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Found 24 results

  1. The return of High Stakes Poker after a nine-and-a-half year hiatus was met with high expectations. The first seven seasons of the show created some of the most memorable moments in televised poker history and showcased cash game action in a way that had never been done before. Season 8 delivered on the nostalgia by bringing in some of the stars of the first seven seasons, including Tom Dwan, Phil Ivey, and Phil Hellmuth, and mixed them in with some new blood, such as Michael Schwimmer, Rick Salomon, and Brandon Steven, who were all unafraid to mix things up. The result was 14 episodes that felt like a continuation rather than a reboot of the original show. Here are the five biggest pots from Season 8. #5 - Bryn Kenney Kicks Tom Dwan Out of his Full House (Episode #5) From UTG, Bryn Kenney raised to $2,500 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="3d"]. Steven called from the cutoff with [poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"] before Dwan raised to $12,000 from the button with [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"]. Both Kenney and Steven called to build a pot to $38,000. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="kc"][poker card="3h"] flop gave Dwan top two pair with Kenney picking up top and bottom pair. After action checked to him, Dwan bet $22,000 and just Kenney called. The [poker card="3c"] turn gave Kenney a full house and he check-called Dwan's bet of $55,000. Kenney checked again when the [poker card="th"] completed the board. Dwan reached into his stack and bet $55,000 only to have Kenney click back with a raise to $285,000. The raise made Dwan visibly uncomfortable and after considering his action for 30 seconds, Dwan folded to let Kenney win the $572,000 pot and take a $198,000 profit. #4 - Michael Schwimmer Also Falls Victim to Bryn Kenney (Episode #8) John Andress bumped things up by straddling for $1,600. Dwan called with [poker card="8s"][poker card="7s"] and and Jean-Robert Bellande called from the button with [poker card="kh"][poker card="5h"] before Schwimmer raised to $4,000 from the small blind with [poker card="kc"][poker card="5c"]. Kenney defended the big blind with [poker card="4c"][poker card="4h"], Andress called with [poker card="ad"][poker card="2d"] and both Dwan and Bellande decided to see the flop. Schimmer led out for $15,000 after the [poker card="ks"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2s"] flop gave him top pair. Kenney took the opportunity to raise to $52,000 with middle set getting Andress, Dwan and Bellande to all fold. Schwimmer called and then checked the [poker card="ah"] turn. Kenney bet $71,000 and Schwimmer called. The [poker card="5d"] river gave Schwimmer two pair and after taking some to consider his action he checked to Kenney who bet $165,000. Schwimmer called all in and was shown the bad news. Schwimmer left his seat following that hand. #3 - Sean Perry Brings Jean-Robert Bellande Along for the Ride (Episode #8) Dwan opened to $2,500 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="6d"] only to have Sean Perry raise to $8,000 from Dwan's direct left with [poker card="ah"][poker card="as"]. From the small blind, Bellande re-raised to $30,000 with [poker card="td"][poker card="8d"]. That forced a fold from Dwan, but Perry made it $70,000 to go and Bellande decided to call. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5d"] flop gave Bellande top pair but he checked to Perry who bet $40,000 and Bellande called. The [poker card="9c"] turn gave Bellande outs to a straight and he check-called Perry's $70,000 bet. The [poker card="7d"] river changed nothing for either player and Bellande checked a third time. Perry moved all in for $136,000. Bellande took a long sip from his Las Vegas chalice while contemplating his decision. He asked for a count and then decided to call only to have Perry turn over the winning hand to take down the $637,700 pot. #2 - Rick Salomon Double Straddles His Way to an $868,200 Pot (Episode #2) Straddles were a pretty common occurrence when Salomon was in the game. Just moments after his tablemates bet on how long the table could keep a no straddle agreement in place, Kenney straddled for $1,600 and Salomon double-straddled for $3,200. Action folded to Steven and he called in middle position with [poker card="ac"][poker card="4c"]. Everybody else got out of the way until Kenney called with [poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"] and then Salmon raised to $22,000 with [poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"]. Steven decided to bow out, but Kenney opted to call and see the flop. The dealer spread out [poker card="7c"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4d"] giving Kenney middle set with Salomon picking up an open-ended straight draw. Kenney checked, Salomon bet $30,000 and Kenney called. The [poker card="8c"] turn gave Salomon a straight and an opportunity to improve to a straight flush or flush. Kenney checked again, Salomon bet $55,000 and Kenney called. The [poker card="as"] river changed nothing for either player and once again, Kenney checked to Salomon. With $219,200 in the pot already, Salomon moved all in and Kenney called off his remaining $324,000 which was immediately sent to Salomon after he tabled the winning hand. #1 - Three Times was Definitely a Charm for Dwan (Episode #5) While no pot broke the million dollar mark, the biggest hand of the season got awfully close. Bellande straddled to $1,600 before Salomon raised to $4,000 with [poker card="5c"][poker card="3c"]. Steven, Dwan and Lynne Ji all called to put action back on Bellande. The former Survivor castaway looked down at [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"] and raised to $11,000. Salomon and Steven followed up with calls before Dwan raised to $54,000. Ji then moved all in for $163,000 with [poker card="qh"][poker card="th"] and Bellande move all in over the top of Ji for $399,000. Salomon folded and Steven threw his [poker card="ad"][poker card="jd"] into the muck. Dwan took a moment before calling. The three players first decided to run it twice before Dwan suggested running three boards and Ji and Bellande both agreed. Board #1: [poker card="jc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="9s"][poker card="4h"][poker card="ts"] Board #2: [poker card="qd"][poker card="jh"][poker card="3s"][poker card="7s"][poker card="ah"] Board #3: [poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"][poker card="5s"][poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"] Despite flopping an open-ended straight draw and turning a flush draw on Board #1, Ji was unable to improve, allowing Dwan to win. Dwan then flopped a set on Board #2 and Bellande couldn't find a ten to make Broadway giving Dwan the first two runouts. He then flopped a full house on Board #3 leaving Bellande hoping for an ace or a king on the turn or river. When neither came, Dwan won the third board to scoop all three run outs win the $985,000 pot. With their chips being moved to Dwan, both Li and Bellande left the game at this point.
  2. The long-awaited return season of High Stakes Poker wrapped up on Wednesday with a cast full of some of the most active players of the season. Tom Dwan, Rick Salomon, Jake Daniels, and Brandon Steven were splashing away as the clock wound down on Season 9. The opening hand began with Daniels raising to $2,100 with [poker card="qh"][poker card="tc"]. Dwan called with [poker card="jh"][poker card="8h"] before Salomon bumped the action up with a raise to $14,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="kc"]. Daniels folded but Dwan called. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="js"][poker card="4h"] and Dwan checked to Salomon and then called a bet of $20,000. The [poker card="7s"] turn produced similar action with Dwan check-calling a $25,000 bet from Salomon. The river was the [poker card="7d"] and Dwan checked once again. Salomon threw out a bet of $65,000 and after a brief contemplation, Dwan folded to let Salomon scoop the six-figure pot and add $63,100 to his stack. As Salomon was raking in the chips, Dwan offered him a $500 chip to let him see his cards. Salomon accepted and Dwan learned he made the correct fold. Dwan made all of that and then some back on the next hand before James Bord got the best of John Andress in six-figure pot. Dwan straddled to $1,600, Salomon called, Andress raise to $3,200 with [poker card="as"][poker card="kh"] before Bord moved all in for $113,000 with [poker card="jc"][poker card="jd"]. Dwan and Salomon folded and Andress called. With $230,800 in the middle, the players decided to run two full boards. The first board came [poker card="js"][poker card="td"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2c"] to give Bord a full house. The second board was just as good with Bord making another set of jacks on the [poker card="jh"][poker card="8s"][poker card="2s"] flop. The [poker card="tc"] turn gave Andress straight outs but the [poker card="kc"] river was no help and Bord added $117,000 to his stack. Andress' rough night continued two hands later. Steven straddled to $1,600, Dwan raised to $5,000 with [poker card="6h"][poker card="2h"], Salomon called with [poker card="ad"][poker card="5d"], Andress called with [poker card="8d"][poker card="8s"], and Steven came along for the ride. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="qd"][poker card="8h"] flop resulted in a check from Steven, a $5,000 bet from Dwan, a fold from Salomon, and calls from both Andress and Steven. The turn was the [poker card="3h"] and Steven checked again. Dwan fired out $25,000, Andress called and Steven folded. The [poker card="4h"] completed the board and Dwan's backdoor flush draw. Dwan bet enough to put Andress all in. After only a minute of contemplation, Andress called and was shown the bad news. Dwan netted $101,000 on the hand. After adding another $200,000 to stay in the game, Andress found himself on the wrong side of another six-figure pot. Daniels opened to $2,500 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="as"], Dwan called with [poker card="qd"][poker card="5d"], before Andress raised to $10,000 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="kc"]. Daniels re-raised to $40,000, forcing Dwan to muck his hand, and Andress called. The [poker card="9h"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4c"] flop gave Andress little to hold onto. Daniels bet $17,500 and Andress called. After the [poker card="9d"] turn Daniels bet $51,000 and Andress had little choice but to fold. Six hands later, Andress dropped $80,000 without even seeing a flop. Andress straddled to $1,600 and was dealt [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"], Bryn Kenney double-straddled to $3,200 and was dealt [poker card="2c"][poker card="2s"]. Steven raised to $11,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="kc"], Salomon re-raised to $35,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="tc"]. With action back on him, Andress made it $80,000 to go. Steven needed just 40 seconds to five-bet to $214,000 forcing to Salomon and leaving Andress frustrated. "I'm running into a fucking buzzsaw," Andress said, as he threw his jacks into the muck. The final hand of the night and the season started with Kenney straddling to $1,600. Steven called with [poker card="6d"][poker card="6s"], Daniels called with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9d"] and Dwan raised to $9,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="ts"]. Salomon called with [poker card="7c"][poker card="7s"] and Kenney, Steven, and Daniels all called to push the pot to $46,600 before the flop. The [poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2c"] flop put Salomon in front with top set. Salomon, Kenney, Steven, Daniels all checked to Dwan who bet $15,000. Everybody but Steven called to see the [poker card="4s"] turn pair the board and all four players checked. The [poker card="jc"] completed the board and Salomon led out for $45,000. Kenney folded, but Daniels called and after Dwan folded, Salomon told Daniels, "I got it," and turned over the winning hand to take down the $196,600 pot. PokerGo has not announced plans for a ninth season of High Stakes Poker, but during the opening segment of the season 8 finale, announcer AJ Benza hinted at the possibility. All episodes of the show are available on demand via PokerGo.
  3. This week's episode of High Stakes Poker on PokerGO started off with the players still talking about Doug Polk folding the second nut straight to Phil Hellmuth shove with the nut straight last week, but quickly turned into an episode of the Tom Dwan Show - and he wasn't even in the game when the episode began. It didn't take long to get a six-figure pot. On the second hand of play, James Bord raised to $1,100 with [poker card="7c"][poker card="6h"], Jake Daniels called with [poker card="ks"][poker card="jh"], and Hellmuth defended his big blind with [poker card="7s"][poker card="4s"]. The flop came [poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"][poker card="7d"] and Hellmuth checked to Bord, who bet $2,000. Daniels called only to have Hellmuth raise to $5,000. Bord folded but Daniels called to see the [poker card="qs"] turn. Hellmuth check-called Daniels' bet of $7,100 to bump the pot to $30,100. The [poker card="2h"] river completed the board and Hellmuth led out for $14,000. Daniels raised to $57,000 and Hellmuth went into the tank. "I keep thinking, 'I'm going to fold this and he's going to show me the bluff and I am going to quit," Hellmuth said while contemplating his decision. After 2:35 of waiting, Daniels asked for a clock and Hellmuth was given two minutes to make his decision. Hellmuth ultimately called to take down the $144,000 pot and added $73,500 to his stack. On the next hand, Polk left and was replaced by Rick Salomon with Dwan taking his spot in the four seat. Before seeing a single hand, Dwan asked the double the stakes from $200/$400 to $400/$800 and nobody resisted, setting up a night of six-figure pots. Dwan started his reign of dominance by taking down a $57,800 pot, winning another $1,400 after running the turn and river twice against Bord in a $171,000 pot, but all of that was just whetting his appetite for winning a huge pot without a showdown. Brandon Steven opened to $2,400 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="4s"], Dwan called with [poker card="9d"][poker card="5d"], and Bryn Kenney called from the big blind with [poker card="th"][poker card="7s"]. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4d"] and Kenney checked to Steven who continued for $5,000. Holding a flush draw and middle pair, Dwan raised to $18,000. Kenney folded and Steven called. The [poker card="9c"] turn gave Dwan two pair and after Steven checked, Dwan fired out $33,000 into the $44,400 pot. Steven responded with a raise to $87,000. Dwan took a little more than two minutes before moving all in for $227,000. A visibly frustrated Steven folded his hand instantly and said, "you guys are impossible to bluff. It's amazing." It wouldn't be a Season 8 episode of High Stakes Poker without a bit of a Hellmuth rant. Hellmuth called from UTG with [poker card="as"][poker card="js"]. Bord raised to $2,600 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qh"], Salomon called from the button with [poker card="ad"][poker card="4c"], Kenney came long from the big blind with [poker card="9d"][poker card="9s"] and Hellmuth called. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"][poker card="7s"] flop got all four players to check. The turn was the [poker card="jd"] and Hellmuth bet $7,000 and only Bord called. The river was the [poker card="3s"] and Hellmuth continued to be aggressive, betting $9,000. Bord raised to $33,000 forcing Hellmuth into a decision. "I just can't fold this, I guess," Hellmuth said after 90 seconds and the 15-time WSOP bracelet winner threw in a call. After being shown the nuts, Hellmuth stood up and treated his tablemates and viewers at home to a monologue on Bord. "I love playing against you, I want you every fucking day," Hellmuth said. "You deserve to lose after all of those weird beats you put on me." With Hellmuth done holding the spotlight, Dwan resumed his domination as the episode drew to a close. After Dwan straddled to $1,600 and Salomon double-straddled to $3,200, Steven raised to $10,000 with [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"], Daniels called with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kd"], Dwan called with [poker card="9h"][poker card="7c"], and Salomon made it a four-way pot with [poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="7h"][[poker card="2h"] and everybody checked to Steven who fired $17,000 into the $41,200 pot. Daniels and Dwan called while Salomon got out of the way. All three remaining players checked through the [poker card="9c"] turn that gave Dwan two pair. The [poker card="js"] river completed the board and Daniels checked, Dwan bet $43,000 which forced Steven to fold. Daniels called and was shown the bad news as Dwan's two pair allowed him to rake in the $178,200 pot. Dwan then took down a $106,600 pot before the final hand of the night, which turned out to be the biggest of the week. Salomon straddled, Bord raised to $3,200 with [poker card="as"][poker card="jh"], Daniels three-bet to $10,000 with [poker card="jc"][poker card="td"], and Dwan also called with [poker card="qc"][poker card="tc"]. Action was back to Salomon and he called with [poker card="9c"][poker card="4c"] as Bord folded. The [poker card="7c"][poker card="5s"][poker card="2c"] flop got Daniels to bet $12,500 and both Dwan and Salomon called. Daniels then fired $33,000 after the [poker card="js"] turn and once again, Dwan and Salomon called. The river was the [poker card="8c"] which finally got Daniels to slow down. He checked, allowing Dwan to bet $75,000 with his queen-high flush. Salomon called with his baby flush and realizing he was behind, Daniels folded. Dwan tabled the winning hand and scooped the $320,500 pot, winning an additional $189,000 as play wrapped up for the week. The next episode of High Stakes Poker is the final one of Season 8 and airs on PokerGo on Wednesday, March 17 at 8 PM ET.
  4. A new episode of High Stakes Poker on PokerGO came with a new cast filled with some of the biggest names to take a seat this season and wrapped up with two superstars clashing in what will undoubtedly be one of the most talked about hands in the history of the show. Tom Dwan, Phil Ivey, Phil Hellmuth, Bryn Kenney were joined by James Bord, Brandon Steven, Jake Daniels, and making his Season 8 debut, Doug Polk. Dwan wasn't seated when play began, leaving action to start seven-handed. After the second hand of the night, where Bord scooped a $36,900 pot with [poker card="6c"][poker card="4h"], Hellmuth seemed to take issue with how Bord was assigned his seat and took aim at his fellow WSOP Europe Main Event champion. "I want you in the game, but I don't want you to get away with a lot of bullshit," Hellmuth said to Bord. Two hands later, the pair would clash. From UTG+1, Hellmuth called with [poker card="kc"][poker card="kh"] and action folded to Bord in the cutoff. He raised to $2,000 with [poker card="7d"][poker card="2d"]. Everybody else got out of the way and Hellmuth called. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="6c"][poker card="4c"] and Hellmuth check-called Bord's $3,000 bet. The [poker card="6d"] turn got Hellmuth to check again. This time Bord decided to bet $15,000 into the $11,000 pot while saying, "I'm just going to bluff it off now." Hellmuth complained about how unfair the hand felt before folding face up. Sensing an opportunity to send Hellmuth into tilt, Bord told the 15-time WSOP bracelet winner "good fold" and showed the table his hand. Dwan joined the table for the sixth hand and then had a front row seat for the next big pot. Hellmuth called with [poker card="jh"][poker card="4h"], Steven raised to $2,100 with [poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"] and Bord decided to defend his big blind with [poker card="4s"][poker card="2d"] forcing Hellmuth to fold. After the [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"][poker card="6d"] flop, Steven bet $3,000 and Bord called. The turn was the [poker card="qd"] giving Steven a straight flush. He fired a bet of $5,000 and Bord responded by raising to $17,000. Steven thought over his options and decided to call. The river was the [poker card="7h"] and Steven checked, hoping Bord would fire one more time but the Brit checked behind letting Steven scoop the $45,000 pot. A couple of hands laters, Steven was involved in the first six-figure pot of the episode. Steven raised to $1,100 with [poker card="as"][poker card="jh"] and Dwan three-bet to $4,000 with [poker card="9s"][poker card="7s"]. Steven called to see the [poker card="js"][poker card="8s"][poker card="4h"] flop and then checked to Dwan. Dwan bet $5,000 and Steven called. The [poker card="3d"] turn improved neither player and Steven check-called Dwan's $14,000 bet. The [poker card="3c"] river completed the board and once again Steven opted to check. Dwan bet $30,000 and Steven called and showed down the winner. Half of the players at the table were involved in the next hand - at least until the flop. Kenney opened to $1,500 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="qh"], Steven called with [poker card="kc"][poker card="6c"], Daniels called with [poker card="as"][poker card="jd"] and Bord came along with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="9c"][poker card="6s"] flop gave Bord top pair, top kicker but he checked, as did Daniels. Kenney continued for $2,500, Steven folded, and Bord raised to $8,000. Daniels folded but Kenney called. The turn was the [poker card="2d"] and Bord bet $14,000 and Kenney called. The [poker card="2s"] river slowed Bord down and he checked to Kenney who bet $25,000. Bord called and showed Kenney he had him out-kicked to take down the $122,900 pot for a $64,400 boost to his stack. Ivey then left the table after apparently not feeling well. He was replaced by John Andress who sat down with $100,000 but wouldn't have to wait long to get those chips in play. Looking down at [poker card="7c"][poker card="7h"], Bord raised from UTG+1 to $1,100 before Andress raised to $3,500 from the button with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ad"]. Bord called and then got great news on the [poker card="qc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="5d"] flop. Bord checked to let Andress bet $2,500. Bord raised to $10,000 and Andress called. The turn was the [poker card="4s"] and Bord led for $30,000 and Andress called. The [poker card="ah"] river gave Andress top set. Bord announced he was all in and Andress called all in and then showed Bord the bad news. That $203,000 pot was the largest of the show but certainly won't be the most talked about. The final hand of the night started with Hellmuth raising to $1,100 from middle position with [poker card="qs"][poker card="th"]. Bord called his button with [poker card="2c"][poker card="2h"] and Polk defended the big blind with [poker card="td"][poker card="7c"]. The [poker card="js"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8h"] flop gave Polk and Hellmuth straights. Both players checked to Bord who bet $2,000. Polk raised to $7,000 before Hellmuth moved all in for $97,200. Bord folded and Polk asked for a count and that's when the drama began. "Just such a massive raise," Polk said to Hellmuth. "Phil, what do you have over there?" Holding the second best straight possible, Polk indicated he was contemplating making a massive laydown and Hellmuth couldn't keep quiet. "Well, I could easily have ... " Hellmuth said. "What could you easily have?" Polk asked. "You just bet a lot into very little." "I could have a set," Hellmuth said. Polk immediately doubted Hellmuth would shove with a set. "I could have blockers, two tens," Hellmuth said. "Oh, now you're busting out 'blockers'? God, if I fold this and I'm wrong, oh my fucking lord," Polk said. "I think I'm dead a lot given this," Polk said while pointing to Hellmuth. "Or like, you just have ton of equity against me." Throughout all of the post-flop action, Steven, Bord, and Daniels were engaged in a side bet about each player's holdings and were openly discussing it as Polk considered his action. At this point Polk realized he could show his hand without penalty and turned over this hand. Hellmuth put his head down and went quiet and Polk came to a conclusion. "This is completely absurd. He has to get through him (Bord) and then he has to get through me. No, this is just a fold," Polk said while throwing his hand into the muck. Hellmuth refused to show his hand. Commentator Gabe Kaplan called Polk's fold the "best letdown ever on High Stakes Poker." The next episode of High Stakes Poker airs Wednesday, March 10 at 8 pm ET and will features much of the same cast along with the return of Rick Salomon.
  5. In the history of High Stakes Poker there are few players who have moved the needle the way that Tom Dwan has. On this week's episode of HSP, Dwan was his usual aggressive self, playing plenty of hands and when all was said and done he had in fact moved the needle this week, to an uptick of over $300,000. It didn't take long for the fireworks to start. On the first hand of the show, Jason Koon, who took Phil Ivey's seat last week, straddled to $1,600. Action folded around to Jake Daniels in the big blind and he raised to $4,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="3h"]. Koon checked his cards and then told Daniels, "I'm going to call you with a really bad hand" before putting in the additional $2,400 with [poker card="ts"][poker card="5d"]. The [poker card="as"][poker card="tc"][poker card="6h"] flop gave Koon middle pair. Daniels bet $2,700 and Koon called. The turn was the [poker card="ah"] and Daniels fired again, betting $8,100 into the $14,600 pot. Koon called. The [poker card="ac"] completed the board and Daniels took some time before betting $40,000. Koon tanked for a full minute before folding, giving Daniels an early $16,200 boost. The hot streak continued for Daniels on the next hand. After Daniels straddled for $1,600, Koon raised to $3,500 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="6h"], Dwan called with [poker card="kc"][poker card="9c"], and Hernandez came along with [poker card="th"][poker card="9h"]. Daniels also called with [poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"]. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="8c"][poker card="8s"] flop gave Daniels trip eights. Everybody checked to Dwan who bet $5,500. Hernandez and Daniels called forcing a fold from Koon. The [poker card="jc"] turn improved both Hernandez and Dwan's outs, but left Daniels ahead. Action checked again to Dwan and fired $22,000 into the pot. Hernandez folded and Daniels called to see the [poker card="ah"] river. Daniels checked to Dwan who contemplated a bet before frustratingly tapping the table to check, giving Daniels the opportunity to show the winner and take the $75,700 pot. With Phil Hellmuth steaming after laying down pocket tens earlier in the session, the 15-time World Series of Poker Bracelet winner raised to $3,800 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"] after Dwan straddled. Lazaro Hernandez re-raised to $8,500 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kd"] which got Hellmuth talking. "I love poker," Hellmuth told the table. "You guys can't beat me today I don't think." Meanwhile, Dwan called with [poker card="jd"][poker card="5d"] before Hellmuth folded. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="9h"][poker card="2c"] flop gave Dwan control with top pair. Dwan check-called Hernandez's bet of $15,000. The [poker card="4s"] turn gave Dwan another opportunity to check to Hernandez who threw out a bet of $25,000. Dwan called again. The [poker card="4h"] river changed nothing and Dwan checked again. Hernandez bet $30,000 into the $102,800 pot. Dwan took some time before calling and showing the winner to take down the biggest pot of the night to that point. Daniels and Koon weren't done clashing though. Daniels opened to $2,200 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="kh"] before Koon, sitting to Daniels' direct left, three-bet to $8,000 with [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"]. Action folded back to Daniels who put in yet another raise, this time making it $29,000 to go. Koon called to send the two players to a flop of [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"][poker card="4s"]. Daniels led out for $14,300 and Koon called. The [poker card="3s"] turn gave Koon outs to a flush. Daniels did not slow down and bet $40,000 and Koon called again. The river was the [poker card="2h"] and Daniels moved all in for $128,400. Koon asked for an official count and spent nearly five minutes in the tank before calling and being shown the winning hand. Daniels won the $425,400 pot to add $213,000 to his stack. All of that money didn't stay in Daniels' stack for long. Dwan straddled, and Hellmuth raised to $3,600 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="9s"]. Daniels re-raised to $11,500 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"], Dwan called with [poker card="9d"][poker card="7d"] and Hellmuth folded. The flop came [poker card="4d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="3d"] and Dwan checked to Daniels who bet $8,200. Dwan raised to $30,000 and Daniels called. The [poker card="qh"] turn was a brick for both players. Dwan checked to Daniels who bet $40,200 which got another call from Dwan. The [poker card="td"] turn completed Dwan's flush draw but he opted to check. Daniels took the bait and bet $90,000. Dwan tanked briefly before calling to take down the $349,000 pot. After the hand, Daniels admitted he didn't notice that the river completed a potential flush draw. That was the final hand of the episode and ensured Dwan finished as the big winner. Dwan won $331,700 on this episode. Daniels was the only other player to crack the six-figure win mark, taking home $128,800. Hernandez was the biggest loser on this episode, dropping $108,700. The next episode of High Stakes Poker airs on Wednesday, March 3 on PokerGO.
  6. James Bord had a story about a bike ride. Chamath Palihapitiya had some insight on how the Houston Rockets changed basketball. And Phil Hellmuth had a rant about just how bad others play. That and a handful of six-figure pots were the highlights from this week's episode of High Stakes Poker on PokerGO. Joining Hellmuth, Bord, Palihapitiya, at the start of the episode were Phil Ivey, Tom Dwan, Lazaro Hernandez, Jake Daniels, and Brandon Adams. As usual, the stakes were $400/$800 for the No Limit Hold'em cash game. As he is prone to do, Dwan decided to show some aggression early. Hernandez called from UTG with [poker card="8s"][poker card="6s"], Daniels raised to $4,000 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="7d"] before Dwan re-raised to $17,000 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"]. Hernandez folded but Daniels clicked back, making it $51,000 to go. Dwan took a moment before moving all in for $174,000 forcing Daniels to muck his cards. Dwan added $52,200 to his stack without even seeing a flop. Not long after regaling the table with his story about attempting to win a prop bet by riding a bike from Miami to Los Angeles, Bord sent Hellmuth on a trip to Tiltsville. From UTG, Bord called with [poker card="as"][poker card="9s"]. Daniels, with [poker card="2c"][poker card="2h"], and Ivey, holding [poker card="7d"][poker card="4d"], both called. From the big blind however, Hellmuth raised to $4,800 with [poker card="js"][poker card="jh"]. All three players called to see a flop of [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"][poker card="td"]. Hellmuth opted to check and Bord bet $7,000, forcing Ivey and Daniels to fold. Hellmuth called and then checked in the dark. The [poker card="ac"] on the turn gave Bord top pair. He bet $12,000 sending Hellmuth into an early tailspin. Hellmuth: "What are you doing, Bordie?" Bord: "I believe it's called gambling." Hellmuth: "You trying to give me money?" Bord: "Yeah, definitely." Hellmuth called and then checked when the [poker card="6s"] completed the board. Bord turned over the winning hand and Hellmuth launched into a rant that had PokerGO's sensors pounding the beep button. The Poker Brat routine continued through the next hand that saw Hellmuth win a small pot off of Dwan with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"]. After giving Dwan the rundown on Bord's win, Hellmuth made it clear he was over it. "I've processed it," Hellmuth said, speaking to Bord. "You're going down. Ten years ago, you might have tilted me, but now I see it for what it was." In the aftermath of Hellmuth's loss, his good friend Palihapitiya became the latest player to make quads this season and the venture capitalist got paid. After Palihapitiya straddled to $1,600, Dwan raised to $5,000 with [poker card="7d"][poker card="5h"], Hellmuth folded [poker card="6d"][poker card="6h"] before Palihapitiya re-raised to $17,000. Dwan called. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="9s"][poker card="5c"] flop gave Palihapitiya a set and left Dwan with bottom pair. Palihapitiya bet $20,000 and Dwan called. The [poker card="9d"] turn gave Palihapitiya quad nines and with the pot at $76,000, both players checked. The [poker card="7c"] river gave Dwan two pair. Palihapitiya bet $85,000 and Dwan leaned back in his chair smiling, eventually telling Palihapitiya, "kinda feels like you might be going for it". Dwan called and Palihapitiya showed him the goods and raked in a $246,000 pot. Palihapitiya featured in the next big pot, this time taking on Adams. Palihapitiya raised to $2,300 with [poker card="jh"][poker card="js"] and Adams called with [poker card="3h"][poker card="3s"]. Adams moved ahead after the [poker card="tc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3c"] flop. Palihapitiya lead for $4,000 before Adams raised to $14,000. Palihapitiya called and then checked after the [poker card="2c"] turn. Adams bet $22,000 and Palihapitiya called. The [poker card="8d"] river got Palihapitiya to check again. Adams bet $35,000 and Palihapitiya called and Adams took down the $148,600 pot. At this point, Ivey left the game having not played a significant pot on this episode. Jason Koon replaced him and sat down with $500,000 but stayed out of the picture though the end of the episode. The last significant hand featured the key figures in the big pots played by Palihapitiya. From UTG, Adams raised to $2,500 with [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"]. Action folded around to Dwan in the big blind and he re-raised to $10,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ah"]. Adams called. The flop came [poker card="9s"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2h"] and Adams called Dwan's bet of $15,000. The [poker card="ts"] turn gave Adams the nut flush draw. Dwan bet $40,000 and once again, Adams called. The [poker card="4h"] river was no help for Adams. With the pot at $131,200, Dwan moved ll in for $145,000 effective and Adams threw his cards away, allowing Dwan to take the pot and add $65,400 to his winnings for the episode. Dwan ended up with a $78,000 net win but was not the biggest winner. Thanks largely to making quads against Dwan's rivered two pair, Palihapitiya ended up with a $87,100 uptick. The biggest loser on the show was Lazaro Hernandez who lost $89,700. Hellmuth wound up losing $38,500. The next episode of High Stakes Poker debuts on PokerGO on Wednesday, February 24 and once again features Hellmuth, Dwan, and Koon.
  7. ‘Twas the night before Christmas, and all through the land poker players were playing, getting in one last hand. The bad-regs were grinding at the tables with care in hopes that some run good soon would be theirs. The locals were nestled, all snug in their seats, with visions of jackpots brought on by bad beats. Playing live on the strip, no PokerBros app. Is that Mike Postle with his phone in his lap? When out in the lobby, someone backed up a truck. I sprang from my seat to see what the f**k. There was Doug Polk celebrating a win, and Joey beside him, a shit-eating grin. The scene was electric, a buzz filled the air. Like Galfond’s big comeback, I’m glad I was there. When what to my bloodshot eyes should appear? A high-stakes affair, the big game was here! With cameras, lights, and high society stacks, a commentary team of Schulman and Platt. As if from a chimney, the great Mori came and he whistled and shouted and called them by name: “It’s Ivey, and Dwan! There’s Doyle and Gus Hansen! Daniel and Bellande! That’s Dan Bilzerian!” They all took a seat Stacking chips with a grin “Splash away! Splash away! Let’s go all-in!” They got ready to play, the rail became deep. I was pushed to the back, it was hard just to see. But then the crowd parted, Daniel stood on his seat, he said “We need one more!” and he pointed at me. Nervous but ready I knew this was my chance. A seat with the best, a trip to the dance. A Perkins-sized buy-in, it’s all on the line. Like Mike versus Teddy, it’s my time to shine. They shuffled and dealt, chips and cards flew. I was tight, I was snug, it was all I could do. The pros were relentless, betting and raising. The pots quickly grew, these guys were amazing. Finally the time to play a hand had arrived. With joy I looked down, I spied Pocket Fives I opened with a raise, but Ivey three-bet. Folded back to me, should I mine for a set? I looked in his eyes, not a read to be had. The poker world will see this, will math nerds be mad? I called and I gulped and awaited the flop. Ivey laughed, turned to Doyle, and said “We’re on for props!” An ace and a queen with a five in the door. Ivey didn’t slow down, he bet even more. Just what I wanted, I set the trap. “Let’s play for it all”, I pushed in my stack. Ivey snap-called, like I hoped he would do. He flipped over his cards, he flopped top two. We just had to hold, I showed down my set. The turn was a deuce, we’re not safe just yet. I used my ”one time”, I prayed to St. Nick The river was dealt, “It’s a brick, it’s a brick!” With the pot pushed my way, Ivey vanished from sight “Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!”
  8. Phil "OMGClayAiken" Galfond(pictured) has been having a rough year at the tables online. After starting March off strong and winning over $220,000, the high-stakes grinder quickly lost it all back, plus another $1.2 million, in just a few sessions. The sudden downswing led Galfond to post a lighthearted Tweet about his current misfortune: "What's the best way to make a quick $1.4m back? Asking for a friend." While the Tweet garnered several responses, some serious and some tongue-in-cheek, the most interesting came from Tom "durrrr" Dwan, who said, "In Macau, the standard way to get even is baccarat." While Dwan could have been joking, his response, at the very least, highlights the absurd amounts of cash being gambled on a regular basis at Macau's casinos. The tiny Chinese gambling enclave has become the de facto center of the ultra high-stakes poker world in recent years, with action moving away from Las Vegas. In fact, the former Portuguese colony took in $45 billion in revenue in 2013, over seven times what Las Vegas made in the same period, according to CNN. In card rooms like the Poker King Club Macau, you can find Dwan battling pros, wealthy businessman, and Chinese mega-whales for millions of dollars in games with blinds up to $12,500/$25,000. Entrepreneur and poker player Tom "Hong Kong Tom" Hall, a Macau high-stakes regular, recently gave an interview revealing some rare details on the game. He said that since it began, around 100 to 150 players have participated, with 10 to 20 playing regularly. For pros, entry is not guaranteed and a recommendation from another player already in the game is needed. Usually, only a set number of grinders will be allowed at the table and those not willing to gamble a little are frowned upon. "I don't think any individual is specifically unwelcome, but those super-nitty, 'silent at the table' pros are extremely unlikely to get a second invite," said Hall. With blinds so high, huge wins and losses are commonplace. "I would say approximately… $12.8 million [was the most] won/lost in a single session, bearing in mind these sessions can run 30 to 40 hours regularly with perhaps a mini-food break or quick nap or break to watch a soccer game." According to Hall, "all of the local regulars usually play their own funds, whereas most of the pros are either staked or pierced out to a certain degree." Perhaps that's why Dwan(pictured), who is known to play an extremely loose-aggressive style, is so welcome at the game. And as the ex-Full Tiltsponsored pro joked with Galfond, he regularly sees wild swings of his own in the Macau game. Last September, he Tweeted that he had taken his "biggest loss ever" there; people familiar with the game claimed it was more than $4 million. If Galfond doesn't prefer baccarat, several other prominent members of the poker community chimed in with other suggestions. Lance Bradley, editor of Bluff, quipped, "Find Gus [Hansen]," while PokerStarsteam member Jorge Limon recommended "a flight to Macau." Jimmy Gobboboy Fricke brought up Antonio Esfandiari's "Rocks and Rings" high-stakes crew, while Victoria Fath proposed Galfond do some "hand modeling." Galfond seems to be taking the loss in stride and, with such a solid track record in online cash games and live tournaments, it's hard to imagine he will be too affected by the downswing. According to HighstakesDB, the 29-year-old is up around $7.3 million over a half-million hands in seven years. He's no slouch in tournaments either, boasting $1.8 million in total tracked earnings. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  9. Phil Galfond (pictured), needless to say, is one of the biggest winners in online poker history, having profited over $7.8 million in cash games on PokerStarsand Full Tilt Poker, according to HighStakesDB. He's a stud, plain and simple. So, there would be no better person to hear from about where online cash games are headed. Accordingly, PokerListings sat down with him to get his thoughts on the matter recently and, perhaps surprisingly, even someone as incredible at poker as Galfond is finding it more and more difficult to thrive in the high-stakes world. "The games are getting worse online. Yeah, it keeps happening. It hasn't been great. The games have moved from No Limit Hold'em to PLO and now most of the nosebleed games are either Triple Draw or 8-Game," he told PokerListings. "I can play Triple Draw, but I'm not really strong enough to step into a lot of 8-Game lineups," he added. As for where the big online games are headed, Galfond predicted that it will be important for players to have a strong all-around game. "I think that Triple Draw, over the next two years, will kind of slowly die at high-stakes, so I think Mix is next," he said. In the interview, Galfond also talked about one of his biggest poker rivals, Tom Dwan (pictured), who also happens to be a good friend. Dwan, Galfond said, brings out the best in him. "Whenever I play pots against Tom online, I probably have my highest level of focus because he has, I call it intensity. He's always paying a lot of attention to a hand, so if you look weak, he's gonna pounce on it. So, I would always play against him with my highest level of focus." Dwan also ranks as one of the biggest online cash game winners, having amassed a $2.2 million in profit, according to HighStakesDB. Galfond isn't as well-known for his live tournament play – online cash games are still his bread and butter – but he has certainly seen his share of success. This year already, he has two sixth place finishes in World Series of Poker events. He has won one WSOP bracelet lifetime, earned in a $5,000 Pot Limit Omaha event in 2008, and came extremely close to another last year, finishing as the runner-up in the $25,000 Six-Handed No Limit Hold'em event. All told, he has won about $2 million in live tournaments, according to the Hendon Mob. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  10. The rumors swirling over the last day or two were true: Viktor "Isildur1" Blom and Gus Hansen (pictured) are no longer sponsored pros of Full Tilt Poker. There had been reports of their likenesses being removed from the Full Tilt website, so the rumors were strong, but no public statement had been made as to whether it was just a site redesign or if, in fact, the two players were really not part of Full Tilt anymore. PocketFives reached out to Full Tilt and the online poker room confirmed that Blom and Hansen are no longer serving as the site's pros. The brief statement is as follows: "We can confirm that Full Tilt's sponsorship of Viktor Blom and Gus Hansen has expired. This follows a year-long review of the Full Tilt brand and a decision to move away from Pro-centric advertising to focus on the experiences and stories of the vast majority of our players. Full Tilt will celebrate the excitement, fun, and intrinsic enjoyment of playing our poker, blackjack, roulette, and slots games. A new TV campaign will launch imminently, representing this new approach. There will be more news on this later in the week. We would like to wish Viktor and Gus all the best in their future endeavors." The reaction to the initial rumors was slightly mixed in the poker community. People were generally disappointed that the two big names would possibly be leaving the nosebleed-stakes tables at Full Tilt, but at the same time, the move by Full Tilt made sense. As poster "Karcsi" on Two Plus Two put it, "Let's be honest,Viktor has practically no marketing value at all since he is not doing any interviews or promoting the site or even the game itself more to the public." When Full Tilt Poker re-launched in late 2012, it did so with three men as the face of the site: Hansen, Blom (pictured), and Tom "durrrr" Dwan. Called "The Professionals," they were three of the biggest high-stakes draws in the game, players who fans regularly logged in to watch. Dwan left Full Tilt in December 2013 after his contract was up. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  11. Let the drama and personal insults continue to fly! This week, PokerListingssat down with Dan Cates (pictured), who was formerly in the midst of the Durrrr Challenge with Tom Dwan. The challenge, which was set to last 50,000 hands, is only about 40% completed and, according to PokerListings and other sites, Cates is up $1.25 million thus far. If Cates is up after 50,000 hands, Dwan owes him $1.5 million; otherwise, Cates owes Dwan $500,000. --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by Betsafe, one of the leading suppliers of online gaming products worldwide and a major sponsor of Gumball 3000. Sign up now for great bonuses, €3,000,000 guaranteed monthly, and plenty of live events! --- Penalties for Dwan and Cates not playingDurrrr Challenge hands were introduced in an effort to speed along the four-year-old battle. But, according to PokerListings, Cates is growing increasingly frustrated at the lack of action, saying, "[Dwan] failed to uphold any promises he made to me. He's extremely frustrating. It's outrageous. I feel like he won't complete it, for a few reasons, but for now I won't divulge his personal situation. But I'm not thrilled with anything I hear about him." Notice that Cates said he wouldn't divulge Dwan's personal situation "for now." According to PokerListings, "Cates went on to say that if things don't change he will be forced to say more about why Dwan isn't playing, but that he hopes things can be worked out privately." PokerListings added that the incentives inserted into the Durrrr Challenge have resulted in Dwan building a debt of $300,000. Dwan (pictured) has reportedly not paid any of that total. One of the most recent Durrrr Challenge sessions between Cates and Dwan occurred last October, when Cates padded his lead by $200,000 over 1,500 hands. $200/$400 Heads-Up No Limit Hold'em tables on Full Tilt played host to the competition, which has garnered a considerable amount of attention from the poker community when it has taken place. The original Durrrr Challenge started in 2009 and pitted Dwan against Patrik Antonius. The latter shredded Dwan, winning over $2 million in about 40,000 hands. Then, a buyout allegedly occurred that ended the challenge. In May, Cates and Dwan sparred over the unfinished Durrrr Challenge, with Cates Tweeting at one point, "@TomDwan, would you like to continue our challenge instead of playing everybody else at every game on @FullTiltPoker?" There were also threats to air "our business" via Twitter. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  12. A few days ago, Dan Cates (pictured), who is known as junglemanonline, posted the following on Twitter rather nonchalantly: "Sooo Manila didn't go well, only lost about 38m hkd(5m usd)... Gonna play some 5/10 online and take another shot." Yes, not going "well" meant losing $5 million in high-stakes cash games in Manila. --- Tournament Poker Edgeis the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- The Tweet had been re-Tweeted 85 times and marked as a Favorite 143 times when we took a look at it on Monday. According to PokerNews, games in Manila were reportedly going as high as $2,500-$5,000-$10,000. A few days prior to the news, Cates Tweeted that 2015 was not going so well for many players: "Pretty dark year for everyone I know in poker... Who is winning out there lol besides Rast and Robl?" According to HighStakesDB, Cates played online on August 13, the same day he posted his Tweet, and dropped about $1 million. Since HighStakesDB began tracking Cates on PokerStarsunder the name w00ki3zin 2010, he is up about three-quarters of a million dollars. On Full Tilt, where he plays as jungleman12, he is up almost $10.3 million lifetime. When asked by one poster whether he had "partners" to help finance him in Manila, Cates responded, "Probably." Other well-known players who have been spotted in Manila recently include Phil Ivey (pictured) and Tom Dwan. On Monday, one player wrote on 2+2 that he had spotted Cates over the weekend in a live game: "Saw w00ki3z… playing high-stakes games as usual in the Kings Rozvadov this weekend. He was laughing all day and doing this left/right freak look with his eyes as usual. He's just fine, playing 100/200 live mixed games, 10k high-roller donkaments, and all this stuff." Back in 2013, Dwan, who has also been part of the high-stakes action in Manila recently, was rumored to have lost $4 million in a live game in Macau. He posted while in transit from Macau, "In Taiwan for the 1st time ever... Not leaving the airport tho. Maybe next trip. Had my biggest loss ever yesterday." He didn't give the exact amount of the loss at the time, but sources at the game said the damage was $4 million. Also in Asia, Dwan, Ivey, and others have been high-rolling in a game called Six Plus Hold'em in which the deuces, threes, fours, and fives are removed from the deck. As Dwan put it, "In Six Plus, everybody needs to be gambling more and thinking more. [You] can't just be lazy and wait for a good hand. It's just fun. Everyone is in a lot of pots and there's a lot of money in them." Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  13. In the years before Black Friday, Tom durrrrDwan was a star in the online high-stakes community, playing the biggest stakes versus the best in the world, usually on Full Tilt Poker. Dwan was doing so well, in fact, that he was finding it hard to even get any action at the tables. --- Tournament Poker Edgeis the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- So confident in his abilities was he at the time that he decided to throw down the gauntlet and offer 3:1 odds that he could be any player in the world heads-up over 50,000 hands. Known as the Durrrr Challenge, Dwan would pay $1.5 million to his opponent if he were up by $1 after the required hands were played. If Dwan came out on top, his opponent would pay only $500,000. Daniel JunglemanCates (pictured) was happy to accept the bet and the pair began sparring in 2010. After playing around 20,000 hands, Cates had amassed a sizable $1.3 million lead over Dwan. But the events of Black Friday effectively shut Full Tilt Poker down and delayed the challenge indefinitely. Since that time, Cates has been prodding Dwan to finish the match, but has had little luck wrangling the young high-stakes specialist. That could all change, however, if a 2+2 post by Jungleman is any indicator. "Tom and I have had some disputes, but I believe we have essentially resolved them," he said. "The challenge is agreed to be played out in the next nine months. I think Tom intends on finishing the challenge, but has been distracted by things of great importance... In addition, Black Friday greatly hindered our progress." Indeed, in Cates' frustration, he called out Dwan (pictured) in the poker media and threatened to reveal aspects of Dwan's personal life. "The latest with durrrr is that he is being totally uncooperative," Cates told PokerListings last year. "We have played zero hands in 2014 and only 2,500 of the 62,000 hands Tom played in 2013 were from the challenge." In 2013, it seemed like the challenge was back on after the pair agreed to a penalty schedule in which Dwan would pay Cates $40,000 for every two months that passed without progress on the bet. Needless to say, the penalties failed to motivate Dwan, who now owes $300,000 in fines, according to Cates. "He failed to uphold any promises he made to me," added Cates. "He's extremely frustrating. It's outrageous." Even with Dwan seemingly unresponsive, Cates was confident enough in being paid by his foe to cross-book action against him in his battle against a Heads-Up No Limit Hold'em machine at the Bellagio in Las Vegas. The bet ended up costing Cates $400,000, a figure which he would deduct from the amount was owed by Dwan for the challenge. In the past few years, Durrrr has rarely been seen playing high-stakes online and is known to instead frequent the live nosebleed games in Macau. While that juicy game is off-limits to many pros, Dwan is allowed in due to his loose playing style, which generates a lot of action. If the challenge is indeed resurrected, the pair will need to find a new destination to play out their remaining 30,000 hands. Full Tilt Poker, which once hosted the challenge, recently decided to remove its high-stakes tables and has removed heads-up tables altogether. The Amaya-owned company hopes to reduce the risk of amateur players quickly going broke at the hands of professionals, never to return again.
  14. When you've played as many hands of No Limit Hold'em as poker pros Phil Ivey (pictured) and Tom Durrrr Dwan have, it's only natural to want to mix it up a bit. For most pros, that usually means games like PLO, Razz, and Triple Draw, but even those variants can get boring after a while. Ivey and Dwan are now promoting a lesser-known game called Six Plus Hold'em, which has apparently become popular in the nosebleed games in Macau. --- Tournament Poker Edge is the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- The two poker legends spoke about the game with an Asian presenter in a YouTube video, likely filmed in Macau or in the new high-stakes hotspot of Manila, Philippines. "I love the game. It's fun and there's a lot of action," said Ivey. "It creates big pots and there's a lot of skill involved, but there's also a lot of luck involved." For those not familiar with the game, it's usually played similarly to standard NLHE, but with the twos, threes, fours, and fives removed from the deck. Aces can count as high or low and can make an A-6-7-8-9 straight, the lowest one possible. Since there are only 36 cards in the deck, hand ranks shift a bit. In this variant, three-of-a-kind trumps a straight and flushes beat a full house. According to Dwan and Ivey, Six Plus' popularity can be attributed to the action the game encourages. "In Six Plus, everybody needs to be gambling more and thinking more. [You] can't just be lazy and wait for a good hand," said Dwan. "It's just fun. Everyone is in a lot of pots and there's a lot of money in them." The two poker pros regularly travel to Macau to battle wealthy Asian gamblers in the biggest games on the globe. In May, the pair appeared at the reopening of the Poker King Club inside Venetian Macau, host to the area's high-stakes action. But with the Chinese government cracking down on nefarious junket operators and corrupt officials, the industry has seen a huge decline. For high-stakes poker players, that means migrating to wherever the action resumes, even if it means traveling the globe. According to reports, the big game has picked up again at the Poker King Club inside Manila's Solaire Resort and Casino, where Daniel Jungleman Cates, Ivey, and Dwan (pictured) have recently been spotted playing $2,500/$5,000/$10,000 stakes. Poker King Club CEO Winfred Yu, a successful poker player with $1.3 million in tournament scores on his resume, called the action the "biggest in the world right now." It's unclear whether the pros have introduced Six Plus into their repertoire there, but if so, the game could give them a huge advantage over unsophisticated players still learning the ropes. All one needs to do is look back into the history of online poker, when fish were abundant and few players possessed the knowledge needed to beat the games consistently. But with so many strategy resources available, amateur players soon caught up, making the games much tougher. Now, enterprising pros have begun to focus on mixed games, variants which few amateurs can play solidly. With Six Plus, even Dwan is having a hard time perfecting his strategy and dealing with the high variance of the game. "I'm still trying to figure out the game myself, as I'm sure lots of other people are," he said. "You make stronger hands than normal because there are fewer cards in the deck and also less equity." Where you may have enjoyed being a 5:1 favorite in standard Hold'em, in Six Plus your lead would be closer to 2:1, according to Dwan. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitter and Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  15. Hosted by PocketFives President and Editor in Chief Lance Bradley and poker writer Matt Clark, The Fives runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and interview players and industry leaders. DOWNLOAD THIS EPISODE IN ITUNES Lance and Matt are pretty excited that Tom Dwan is back on Poker After Dark. On this episode, they discuss Dwan's big hand against Antonio Esfandiari, wrap up all the action from the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open, preview Poker Night in America's King of the Hill event and convince themselves to go see Molly's Game, the poker movie from Aaron Sorkin.
  16. [caption width="640"] Tom Dwan is the headliner in the first three episodes of Poker After Dark on PokerGO (WPT photo)[/caption] When PokerGO announced they were bringing Poker After Dark back as part of their schedule, there was plenty of speculation as to who would be on the show. Fans seemed to want some of the players who played on the show before mixed in with some of the top younger talent that has emerged since the show last ran. Nobody thought it would mean the return of Tom Dwan though. Thursday night, PokerGO announced the first three lineups for the show and Dwan is scheduled to be playing in all three. The first three days of PAD are a $100,000 minimum buy-in cash game with $200/$400 blinds and a $400 button ante. The first show airs live on PokerGO, Monday, August 14 at 8 pm ET. Subsequent episodes will also air live on Tuesday, August 15 and Wednesday, August 16. The nosebleed wunderkind, once a regular PAD participant, has been playing in Macau and Manila and has spent very little time in the public eye since Black Friday. “The shows were fun, they ended up being more interesting and more fun than I expected. It also helped that I won basically every hand that I played. If I called they were bluffing, if I was bluffing they folded. I’m hoping that continues,” said Dwan. The first episode also features Daniel Negreanu and Antonio Esfandiari while Doyle Brunson and Andrew Robl are both scheduled to play in the second and third episodes. Jean-Robert Bellande, Lauren Roberts and Bill Klein will also appear on all three episodes. Lineup #1 - Monday, August 14 Tom Dwan Daniel Negreanu Antonio Esfandiari Jean-Robert Bellande Lauren Roberts Bill Klein Lineup #2 - Tuesday, August 15 Tom Dwan Doyle Brunson Andrew Robl Jean-Robert Bellande Lauren Roberts Bill Klein Lineup #3 - Wednesday, August 16 Tom Dwan Doyle Brunson Andrew Robl Jean-Robert Bellande Lauren Roberts Bill Klein
  17. The Super High Roller Bowl is taking a trip overseas. PokerCentral, sponsor and creator of the Super High Roller Bowl, has teamed up with Macau Billionaire Poker, a poker room in Macau, to announce the expansion of the Super High Roller Bowl to China. From March 20-22 the inaugural, invite-only Super High Roller Bowl China tournament will take place at the Babylon Casino, at Macau Fisherman’s Wharf in Macau, China. Macau Billionaire Poker has attached a $100 million HKD ($12.8M USD) guarantee with a buy-in of $2,000,000 + $100,000 HKD ($268,000 USD) and unlimited re-entry for those selected to participate. "As the annual Super High Roller Bowl out of Las Vegas continues to be the gold standard for high roller tournament poker, we knew the time was right to expand the format globally," Sampson Simmons, vice president of content at Poker Central commented. "China is one of poker’s largest markets, and Macau Billionaire Poker is a natural partner to help bring the Super High Roller Bowl to poker fans internationally." In 2017 Macau Billionaire Poker hosted the MPB Summer Showdown Main Event, a tournament that boasted a $20 million HKD guarantee, the largest guaranteed prize pool ever for the area. The Super High Roller Bowl China is slated to break that record five times over. "We are delighted to launch a new edition of the Super High Roller Bowl with Poker Central," said Tim Chen, CEO of Macau Billionaire Poker. “We wanted to raise the stakes by providing a prize pool befitting of the event’s renowned stature - we can’t wait to see what unfolds at this inaugural event.” Surely poker fans will be eager to see what unfolds as well. Perhaps, more specifically, who shows up for the tournament. Macau has long been the location of legendary tales of ultra-high stakes poker games with some of the biggest names in poker, like Phil Ivey and Tom Dwan, seemingly swept up in the mystery of Macau. Perhaps the Super High Roller Bowl China will be an opportunity for fans to once again to watch Ivey, Dwan, and more, in action. The event is invite-only and currently is announced with a 49 player maximum, so it’s likely a carefully curated field of some of the elite players in the world matching wits against the richest business-minded poker players in Asia. For those looking to enter, an email address has been provided for potential registration information. Broadcast details of the event to be announced at a later date.
  18. Hosted by PocketFives President and Editor in Chief Lance Bradley and poker writer Matt Clark, The Fives runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. DOWNLOAD THIS EPISODE IN ITUNES GET THIS EPISODE ON STITCHER GET THIS EPISODE ON GOOGLE PLAY
  19. Short deck hold'em continues to grow in popularity, both in cash game and tournament format. This summer, the World Series of Poker added a $10,000 buy-in short deck hold'em event to its schedule of gold bracelet events, plus a handful of other venues around town are including the game in their summer offerings. Here are where and when you can play short deck hold’em in Las Vegas this summer. Short Deck Hold'em Events in Vegas This Summer Date Time (PT) Venue Buy-In Guarantee 6/1 2 p.m. Planet Hollywood $200 None 6/1 6 p.m. The Orleans $200 $20,000 6/2 6 p.m. World Series of Poker $10,000 None 6/5 7 p.m. ARIA $240 None 6/14 11 a.m. Golden Nugget $250 $5,000 6/20 10 a.m. Golden Nugget $360 $5,000 In addition to the tournaments listed in the table above, players may be able to find short deck hold'em cash games around Las Vegas this summer. One venue that is open to spreading it is ARIA Resort & Casino, who said they would be open to dealing the game at any limit they have in place for regular no-limit hold'em. What Is Short Deck Hold’em and How Do You Play? Also known as "six-plus hold’em," short deck hold'em is the new game in town that's quickly risen in the ranks of popularity. Players such as Phil Ivey, Tom Dwan, and Jason Koon are playing the game for astronomical stakes throughout Asia, and it's coming to the WSOP for the first time ever in 2019. Compared to regular no-limit hold'em, short deck hold'em is still extremely young and, therefore, not as widely known. Its rise in popularity has it almost on par with pot-limit Omaha. So, how does one play short deck hold'em? Short deck hold'em plays just like regular no-limit hold'em. Everyone is dealt two cards and there is a flop, turn, and river, with betting action taking place preflop and after each street of community cards. Also just like hold'em, players use their two hole cards combined with the five community cards on the board to make the best five-card poker hand. The deck being played with is different, though, and this is the first major difference between short deck hold'em and regular hold'em. Instead of the normal 52 cards that make up your regular poker deck, a deck used for short deck hold'em is only made up of 36 cards. Removed from the deck to cut it from 52 to 36 are the twos, threes, fours, and fives, hence the alternate name "six-plus hold’em." An ace remains a two-way card that can be used as both a high card and a low card. The second major difference is how the hands are ranked. It's become commonplace that flushes rank ahead of full houses in short deck hold'em. Some rules allow for three of a kind to beat straights, as well, but this is not the case for the $10,000 Short Deck tournament at the 2019 WSOP. Due to the shorter deck that's used in short deck hold'em, the odds for making certain hands change. It's easier to make a full house than it is a flush, which is why flushes rank higher than full houses in short deck hold'em. Below is a table of the most commonly used hand ranking system for short deck hold’em. Short Deck Hold'em Hand Rankings Royal Flush Straight Flush Four of a Kind Flush Full House Straight Three of a Kind Two Pair One Pair High Card Preflop, both blind and ante structures have been used for short deck hold'em.When blinds are used, the two players to the left of the button post the small blind and big blind, just as they would in regular hold'em, but some short deck hold'em games are played ante-only with no blinds.
  20. The Triton Super High Roller Poker Series is about to make history. On Thursday, August 1 the Triton Million: A Helping Hand For Charity tournament will begin and it’s £1,050,000 buy-in will make the three-day event the biggest buy-in in poker history. Some of the biggest names in the game of poker will make their way to the UK to participate in this historic event that blends nosebleed stakes with an effort to raise money for a host of charitable causes. From every buy-in, £50,000 will be raised to benefit charities that include REG, the Caring For Children Foundation, Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity, and One Drop. Invitations Please It’s not just the super-sized buy-in that makes playing in this tournament unique. The Triton Million was searching for a way to make sure the event wasn’t simply packed with pieced-out pros. They wanted to give recreational players and business professionals a reason to participate, so that made the event invitation only - with a twist. A Triton Poker Series committee handed out invitations only to non-professional players and then allowed them to invite one player each, which could be a pro player. The result is a field consisting of one half ‘recreationals’ and the other half, super high roller poker pros. For the first six hours, each half will be separated. The pros will only play against other pros and the recs will battle the recs. Then, there will be a redraw and the tournament will proceed as usual. With only 23 business professionals signed up, pro players needed to find themselves an invite from a like-minded counterpart. Here are those pro players that made a connection or two and will be taking a seat at the Triton Million. Bryn Kenney [caption id="attachment_625864" align="alignnone" width="903"] Bryn Kenney (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Bryn Kenney is in the midst of a career year. The regular super high roller and former #1-ranked GPI player has spent the better part of 2019 destroying the biggest buy-ins in the world, claiming three seven-figure scores this year alone. In addition to taking down the 2019 Aussie Million Main Event for over $914,000, Kenney has posted some of the biggest results of his career in previous Triton Poker Super High Roller Series. In March, he finished as the runner-up in the Triton Jeju Main Event for a career-high cash of $3,062,513. He followed that up with back-to-back victories during Triton Montenegro bringing him scores of $1.4 million and $2.7 million in a three-day span. His incredible run has vaulted him to the rarified air of the top 5 on the All-Time Money List, where he currently sits at #4. He is also currently resting as the #2 player on the 2019 Money List, second only to the winner of the World Series of Poker Main Event, Hossein Ensan. Kenney was invited to the Triton Million by Poker Central founder Cary Katz. Tom Dwan [caption id="attachment_625865" align="alignnone" width="903"] Tom Dwan (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Tom Dwan is arguably one of the most popular poker players in the history of the game. When his exciting, aggressive style of play was featured in the pre-Black Friday televised cash games heyday, the young man known as ‘Durrrr’ became iconic as the representative of the young crop of online grinders who helped push the game of poker to the next level. Nowadays, a Tom Dwan sighting is rare. Especially in a tournament. It’s generally understood that Dwan spends his time grinding the largest cash games in the world in Macau, only buying into tournaments when the stakes are at their highest, like the Triton Million. In fact, Dwan only has five recorded tournament results since 2011, two of which were invitational events. His last tournament cash was from June 2018 where he had a final table finish during the Triton Jeju Short Deck event for $252,320. In April 2019, Dwan was named an official Triton Poker ambassador. Dwan was invited to the Triton Million by the founder of the Triton Series himself, Paul Phua. Justin Bonomo [caption id="attachment_625867" align="alignnone" width="903"] Justin Bonomo (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] It wouldn’t be a Super High Roller event without the current king of the All-Time Money List, Justin Bonomo. For roughly a two year stretch between 2017-2018, it seemed like there wasn’t a nosebleed tournament where Bonomo didn't end up with all the chips. With just over $45 million in career earnings, Bonomo has a trophy case filled with super high roller scores including the 2018 Super High Roller Bowl China for $4.8 million, the 2019 Super High Roller Bowl title in Las Vegas for $5 million and the 2018 $1M The Big One For One Drop at the World Series of Poker for $10 million. Bonomo’s last outright victory took place this past March when he conquered the field in the first Short Deck event of the 2019 Triton Juju SHR Series taking home just over $586,000. Bonomo was invited to the Triton Million by Ferdinand Putra. Fedor Holz [caption id="attachment_625869" align="alignnone" width="903"] Fedor Holz (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Despite having ‘retired’ from poker, German poker savant Fedor Holz is still very much categorized as a pro. Hailing from a country packed with some of the greatest minds in the game, Holz sits at #1 on Germany’s All-Time Money List (#6 in the world) thanks to his over $32M in career earnings. Like many players who will be attending Triton Million, Holz found the majority of his success in the high rollers, where he absolutely dominated the scene in 2016. At the time Holz went on his outstanding tournament tear, the poker world had not seen anything like it. Holz took down the 2016 Triton Philippines Main Event title for over $3 million as well as the WSOP’s $111,111 High Roller for One Drop for nearly $5 million in a campaign that brought his over $16 million for the year. Nowadays, Holz spends much of his time working in business endeavors off the felt, including his midset app, Primed Mind. However, it was just last year that Holz finished as the runner-up to Justin Bonomo in the $1M buy-in Big One For One Drop, taking home $6 million for his efforts. Holz was invited to the Triton Mliion by Antanas ‘Tony G’ Guoga. Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates [caption id="attachment_625872" align="alignnone" width="903"] Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] One of the most unique and entertaining players on the SHR circuit is Daniel ‘Jungleman’ Cates. A regular in the nosebleed cash games in Bobby’s Room at the Bellagio Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Cates is known as a fearless player willing to take on anyone, anywhere, and at any stakes. When Cates isn’t busy producing steamy poker themed music videos, he has found plenty of success on the Triton tour. In 2016 he took home the Triton SHR Series Sanctity Cup title, just days before finishing third in the same series Main Event for over $1 million. He also took home another Triton trophy in May 2019 taking down the NLHE/Short Deck Mix event for just over $500,000. Cates was invited to the Triton Million by Malaysian businessman Richard Yong. Plenty of other pro players were able to find an invite into the tournaments and they are listed below, with their businessman/recreational counterpart in parentheses. David Peters (Stanley Choi) Rui Cao (Wai Kin Yong) Jason Koon (Bobby Baldwin) Mikita Badziakouski (Liang Yu) Timofey Kuznetsov (Ivan Leow) Stephen Chidwick (Alfred DeCarolis) Wai Leong Chan (Chin Wei Lim) Christoph Vogelsang (Chow Hing Yaung) Nick Petrangelo (Pat Madden) Sam Greenwood (Sosia Jiang) Elton Tsang (Qiang Wang) Tan Xuan (Zang Shu Nu) Martin Kabrhel (Leon Tsoukernik) Matthias Eibinger (Open Kisacikoglu) Igor Kurganov (Talal Shakerchi) Sam Trickett (Rob Yong) Bill Perkins (Dan Smith) Andrew Robl (Andrew Pantling) Vivek Rajkumar (Rick Solomon) Danny Tang (Winfred Yu) Michael Soyza (Ben Wu) How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code “POCKET5S” for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  21. London won't be burning with boredom this week. The biggest buy-in poker tournament ever takes over London this week with many of the world's best high roller poker players playing at the invite of big-swinging recreational players. The Triton Million is a £1,050,000 buy-in tournament with unique rules designed to provide some level footing for the businessmen and women against some of poker's elite and all of the action will be streamed live. Leveling the Playing Field Not just anybody can play though. The Triton Million features a unique format designed to ensure the tournament isn't a shark fest. Triton organizers invited 23 recreational players, mainly businessmen and women, and each of them is allowed to invite one professional poker player as their guest. In an attempt to create a fair playing environment, recreational players will be separated from the pros for the first six levels of play with a full re-draw taking place following the sixth level. At that point, all players will be inter-mingled with the exception that recreational players can not be seated with the pro they invited until reaching the final table. Players are also not permitted to wear any form of clothing that covers their face or head. This includes scarves, funnel neck sweatshirts, turtle neck jumpers, hats/caps. All-Star Calibre Field As with any Triton Poker event, Paul Phua and Richard Yong will be in the field as two of the recreational players. They'll be joined on the recreational side by the likes of Bobby Baldwin, Cary Katz, Rob Yong, Talal Shakerchi, Tony G, and Leon Tsoukernik. Fedor Holz, Tom Dwan, Jason Koon, Sam Greenwood, Bryn Kenney, Mikita Badziakouski, Stephen Chidwick, Nick Petrangelo, and Timofey Kuznetsov are just a sprinkling of the players who have accepted an invite to play. There are currently 47 players registered including two additions made late Monday when hedge fund manager Bill Perkins invited Dan Smith to play. The only recreational player who has so far chosen not to extend an invite to a pro is Rick Salomon. The History of $1 Million Buy-In Poker Tournaments The £1,050,000 buy-in - roughly $1,285,000 US - make this just the fifth tournament in history to have a seven-figure buy-in. The previous four were all World Series of Poker Big One for One Drop events. The first Big One for One Drop in 2012 featured 48 players and was won by Antonio Esfandiari and represents the largest prize pool of the four. Year Event Entries Winner Prize pool 2012 $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop 48 Antonio Esfandiari $42,666,672 2014 $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop 42 Dan Colman $37,333,338 2016 €1,000,000 Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza 28 Elton Tsang $27,437,564 2018 $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop 27 Justin Bonomo $24,840,000 The 2016 event in Monte Carlo was only open to recreational players and was won by Elton Tsang. Multiple Charities Set to Benefit Like the Big One for One Drop, the Triton Million also has a charitable angle. £50,000 from each buy-in goes to Triton Million beneficiaries, a hand-selected collection of charities including Caring for Children Foundation, Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity Foundation, Sarawak Children's Cancer Society, Malaysian Red Crescent, One Drop, and Raise for Effective Giving (REG). Full Triton Super High Roller London Schedule The Triton Million is the star of a seven-event Super High Roller London schedule that includes a mix of traditional No Limit Hold'em and Short Deck Hold'em spread over the eight days of play. Event # Buy-In Game Dates 1 £25,000 Six Max No Limit Hold'em Turbo July 31 2 £1,050,000 Triton Million for Charity August 1-3 3 £50,000 No Limit Hold'em August 2-3 4 £100,000 Main Event August 4-5 5 £25,000 Short Deck Ante Only No Limit Hold'em August 5-6 6 £100,000 Short Deck Main Event August 6-8 7 £50,000 Short Deck Ante Only No Limit Hold'em August 7-8 How to Watch the Triton Million Triton Poker has an established history of hosting live streams of their events to huge audiences around the world with commentary in multiple languages. Previous tournaments have been streamed on YouTube and Twitch, but the all three days of Triton Million will be streamed for free on PokerGO beginning, August 1 at 8 AM ET. Ali Nejad and Nick Schulman will be in the booth calling all of the action. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  22. The 2019 Triton Super High Roller Series London kicks off this week with the biggest buy-in in tournament poker history as the highlight. Deemed the Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity, the event has a gargantuan £1,050,000 buy-in, of which £1,000,000 goes to the prize pool and £50,000 goes towards charitable causes. The Triton Million takes place at London Hilton on Park Lane and is sponsored by partypoker LIVE. It is scheduled as a three-day event from August 1-3. Charitable causes to benefit include Caring For Children Foundation, R.E.G., Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity, and One Drop. Triton Million Provides Unique Twist The Triton Million has a freezeout format with a rather unique twist to it. It’s invite-only. Invited players were issued invitations from a committee, and these players are of the recreational or businessman or woman variety. Those fortunate enough to receive invitations can then issue one invitation of their own to a guest player. The guest player can be a professional poker player. This allows for the field to be at least a 50% businessmen. For the first six hours of tournament play, the two player pools will be separated, such that the recreational/businessmen and women compete against one another and the guests/professionals play against one another. Furthermore, players will be asked to dress in formal attire for the final table. The Triton Million field has 25 businessmen signed up. Let’s take a look at them. Paul Phua [caption id="attachment_625843" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Paul Phua (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Paul Phua has been around the ultra high-stakes poker scene for nearly a decade now, amassing more than $11,400,000 in live tournament earnings and cashing in some of the richest poker events in the world. He has two victories on record, first in the Aspers £100,000 High Roller in 2012 for £1,000,000 ($1,621,297) and second in the Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza €100,000 High Roller for €752,700 ($825,619). As for his business exploits that have earned him a fortune, Phua has been a well-known junket operator for some of the world’s richest and he’s been in the news as the "world's biggest bookie," having his Caesars Palace villa raided in July 2014 for running an illegal gambling operation. The raid came just about a month after Phua was arrested in Macau under similar charges. Phua's guest player for the Triton Million is Tom Dwan. Cary Katz [caption id="attachment_625842" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Cary Katz (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Cary Katz is the man atop the Poker Central organizational chart, having founded the company in 2015. Prior to that, he was founder and CEO of one of the largest student loan companies in the United States. On the felt, Katz has nearly $20,000,000 in live tournament earnings, including a career-best score of €1,750,000 ($1,929,203) when he finished fifth in the 2016 Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza €1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. In January 2018, Katz won the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $100,000 Super High Roller to the tune of $1,492,340, and he placed eighth in the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop for $1,306,667. Katz's guest player for the Triton Million is Bryn Kenney. Rob Yong [caption id="attachment_625844" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Rob Yong (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Rob Yong is the owner of Dusk Till Dawn Poker & Casino in Nottingham, UK. Under Yong’s watchful eye, Dusk Till Dawn was built into what is considered to be one of the best card rooms in the world, with top-tier brands such as the World Series of Poker, World Poker Tour, partypoker, and UK & Ireland Poker Tour holding events there. Yong is now heavily involved with partypoker and partypoker LIVE, helping to grow these two brands in the online and live realms, respectively. Although his live tournament results amount to only a little more than $330,000, Yong has been a regular at some of the highest stakes in the world, specifically when it comes to cash games. At the table, he’s an entertaining competitor who doesn’t shy away from risk and will liven up any game. Yong's guest player for the Triton Million is Sam Trickett. Talal Shakerchi [caption id="attachment_625845" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Talal Shakerchi (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Talal Shakerchi is a player from the recreational/businessmen category that could likely fit into the professional poker player category. He doesn’t have the most live tournament earnings, with more than $7,300,000 won in his career, but make no mistake about it, Shakerchi is a grinder. For quite some time, Shakerchi kept his online poker name a secret so others in the high-stakes community wouldn’t realize his ability or the amount of volume he was putting in. On the business side, Shakerchi is an investment manager, running Meditor Capital Management Limited, which he founded. Shakerchi's guest player for the Triton Million is Igor Kurganov. Antanas 'Tony G' Guoga [caption id="attachment_625841" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Antanas 'Tony G' Guoga (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Antanas Guoga, who is best known as 'Tony G' in the poker world, is another player listed in the recreational/businessmen category that could very well be considered a professional poker player. At least that’s what he used to be. Now a politician and Lithuanian Member of the European Parliament, Guoga is rarely seen on the poker scene these days. He is the founder of PokerNews.com and TonyBet. Guoga boasts more than $6,000,000 in live tournament earnings and became famous for his brash table talk. His biggest cash came at the European Poker Tour Grand Final €25,500 High Roller in 2009, when he took third for €420,000 ($552,239). He won the 2005 European Poker Championships Main Event for £260,000 ($456,822) and placed second in the World Poker Tour €10,000 Grand Prix de Paris for €339,930 ($414,478) in 2004. Guoga's guest player for the Triton Million is Fedor Holz. Additional Triton Million players from the recreational/businessmen category are listed below, with their guest players in parentheses. Richard Yong (Dan Cates) Stanley Choi (David Peters) Wai Kin Yong (Rui Cao) Bobby Baldwin (Jason Koon) Liang Yu (Mikita Badziakouski) Ivan Leow (Timofey Kuznetsov) Alfred DeCarolis (Stephen Chidwick) Chin Wei Lim (Wai Leong Chan) Chow Hing Yaung (Christoph Vogelsang) Pat Madden (Nick Petrangelo) Sosia Jiang (Sam Greenwood) Qiang Wang (Elton Tsang) Zang Shu Nu (Tan Xuan) Leon Tsoukernik (Martin Kabrhel) Orpen Kisacikoglu (Matthias Eibinger) Ferdinand Putra (Justin Bonomo) Rick Salomon (Vivek Rajkumar) Bill Perkins (Dan Smith) Winfred Yu (Danny Tang) Andrew Pantling (Andrew Robl) Ben Wu (Michael Soyza) How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  23. Poker Central has acquired the brand and assets for High Stakes Poker, the company announced on Tuesday, and will begin streaming episodes of the show on the PokerGO platform in the coming months. Additionally, Poker Central is said to have future plans for the series, including new episodes. "High Stakes Poker was a remarkable poker program," said Sampson Simmons, president of Poker Central. "With star players, massive pots, and memorable moments, the show beautifully conveys the drama of cash game poker. Bringing the existing episodes of High Stakes Poker to our platform and producing more in the future will enable us to recapture the nostalgia and magic of the show for our PokerGO subscribers in the present-day poker climate." [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="GG Poker"][ptable zone="Party Poker NJ"] High Stakes Poker took place from 2006-2011 and included seven seasons of high-stakes, cash game action during the height of the poker boom. Over its many seasons, the show was hosted by Gabe Kaplan, AJ Benza, Kara Scott, and Norm Macdonald, with Kaplan and Benza hosting together through the show’s first five seasons. The show’s success was propelled by the astronomical stakes of poker that were being played by superstar poker players and celebrities, oftentimes sitting behind huge bricks of cash and mounds of large denomination chips that became staples of the show. Notable players to appear on High Stakes Poker were Doyle Brunson, Phil Ivey, Daniel Negreanu, Gus Hansen, Antonio Esfandiari, Sammy Farha, Phil Galfond, and Barry Greenstein. Brunson, Negreanu, Esfandiari, and Greenstein appeared in all seven seasons of the show. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO and are interested in watching High Stakes Poker, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan. Minimum buy-ins for High Stakes Poker ranged from $100,000 to $500,000, depending on the season, and plenty of episodes featured millions of dollars at stake. During Season 4 of High Stakes Poker, poker pro David Benyamine went at it with celebrity businessman Guy Laliberte to create the largest pot in the show’s history, only it came with a plot twist. Largest Pot in High Stakes Poker History In a game with $300-$600 blinds and a $1,200 straddle, Farha started the action with a raise to $4,200 from under the gun with the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="3s"]. Benyamine made the call with the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8c"] and Laliberte called from the big blind with the [poker card="Kd"][poker card="5d"]. The flop was [poker card="Kc"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3d"]. Farha picked up bottom pair, but it was the top two pair for Laliberte and nut flush draw for Benyamine that really made this hand explode. On the flop, Laliberte checked, Farha bet $13,000, and Benyamine raised to $43,000. Laliberte reraised and made it $168,000 to go. Farha folded and Benyamine, behind bricks of cash, stood up, contemplated the decision, and then moved all in for $600,000. Laliberte turned his hand over and thought about the decision before making the call. Laliberte first said to run it once but then the two players went back and forth on what to do. Laliberte had said that the money doesn’t matter to him and would do what Benyamine wanted. Laliberte eventually offered to just take the pot before Benyamine’s all-in raise, which Benyamine agreed to. High Stakes Poker also helped young guns such as Tom Dwan get immense exposure. Of course, it also helps when you play $919,600 pots against one of the game’s greats on television. Although the hand between Laliberte and Benyamine created the largest pot in High Stakes Poker history, the hand ultimately finished with a much cheaper result. The hand Dwan played against Greenstein in Season 5 was played to the fullest for more than $900,000 and it had a single winner. Playing $500-$1,000 blinds, Peter Eastgate raised to $3,500 with the [poker card="As"][poker card="Kh"] and Greenstein reraised to $15,000 with the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ac"] on the button. Dwan was next and made the call from the small blind with the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qs"]. Eastgate also called and the flop came down [poker card="Qh"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2s"]. Dwan fired $28,700, Eastgate folded, and Greenstein raised to $100,000. Dwan made it $244,600 to go and Greenstein moved all in for what was effectively $436,100 total. Dwan called and the pot ballooned to $919,600. Like the Laliberte and Benyamine hand, the question of how many times to run the board out came up. Greenstein said he wanted to run it once but asked if they wanted to take a couple hundred thousand back. Dwan declined and they were off to the races. The turn was the [poker card="Qc"] to vault Dwan into the lead with trip queens. The river completed the board with the [poker card="7d"] and Dwan was the winner of the biggest hand in High Stakes Poker history.
  24. For many who take the game of poker seriously, they can point to another player who has had a profound effect on their game. Whether it’s emerging from obscurity to win the Main Event of the World Series of Poker, pulling off heart-stopping bluffs on High Stakes Poker, or crushing the nosebleed stakes of online poker, some of the best poker players in the world have helped to inspire generations of new players find their way in poker. We've spoken with some of the biggest stars in the game today about who it their poker idols are. Brazil’s Vivian Saliba first gained the attention of the poker world through her consistent play and results in the Brazilian Series of Poker. In 2017, the PLO specialist made a splash at the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas, racking up five cashes including a resume-building run in the $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha 8 Handed Championship for $47,923. As more results in high profile tournaments came her way, Saliba’s poker career took another step forward as she signed on to become an ambassador for 888poker and started traveling all over the world playing in live events. In 2019, she earned the biggest score of her career after finishing in fourth place in the WSOP $888 Crazy Eights event for $308,888. When you first started playing poker, who was the player you admired the most? I remember that when I first started playing poker, I would spend many of my weekends watching Poker After Dark on TV or any other poker show that I could find. I used to admire Patrik Antonius, Phil Ivey, and Tom Dwan. If I have to pick one name, I would say probably Patrick Antonius. What was it about that player that you liked or admired? Patrik Antonius had a very professional approach at the poker table and booked constant wins. Tom Dwan and Ivey used to impress me because of their very aggressive style, crazy bluffs, and unbelievable reads. When did you first get to see them play (either on TV, or live)? I started watching poker shows on TV since I was a teenager and this was the time I got to have knowledge of these players. The first time I traveled to Las Vegas for the WSOP, back in 2016, I had the opportunity to play the Ladies Event at the same table as Vanessa Selbst. That was the first I played against a real big name in poker. The first time I played against one of the players of my original list was in 2017 during the WSOPE Main Event, Patrick Antonius was at my table on Day 2. Did you ever get to meet that player and what was that like? When I used to be very inexperienced with poker, probably I would just imagine that any professional poker player could do "miracles" with the cards they were dealt, but as I grew older and more experienced, I learned that after all, we all make mistakes and most of the players I used to put on a pedestal are in the end just normal people that play very good poker. I was excited about playing at the same table as some big names but mostly because it meant to me how far I have progressed from where I first started (playing freerolls with my dad on weekends). Can you tell me about something either on the felt or off of the felt that you learned from them? I would say that I learned that is very important to have a good presence at the table, to keep your ambitions high, and to constantly improve your game. How does it feel to know somebody out there looks at you the way you looked up to your favorite player? I feel very flattered but at the same time with great responsibility. As a public person in the poker market, I must represent the sport well and set a good example for others. I remember the first time someone asked me for a picture during a poker tournament, I couldn´t understand why someone would want to take a picture with me but I felt very happy with the situation. Nowadays I receive a lot of support in the live events and thru my social media channels and this motivates me to do better and keep improving as a person and as a poker player.
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