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Found 4 results

  1. According to PokerNews, Todd Brunson (pictured) took $5 million off billionaire Andy Beal over the weekend. The game was $50,000/$100,000 Heads-Up Limit Hold'em inside Bobby's Room at the Bellagio in Las Vegas. PokerNews explained, "Each bought in for $5 million and when all was said and done, Brunson held all the chips." Poker pro Kyle Loman was on-hand for the action, although shut out of the room itself, and reported via Twitter on Friday and Saturday. He ended with, "Thanks everyone for the love and follows about the HU match last night. I play for a living and am still a super fan. So fun 4 me to see it." Todd Brunson's father, Doyle Brunson, was in attendance for part of the heads-up session, which began with 20 people in Bobby's Room. The younger Brunson was up $7 million to $3 million early on before Beal rebounded, according to Loman. However, Brunson went back on the offensive, with Loman Tweeting, "Todd: 7 Beal: 3. There are only 3 people in Bobby's Room now: Todd, Beal, and the dealer." Beal battled back to even once more before the tide shifted permanently in favor of Brunson. Loman Tweeted when all was said and done: Beal has a history against both Brunsons, as the two were part of the famed "Corporation" that went toe-to-toe with the billionaire about 10 years ago. PokerNews explained, "Despite winning a massive $11.7 pot on May 13, 2004, Beal ended up quitting the game, only to return in February 2006 for more action. He quickly lost $3.3 million; went on a three-day, $13.6 million upswing; and then lost $16.6 million to Ivey in a separate three-day match. It was at that point Beal claimed he was done with poker." Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  2. Tournament after tournament at the 2015 World Series of Poker has featured brand name pros at the top of the leaderboard. Event #39, a $1,500 10-Game Mix, is no exception. We're down to our final nine and the group is loaded with talent, including three bracelet winners. In fact, 2015 bracelet winner Brian Stinger885 Hastings (pictured) leads the way. --- Tournament Poker Edgeis the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- Hastings has a stack of 651,000, over 200,000 ahead of the second place tally belonging to Tim Reusch. Hastings won the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship a week ago for $239,000 and his second bracelet. His first came in 2012 in the $10,000 No Limit Hold'em Heads-Up Championship. Hastings was active on Twitter on Saturday morning, but he wasn't talking about the 10-Game Mix and a possible third bracelet. Instead, he was trying to sell action for a $500,000 buy-in event at Aria. Fifth place in the 10-Game event belongs to PocketFiver Mike SirWatts Watson (pictured), who has a stack of 277,000. Watson has had an impressive showing thus far at the 2015 WSOP, recording four top-25 finishes and two final tables. He has $1.1 million in career WSOP winnings despite not having a bracelet. Eric Wasserson, known on PocketFives as gpokerg, is in sixth place entering Saturday's finale. Wasserson has five top-20 finishes already at the WSOP and took second in a $3,000 No Limit Hold'em Shootout last year. He bagged 255,000 in chips on Friday. Bracelet winners Owais Ahmed and Todd Brunson are also still in the mix, which means we have a 33% chance of having a repeat bracelet winner. Here's how the field stacks up: 1. Brian Stinger885Hastings - 651,000 2. Tim Reusch - 434,000 3. Owais Ahmed - 383,500 4. Alexey Makarov - 352,000 5. Mike SirWattsWatson - 277,000 6. Eric gpokergWasserson - 255,000 7. Rostislav Tsodikov - 206,500 8. Todd Brunson - 191,500 9. Dan Matsuzuki - 96,000 The tournament will restart at 2:00pm PT with two tables. The winner gets $133,000 and a bracelet and everyone left is guaranteed $9,000. Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest WSOP coverage, brought to you by Tournament Poker Edge. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  3. [caption width="640"] Ten players worth considering as the Poker Hall of Fame public nomination process opens[/caption] The public nomination process for the Poker Hall of Fame to determine the top ten candidates for official voting for the Class of 2016 opened earlier this month. The nomination period allows poker fans around the world to submit the names of players they think should be considered for inclusion in the Poker Hall of Fame. The Criteria: A player must have played poker against acknowledged top competition Be a minimum of 40 years old at time of nomination Played for high stakes Played consistently well, gaining the respect of peers Stood the test of time Or, for non-players, contributed to the overall growth and success of the game of poker, with indelible positive and lasting results. And while everybody has an opinion on who should or shouldn’t get in, PocketFives has created a guide for you of 10 names you should consider nominating. Keep in mind, many thought Phil Ivey would be a shoo-in this year, but turns out he's not quite eligible yet. With that in mind, we’ve broken the names into three groups: Obvious Choices, Dark Horses and Long Shots. Obvious ChoicesChris Moneymaker Rule of thumb – if an era is named after someone, then that person is probably a Hall of Famer. Chris Moneymaker was the right guy, at the right place, bluffing at the right time when he won the WSOP Main Event in 2003. ESPN audiences drank up a 20-something accountant from Tennessee facing down Sammy Farha for $2.5 million dollars. Moneymaker not only won, but somehow graciously handled the media firestorm of attention that no one could be prepared for. He was the face of the poker boom that followed and soon every line cook in the country was hosting a home game. Moneymaker wasn’t a flash in the pan, since his historic win he’s earned $1.1 million in tournaments and solidified himself as one of the top ambassadors of the game, greeting every critic with a smile. But his influence goes beyond a player and undoubtedly “contributed to the overall growth and success of the game.” Carlos Mortensen Carlos Mortensen first rose to poker fame after winning the 2001 WSOP Main Event but he is also the all-time leading money winner in World Poker Tour history thanks largely to his three WPT titles. His lifetime earnings are just north of $11.8 million. Mortensen has two bracelets in 35 WSOP cashes with another 20 cashes and seven WPT final tables. Should he get into the Hall of Fame, he would undoubtedly be the most WPT-centric player in the Hall of Fame to date, Mike Sexton withstanding (almost all tournament success in WSOP events). But with his banner hung in the Amazon Room the stewards of the HOF can breathe easy. Bruno Fitoussi One can’t discuss French poker without mentioning Bruno Fitoussi’s name. He was one-part Mike Sexton, one-part Mori Eskandani and one-part Chris Moneymaker when poker boomed on TV in France. He was one of the operators of The Aviation Club – one of Europe’s premier poker rooms – and the lack of European inductees is one of the PHOF’s most warranted criticisms. As a player he’s won $2.8 million around the world while logging 20 WSOP cashes. He finished runner-up in the 2007 $50,000 HORSE Championship for $1.2 million and finished 15th in the 2003 Main Event. Ted Forrest The six-time bracelet winner’s name keeps coming up in this conversation. He’s one of five players to win three bracelets in a year, nine of his 34 WSOP cashes were in events with a $5,000 buy-in or greater. Forrest doesn’t have the flash that screams Hall of Famer but he’s got a track record in all the games, was a part of “The Corporation”, the group of top level pros that took on billionaire banker Andy Beal, and as far as standing the test of time is concerned – he’s got 21 years between his first and most recent bracelet. David Chiu David Chiu just passed the $8 million in career earnings mark and he has five WSOP bracelets, 25 final tables and 73 cashes in the WSOP alone and finds himself in rarified air among the five-bracelet club, he’s one of three or four players that could arguably keep adding to his total. His game hasn’t aged like many in his age bracket – he’s cashed in six $10,000 or greater events since 2014, including the 2015 $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha event. Dark HorsesChris Bjorin Chris Bjorin’s grandfatherly smile and non-threatening demeanour masks that he’s won $5 million, two bracelets and a European Poker Tour title and it took Martin Jacobson winning $10 million in the 2014 WSOP Main Event to top him on Sweden’s all-time money list. Huck Seed If there was a Hall of Fame of Not Giving a Sh*t, Huck Seed would be there. There’s certain politicking and campaigning many nominees endure to gain entry, but that’s something this former Main Event Champ and four-time bracelet winner just won’t do. Todd Brunson Todd Brunson isn’t discussed much in after-hours PHOF talk but has won $4.2 million and has 50 WSOP cashes. He has spent most of his career focused on high stakes cash games. The largest strike against him is that he has just one bracelet and while nowhere in the requirements does it say “multi-bracelet winner”, it’s implied. Mike Matusow Mike Matusow’s life shows highs and lows of the life of a professional gambler better than any Hollywood flick ever could. He’s a true blue-collar player that’s won and lost at least $8.6 million, has four bracelets, spent time in jail and battled life-threatening medical problems all while being a big star in the TV boom era. The Long ShotIsai Scheinberg International poker politics are a curious thing, and while the entity that owns the PHOF prefers their own version of worldwide poker history, most everyone else recognizes Isai Scheinberg as the single most influential businessman in poker the world will probably ever see. Scheinberg was the former CEO of PokerStars and directed the company during its profitable and expansive rise to the top of the online poker world. The private ownership allowed Scheinberg and his management team room to innovate and become the overwhelming leaders in the industry. Photos courtesy of World Poker Tour and European Poker Tour.
  4. It wasn’t supposed to end like this. Nobody even expected him to play. Doyle Brunson’s appearance in the $10,000 No Limit Deuce to Seven event at the 2018 World Series of Poker came as a surprise to anybody who has followed poker over the last few years. Once the face of the franchise, Brunson first stopped playing the WSOP back in 2013, citing the long hours of play as the main reason. He much preferred the high stakes cash game action at the Bellagio where could come and go as he pleased. He teased coming back in 2017, but nobody, absolutely nobody, thought they’d see him at all this year. Then came the tweet heard ‘round the poker world. Word soon came that not only was this likely going to be the last WSOP tournament he was ever going to play, but he’d also be walking away from poker at the end of the summer. His wife, Louise, wasn’t doing all that great healthwise and he wanted to spend more time with her. He said he owed it to her. He owed the poker world nothing though. He’d been front and center long before the poker boom was a thing and wrote an in-depth strategy book at a time when every pro kept their secrets as close to their chest as possible. The Super System became the most important book in poker history. So there was a Christmas Morning-like excitement when Brunson late-regged for the event and took his seat alongside some of the best players in the world. Over the 30 hours that followed, Brunson took the poker world on a journey that will now serve as an almost unbelievable prologue on a Hall of Fame poker career that includes 10 WSOP bracelets, a World Poker Tour title, that best-selling strategy book and millions of dollars won in some of the biggest cash games the world has ever known. As the field dwindled down and eventually stopped with 11 players remaining on Monday night, many poker fans and players alike started to fantasize about an 11th bracelet for the Godfather of Poker, maybe even a heads-up battle with his son, Todd, who was also still in the tournament. If this was really going to be Brunson’s last WSOP event, it would be somewhat fitting if he went out on top. On Tuesday, the 11 players quickly became eight and action moved to the PokerGO livestream. Eight became seven. At no point did it look like Brunson was going to cruise to victory, but thanks to the swingy nature of No Limit Deuce, he was never out of it until he was out of it. And then seven became six. Brunson was finished. He tipped his trademark cowboy hat to the crowd that had gathered on this trip back in time and then exited the Rio to a standing ovation. The current generation of players that are dominating poker have little difficulty looking up to Brunson the poker player but that same group has, at times, struggled to relate to or even accept some of his political or social views. Over the last few years, Brunson has often found himself defending those views. He’s gotten in hot water for tweets that touch on political or social issues. In 2015, TMZ picked up a story about Brunson’s comments on Caitlyn Jenner after she transitioned from Bruce. He’s been an ardent supporter of Donald Trump and the NRA - two topics that often polarize the poker community. In the case of Jenner, and more recently John McCain, Brunson has talked about how people who were once his heroes have since let him down. A fair number of people who once looked up to Brunson will probably say they can relate as they struggle to reconcile the difference between Brunson the poker player and Brunson the person. Nobody was going to change their view of Brunson whether he won the bracelet or not on Monday. His place in poker history is as locked in as they come and, for better or worse, this is a time where one's political views just don’t change too quickly. For those 30 hours though, the politics didn’t matter. Only the cards did.
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