed $1.29M for the Double Up Drive and that they would use to match donations to spread to 10 carefully cultivated charities. They nearly got that amount in a single day when DFS champion Tom Crowley promised to give 50% of any winnings he might make from the DraftKings World Championship Final. Crowley, known as ‘ChipotleAddict’, went on to win the event for $2 million and over the weekend hauled in a total of $2.254 - half of which was donated to the Double Up Drive. The donation was ‘surreal’ but Smith wants to make sure people knew that donations of any size are welcome. “I want to clarify that any amount makes a difference,” Smith told PocketFives. “People in Uganda are living off 65 cents a day, an amount we don’t even consider at all.” READ: Dan Smith Charity Drive Gets “Surreal” $1.1M Donation via DFS Champ Isaac Haxton Wins Super High Roller Bowl V The fifth edition of the $300,000 buy-in Super High Roller Bowl saw Isaac Haxton best the field of 36 elite players to earn a career-high cash of $3.672 million dollars. “This is easily the best tournament result I’ve ever had and it’s an event I love. It feels great to win here at ARIA. This is the highlight of my tournament career, no doubt,” said Haxton after the win. The final table was replete with talent including Poker Masters champion Ali Imsirovic, Igor Kurganov, Adrian Mateos, Talal Shakerchi, Stephen Chidwick, and eventual runner-up Alex Foxen. Foxen took home a career-best $2.1 million for his second-place finish. This capped off an amazing year that saw him earn 12 cashes of six-figures or better as well as rise to become the #1-ranked player on the GPI. READ: Isaac Haxton Wins Super High Roller Bowl for $3.672 Million READ: Alex Foxen’s Drive Takes Him to the Super High Roller Bowl The World Series of Poker Releases 2019 Dates Just before Christmas the World Series of Poker delivered players an early present by announcing a partial schedule of the 2019 WSOP. This summer will be the 50th anniversary for the longest-running tournament series and to help commemorate the occasion the WSOP is planning a number of special events for the players. The schedule included the announcement of the ‘Big 50’, a $500 buy-in tournament with a $5 million guaranteed prize pool and a $1 million guarantee for first place. Additionally, in an extra effort to “make the 2019 WSOP a better value all-around” many of the marquee events of the summer have an increased starting stack. This includes the WSOP Main Event which is increasing their starting stack to 60,000. READ: WSOP Releases 2019 Dates, New ‘Big 50’ Event - $500 Buy-in, $5M GTD Dylan Linde Wins WPT Five Diamond for $1.6 Million The crypto crash of 2018 has some in the industry fearing that the numbers for the World Poker Tour’s highlight event, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic, might see a dip in registration. However, just the opposite happened as players flocked to the Bellagio in record-setting numbers. The event attracted 1001 runners and generated a prize pool of $9.7 million. In the end, longtime poker pro Dylan ‘ImaLucSac’ Linde (who re-entered five times in the event) dominated a stacked final table that included Andrew Lichtenberger, Ping Liu, Lisa Hamilton, Barry Hutter and runner-up Milos Skrbic. Linde won a career-high $1.6 million and earned the title of WPT Champion. READ: Dylan Line Wins Record-Shattering WPT Five Diamond Title for $1.6 Million Manuel ‘Sheparentao’ Ruvio, Pim ‘ForMatherRussia’ De Goede Chop 2018 partypoker MILLIONS Online. partypoker’s 2018 $20M GTD MILLIONS Online did not disappoint. The incredible online tournament surpassed its posted guarantee and set the record for the largest single online tournament in history with players vying for a first place prize of over $2.6M. In the end, after one hand of heads-up play, Manuel ‘Sheparentao’ Ruvio and PocketFiver Pim ‘ForMatherRussia’ De Goede settled on a lightning-fast chop that awarded both players over $2.3M. Rubio, technically, earned the victory, taking home $20K more than De Goede and now owns the record for the single largest online payday in history. READ: Manuel ‘Sheparentao’ Ruvio and Pim ‘ForMatherRussia’ De Goede Chop partypoker MILLIONS Online A December To Remember December was just one of those month’s where huge news seemed to break every day. Here are some of the other must-read major headlines in December. Michigan opens its doors to online poker. READ: Michigan Becomes Fifth State to Regulate Online Poker The poker world loses a legend in the passing of Thor Hansen. READ: Thor Hansen Passes Away at 71 The pitch black bathroom bet comes to an abrupt end. READ: The $100K Bathroom Prop Ends Early; Alati, Young Agree on $62K Buyout Bay 101’s Shooting Star returns without the WPT behind it. READ: After a Year Away, Bay 101 Shooting Star Returns With New Look
  14. The fifth edition of the $300,000 buy-in Super High Roller Bowl crowned its champion on Wednesday night, with Isaac Haxton topping the exclusive field of 36 entries to earn the $3.672 million prize. "I just feel f***ing great," Haxton said in the moments following the big win. "I'm just super happy, even a little relieved it's over. Obviously, a day like today is pretty stressful, in the best way." With the victory, Haxton moved to more than $23.65 million in live tournament earnings, which bumps him up ahead of Jake Schindler and into 13th place on poker's all-time money list. "I'm gonna have more than a couple drinks and probably eat at least 1,500 calories of something disgusting," Haxton said about his plans to celebrate, with a smile of course. "That should do it, and then hopefully sleep for about 12 hours. That would be a perfect victory party for me." Super High Roller Bowl V Results 1st: Isaac Haxton - $3,672,000 2nd: Alex Foxen - $2,160,000 3rd: Stephen Chidwick - $1,512,000 4th: Talal Shakerchi - $1,188,000 5th: Adrian Mateos - $972,000 6th: Igor Kurganov - $756,000 7th: Ali Imsirovic - $540,000 For the past three days, the PokerGO Studio at ARIA Resort & Casino in Las Vegas played host to the high-stakes affair that attracted the likes of Daniel Negreanu, Phil Hellmuth, Fedor Holz, and Justin Bonomo, just to name a few. After Monday’s Day 1, 27 players remained. After Day 2, just seven were left, all in the money and guaranteed a $540,000 payday. Bubbling the money in eighth place was Mikita Badziakouski. Haxton started the final table as the chip leader and Ali Imsirovic was bringing up the rear with the shortest stack left. After starting the final table with 875,000 and blinds of 10,000/15,000 with a 15,000 big blind ante, Imsirovic worked his way to nearly 1.9 million before taking a dive in the other direction that ultimately resulted with his seventh-place elimination. Imsirovic lost a pot to Stephen Chidwick that knocked him all the way back down to 520,000 and then got the last of his stack in with pocket jacks against the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"] of Haxton. Haxton flopped a flush draw and hit it on the turn to knock out the 23-year-old in seventh. Next to go was Igor Kurganov, who was never able to get any real momentum going on the final day. On his final hand, Kurganov, on the button, moved all in for 350,000 over the top of a raise to 65,000 from Chidwick with the blinds at 15,000/30,000 with a 30,000 big blind ante. Talal Shakerchi reraised all in from the small blind and Chidwick folded. Shakerchi had pocket tens to Kurganov’s pocket sevens, and the board ran out [poker card="9d"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="Ac"] to send Kurganov home in sixth place. Shakerchi continued to climb after he busted Kurganov and even worked his way into the chip lead, but then he started to slide the other way as Alex Foxen increased. Adrian Mateos was next out the door when he was eliminated in fifth place by Foxen, falling in the 25,000/50,000 level with a big blind ante of 50,000. Mateos raised and then four-bet all in with pocket nines against Foxen, who made the call with the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ks"]. Foxen flopped a king and held from there to send the young Spaniard to collect his $972,000 payout. With Foxen out in front by a large margin and Haxton in second place, the final four players moved into Level 21 with the blinds at 30,000/60,000 with a 60,000 big blind ante. Shortly after the level went up, Shakerchi went out, and he was busted by Haxton. Haxton opened to 140,000 and Shakerchi reraised all in for 1.285 million. Haxton called with two nines and won the flip against Shakerchi's [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Td"]. Shakerchi collected $1.118 million for his finish. Not too long after, Haxton added another chunk of chips when he busted Chidwick in third place. The two got the money in a blind-versus-blind situation, with Chidwick on the ropes holding the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qh"] to Haxton’s pocket jacks. To make matters worse for Chidwick, Haxton flopped top set to leave him needing runner-runner. It didn't come and Chidwick was out in third for $1.512 million. Although Foxen held the lead going into heads-up play - his 5.84 million to Haxton's 4.965 million - Haxton made short work of the match. Haxton won the first heads-up pot to take a 2-1 chip lead and Foxen could never recover from there. On the final hand, Haxton limped the button holding the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jh"]. Foxen raised to 225,000 out of the big blind with the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8d"] and Haxton jammed. Foxen called to put himself at risk for 1.33 million, but he wouldn’t be doubling up. The final board ran [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="6c"][poker card="Kh"][poker card="Js"] to give Haxton two pair and the victory. For Foxen, his second-place finish was worth a whopping $2.16 million and put quite the cap on an incredible year that saw him win more than $6.6 million on the live felt. "For tournament results, there's no competition," Haxton said of where he ranked this Super High Roller Bowl triumph. "This is my biggest score ever and the other ones that come somewhat close are second- and third-place finishes. This is easily the best tournament result I've ever had and it's an event I love. It feels great to win here at ARIA. This is the highlight of my tournament career, no doubt." Widely known as a high-stakes cash game player, Haxton certainly does his fair share of competing in the largest tournaments in the world. As for how he wins this much money, Haxton will take it any way he can get it. "If I can win $3.6 million, I'm not going to be picky about how I win it," Haxton said. "It can be in the lottery, on Wheel of Fortune, I don’t care. Give me the $3.6 million. I’m not going to complain about how I won it."
  15. Somewhere tonight in Berlin, Greek restaurateur Makarios Avramidis (pictured) is likely celebrating the accomplishment of a lifelong goal. Don't be surprised however if there aren't too many locals celebrating with him. Avramidis beat a final table that included three Germans to win the €2,200 Six Max No Limit Hold'em event at WSOP Europe and with it the first ever World Series of Poker bracelet awarded in Germany. Avramidis beat German Frederic Schwarzer heads-up to claim the €105,000 ($119,266 US) first place prize money and that coveted bracelet. His previous best score was for just over $60,000 for an eighth place finish at the Master Classics of Poker in 2011. Schwarzer earned €64,930 for finishing second. The other German players who fell just short of becoming the envy of their countrymen were Paul Michaelis and Marvin Rettenmaier. Michaelis actually sent two players to the rail on his way to being the overwhelming chip leader at one point. First, he busted Rettenmaier in sixth and then PocketFiver Stephen stevie444 Chidwick in fourth place. Sandwiched between those two bustouts was the only American player at the final table. Californian Rick Alvarado, who started the day second in chips, was eliminated by Chidwick in fifth place. Alvarado now has seven WSOP cashes this year, including three final tables. Chidwick, who started the final table with the chip lead, was unable to maintain the momentum he had at the end of Day 2 and scored his eighth 2015 WSOP cash, earning €32,600 in the process. Following Chidwick's bustout, Michaelis found himself with 58% of the chips three-handed. It went downhill from there. The key hand came just a few minutes into Level 24 (10,000/20,000 - 3,000 ante). From the button, Avramidis raised to 50,000, Schwarzer folded the small blind before Michaelis moved all-in from the big blind. Avramidis called with his tournament life on the line and tabled Jh-Js before Michaelis showed Tc-Td. The board ran out Qs-Jd-9d-Ah-4d to double up into the chip lead. Michaelis was eliminated just five minutes later when he again found himself all-in pre-flop with a smaller pocket pair than his opponent. Schwarzer held pocket jacks to Michaelis' pocket tens. Michaelis got no help from the dealer and was out in third place. Heads-up play lasted a little over an hour with the two players swapping the chip lead back and forth a few times before Avramidis finished off Schwarzer to win his first career bracelet. There is one event underway at Spielbank Casino in Berlin, the €550 Oktoberfest No Limit Hold'em, with another eight on the schedule. A new event starts each day this week until the €10,450 Main Event next Sunday. Final Table Payouts Makarios Avramidis - €105,000 Frederic Schwarzer - €64,930 Paul Michaelis - €45,860 Stephen Chidwick - €32,600 Rick Alvarado - €23,310 Marvin Rettenmaier - €16,740
  16. The opening day butterflies are officially behind us as the 2018 World Series of Poker picks up steam headed into week #2. There is plenty to look forward to, including a long list of upcoming bracelet events as well as plenty of opportunities for fans to tune in to Twitch or PokerGo to rail the action. Welcome Weekend Warriors, Value Hunters This week is rife with tournaments for those looking to play some of the lower buy-in events with hopes to bink a bracelet. The week starts off with the final two flights of the mammoth Colossus event. Monday is the final day for players to find a bag and win a spot in the Day 2 field. The end of the week is just as plentiful for those looking to spend under $1K. Friday brings both flights of the $565 Pot Limit Omaha Event. The $565 PLO Giant will field its second flight on Sunday. Add to those, another flight of the $365 NL Giant and there will be no shortage of players spinning up the prize pools all weekend long. For the recreational player, perhaps one of the most anticipated events on the calendar is Event #21 - The $1,500 Millionaire Maker. The cornerstone event gets underway on Saturday, June 9 and offers two flights, with a single re-entry per flight. The winner is guaranteed a minimum payday of $1,000,000. Last year, Canada’s Pable Mariz, outlasted the 7,761 entries for a $1,221,407 payday. 2018 WSOP Week 2 Schedule Day Event # Event Defending Champion Monday 7E $565 Colossus Thomas Pomponio Monday 12 $1,500 Dealers Choice 6-Handed David Bach Monday 7F $565 Colossus - Tuesday 13 $1,500 NL Big Blind Ante NONE Tuesday 14 $1,500 NL 2-7 Lowball Draw Frank Kassela Wednesday 15 $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. David Singer Wednesday 16 $10,000 Heads Up NL Championship Adrian Mateos Thursday 17 $1,500 No Limit Hold'em 6-Handed Anthony Marquez Thursday 18 $10,000 Dealers Choice 6-Handed John Racener Friday 19 $565 PLO Tyler Smith Friday 20 $5,000 NL Big Blind Ante NONE Friday 19B $565 PLO -- Friday 6B $365 NL Giant Dieter Dechant Saturday 21 $1,500 NL Millionaire Maker Pablo Mariz Saturday 22 $1,500 8-Game Mix Ronald Ware Sunday 21B $1,500 NL Millionaire Maker -- Sunday 23 $10,000 NL 2-7 Lowball Draw Championship John Monnette Sunday 11B $565 PLO Giant --   Big Money Broadcasts There are no days off this week when it comes to the streaming schedule. Big money is on the line right off the bat as PokerGo streams the final table of the $100,000 NL High Roller on June 4. Some of the game’s biggest names, including Bryn Kenney, Stephen Chidwick, and final table chip leader Nick Petrangelo will be vying for the first million-dollar payouts of the summer. There’s so much streaming action this week that on June 4, 7, and 8 there are multiple streams, giving players the non-stop action they crave. Date Time Event Outlet June 4 6:00 PM $100,000 High Roller FT PokerGO June 4 6:00 PM $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo Day 2 Twitch June 5 6:00 PM $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo FT PokerGO June 6 3:00 PM $1,500 NL Day 2 Twitch June 7 4:00 PM $1,500 NL Final Table PokerGO June 7 6:00 PM $10,000 NL Heads-Up Day 2 Twitch June 8 4:00 PM $10,000 NL Heads-Up FT PokerGO June 8 6:00 PM $565 Colossus FT Twitch June 9 4:00 PM $1,500 NL 6-Max FT PokerGO June 10 6:00 PM $565 PLO FT Twitch News & Notes Elio Fox, another one of the big names sitting at the final table of the $100,000 NL High Roller, will have the opportunity to become the first double bracelet winner of the young summer. Headed into the final table, he's currently third in chips. The first of the four online bracelet events to be held on WSOP.com, which includes players from New Jersey for the first time, closed registration with 2,972 runners. The $365 tournament saw a 16% increase in players from the $333 online bracelet event held in 2017 which attracted 2,509 players. Will the Colossus live up to its name in 2018? Keep an eye on Monday's numbers for players registering for the final two flights of the $565 Colossus. In 2017, the field exceeded 18,000, generating a prize pool of over $9 million. Through four flights, the total number of runners ended up right around 7K, leaving only two flights (on a Monday) to make up a massive difference to even get close to those 2017 numbers.
  17. Over the last 12 months, Jake Schindler has proven to be a legitimate threat in high roller tournaments around the world. He finished runner-up in the 2017 Super High Roller Bowl, runner-up in the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open High Roller, third in a Poker Masters $50,000 event, runner-up in the US Poker Open Main Event. In March, he picked up two wins in Aria High Rollers, but on Wednesday in Barcelona he posted what could be considered a breakthrough win. Schindler beat Stephen Chidwick heads-up and overcame a final table that included Erik Seidel, Jason Koon and Bryn Kenney to win the partypoker MILLIONS Grand Final €100,000 Super High Roller for €1,750,000 ($2,163,174 US), the second biggest score of his career. The day began with 11 players still in contention for the €1.75 million first place prize but Koray Aldemir, Dominik Nitsche, Mikita Badziakouski, Steffen Sontheimer all failed to make the money, and once Keith Tilston went out in seventh, the remaining six players were all in the money. The first player to bust was Seidel. Down to less than five big blinds, Seidel three-bet all in over Kenney's UTG raise. Kenney called and showed [poker card="as"][poker card="tc"] which put him ahead of Seidel's tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"]. The [poker card="7c"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2h"] gave Seidel more outs but the [poker card="td"] turn and [poker card="ah"] river were no help and he was left with a sixth place finish. Despite picking up the first in-the-money elimination, things went south from that point on for Kenney. Kenney was on the button and raised to 350,000 and Schindler called from the big blind and then checked after the [poker card="th"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"] flop. Kenney bet 305,000 and Schindler raised to 1,200,000. Kenney moved all in for 4,410,000 total and Schindler called. Kenney showed [poker card="8c"][poker card="7s"] for an open-ended straight draw while Schindler showed [poker card="6d"][poker card="6h"] for middle set. The [poker card="ac"] turn was a blank and Schindler improved to quads with the [poker card="6s"] river to bust Kenney in fifth. A little over an hour later two more players were sent packing in quick succession by Chidwick. From the button, Chidwick raised to 400,000 and Koon moved all in from the small blind for 5,975,000. Chidwick called and turned up [poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"] while Koon showed [poker card="3d"][poker card="3h"]. The board ran out [poker card="kd"][poker card="jd"][poker card="th"][poker card="js"][poker card="7c"] to eliminate Koon. Left with just three big blinds, Jean-Noel Thorel moved all in for 600,000 from the button and Chidwick and Schindler called from the small and big blind respectively. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2h"] flop saw both remaining players check. The [poker card="5h"] turn got Chidwick to be enough for Schindler to fold. Chidwick showed [poker card="kh"][poker card="th"] for top pair with the second nut flush draw. Thorel needed help with the [poker card="qd"][poker card="8c"] but got none after the [poker card="9h"] river to go home in third. Heads up play began with Schindler holding just 54% of the chips in play. The two players traded the led back and forth for almost three hours before Schindler was able to finish Chidwick off. On the final hand, Schindler raised to 875,000 and Chidwick called. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2s"], Chidwick checked, Schindler bet 500,000 and Chidwick called. The turn was the [poker card="5c"] and Chidwick checked again, Schindler bet 1,800,000 but Chidwick raised to 5,100,000. Schindler called and both players saw the [poker card="7s"] river. Chidwick moved all in and Schindler called. Schindler showed [poker card="qs"][poker card="6h"] for a bluff while Schindler showed [poker card="as"][poker card="3h"] for a wheel and the final pot of the night. Final Table Payouts Jake Schindler - €1,750,000 Stephen Chidwick - €1,100,000 Jean-Noel Thorel - €726,000 Jason Koon - €500,000 Bryn Kenney - €340,000 Erik Seidel - €240,000
  18. Well before the completion of the Main Event of the inaugural U.S. Poker Open, the trophy and title of U.S. Poker Open Champion were already claimed due to a dominating overall performance from the UK’s Stephen ‘stevie444’ Chidwick. The U.S. Poker Open, Presented by Poker Central and streamed on the PokerGO platform, featured eight high-rolling events that invited some of the best players in the world to compete for both massive amounts of money and the bragging rights of hoisting the title trophy for the very first time. In a twist to the usual high roller series that take place from time to time at the Aria Hotel & Casino, the schedule included a Pot Limit Omaha event as well as a Mixed Game Championship. Event #1 - $10,000 No Limit Hold’em The first event of the series was well attended with 68 players hoping to make an early score and take an early lead in the USPO standings. Ten players made their way into the money including World Poker Tour Season XIII Player of the Year Anthony Zinno ($20,400), high stakes crusher Jake Schindler ($20,400) and final table bubble boy, PokerCentral’s founder, Cary Katz ($34,000). Chidwick would fall in fifth place, a result that would be just beginning a week long stretch of amazing results. Eventual winner Justin Bonomo would out duel Lebanon’s Boutros Naim in a head-up battle to take down Event #1. For Naim, the $136,000 score is currently a recorded career high. For Bonomo, who is a regular at the highest stakes, his $190,400 haul is his fifth best out six recorded cashes in 2018. Final Table Results Justin Bonomo - $190,400 Boutros Naim - $136,000 David Peters - $88,400 Justin Young - $68,000 Stephen Chidwick - $54,400 Sam Soverel - $40,800 Event #2 - $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha The first of the non-NLHE events belonged to mixed-game specialist Mike Gorodinsky after he defeated a field of 64 players to capture the win and over $179,000. Joining the 2015 WSOP Players Championship winner at the final table was Cary Katz, Anthony Zinno and former Super High Roller Bowl Champion Rainer Kempe. Final Table Results Mike Gorodinsky - $179,200 Richard Kirsch - $128,000 Rainer Kempe - $83,200 Anthony Zinno - $64,000 Andjelko Andrejevic - $51,200 Cary Katz - $38,400 Event #3 - $25,000 No Limit Hold’em The first of the $25,000 events saw Stephen Chidwick take the USPO lead by besting the 44 player field for $374,000. Chidwick defeated Keith Tilston heads up for the win, Tilston would take home $242,000 in this event and begin a heater of his own resulting in over $1,000,000 in cashes over the course of the week. Daniel Negreanu also made the final table of Event #3 along with Jake Schindler and PokerCentral podcast personality Brent Hanks. Final Table Results Stephen Chidwick - $374,000 Keith Tilston - $242,000 Daniel Negreanu - $165,000 Jake Schindler - $110,000 Brent Hanks - $88,000 Seth Davies - $66,000 Event #4 - $25,000 Mixed Game Championship It was back-to-back victories for the UK pro as Stephen Chidwick once again posed for the winner’s photo but this time it was for the Mixed Game Championship. The format included Limit Hold’em, 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw, Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better, Seven Card Stud, Seven Card Hi-Lo 8 in addition to the previously played Pot Limit Omaha and No Limit Hold’em. Daniel Negreanu just missed out on being a part of the stacked final table as he busted in seventh place for his second cash of the series. A short-stacked Phil Hellmuth finished in sixth for $67,500, his lone result of the entire series. Following Hellmuth to the rail was part-time high-roller Dan Shak and 2017 World Series of Poker Final Table participant Benjamin Pollak. Despite coming into the final table with the chip lead, new partypoker ambassador Isaac Haxton couldn’t hold on and finished in third. Chidwick ended up closing out Christopher Vitch and putting a large gap between himself and the rest of the field on the USPO leaderboard. Vitch for his runner-up performance took home $247,500, is second largest career score on record. Final Table Results Stephen Chidwick - $382,500 Christopher Vitch - $247,500 Isaac Haxton - $168,750 Benjamin Pollak - $112,500 Dan Shak - $90,000 Phil Hellmuth Jr. - $67,500 Event #5 - $10,000 No Limit Hold’em It was Ben Tollerene’s turn in the winner’s circle in Event #5 as the high stakes online cash game pro defeated Jake Schindler heads up for the $187,000 first place prize. Schindler, Katz, Hanks, Tilston and David Peters all found their way into the cash yet again as did former World Series of Poker Main Event Champion Ryan Riess, who finished in third. Final Table Results Ben Tollerene - $187,600 Jake Schindler - $134,000 Ryan Reiss - $87,100 Cary Katz - $67,000 Kristin Holst - $53,600 Rodger Johnson - $40,200 Event #6 - $25,000 No Limit Hold’em On the heels of his fourth-place finish in the Mixed Game Championship, Benjamin Pollak ended up on top in Event #6. Pollak won the heads-up battle with high roller specialist Jason Koon for $416,500. Chidwick once again found himself at a final table, finishing in third and practically putting the USPO trophy on his mantle in the process. Isaac Haxton found himself at another final table as well and, for the second time in a matter of days, Daniel Negreanu found himself on the outside looking in, finishing as the bubble boy for $61,250. Final Table Results Benjamin Pollak - $416,500 Jason Koon - $269,500 Stephen Chidwick - $183,750 Isaac Haxton - $112,500 Brian Green - $98,000 Elijah Berg - $73,500 Event #7 - $25,000 No Limit Hold’em Even though it was David Peters who took down Event #7, all the talk was about the fact that Stephen Chidwick, once again, made his way to a final table. Peters may have won the event for $400,000, besting the 50 total runners, but Chidwick virtually put the inaugural USPO title out of reach with his runner-up finish for $262,000. Tilston, Tollerene and Negreanu all made the Event #7 final table, and all had incredible results throughout the series, but the run of Chidwick had become the focal point of the series. It was going to take a big win by one of Chidwick’s challengers in the final event to have a shot at catching him for the title. Final Table Results David Peters - $400,000 Stephen Chidwick - $262,000 Sean Winter - $175,000 Keith Tilston - $125,000 Ben Tollerene - $100,000 Daniel Negreanu - $75,000 Event #8 - $50,000 No Limit Hold’em Main Event With only 33 runnings posting the $50,000 buy-in, even though the eventual winner would take home $660,000 - there was no catching Chidwick. So by the end of registration for the event, everyone in the field knew they were playing for second place at best. The winner of the Main Event was Keith Tilston who defeated Jake Schindler as the final two. Daniel Negreanu, Thomas Marchese and “Cowboy” Dan Smith rounded out the final five who made it into the money. Final Table Results Keith Tilston - $660,000 jake Schindler - $429,000 Daniel Negreanu - $264,000 Tomas Marchese - $165,000 Dan Smith - $132,000 In the end, Chidwick found his way into the money in five out of the eight contests. He won two, back to back, and had a runner-up finish. The USPO Champion accumulated over $1.25 million in earnings during the course of the series, pushing him to over $11 million in career live earnings to go along with his over $5 million of career online winnings.
  19. Lauren Roberts overcame a final table full of end bosses to win Event #3 of the 2019 US Poker Open and a career-best tournament score of $218,400. Roberts outlasted the likes of Sean Winter, Brandon Adams, and Stephen Chidwick before overcoming a 3-1 chip deficit to beat Koray Aldemir heads-up for the win. Final Table Payouts Lauren Roberts - $218,400 Koray Aldemir - $159,250 Stephen Chidwick - $113,750 Brandon Adams - $91,000 Sean Winter - $72,800 Ralph Wong - $54,600 Rodger Johnson - $45,500 Within minutes of the official seven-handed final table beginning, Chidwick went to work. Rodger Johnson was down to just over six big blinds and moved all in with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="jh"]. Chidwick called with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="jd"]. The board ran out [poker card="ac"][poker card="qh"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="4d"] to eliminate Johnson in seventh place. It took more than an hour before another player was sent packing. Aldemir raised to 750,000 with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="qh"] before Ralph Wong moved all in with the [poker card="3c"][poker card="3s"]. Aldemir called and the [poker card="kc"][poker card="jh"][poker card="7d"] flop moved Aldemir in front. He stayed there through the [poker card="9h"] turn and [poker card="ah"] river and Wong was out in sixth place. Ten minutes later, Aldemir scored an important double up against Winter, who was chip leader at the time. Aldemir raised to 210,000 with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="ah"] and Winter jammed from the button with the [poker card="as"][poker card="js"]. Aldemir survived the runout to double into the lead. Winter lasted just over an hour on the short stack. Action folded to Aldemir the big blind and he moved all with the [poker card="8s"][poker card="3d"] and Winter called with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="kd"]. The [poker card="8d"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2h"] flop gave Aldemir top pair and Winter could only watch as the [poker card="jd"] turn and [poker card="4h"] river ended his tournament with a fifth-place finish. Adams got down to his last 2.5 big blinds and couldn't find a double up to stay alive. Adams moved all in for 285,000 with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="8d"] from the button before Chidwick called with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="3c"] from the small blind. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2h"] flop left Adams with options but the [poker card="as"] turn took them all away. The meaningless river was the [poker card="jd"] and Adams was out in fourth. Despite picking up that elimination, Chidwick found himself in a spot he couldn't escape from. Roberts folded her button, Aldemir moved all in with the [poker card="4h"][poker card="4h"] and Chidwick called all for 3,010,000 with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="qh"]. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4s"] flop gave Aldemir a set. The [poker card="8h"] turn ended any hope for Chidwick and he was eliminated in third place. This finish was Chidwick's seventh career USPO cash in just 11 events. Aldemir began heads-up play with nearly 75% of the chips in play, but through 45 minutes of play, Roberts flipped the script after scoring a double up with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qc"] against the [poker card="qd"][poker card="jd"]. She then picked off a bluff on a [poker card="tc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="as"][poker card="jh"] board with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="ts"] to double into the lead for the first time. Two minutes later, Roberts finished Aldemir off. Aldemir moved all in for 9.5 big blinds with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="3h"] and Roberts called with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="4d"]. The board ran out [poker card="6c"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="6s"][poker card="8c"] to give Roberts the nut flush and the title. USPO Top 10 After Event #3 PLAYER CASHES PRIZE MONEY POINTS 1. Stephen Chidwick 2 $329,750 300 2. Sean Winter 3 $268,200 240 3. Jordan Cristos 2 $206,200 240 4. Lauren Roberts 1 $218,400 200 5. Manig Loeser 2 $146,200 180 6. Koray Aldemir 1 $159,250 140 7. Joseph Cheong 1 $112,500 100 8. Martin Zamani 1 $83,200 100 9. Brandon Adams 1 $91,000 80 10. Joseph Cappello 1 $90,000 80   The final table for Event #3: $10,000 No-Limit Hold’em will take place on Saturday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/14/19 Event #1: #10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/15/19 Event #2: #10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/16/19 Event #3: $10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/17/19 Event #4: $10,000 Short Deck 5 p.m. 02/18/19 Event #5: $25,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/19/19 Event #6: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/20/19 Event #7: $25,000 No Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #8: $25,000 8-Game 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 8 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  20. It's getting to the point where Stephen Chidwick winning a U.S. Poker Open event isn't news. Tuesday night in Las Vegas the British poker pro picked up his fourth career USPO title, beating Cary Katz heads up to win Event #6, the $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha event. It's his second USPO win in 2019 giving him two wins in each year the tournament series has existed. Chidwick, who won the USPO title last season, now leads the overall standings this year with just four events remaining. Chidwick started Tuesday's final table with the chip lead and, along with Anthony Zinno, was one of just two players with a seven-figure stack. While Chidwick continued to build early, Zinno was less fortunate. After a little more than an hour of play, Zinno was down to just 365,000 and found himself tangling with Katz. Chidwick raised to 90,000 and Katz called before Zinno moved all in from the button. Chidwick folded and Katz called, tabling [poker card="qc"][poker card="jc"][poker card="th"][poker card="5c"]. Zinno was ahead with [poker card="ac"][poker card="as"][poker card="jh"][poker card="6s"]. The [poker card="8s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3c"] flop was a relatively safe one for Zinno. The [poker card="2c"] turn gave Katz a flush draw which came in on the [poker card="7c"] river to eliminate Zinno in sixth place. Chidwick then put his big stack to work 20 minutes to send Sean Rafael to the rail. Chidwick opened to 90,000 before Rafael made it 290,000. Chidwick called and the two players saw a [poker card="9d"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6d"] flop. Rafael bet 155,000 all in and Chidwick called. Rafael tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="jc"][poker card="jd"][poker card="ts"] but Chidwick showed [poker card="tc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3c"] for trips. Neither the [poker card="3h"] turn or [poker card="qh"] river were any help and Rafael was out in fifth. Katz then picked up another elimination just 30 minutes later. Katz limped his button, Ben Lamb completed from the small blind and Tom Marchese checked his option. The [poker card="as"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5c"] flop got Lamb bet pot. Marchese folded but Katz repotted and Lamb called all in. Katz turned over [poker card="ac"][poker card="jh"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8d"] while Lamb was drawing with [poker card="kh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6s"]. The [poker card="5h"] turn was no help for Lamb and after the [poker card="8h"] river failed to complete his draw, Lamb was eliminated in fourth place. Marchese actually started the day as the shortest stack but managed to outlast three other players before meeting his fate. Katz completed from the button and Marchese raised to 240,000 from the small blind. Chidwick folded and Katz called. After the [poker card="jc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="4c"] flop, Marchese bet 600,000 and Katz responded by repotting and Marchese called his last 240,000. Marchese tabled [poker card="qc"][poker card="qh"][poker card="js"][poker card="5s"] while Katz was drawing wiht [poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3c"]. The [sc] ended all the drama, completing Katz's flush draw. The meaningless river was the [poker card="6c"] and Marchese was out in third. Thanks to those last two eliminations, Katz began heads up play with 65% of the chips in play. Chidwick and Katz played heads-up for nearly two hours with the lead being traded back and forth before Chidwick finally put a cap on another USPO win. Down to just 3.5 big blinds, Katz moved all in for 410,000 after Chidwick had opened with a pot-size bet of 360,000. Chidwick called and turned up [poker card="as"][poker card="tc"][poker card="8s"][poker card="4h"] which put him behind Katz' [poker card="ac"][poker card="jd"][poker card="js"][poker card="3d"]. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="6c"] gave Chidwick a wheel and eliminate Katz. Final Table Payouts Stephen Chidwick - $351,000 Cary Katz - $234,000 Tom Marchese - $156,000 Ben Lamb - $97,500 Sean Rafael - $78,000 Anthony Zinno - $58,500 Chidwick now has four USPO wins and nine final tables over 14 events stretching the last two years. He now sits atop the USPO leaderboard and is 100 points clear of his nearest competitor, Sean Winter. USPO Top 10 After Event #6 PLAYER CASHES PRIZE MONEY POINTS 1. Stephen Chidwick 4 $705,950 540 2. Sean Winter 4 $419,400 440 3. Cary Katz 3 $580,200 340 4. Jordan Cristos 2 $206,200 240 5. Ali Imsirovic 1 $442,500 200 6. Lauren Roberts 1 $218,400 200 7. Manig Loeser 2 $146,200 180 8. Ben Lamb 2 $146,200 160 9. Dan Shak 2 $232,100 140 10. Koray Aldemir 1 $159,250 140   The final table for Event #7: $25,000 No-Limit Hold’em takes place on Wednesday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/20/19 Event #7: $25,000 No Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #8: $25,000 8-Game 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 8 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  21. By the time the 2019 World Series of Poker is over, the "Best Player Without a Bracelet" is going to be all new names. Three more players who have seen their names on the list in the past, pulled out a red marker on Saturday and crossed it off permanently. Former #1-ranked PocketFiver Ari Engel, Stephen Chidwick, and Luke Schwartz all won bracelets just a few hours apart on another busy Saturday at the WSOP Stephen Chidwick Ships $25K PLO High Roller for $1.6M Stephen Chidwick, one of the most well-respected players in poker, recently became a father and that life change meant he wouldn't be able to play a full WSOP schedule this summer. He showed up this week and entered his first tournament of the summer and then promptly won it for $1.6 million and the first bracelet of his career. “It’s super ironic. Usually, I play every single tournament. Usually, I play a final table, bust and then register a $1,500 Stud immediately. Just play everything," Chidwick said. "I come in here halfway through, haven’t played any of the others and then just win the first one I play. Pretty funny.” Prior to Saturday's win, Chidwick had 52 career WSOP cashes and just north of $2.2 million in WSOP earnings. He had no bracelet though. That all changed dramatically after Chidwick eliminated James Chen heads-up “It means a lot. It feels great. It’s obviously a good one to win it in," Chidwick said. "I’m in shock a little bit." Chen walked away without the win, but still ended up earning a seven-figure payday. Matthew Gonzales finished third for $699,364 representing a career-best score for each of the top three finishers. Final Table Payouts Stephen Chidwick - $1,618,417 James Chen - $1,000,253 Matthew Gonzales - $699,364 Robert Mizrachi - $497,112 Alex Epstein - $359,320 Erik Seidel - $264,186 Wasim Korkis - $197,637 Ka Kwan Lau - $150,483 Tu Dao Maintains Lead in Ladies Event with Six Left Tu Dao started Day 3 of the $1,000 Ladies Event with the chip lead and 42 players standing in her way. On Saturday, she maintained that chip lead while 36 players were sent to the cashier cage after busting out. Dao now has to outlast just five more players to claim victory. Dao bagged up 5,420,000 which puts here ahead of Jiyoung Kim by just 320,000. Nancy Matson sits third with 4,530,000. The final three players find themselves trailing by quite a bit. Lyly Vo, Lexy Gavin, and Sandrine Phan all have between 1.185 million and 1.7 million. Kathy Liebert, Ana Marquez, Jackie Glazer, Lisa Costello, and Vanessa Kade were among the 36 bustouts on Saturday. The final table begins at Noon PT. Final Table Chip Counts Tu Dao - 5,420,000 Jiyoung Kim - 5,100,000 Nancy Matson - 4,530,000 Lyly Vo - 1,700,000 Lexy Gavin - 1,430,000 Sandrine Phan - 1,185,000 Ari Engel Takes Down $2,500 NLHE for First Bracelet Ari Engel, one of the most revered players in the history of PocketFives, can now call himself a WSOP bracelet winner. Engel topped a 996-player field to win the $2,500 No Limit Hold'em event for $427,399. “It’s more crazy that Stephen Chidwick hadn’t won one before. Us huge field no-limit players, there’s no real "due". You play these, you expect to win one in a lifetime, maybe. I expect to f*** it up somewhere along the line and just blow it up," Engel said after his win. "I did that, I’m sure, a few times and I got lucky instead of losing the tournament. It’s a relief to not mess it up whenever I win a tournament because most of the time I do end up messing it up.” Engel defeated Pablo Melogno heads-up to win the bracelet. The 35-year-old thinks the win might help him in the next event he plays. Maybe. “I’m very competitive and poker’s a game of losing a lot. I lose my confidence very easily so I should be good to go for tomorrow at least,” he said. David 'Bakes' Baker picked up his fifth cash of the summer with a fifth place finish. Final Table Payouts Ari Engel - $427,399 Pablo Melogno - $264,104 Wilbern Hoffman - $186,392 Ben Keeline - $133,306 David 'Bakes' Baker - $96,632 James Hughes - $71,010 Raylene Celaya - $52,909 Stephanie Hubbard - $39,980 Josh Arieh - $30,643 Luke Schwartz Wins $10,000 2-7 Triple Draw Luke Schwartz is one of the best poker players on the planet. Just ask him. On Saturday, Schwartz proved his mettle by taking down the $10,000 Deuce to Seven Triple Draw event for $273,336 and just his fifth WSOP cash. Schwartz was complimentary of the players he bested to win. “Everyone played great. Johannes – he was frustrating me so much, because I would stand pat with decent hands and he kept drawing and making it on the river. That happened so many times," Schwartz said. "Maybe the old me would have just got frustrated and tilted, but I took deep breaths and managed to see it through.” George Wolff, who held the chip lead at the start of the day, finished runner-up for $168,936. Johannes Becker, who Schwartz credited as being one of the best Triple Draw players in the world, ended up third for $116,236. Former #1-ranked PocketFiver Calvin Anderson wound up sixth. Final Table Payouts Luke Schwartz - $273,336 George Wolff - $168,936 Johannes Becker - $116,236 Mark Gregorich - $81,635 Yueqi Zhu - $58,547 Calvin Anderson - $42,898 Monster Stack Sees Lowest Turnout in Six Year History Originally intended to give players perceived value through a larger starting stack, it appears the polish on the $1,500 Monster Stack is officially worn off. For the fifth consecutive year, the Monster Stack saw a year-over-year drop in attendance after 3,607 Day 1B players pushed the total field to just 6,035 players. The original Monster Stack, in 2014, had a 7,862-player field. YEAR ENTRIES Y/Y +/- 2019 6035 -3.59% 2018 6260 -6.79% 2017 6716 -3.05% 2016 6927 -3.68% 2015 7192 -8.52% 2014 7862 -- Pennsylvania poker player James Hundt finished Day 1B with 466,600 and the chip lead. A total of 1,778 survived 1B and will be part of the Day 2 restart beginning at 11 AM PT. Some of the notables moving on to Day 2 from 1B include John Racener, Tristan Wade, Ryan Hughes, Arash Ghaneian, Taylor Paur, and Greg Raymer. Top 10 Chip Counts James Hundt - 466,600 Kapila Garner - 464,100 Rick Alvarado - 443,600 Nishant Sharma - 429,000 John Gravagna - 415,000 Julian Manolio - 405,700 Michael Jagroo - 391,000 Venkata Chinta - 364,300 Terence Clee - 362,000 Matthew Kirby - 359,000 Michael Thompson Leads $2,500 Omaha Hi-Lo/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo Final 12 Michael Thompson sits atop the final 12 players heading into the last day of play in the $2,500 Omaha Hi-Lo/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo but there's a WSOP Player of the Year contender still lurking around. Thompson bagged up 923,000 after Day 2, which puts him ahead of his closest competition, Daniel Ratigan, by just 24,000. Scroll down the second shortest stack and you see Dan Zack still chasing a second bracelet and those all-important WSOP POY points. Zack currently sits 15.82 points behind current leader Upeshka De Silva but will earn no fewer than 197.44 points on Sunday. A win would give him 987.22 points and a massive lead over the rest of the field. Included among the 49 players who busted after the bubble burst on Saturday were Jeffrey Lisandro, Yuval Bronshtein, Brett Richey, Eli Elezra, Simon Mattsson, Dzmitry Urbanovich, and Shaun Deeb. Action resumes Sunday at 2 PM PT. Final 12 Chip Counts Michael Thompson - 923,000 Daniel Ratigan - 899,000 Philip Long - 813,000 Denis Strebkob - 709,000 Yuri Dzivielevski - 594,000 Gerard Rechnitzer - 496,000 Andrey Zaichenko - 424,000 Michael Coombs - 387,000 Alex Livingston - 254,000 Nickolai Orlov - 230,000 Dan Zack - 214,000 Carlos Rodriguez - 103,000 Yi Li On Top of $10K Pot Limit Omaha Championship Day 1 Don't look now, but there's a chance that the $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship could crack 500 entries for the first time in history. Day 1 saw 494 players enter and registration is open until the start of Day 2. Yi Li finished the 10 levels of play Saturday with 572,000 and was the only player to end with more than 500,000. Mohsin Virani ended with the second biggest stack at 401,000. Ben Lamb, who won this event in 2011 by beating 360 players, finished with 343,700. Longtime PocketFiver Laszlo 'omaha4rollz' Bujtas finished with a top 10 stack. Other notables among the 253 players moving on to Day 2 include Kahle Burns, Ryan Laplante, Bryce Yockey, Phil Galfond, Chance Kornuth, Chris Hunichen, Brian Hastings, and Daniel Negreanu. Top 10 Chip Counts Yi Li - 572,000 Mohsin Virani - 401,000 Timothy Batow - 358,700 Ben Lamb - 343,700 Andrew Loomis - 329,300 Antonios Rouggeris - 310,300 Alexey Makarov - 300,300 Laszlo Bujtas - 297,900 Frank Koopmann - 294,900 Grzegorz Derkowski - 288,100
  22. The 2019 Triton Poker Super High Roller Series wrapped up its festival of high-stakes events in London last week. There were seven events, headlined by the £1,050,000 buy-in Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity and several million-dollar scores were had. Chief among them was Bryn Kenney with his £16,890,509 result, that converted to $20,563,324. The monstrous score earned Kenney the largest payday in poker history and put him atop the all-time money list. Kenney wasn’t the only big winner, though. Here’s a look at the biggest winners from the 2019 Triton Poker Super High Roller Series London. Top 20 2019 Triton Poker Series London Money List 1. Bryn Kenney - £16,890,509 ($20,563,324) 2. Aaron Zang - £13,779,491 ($16,775,920) 3. Dan Smith - £7,245,300 ($8,820,778) 4. Stephen Chidwick - £5,383,800 ($6,553,948) 5. Wai Kin Yong - £4,426,695 ($5,386,804) 6. Paul Phua - £3,582,305 (4,359,418) 7. Vivek Rajkumar - £3,000,000 ($3,652,345) 8. Justin Bonomo - £2,871,600 ($3,494,073) 9. Bill Perkins - £2,200,000 ($2,678,386) 10. Timothy Adams - £1,899,000 ($2,311,845) 11. Alfred De Carolis - £1,720,000 ($2,094,011) 12. David Benefield - £1,578,600 ($1,919,582) 13. Chin Lim - £1,561,300 ($1,900,134) 14. Wai Chan- £1,550,300 ($1,887,269) 15. Xu Liang - £1,452,900 ($1,767,878) 16. Ben Heath - £1,393,100 ($1,695,407) 17. Charlie Carrel - £1,321,000 ($1,601,853) 18. Linus Loeliger - £1,284,000 ($1,560,327) 19. Christopher Soyza - £1,242,300 ($1,511,921) 20. Jason Koon - £1,177,500 ($1,428,868) Kenney sits atop the series’ leaderboard thanks to his historic score. An interesting note about the score is that, while it broke the record for poker’s largest single tournament score, it was for a second-place finish in the event. Aaron Zang, who is second on this list, actually won the Triton Million event, but a deal with Kenney allowed Kenney to take more money. As a brief aside, Kenney’s 2019 has been absolutely incredible. He’s won nearly $30,000,000 in 2019 and this year alone would have him ranked #10 on poker’s all-time money list. Of note, Kenney won the Aussie Millions Main Event and was the fifth biggest winner from that entire series. Dan Smith and Stephen Chidwick are third and fourth on the list, respectively, and both placed in this positions in the Triton Million. But unlike Kenney and Zang ahead of them, Smith and Chidwick cashed in more events than just the £1,050,000 headliner. Smith took 15th in the £25,000 6-Handed No Limit Hold’em Turbo event for £45,300 ($55,150). Chidwick cashed in three other events for an additional £973,800 ($1,185,001) on top of the £4,410,000 ($5,368,947) he cashed for in the Triton Million. Chidwick took sixth in the £50,000 Short Deck Ante-Only event, seventh in the £100,000 Triton Main Event, and ninth in the £100,000 Short Deck Main Event. The next two names on the list, Wai Kin Yong and Paul Phua, did not cash in the Triton Million, so their performances over the course of the rest of the series must have been pretty good if they landed this high on the leaderboard. Yong won the £100,000 Triton Main Event for £2,591,695 ($3,154,064), and the player he beat was Phua, who took £2,558,305 ($3,113,429) for second place after the two struck a deal. Yong then took second in the £100,00 Short Deck Main Event for £1,835,000 ($2,232,740). Interestingly enough, Phua also went deep in that one, finishing fourth for £974,500 ($1,185,725). Phua added a third cash to his performance. Timothy Adams found himself as the 10th biggest earner from the series, having cashed a total of three times including once in the Triton Million. Outside of the top 10, David Benefield, Chin Lim, Wai Chan, Jason Koon, and Isaac Haxton also cashed three times at the festival. All told, 24 players cashed for at least $1,000,000 at the series. The 20 listed above were joined by Winfred Yu, Sam Greenwood, Haxton, and Rui Cao as seven-figure winners.
  23. Justin Bonomo is having himself quite a year and that theme continued on Wednesday night as he defeated a final table that included Daniel Negreanu, Jason Koon and Christoph Vogelsang to win the 2018 Super High Roller Bowl for $5,000,000. The win comes just over two months after he won the Super High Roller Bowl China event for $4.8 million. He’s now won $13.9 million in 2018 from 16 cashes, including six victories. Nick Petrangelo started Day 4 with the second smallest stack and any hope of turning that into a long day was taken away on the first hand of play. Petrangelo raised from the cutoff to 50,000 before Jason Koon re-raised to 130,000 from the button. Petrangelo moved all in for 400,000 and Koon called. Petrangelo showed [poker card="tc"][poker card="ts"] but found nothing but bad news when Koon tabled [poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"]. The board ran out [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"][poker card="5s"][poker card="8s"][poker card="qh"] to eliminate Peterangelo in sixth place. It took another two hours before the next player was sent to the rail. Down to just seven big blinds, Christoph Vogelsang moved all in from the small blind and Mikita Badziakouski happily called from the big blind and flipped over [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"] while Vogelsang, the defending champion, wasn’t quite drawing dead with [poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5c"] flop gave Vogelsang all kinds of hope, but the neither the [poker card="9h"] turn or [poker card="8d"] river fulfilled that hope and Vogelsang was out in fifth place. Four-handed play lasted nearly 5.5 hours before Bonomo and Badziakouski clashed in a blind vs. blind battle. Bonomo raised to 140,000 from the small blind and Badziakouski defended his big. The flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="9c"][poker card="3s"] Badziakouski called Bonomo’s bet of 225,000. The turn was the [poker card="4c"] and Bonomo bet 475,000 before Badziakouski moved all in for 1,500,000. Bonomo snap-called and turned over [poker card="kd"][poker card="tc"] while Badziakouski showed [poker card="td"][poker card="8s"] which put him behind. The river was the [poker card="2h"] and Badziakouski, who began the day with the chip lead, was eliminated in fourth place. The final three players had roughly the same stacks before Koon lost 80% of his chips to Bonomo after both players flopped two pair. Koon was unable to spin his stack up and was eliminated by Bonomo just a few hands later. When heads-up play began, Bonomo had 80% of the chips in play and over the next 90 minutes, he never relinquished the lead before finally finishing off Negreanu. Bonomo raised to 200,000 from the button and Negreanu called. The flop came [poker card="9h"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6d"] and Negreanu checked. Bonomo bet 160,000 and Negreanu responded with a raise to 500,000. Bonomo kept the throttle on and made it 1,250,000 to go, forcing Negreanu into the tank. After a minute to consider his options, Negreanu moved all in for 4,400,000 and Bonomo snap-called and turned over [poker card="9d"][poker card="9s"] for top set while Negreanu showed [poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"] for an open-ended straight draw. The turn was the [poker card="ks"] and the river was the [poker card="6c"], giving Bonomo an unneeded full house and his second Super High Roller Bowl title of 2018. Payouts Justin Bonomo - $5,000,000 Daniel Negreanu - $3,000,000 Jason Koon - $2,100,000 Mikita Badziakouski - $1,600,000 Christoph Vogelsang - $1,200,000 Nick Petrangelo - $900,000 Stephen Chidwick - $600,000 Seth Davies - $90,000
  24. February may seem like forever ago, but it wasn't too long ago that the second month of 2018 saw the names of Chris 'moorman1' Moorman, Mike 'goleafsgoeh' Leah, and Viktor 'isildur1' Blom capture the headlines. Below are PocketFives' top five stories from February 2018, plus a look back at the February's Monthly PLB winner. MILESTONES: Chris 'moorman1' Moorman Earns 27th Triple Crown Chris 'moorman1' Moorman is online poker’s leading all-time money earner with, at time of writing, $15.595 million in online tournament winnings. In February 2018, Moorman captured headlines when he won his record 27th PocketFives Triple Crown. Moorman achieved the feat when he scored first place in tournaments from three different sites in back-to-back-to-back days. Moorman then went on to win two more in 2018 and bring his industry-leading total to 29. READ: MILESTONES: Chris 'moorman1' Moorman Earns 27th Triple Crown Stephen Chidwick Wins Inaugural U.S. Poker Open Title The poker world was treated to the first-ever U.S. Poker Open in February 2018. The eight-tournament high-roller series took place at ARIA Resort & Casino in Las Vegas with buy-ins ranging from $10,000 to $50,000. An elite group of poker's best were in competition across the eight events, including Daniel Negreanu, Phil Hellmuth, Justin Bonomo, Dan Smith, and Jason Koon. In addition to individual tournament scores for large sums of money, each player was looking to become the first overall U.S. Poker Open champion. At its completion, Stephen 'stevie444' Chidwick had cashed in four of the eight events to win more than $1.25 million combined and be crowned U.S. Poker Open champion. READ: Stephen Chidwick Wins Inaugural U.S. Poker Open Title WPT: Mike Leah Wins Fallsview Classic for First WPT Title The World Poker Tour once again made its seasonal stop at Fallsview Casino Resort in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, back in February. With it came a record-breaking field of 517 entries for the event and a final table that included one staunch Canadian grinder, Mike 'goleafsgoeh' Leah, looking for his first WPT title. Leah entered the final day of play ranked third in chips among the remaining 20 players. From there, he went on to claim victory and his first World Poker Tour title worth C$451,821 ($359,001). READ: Mike Leah Wins Fallsview Classic for First WPT Title Viktor Blom Stages Huge Comeback to Win partypoker MILLIONS Germany If 2018 was the year of anything, it's likely the year of partypoker. The online poker giant’s live tournament offering, partypokerLIVE, delivered enormous prize pool upon enormous prize pool all across the globe, including February's partypoker MILLIONS Germany in Rozvadov. That's where Viktor 'isildur1' Blom grabbed the title worth €1 million, but not without having to overcome a greater than 6-to-1 chip deficit during heads-up play against Pavel Plesuv. READ: Viktor Blom Stages Huge Comeback to Win partypoker MILLIONS Germany Leon Tsoukernik's Counterclaim Against Matt Kirk Dismissed Speaking of Rozvadov, King's Casino owner Leon Tsoukernik was back in the headlines in February with another episode involving his dispute with high-stakes poker pro "Aussie" Matt Kirk. Three months prior, in November, Tsoukernik filed a counterclaim for $10 million in damages. That was followed by Kirk's lawyers filing a motion to dismiss. At the end of February 2018, a Las Vegas judge dismissed Tsoukernik’s counterclaim it what appears to have ended a highly publicized legal tug o' war. READ: Leon Tsoukernik's Counterclaim Against Matt Kirk Dismissed 'European' Wins February Monthly PLB Title With 4,133.54 points, 'European' won the Monthly PLB title for February. 'European' booked 48 cashes in February, including scores of $86,000 for 707.11 points, $58,160 for 584.38 points, $56,975 for 463.68 points, $49,574 for 383.28 points, and $46,418 for 415.33 points. The $86,000 win for 'European' came in the $530 buy-in partypoker Powerfest #46-M: $500K Gtd NLH under the username 'JHelppi' when he outlasted a field of 979 entries.
  25. The 2019 U.S. Poker Open has really been about two names so far; Stephen Chidwick and Sean Winter. Chidwick got things off to a strong start by winning Event #1, while Winter had made every final table but hadn't picked up a win. That all changed Sunday night when Winter beat David Peters heads up to win $151,200 and his first USPO title in the $10,000 Short Deck event. Final Table Payouts 1. Sean Winter - $151,200 2. David Peters - $100,800 3. Seth Davies - $67,200 4. Ben Lamb - $42,000 5. Ben Yu - $33,600 6. Stephen Chidwick - $25,200 Chidwick also made the final table but started the day with the second shortest stack ahead of only Ben Lamb. Two double ups allowed Lamb to avoid elimination, whereas Chidwick wasn't so fortunate. Four players limped in front Chidwick before the 2018 US Poker Open champion moved all in for 725,000 with the [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"]. Seth Davies and Ben Yu both folded their hands but Winter called with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="kh"]. The flop came [poker card="js"][poker card="td"][poker card="6d"] to give Chidwick outs to Broadway. The [poker card="6s"] turn left Chidwick drawing only to one of three aces. The river was the [poker card="kd"] to give Winter a full house and eliminate Chidwick in sixth place. It took 45 minutes before another player hit the rail. From under the gun, Yu moved all in for 655,000 with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"] and only Davies decided to look him up, calling with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="8h"]. The board ran out [poker card="jc"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6h"][poker card="9h"][poker card="6s"] to completely miss Yu and eliminate him in fifth place. Lamb managed to last just one more hour before falling in fourth place. Winter limped with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="kh"] again before Lamb moved all in for 1,780,000 with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"]. Winter called and then watched the [poker card="ad"][poker card="js"][poker card="7s"][poker card="ks"][poker card="8s"] runout secure Lamb's fourth-place finish. Winter picked up yet another victim 45 minutes later. Davies limped with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="jd"] before Winter moved all in from the button with the [poker card="jc"][poker card="9c"]. Davies called off his last 3,525,000. The [poker card="js"][poker card="9h"][poker card="6h"] put Davies in dire straits and the [poker card="kh"] turn and [poker card="7d"] river both failed to save him from a third-place result. Thanks to the three players he had eliminated, Winter started heads-up play with a nearly 3-1 chip lead over Peters. It took almost exactly an hour for Winter to put the finishing touches on his first USPO title. Winter shoved all in with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="9c"] and Peters called all in with the [poker card="jd"][poker card="9s"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"][poker card="9d"] flop gave Winter two pair. The turn was the [poker card="th"] to give Peters outs to a straight. The river was the [poker card="as"] and Peters was eliminated in second place. The win gives Winter a total of four straight final table appearances in the 2019 USPO. He also has a second-place finish, a sixth-place finish, and a fifth-place finish. Those results and this victory moved Winter to the top spot on the overall 2019 USPO leaderboard through four events. USPO Top 10 After Event #4 PLAYER CASHES PRIZE MONEY POINTS 1. Sean Winter 4 $419,400 440 2. Stephen Chidwick 3 $354,950 340 3. Jordan Cristos 2 $206,200 240 4. Lauren Roberts 1 $218,400 200 5. Manig Loeser 2 $146,200 180 6. Koray Aldemir 1 $159,250 140 7. David Peters 1 $100,800 140 8. Seth Davies 2 $94,500 140 9. Joseph Cheong 1 $112,500 100 10. Martin Zamani 1 $83,200 100   The final table for Event #5: $10,000 No-Limit Hold’em will take place on Monday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/14/19 Event #1: #10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/15/19 Event #2: #10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/16/19 Event #3: $10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/17/19 Event #4: $10,000 Short Deck 5 p.m. 02/18/19 Event #5: $25,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/19/19 Event #6: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/20/19 Event #7: $25,000 No Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #8: $25,000 8-Game 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 8 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.