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Found 823 results

  1. Nine days ago, Shane 'danish01' Daniels finished runner-up to Nathan Gamble in Event #6 ($600 Pot Limit Omaha 8-or-better). Early Thursday morning, Daniels had a chance to becoome the second player of the 2020 World Series of Poker Online to post a runner-up finish and then follow it with a victory when he reached the heads-up stage of Event #15 ($1,000 Pot Limit Omaha). Unfortunately for Daniels, Guy 'PhilLaak' Dunlap wasn't quite ready to let that story repeat itself. Dunlap beat Daniels heads-up and topped the 663-entry field to win his first career bracelet and $133,780. Daniels had to settle for $82,069 and yet another runner-up finish. Anthony 'heheh' Zinno came to the final table with the shortest stack and was unable to change his fate. From the cutoff, Zinno raised to 240,000 and Matt 'jacksup' Matros called. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="kd"][poker card="3s"] and Matros bet 520,000 and Zinno called. Matros showed [poker card="jd"][poker card="th"][poker card="9h"][poker card="3d"] for a flush draw and gutshot straight draw while Zinno tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="as"][poker card="jh"][poker card="6c"] for a set of aces. The [poker card="2d"] turn filled Matros' flush and Zinno got no full house help with the [poker card="7s"] river and was eliminated in eighth. Despite picking up his opponent's stack, Matros was next out the door. Matros raised to 180,000 from middle position, Dunlap called from the cutoff and Todd 'chi.t.420' Sladek re-raised to 840,000 from the button. Matros responded by moving all in for 1,975,532, Dunlap folded but Sladek called and turned over [poker card="ac"][poker card="ad"][poker card="6c"][poker card="4s"] which put him ahead of Matros' [poker card="kd"][poker card="kh"][poker card="td"][poker card="9h"]. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3d"] flop kept Sladek ahead and gave him a flush draw to eliminate one of Matros' outs. The [poker card="8d"] turn gave Matros a flush draw but the [poker card="jh"] river filled the board and missed both players to give Sladek the pot and eliminated Matros in seventh place. Sladek ended another player's tournament just 12 minutes later. Sladek raised to 200,000 from UTG with [poker card="js"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7d"] before Blake 'shampainpopn' Whittington moved all in for 317,760 with [poker card="kd"][poker card="ks"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6h"]. Sladek called and then picked up a pair and a flush draw on the [poker card="8s"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2s"] flop. The [poker card="ad"] turn changed nothing. The river was the [poker card="7c"] to give Sladek two pair and eliminate Whittington in sixth. Four-handed play lasted 20 minutes before the two shortest stacks went head-to-head. From the button, Keith 'thxsimgod' Ferrera raised to 420,000, Daniels called from the small blind and Dunlap folded his big blind. The flop came [poker card="js"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5d"] and Daniels bet 575,328 and Ferrera called. Daniels showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="4h"] for a straight draw and middle pair while Ferrera held [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"][poker card="9d"][poker card="9s"] for the nut flush draw and a pair of nines. The [poker card="2h"] turn was a brick but Daniels made two pair on the [poker card="4c"] river to bust Ferrera in fifth place. Five minutes later, Daniels busted another player. After Daniels raised to 270,000 from UTG, Jacob 'Bandit275' Powers re-raised to 870,000 from the big blind and Daniels called. The [poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2s"] flop got Powers to bet 120,000. Daniels shoved for 1,322,276 and Powers called all in for 596,640. Daniels showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6s"] for a straight draw while Powers showed [poker card="kd"][poker card="ks"][poker card="2c"][poker card="2d"] for bottom set. The [poker card="td"] turn filled Daniels' straight draw and Powers was unable to improve to a full house on the [poker card="5c"] river and was eliminated in fourth. It took 35 minutes of three-handed play to get heads up. Daniels raised to 600,000 fromthe button with [poker card="ad"][poker card="qs"][poker card="jd"][poker card="5d"] and Sladek moved all in for 679,800 from the big blind with [poker card="ks"][poker card="qh"][poker card="th"][poker card="3s"]. The board ran out [poker card="js"][poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"][poker card="kh"][poker card="td"] to give Daniels an ace-high straight and eliminate Sladek in third place. Dunlap was ahead 8,437,368 to the 4,822,632 of Daniels when heads up play started and it took almost 15 for Dunlap end the tournament. On the final hand, Daniels raised to 400,000, Dunlap re-raised to 1,200,000 and Daniels called. After the [poker card="kd"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8d"] flop, Dunlap bet 1,800,000 and Daniels called all in for 1,622,632. Dunlap showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="as"][poker card="ks"][poker card="3c"] while Daniels was going to need help with [poker card="ah"][poker card="jc"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"]. Dunlap improved to trip kings on the [poker card="kc"] turn before the [poker card="4c"] river gave both players a flush. Dunlap's nut flush eliminated Daniels in second place and gave him his first career bracelet and $133,780. Final Table Payouts Guy 'PhilLaak' Dunlap - $133,780 Shane 'danish01' Daniels - $82,069 Todd 'chi.t.420' Sladek - $56,749 Jacob 'Bandit275' Powers - $39,870 Keith 'thxsimgod' Ferrera - $28,469 Blake 'shampainpopn' Whittington - $20,659 Matt 'jacksup' Matros - $15,305 Anthony 'heheh' Zinno - $11,526 Faces in the Crowd The amazing WSOP of Robert Kuhn continued Wednesday. The Event #3 winner picked up his ninth cash of the Series with a 15th place result for $5,416.71. He wasn't the only 2020 WSOP Online bracelet who finished in the money. Nathan Gamble finished 28th for $3,023.38 and Michael Lech came in 43rd place for $2,852.38. Other well known players who cashed in this event included David 'Twizzlers' Prociak (40th - $2,582.38), Kevin MacPhee (44th - $2,582.38), Ryan Laplante (58th - $2,015.52), Ari 'philivey' Engel (71st - $1,826.56), and Shawn 'Saygoodnight' Daniels (72nd - $1,826.56).
  2. It’s the day after 30-year-old poker pro Michael ‘miguelfiesta’ Lech won his first World Series of Poker gold bracelet and he’s spending some time doing what many might do after taking down one of the biggest online tournaments of the 2020 WSOP - he’s drinking some beer, relaxing by the pool. But truth be told, that the same thing he was doing while playing the tournament the night before. “I was at least ten Stellas in by the time the final table hit yesterday,” Lech admits. “I was a little trashed.” To be fair, Lech’s intoxicated state wasn’t entirely his own fault. Lech and his girlfriend, poker pro Vanessa Kade, made their way to Nevada specifically to play in the 2020 WSOP Online events. They've since ended up shutting themselves in with a nice German family that Kade had stayed with during previous trips to the WSOP. Over the past nearly two weeks of staying with his hosts, this family has become a support system of sorts, following the action, checking in on updates, and cheering them on. And on the morning of the WSOP $1,500 High Roller Freezeout Lech’s host family burst into the house with a Kegerator of beer. “He’s like ‘Let’s have some beers for breakfast and for good luck’ and was like, alright that sounds great.” Some who would be on the verge of achieving a poker player's dream may have been overly nervous, perhaps too nervous to partake. But Lech, the first-time bracelet winner, recounts the victory with an even-keel tone of a grinder who has been there before. That’s because, in a sense, he has. Many times. At the 2016 WSOP, Lech had a break-through performance at the final table of the 888 Crazy Eights event. In the end, he finished as the runner-up for a career-high score of just over $400,000. While he was thrilled about the cash, coming so close to the victory and missing out had him wanting another shot. “After that, I was kind of distraught. I was really happy, but I didn’t win. I realized how close I was. I didn’t ever want to lose again,” he said. “Then after that, I won seven [WSOP Circuit] rings in a row without ever losing a heads up match.” In addition to his new gold bracelet, Lech is actually an eight-time WSOP Circuit ring winner. That in its own right is impressive, but what distinguishes him from others in the same elite category is that five of those rings come from five different countries. It’s something he holds in high regard as he’s the only player with that fact on his poker resume. He’s been able to do this by spending the better part of the past five years traveling outside of the U.S., including the past three in South America. “I was backpacking around for a lot and it just happened to be that every time there was a different WSOP Circuit I just went there and ended up winning one,” he said. “I was fortunate to have some families that I knew down there and I lived with them and they got connections and moved between different countries and cities, living relatively cheap,” So when it came to his 2020 WSOP final table, even while perhaps a little inebriated, his extensive experience at final tables kicked in. He was facing some tough competition, including 2020 Spring Championship of Online Poker standout Connor Drinan, but he picked up some hands in key spots. “The thing is, since the final table is so short, it didn’t really take a super amount of concentration. It was like do I min-open here, do I limp, or do I shove,” he explained. “If you stress too much about it then you’re not going to be focused on the actual game. It’s still just poker. It’s the final table just like any other final table be it a daily or a sit-and-go with friends. You’re in the final nine and you gotta beat those guys.” Lech hails from Arkansas and lived in a dry county where, according to him, “poker is even more devilish” than alcohol. But that never stopped his family from encouraging and supporting him. His grandmother, who still plays cards to this day, first taught him poker at age 15. By 18, he was traveling 30 minutes across the border to Oklahoma to cut his teeth playing cash games. “‘If you’re going to do it, put your heart into it and do it the best you can,” Lech said, reciting the words of support said to him by his family. “It’s important to have people that care about you no matter if you win or lose,” Lech said. “They may not even really understand poker that much but they’ll watch every stream just knowing that I’m there, just to support me. That’s an important thing that I know a lot of people have not has as fortunate a situation to have.” In the end, with his family and friends watching, he took down the tournament and locked up the $168,248 first-place prize and also that gold bracelet that he missed out on in 2016. “It’s nice to win one as it’s the pinnacle of most poker player’s career,” he said. “It’s nice to have something that people care about and have outstanding respect for. And now nobody can ever take away the fact that I have a bracelet…even if they say it’s ‘online and anyone can beat online.’ Well, Daniel Negreanu and Phil Hellmuth were there and in the money too and I hung with them so….” He has plans to play out the majority of the WSOP.com series but will cut his trip to Las Vegas short by returning to the East Coast to attend a yearly family reunion. A chance to celebrate and reconnect with those who have supported him and helped him achieve a major goal. “It’s nice to have people that have your back for anything and what to support you no matter what you do.”
  3. When Las Vegas-based poker pro Kami Hudson decides to do something she tends to go “full out.” From her morning meditation routine clearing her head, setting her intentions, and getting active to grinding online, Hudson’s approach to all of her passions is one of positivity and going for it. “I’m a big believer in positive thinking and in poker and in life I do my best to look on the bright side of things.” And there’s been plenty to be positive about for Hudson, who plays on WSOP.com under the screen name ‘Loco4coco’, when it comes to her poker career. More specifically, her positivity helped her in her recent victory in the World Series of Poker $320 Online Circuit Season Finale NLHE event in which she took home her first career gold ring and a payday of over $50,000. “I was really excited to win a ring,” Hudson said. “As all MTT players know, it isn’t easy to win a tournament, and all of the close calls can really start to wear on you.” Hudson had been tracking down a WSOP Circuit ring for years, making three final tables over the past three years in various WSOPC events. She also bubbled a WSOP final table in 2017, finishing in 10th place in a $1,500 event for over $23,000. But those close calls just encouraged her press forward. “Yes, I’ve had a lot of close calls and have been close to winning several events, but instead of letting that get me down, I use it as motivation and look at it as a sign that I am growing,” she said. “I don’t look at it as a failure but instead as improvement and that I must be doing a lot of things right to get so deep and close.” Hudson, who grew up in Oklahoma and earned her degree in Human Relations from the University of Oklahoma, has always found herself drawn to pursuits that lend themselves to success in the game. “As a kid growing up and throughout my entire life I have always been curious and inquisitive, into playing games, solving various kinds of puzzles, and super interested in studying people and the psychology behind everything I encounter,” she said. “I’ve been around a poker environment since the age of 18 and that’s how I began picking it up. In the beginning, it was more of just a hobby and it wasn’t until about four years ago I became more interested in it and started taking it more seriously.” At the same time that Hudson first encountered poker, she also was introduced to another life passion. In her first year of college, she was invited to go on a trip to Honduras to visit and work with an orphanage. “From that very first trip, I fell in love with the people and the place, and the rest is history,” she said. “Those kids broke my heart wide open and change my entire life in the best ways possible. Thirteen years and twenty trips later, it has become my biggest passion.” Hudson isn’t a part of an organization, it’s a personal endeavor that she at first shared with a friend but now has now extended to her entire family including her parents and sisters. Projects for the orphanage have included installing an entire water purifying system, purchasing a new playground, fixing up the building, providing greater security and essential items like bedding and pillows for the children. “But the biggest thing I have a heart for, the type of service most important to me, is investing my time and energy into the children emotionally and mentally,” she said. After her first trip, she immediately started learning Spanish so she could better connect with the kids. "I spend a lot of my time there sitting with the kids and communicating about life and their goals and what we can do to accomplish their dreams." “Each time I leave, I leave a piece of my heart there, but at least I know I leave with them knowing that they are loved, brave, smart and that people believe in them,” she said. “My days there are spent laughing, crying, playing, building, teaching, learning, starting and keeping traditions, showing consistency, capturing the good times on camera so that they can have photos of a happy childhood with people who love them with people who love them, and making memories with some of the most beautiful people on the planet.” “I know it might not look like much to some people but to these kids, it might be the first time a person has been a constant source of love and support in their life.” That love and support, when at it’s best, is a two-way street. Hudson not only has had the opportunity to change the lives of children in desperate need but in return, she found love and purpose in her own life. "I will never forget the time I heard one of my little 6-year-olds praying before dinner, and she prayed for the lives and health of her mother and father, who she had never met, and then followed that with all of the things she was grateful for. That hit me hard,” Hudson said. “Those kids have changed my life, they have given me so much. I will never be able to repay them, but I will continuously return to them, over and over, to do all that I can to try." Hudson credits her current life as a poker pro with giving her the flexible schedule and free time to continually support the orphanage and the kids. She has plans on returning to Honduras at some point after her current World Series of Poker grind. “I plan on playing the majority of the WSOP.com/USA event because I think they are amazing value,” she said, noting that one of the reasons she originally moved to Las Vegas was to have access to these types of events. “I do intend to travel to Mexico to play some of the [GGPoker] events next month, but mainly the $1Ks and lower. Winning an online bracelet would be a great accomplishment but I don’t think I will feel fully satisfied until I win one live.” For Hudson though, satisfaction in poker is one thing while the definition of success is another. “We all have our definitions of success,” she said. “Success and happiness are relative. One of the biggest lessons my kids in Honduras have taught me is that happiness isn't based on material things. Because despite not having money or many material items, they are so much happier than the majority of people I know who society would consider being "rich". In my opinion, the key to happiness and success is being grateful for what you have and always doing the best you can with what you know at the time.”
  4. The argument could be made that Joe McKeehen is the most successful World Series of Poker Main Event champion of the modern era. The 2015 WSOP Main Event champion added a second bracelet in 2017 and has nearly $9 million in live earnings outside of his Main Event victory. Early Wednesday morning, McKeehen added to that resume when he took down Event #14 ($3,200 High Roller) of the 2020 WSOP Online. The event, the biggest buy-in on the 2020 WSOP Online events on WSOP.com, drew 328 unique players who accounted for an additional 128 total reentries to build a prize pool of $1,507,840. McKeehen earned the bracelet after coming to the final table third in chips and was responsible for eliminating just one player. The first elimination of the final table came 10 minutes after it began. David 'newjerz05' Jackson raised to 120,000 from middle position with [poker card="kd"][poker card="qd"] before 'SoccerDJ' re-raised to 450,000 from the button with [poker card="ad"][poker card="as"]. Jackson moved all in for 1,248,229 and 'SoccerDJ' called. The board ran out [poker card="kh"][poker card="ts"][poker card="2h"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7h"] to give 'SoccerDJ' the pot and Jackson was out in eighth place. The slow pace of the final table continued for another 20 minutes for the next elimination. 'SoccerDJ' raised to 160,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"] after action folded to them in the small blind. Nathan 'innate9' Russler moved all in for 1,312,269 from the big blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="5h"] and 'SoccerDJ' called. Russler was unable to get any help through the [poker card="kh"][poker card="8c"][poker card="2h"][poker card="ah"][poker card="6c"] runout and he was out in seventh. The final six players played for another 25 minutes before another blind versus blind battle ended with an elimination. Action folded to Clayton 'nevarlucky' Maguire in the small blind and he jammed for 1,266,984 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="3d"] only to have Frank 'thewholefunk' Funaro call from the big blind with [poker card="ah"][poker card="7d"]. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="qd"][poker card="8c"] flop missed Maguire. The [poker card="7h"] turn gave Maguire a pair to extend his lead and the [poker card="3h"] river paired Maguire but it wasn't good enough to avoid a sixth place elimination. The two players responsible for all of the final table eliminations clashed ten minutes later resulting in one of them going home. Funaro moved all in for 5,443,009 from the small blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="3h"] and 'SoccerDJ' called off his last 1,749,327 with [poker card="jh"][poker card="th"] from the big blind. The [poker card="9d"][poker card="9s"][poker card="3d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="6h"] board gave 'SoccerDJ' no relief and they were eliminated in fifth. Funaro was back to work eliminating opponents a few minutes later. From the cutoff, Funaro raised to 240,000 and 'Jaydestar17' called from the big blind. After the [poker card="qs"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"] flop 'Jaydestar17' check-raised all in after Funaro bet 120,000. Funaro called and tabled [poker card="tc"][poker card="td"] while 'Jaydestar17' showed [poker card="4d"][poker card="6d"] for a pair of fours. Funaro stayed ahead through the [poker card="9h"] turn and [poker card="qc"] river to eliminate 'Jaydestar17' in fourth place. Funaro wasn't done and it took him just three minutes to send the tournament to heads up. After McKeehen folded his button, Roland 'prngls12' Isrealshvili shoved for 2,090,325 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="9s"] from the small blind and Funaro called from the big blind with [poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"]. The board ran out [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"][poker card="2c"][poker card="th"][poker card="3s"] to eliminate Israelshvili in third place for his 95 career WSOP cash and fifth of the 2020 WSOP Online. Thanks in large part to the string of eliminations he was responsible for, Funaro began heads-up play with a 2.8-1 chip lead. Over the course of the next 15 minutes, however, McKeehen's championship pedigree allowed the 2015 WSOP Main Event winner to claw his way back before ending Funaro's tournament. McKeehen min-raised to 320,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="9h"] and Funaro responded by moving all in for 2,759,541 with [poker card="7d"][poker card="6d"]. The [poker card="ks"][poker card="8d"][poker card="4h"] flop gave Funaro an gutshot straight draw and a backdoor flush draw to go with his six existing outs. The [poker card="4c"] turn was a blank as was the [poker card="qc"] river to eliminate Funaro in second place and give McKeehen the victory and $352,985. Final Table Payouts Joe 'fanofdapoker' McKeehen - $352,985 Frank 'thewholefunk' Funaro - $219,089 Roland 'prngls12' Israelashvili - $148,975 'Jaydestar17' - $103,136 'SoccerDJ' - $72,979 Clayton 'nevarlucky' Maguire - $52,624 Nathan 'innate9' Russler - $38,601 David 'newjerz05' Jackson - $28,951 Faces in the Crowd Two nights after winning his first career bracelet in Event #12 ($500 NLHE The Big 500), Ryan Depaulo posted another deep run, finishing 16th for $11,459.58. Other notables who earned a paycheck on Tuesday included Ryan 'sych0sId' Hohner (13th - $14,022.91), Blake 'CheeetahGirl' Bohn (15th - $14,022.91), Yong 'LUCKYSPEWY1' Kwon (23rd - $9,650.17), Ryan 'protential' Laplante (29th - $8,293,12 ), Tenzin 'tc_ownz' Chakdor (45th - $7,237.63) and for the second night in a row, David 'Twizzlers' Prociak (49th - $6,483.71).
  5. Over the past 50 years, for many, the World Series of Poker has grown into more than just a poker series. It’s become a pilgrimage of sorts. Players from all over the world head to Las Vegas to take their shot at battling against the best, bringing home a bracelet and possibly be crowned a World Champion. With the WSOP regularly taking place in the U.S., it’s no surprise that American players, far and away, have amassed the most bracelets in WSOP history. It’s nearly 20 times that of the next nearest country. But this year is different and the tables have turned. After the month of July, the focus of the bracelet chase will be handed over to GGPoker where the rest of the world will have the edge on grabbing gold as American players continue to be shut out of the global online poker scene. On GGPoker, players from nations from around the world who wouldn’t otherwise make it to the Rio this summer will be looking to add to their own poker resume while contributing to the WSOP legacy of their country. Brazil It’s no secret Brazilians love their poker. They also love playing online. In the history of PocketFives, four Brazilian players have climbed to the #1 worldwide ranking. But when it comes to the World Series of Poker, Brazil isn’t even in the top 10 countries when it comes to taking down WSOP events. Through the end of 2019, six players have earned a bracelet including one of those former #1-ranked online players, Yuri Martins Dzivielevski. Dzivielevski grabbed his first WSOP win just last year after taking down the $2,500 Mixed Omaha/Seven Card Stud Hi/Li 8 or Better event for over $213K. Dzivielevski, partypoker ambassador Joao Simeo, WSOP bracelet winner Andre Akkari, and GGPoker ambassador Felipe Ramos are just some of Brazil's top-flight talent that make it so it wouldn’t be unthinkable for Brazil’s total bracelet count to double in 2020. Canada The truth is, it’s been hard for Canada to compete for bracelets in the U.S. Not because of a lack of talent, there’s more than enough. But because of tax ramifications. When Canadians win at the WSOP they can lose as much as 30% to the US-Canada Tax Treaty, making it hard to be profitable in tournaments. That hasn’t stopped Canada from claiming the #2 spot with 60 total bracelets. Led by Daniel Negreanu and his six wins, Canada boasts numerous multi-time bracelet winners including Greg Mueller, Mark Radoja, Kristen Bicknell and 2010 World Series of Poker Main Event champion Jonathan Duhamel, the first and only Canadian to hold that title. There’s a good chance for Canada to add to their legacy and strengthen their bracelet count in 2020. It’s well known that Negreanu, also a GGPoker ambassador, is going to charging hard for a bracelet with over $500,000 in bracelet bets on the line. Also online crushers like Bicknell, bracelet winner Mike Leah, former #1-ranked PocketFiver Sebastian ‘p0cket00’ Sikorski, and recent PokerStars Spring Championship of Online Poker winner Mike Watson all have full reign to win without getting punished in the wallet simply for being great. United Kingdom Some of the most colorful characters to grace the World Series of Poker stage have come from the UK. Many of which have contributed to the country’s 51 bracelets. David ‘Devilfish’ Ulliott, Luke Schwartz, Roland de Wolfe, Jake Cody, and Barny Boatman are just some of the legendary names that have posed for a WSOP winner’s photo and elevated the profile of poker in the UK. This year it will be a new crop of players who will lead the charge for England starting with the current #1 ranked online poker player in the world, Conor ‘1_conor_b_1’ Beresford. In fact, four of the top 20 online players in the world play from the UK including Patrick ‘pleno1’ Leonard and Tyler ‘Wonderboy222’ Goatcher. In the history of the UK, only seven players have earned multiple bracelets and if there’s one player who is a favorite to join that club it would be high roller savant Stephen Chidwick. Chidwick, who holds a bracelet of his own, is one of the most talented tournament players in both the live and online arena. Provided he has the time, he could even have a shot at catching Benny Glaser, who holds the UK’s record as a three-time bracelet winner. Russia Russia and France both have 22 bracelets, but when it comes to playing online Russia gets a definitive edge. It’s impossible to forget the impact that Russian players have had on the World Series of Poker from Ivan Demidov’s runner-up finish the original November Nine for over $5.8 million to Vitaly Lunkin taking down the 40th WSOP Anniversary event for his second gold bracelet. But while Russia is another talent-rich country, it takes a lot of effort to make it from Moscow to the middle of the Amazon Room. While Dennis ‘aDrENalin710’ Strebkov made the journey in 2019 and went home with a bracelet, many of the online crushers from Russia opt to grind online through the summer. It’s those players, like former #1-ranked ‘veeea’, who could break the tie with France this year and tack on to Russia’s total. That is unless Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier has anything to say about it. The truth is that for many countries, the series on GGPoker can really impact their gold bracelet standing. In China, there are four players who have won a bracelet. With GGPoker’s wide exposure to the Asian market, there’s a very good chance that that club will be adding some new members in 2020. There’s only one bracelet winner from Uruguay, Alex Komaromi, who won his at the WSOPE in 2015. Top-ranked players from Hungary, like ‘Wildace_hun’ have the chance to break a long-standing five-country tie of five bracelets. While none of these countries are going to make up much ground on the 1,1132 bracelets earned by Americans, the gold they take home this summer will be an important part of WSOP, and their countries, legacy in poker.
  6. Michael Lech is one of 13 players with at least eight World Series of Poker Circuit rings to his name. Early Tuesday morning the Arkansas native won Event #13 ($1,500 NLHE High Roller) of the 2020 World Series of Poker Online to become just the fifth player of that group to own a WSOP bracelet. Lech topped the 649-player field in Event #13 to win $164,248.92 for his first career bracelet and seventh cash since the Series started on July 1. The final table included Connor Drinan chasing his first career bracelet and a potential six-figure payday from a bracelet bet with Daniel Negreanu. Megan 'wolverine17' Milburn, the player Mike Matusow berated during his YouTube live stream earlier in the Series, also made the final table. The final table had barely begun and one player was shown the door. From the button, Michael 'wsopmd' Dolle moved all in for 836,123 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="7d"] and Lech called with [poker card="qd"][poker card="qs"]. The [poker card="ks"][poker card="tc"][poker card="8c"][poker card="9s"][poker card="jh"] runout gave Lech a king-high straight to beat Dolle's jack-high straight and eliminate Dolle in ninth place. A few moments later, Milburn moved all in for 775,161 from UTG+1 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qs"] before 'Bingooo' re-shoved for 1,630,010 from the small blind with [poker card="ah"][poker card="jh"]. The [poker card="jc"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3c"] flop gave 'Bingooo' control and all Milburn could do was watch as the [poker card="2s"] turn and [poker card="3s"] river completed the board to eliminate Milburn in eighth. Ten minutes later, 'Bingooo' eliminated another opponent. From the cutoff, 'Bingooo' min-raised to 240,000 and Christopher 'pokeher2014' Fuchs called from the big blind. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="7s"][poker card="4c"] and Fuchs moved all in for 342,320 and 'Bingoooo' called. Fuchs showed [poker card="8h"][poker card="6h"] for a gutshot straight draw while 'Bingooo' tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="6c"] for top pair. Fuchs picked up a pair on the [poker card="8s"] turn but the [poker card="ad"] river made his seventh place finish official. The most high profile player at the final table was the next player shown the exit. Connor '666666' Drinan, who is one of a handful of players with a six-figure bracelet bet against Negreanu, moved all in from UTG for 1,421,573 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="8d"] before William 'SlaweelRyam' Romaine called from the big blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="kh"]. The [poker card="td"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3c"][poker card="4d"][poker card="js"] runout was of no help for Drinan and he was out in sixth. Romaine wasn't done playing executioner. From UTG, Romaine raised to 627,347 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="2h"] and Paul 'ToTheMoon' Dewald called all in from the cutoff with [poker card="5d"][poker card="5s"]. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7h"] flop moved Romain ahead and Dewald missed his chance to improve on the [poker card="tc"] turn and [poker card="7d"] river and was eliminated in fifth place. Despite having picked up a pair of eliminations earlier, 'Bingooo' was the shortstack four-handed. Sean 'SPS8710' Seifert moved all in from the button for 2,054,764 with [poker card="6c"][poker card="6s"] and 'Bingooo' called all in from the big blind with [poker card="ah"][poker card="5d"]. Seifert moved way ahead on the [poker card="qd"][poker card="6h"][poker card="2c"] flop. The [poker card="3c"] turn gave 'Bingooo' some hope but the [poker card="tc"] river snuffed it out to eliminate them in fourth. It took 25 minutes of three-handed play to get down to just two players. Down to less than three big blinds, Seifert moved all in from the button with [poker card="qc"][poker card="7h"] and Leach called from the big blind with [poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="jd"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"][poker card="7s"] runout gave Lech a runner-runner eight-high straight to eliminate Seifert in third. Lech held a slight lead when heads-up play began and it took nearly 15 minutes for Lech to finish off Romaine. Lech raised to 560,000 and Romaine called. Romaine checked the [poker card="kc"][poker card="td"][poker card="3d"] flop and Lech bet 868,000. Romaine moved all in for 4,898,890 and was immediately called by Lech. Romaine showed [poker card="tc"][poker card="8s"] for second pair but got bad news when Lech tabled [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"] for top pair. Neither the [poker card="qs"] turn or [poker card="7h"] river were able to save Romaine and he was out in second place giving Lech the title and $164,249. Final Table Payouts Michael 'miguelfiesta' Lech - $164,249 William 'SlaweelRyam' Romaine - $110,979 Sean 'SPS8710' Seifert - $77,408 Bingooo - $56,599 Paul 'ToTheMoon' Dewald - $40,600 Connor '666666' Drinan - $29,964 Christopher 'pokeher2014' Fuchs - $22,381 Megan 'wolverine17' Milburn - $18,404 Michael 'wsopmd' Dolle - $14,982 Faces in the Crowd He wasn't playing in a Whole Foods parking lot on Monday night, but Event #12 winner Ryan 'Joeyisamush' Deangelo finished 23rd for $6,381.29. Negreanu finished also earned $6,381.29 for coming in four spots behind Deangelo. Other notables who finished in the money incldued David 'bewater' Goodman (32nd - $5,456.46), David 'Twizzlers' Prociak (47th - $3,976.74), Philip 'tomte' Yeh (57th - $3,421.85), Daniel 'centrfieldr' Lupo (83rd - $2,219.58), Chris 'Robotbob47' Moorman (86th - $2,219.58).
  7. The average age of the 2020 World Series of Poker online bracelet winner skewed a little bit higher last Friday when in the wee hours of the morning, 70-year-old businessman from Iowa and high-stakes cash game player Ron ‘MacDaddy15’ McMillen capped off an incredible victory in WSOP Event #9 ($1,000 NLHE Six Max) for $188,214 and his first-career gold bracelet. “I fulfilled part of a dream (Friday) night,” said McMillen. “That was a long time coming, it’s pretty special for me.” It’s safe to say not many expected an elder statesman of the poker community like McMillen to take down what some might argue is the toughest tournament on the WSOP.com summer bracelet schedule. But despite it “absolutely” being McMillen's very first online tournament, the ‘MacDaddy’ is anything like your average septuagenarian. “I've always lived by the philosophy, and the older I get, that I don't let the old man in.” While many his age (and, yes, younger) were sound asleep, McMillen was on the thrill ride that is a WSOP final table. As he was experiencing the highs of completing a decades-long goal, it was his youthful mindset that was key to keeping him in the game. McMillen doesn’t think of himself as some ‘old guy’ and he certainly doesn’t give in to how some may think a man of his age should behave. He surrounds himself with a younger crowd, competing against players decades his junior, learning from them and also teaching them a lesson or two. “People say I'm young for my age, but mentally I'm really young for my age, and I think [my age] just doesn't come into play for me because I guess I just embrace it so much,” he said. “And I embrace life so much. I'm just not going to let age bother me or get in my way.” “You've got to live every day, you know? And I don't care if you're in pain, just go for it. And I might've been a little tired last night, but it wasn't going to get my way. It's just fun. I'm just having too much fun.” Despite what he called “extremely tough” competition against “real deal” players, McMillen never felt like he didn’t belong in the tournament. Prior to diving into the deep end of chasing online bracelets, McMillen has stayed sharp by competing in high stakes cash games over the past few years. While keeping the details of his private game close to the vest except that it’s “high enough stakes that most people wouldn’t want to be in the game”, he does acknowledge that it was a gateway for him when it came to exploring tournaments. “I play against unbelievable competition for getting me where I’ve gotten,” he said. “Of course, we all know that cash and tournaments are two different animals, but at the same time there’s some cross over,” he said. “I've played a lot more cash, but I still love the tournament format. It's taught me patience. It's taught me a different aspect. I’m, I guess, what you'd call an alpha male, a ‘Type A’, and patience is not a virtue. In tournament poker, you have to be patient. And it's kind of helped me in that respect.” “I’ve absolutely embraced tournament poker because I have a great gift of gab. I'm great with numbers, but it's a big learning curve to do it right, and I've gotten really good at it, I feel. And I feel like I've really come into my own.” McMillen may have known the difference between cash games and tournaments, but he was about to also get a crash course in the difference between live and online tournaments. Not everything that has worked for him in his live games translated. “Well, to tell you the truth, my specialty is that I'm a great bullshitter,” he said before telling a tale from playing in a live game the night before his bracelet win. “I talked the guy into a couple-thousand dollar call. I have the stone-cold nuts, and this guy is getting ready to lay it down. And I started talking, dying [for him] to make the call. And you can't do that online.” “It’s so different because you can’t adjust to the personalities. Now, when I play live, I don’t play with hats on, I don’t play with sunglasses. I don’t believe in them,” he said. “I think you should be able to go face up with somebody. I love to look at somebody nose to nose…that’s all out the window with online.” McMillen’s first foray into online poker certainly will not be his last. He plans on trying to become the first WSOP Online two-time bracelet winner while embracing what he’s already accomplished so far this summer. “It kind of defines you, you know? It does. Yeah. Now I have a bracelet, and we've celebrated twice with Dom Perignon, last night at three and today at lunch. And I don't know, I just can't explain it. It takes such pressure off of you in a way, but it's such a feeling of accomplishment for a poker player. It's just amazing.” But even while his goal of racking up bracelets will always be there, he’s still focused on the one goal that’s served him well up to this point. It’s a reminder to everyone, both inside the game and out. “Just remember, never let the old man in.”
  8. Over the course of the 2020 World Series of Poker, PocketFives will be checking in with Chris Moorman and Katie Lindsay as they chase down WSOP glory. This is Episode 2 of The House of Moorman. Katie Lindsay wants to get it on the record early. With her three cashes through the first nine events of the 2020 World Series of Poker Online, she’s still holding the lead over her husband Chris Moorman, who has just two. Not that anybody is keeping score. That second cash came on July 4, when Chris finished 124th in Event #4 ($500 NLHE Super Turbo) for $795.82. It wasn’t pretty. “I had to fold to min-cash with three big blinds,” Chris joked. That min-cash was just part of their low-key July 4th festivities. They picked up some lobster rolls from a local cafe that just opened down the street from their Las Vegas home and hung out by the pool while grinding the fastest structured tournament on the 2020 schedule. “It was weird though because it didn’t feel like a turbo at all and then all of a sudden it turned into a huge crapshoot and no on had more than ten bigs on the bubble,” Chris said. Once that was over, they hung out on their dock and watched some of the fireworks that other area residents were launching into the sky. Sunday was a good day for both of them on the tables. Katie finished fourth in the $320 WSOP.com Online Championship Sunday Special - not to be confused with the WSOP Online events - for $17,497.35 and Chris took down a $75 buy-in Knockout event. He almost didn’t register for it, knowing it’s usually a smaller event on Sundays but decided to add it to the other events he was grinding on Sunday. The win was worth nearly $6,800 but it lasted well into the night. “I’d rather win a smaller tournament then come second or third in a slightly bigger one just because it’s a nice feeling at the end to at least win it,” Chris said. If I had known how long it was going to go, I’m not sure I would have registered it in the first place.” Both Katie and Chris have been surprised to see unfamiliar names walking away with bracelets through the opening week and half of the schedule. “Everyone I know in Vegas is playing it and I’ve not really had one friend at a final table yet,” Chris said. All of that was supposed to change in Thursday’s $1,000 Six Max NLHE event. “Less recreational players like playing Six Max, it’s a slightly higher buy-in.” That’s not at all what happened. 70-year-old Ron ‘MacDaddy15’ MacMillen, playing online poker for the first time in his life, beat out 1,026 other entries to win the bracelet and $188,214. The winning moment was captured on video and shared on social media. “That video is amazing. I feel like that’s what it’s all about,” Chris said. “It brings out the magic of the World Series. It’s good to see.” The success that Chris and Katie have had at the tables the past weeks is made all the more impressive by the fact that they’ve been dealing with some early-rising, noisy house guests. For the past month, renovators have been re-doing the three bathrooms inside their house, arriving each day at 8 am - but they wanted to start earlier. “They tried to start at 7. They come one day and I said ‘You can’t start at 7’. If we’re playing poker until one in the morning, it’s too early,” Katie said. The pair have developed a routine though to help keep them sane through the renovations. Katie gets to get out of the house in the morning to get a workout in and Chris stays behind to answer any questions that the contractors have. Once Katie gets home, Chris heads out to play pickleball or golf before coming back home to start the day. Fortunately for the pair, the contractors are usually out of the house before each day’s bracelet event begins. Moorman, a former #1 on PocketFives, is quite happy returning to his roots as an online grinder while live poker is on hiatus. “I enjoy (online) more. You can’t replicate the feeling of making a live final table, but it’s just so hard,” Chris said, one year after winning a Wynn $1,600 No Limit Hold’em event for $107,590. “Live poker is quite draining for me and mentally sort of challenging, whereas online if you have a bad day, you can just come back the next day and reset.” It’s the opposite for Katie. Playing events in Las Vegas throughout the year means running into the same group of people over and over again. The tourists and recreational players that populate WSOP bracelet events each summer offer a totally different dynamic and it has nothing to do with how soft the fields become. “I love talking to people. I love meeting people. That’s why the World Series is just one of my favorites,” Katie said. “Sitting next to a 75-year-old Navy vet - my dad was in the Navy - and talking about where they were stationed and I just love stuff like that. It’s so cool hearing people’s stories. They’re excitement of just being there and you just feed off that energy.” “I miss it so much.”
  9. Early Friday morning, Ryan Torgersen suffered the ultimate heartbreak in poker after finishing runner-up in Event #9 of the 2020 World Series of Poker Online. A little bit more than 24 hours later, Torgersen enjoyed the ultimate joy after winning Event #10 ($600 NLHE Monster Stack) to win his first career bracelet and $172,361. He could not have picked a better event to win. For the first time in the 2020 WSOP Online, the prize pool moved into seven-figure territory with 2,074 total entries building a $1,119,960 prize pool. The first elimination of the final table came five minutes after it began. Action folded to Tom '4Logan' Dean on the button and he moved all in for 3,105,365 with [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"] and 'Letsgetit888' re-shoved for 5,710,730 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="jc"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="jd"][poker card="9d"] flop gave 'Letsgetit888' second pair and left Dean drawing thin. The [poker card="4s"] turn and [poker card="5h"] river were both blanks and Dean was out in ninth place. Just a few minutes later, another preflop all in confrontation sent a player packing. Eric 'bill_luga' Blair raised to 1,000,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"] before Nick 'DuckFlush' Pupillo moved all in for 6,192,549 from the small blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"] and Blair called. Pupillo was unable to connect with the [poker card="8c"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5h"] flop or the [poker card="2h"] turn and the [poker card="kd"] river gave Blair an unnecessary improvement to eliminate Pupillo in eighth. Torgersen finally got involved in the business of eliminating players at the final table five minutes later. From the hijack, Torgersen raised to 1,095,000, Brent 'grebnrets' Roberts called from the cutoff and 'FatStax' and Sam 'texasmolly' Grizzle defended the small and big blinds respectively. The flop came [poker card="8s"][poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"] and 'FatStax' moved all in for 2,446,816. Grizzle got out of the way, Torgersen came over the top for 10,838,096 forcing Roberts to fold. 'Fatstax' turned over [poker card="td"][poker card="9d"] and Torgersen showed [poker card="ks"][poker card="ts"]. The turn was the [poker card="3d"] and the [poker card="8d"] completed the river to give Torgersen the pot and end the tournament for 'Fatstax' in seventh place. A few hands later Sam Grizzle moved into the chip lead and almost immediately put it to work. From UTG, Roberts moved all in for 7,559,235 with [poker card="8d"][poker card="8s"] and Grizzle called with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"]. The [poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3s"] flop left Roberts in control. The [poker card="7c"] turn gave Grizzle nine more outs. The river was the [poker card="ah"] to give Grizzle top pair and send Roberts home in sixth. Torgersen then ended another player's tournament in a massive pot. Action folded to 'letsgetit888' on the button and they moved all in for 11,964,504 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"] only to have Torgersen call from the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kd"]. The [poker card="jc"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6d"] flop changed nothing but the [poker card="qd"] turn gave 'letsgetit888' top pair. Torgersen filled his straight draw on the [poker card="tc"] river to eliminate 'letsgetit888' in fifth place. Four-handed play lasted nearly 15 minutes. Blair raised to 1,600,000 from the button and Brandon 'Omni27' Ienn called from the big blind. The flop came [poker card="jc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="7h"], Ienn checked, Blair bet 980,000 and Ienn called. The turn was the [poker card="4s"] and Ienn bet 1,600,000. Blair moved all in for 6,590,707 and Ienn called. Blair turned over [poker card="6c"][poker card="7s"] for trip sevens while Blair was drawing to an open-ender with [poker card="5s"][poker card="6s"]. The [poker card="6h"] river gave Ienn an unneeded full house and busted Blair in fourth. Old school poker fans had their heart broken just 15 minutes later. Ienn raised to 2,000,000 from the button before Grizzle moved all in for 13,150,561 from the small blind. Torgersen then moved all in over the top for 37,667,878 and Ienn folded. Grizzle showed [poker card="qd"][poker card="jh"] to Torgersen's [poker card="tc"][poker card="td"]. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2c"] flop gave Grizzle top pair. The turn was the [poker card="8c"] to give Torgersen more outs and the [poker card="ts"] river gave him a set to eliminate Grizzle in third. Torgersen held a nearly 2-1 chip lead over Ienn when heads up play began and needed less than five minutes to eliminate Ienn. The final hand saw Torgersen shove from the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="8d"] and Ienn called all in for 18,761,561. The [poker card="5d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="ts"][poker card="tc"] run out meant Torgersen's [poker card="8d"] played and Ienn was eliminated in second place to give Torgersen his first WSOP bracelet. Final Table Payouts Ryan 'Im.sorry' Torgersen - $172,361 Brandon 'Omni27' Ienn - $106,508 Sam 'texasmolly' Grizzle - $77,725 Eric 'bill_luga' Blair - $57,229 letsgetit888 - $42,558 Brent 'grebnrets' Roberts - $31,918 FatStax - $24,079 Nick 'DuckFlush' Pupillo - $18,367 Tom '4Logan' Dean - $14,223 Faces in the Crowd The player who ultimately busted Torgersen in second place in Event #9, Ron 'MacDaddy15' MacMillen made a deep run in Event #10 as well, eventually busting in 65th place for $2,127.92. He wasn't the only 2020 WSOP Online bracelet winner to cash on Friday though. Robert Kuhn (19th - $5,487.80) and Louis 'PokeThese' Lynch (31st - $4,367.84) both made their way into the money. Other notables included Jesse Sylvia (27th - $5,487.80), Jason 'haderade' Somerville (51st - $3,023.89), Ian Steinman ($1,455.94), and Shawn 'Saygoodnight' Daniels (266th - $1,007.96).
  10. It took just 55 minutes on Friday morning for 'MacDaddy15' to go from middle of the final table pack to World Series of Poker bracelet winner in Event #9 ($1,000 NLHE Six Max) and in the process earn the single biggest score of the 2020 WSOP to date. A total of 1,026 entries from 658 unique players created a $974,700 prize pool with the eventual champion getting to take home $188,214 and the bracelet. When the final table began, Ruth 'crazeeelf666' Ruffman held a comfortable chip lead with 'WillowG23' in second and 'MacDaddy15' not far behind in third. Ian 'apokerjoker2' Steinman was the first player sent packing by 'MacDaddy15'. From the button, 'MacDaddy15' raised to 332,500 with [poker card="2d"][poker card="2s"] before Steinman moved all in for 1,365,109 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="9d"]. 'MacDaddy15' called and then had to sweat all the way through a [poker card="kd"][poker card="qd"][poker card="5s"][poker card="js"][poker card="jc"] runout to eliminate Steinman in sixth. Five-handed play lasted another 15 minutes before the next elimination hand occurred. 'Im.Sorry' raised to 250,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="kh"][poker card="jd"] before 'moodeez' re-raised all in for 890,486 from the small blind with [poker card="jh"][poker card="th"] and 'Im.Sorry' called. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"][poker card="4d"] flop gave 'Im.Sorry' second pair and the [poker card="5c"] turn and [poker card="5h"] river failed to save 'moodeez' from a fifth place finish. A few moments later, 'Im.Sorry' raised to 254,000 from the hijack with [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"] only to have Ruth 'crazeelf666' re-raise to 806,000 with [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"]. 'Im.sorry' continued betting, moving all in for 4,489,926 and Ruffman called all in. Ruffman was unable to improve on the [poker card="ac"][poker card="8d"][poker card="2d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5h"] runout and was eliminated in fourth. 'Im.Sorry' continued to be the aggressor and ended another player's run five minutes later. 'Im.Sorry' called from the button and 'WillowG23' checked their big blind. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"] and 'WillowG23' checked and then called after 'Im.Sorry' threw in a bit of 160,000. The turn was the [poker card="jc"] and 'WillowG23' check-called after 'Im.Sorry' bet 225,000. The river was the [poker card="5c"], 'WillowG23' checked and 'Im.Sorry' moved all-in for 10,070,712 . 'WillowG23' called all in for 1,614,568 and showed [poker card="ks"][poker card="9c"] for top pair but 'Im.Sorry' turned over [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"] for a flush to send 'WillowG23' home in third position. That both gave 'Im.Sorry' 62.8% of the chips at the start of heads up play. The play played for nearly 15 minutes before 'MacDaddy15' took over the lead thanks to winning an all in preflop hand with [poker card="tc"][poker card="ts"] against the [poker card="ad"][poker card="qs"] of 'Im.Sorry'. Two minutes later, the tournament was over. Down to 10 big blinds, 'Im.Sorry' open-shoved for 1,752,560 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="4c"] and 'MacDaddy15' called with [poker card="td"][poker card="5d"]. The [poker card="kd"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6h"] flop gave 'MacDaddy15' a flush draw and gave 'Im.Sorry' to pair. The [poker card="qd"] turn filled that flush draw and eliminated 'Im.Sorry' as the runner-up as the [poker card="2c"] completed the board to officially crown 'MacDaddy15' as the winner. Final Table Payouts MacDaddy15 - $188,214 Im.Sorry - $116,379 WillowG23 - $81,972 Ruth 'crazeelf666' Ruffman - $58,482 mooodeez - $43,301 Ian 'apokerjoker2' Steinman - $30,995 Faces in the Crowd The #1-ranked player in the United States, Yong 'LuckySpewy1' Kwon, came in 56th for $2,729.16 and was one of a handful of notable names to make it into the money. Daniel Negreanu picked up another cash, his fourth, coming in 96th for $1,851.93 and Event #1 champion Jonathan 'Art.Vandelay' Dokler snuck into the top 100, finishing 99th for $1,851.93. A pair of former #1 PocketFivers also had a winning day. Ari 'philivey' Engel finished 105th for $1,754.46 and Chris 'Robotbob47' Moorman was behind him, coming in 141st to take home $1,656.99. Anthony 'heheh' Zinno (22nd - $5,360.25), Shawn 'Saygoodnight' Daniels (37th - $3,703.86), Nick 'cashUSklay' Schulman (43rd - $3,703.86), and Kevin 'ImaLuckSac' MacPhee (95th - $1,851.93) also cashed.
  11. For almost two decades, poker fans have been pestering Brian Koppelman and David Levien to write a sequel to Rounders. In the final scene Mike McDermott jumps in a taxi in New York City and tells the driver to take him to the airport. "So where you headed?" "I'm going to Vegas." "Vegas, huh?" "Yup." "Good luck man." The cab drives off into the distance and the credits roll as Counting Crows' Baby, I'm a Big Star Now plays, but what happens after Mike gets to Las Vegas? Well, Kopelman and Levien are busy with their hit show Billions, and a sequel seems highly unlikely, but 2020 World Series of Poker Online Event #1 winner Jonathan Dokler might just be writing it on his own. Six months ago, the 27-year-old had a good-paying job at a trading firm in New York City. "I decided it wasn't the life for me. I quit my job, moved out to Vegas," Dokler said. He didn't take a cab to Kennedy though - he took a train to Newark and then flew to Las Vegas. Everything started coming together about a month earlier though. Still working his 9-5, Dokler went to Atlantic City to play in some Borgata Winter Poker Open events. "I took a Greyhound from New York to Atlantic City for a quick trip, a couple of days before I had to get back to work. I hadn't even quit my job yet but I was planning to very soon," Dokler said. Dokler, with all of four live cashes to his credit totalling a little more than $21,000 in earnigns, beat out 76 other entries to win a $5,000 High Roller event for $100,829. Some of the players that he outlasted included former #1-ranked PocketFiver Paul Volpe, Faraz Jaka, Ian O’Hara, Jerry Wong, Christian Harder, and Jake Schwartz. "It was a small field, only 77 people, so it's nothing crazy, but it was cool to play that event, against that class of field and have a good result," Dokler said. Having picked up the game in college in 2013, Dokler's competitive side fueled his desire to get better at the game. He began playing more, watching Run It Once videos, and talking over hands with friends. As time went by, Dokler grew more and more passionate about the game and he kept flirting with the idea of playing professionally. The bus ride back to New York City gave Dokler time to think and the Borgata win made it crystal clear to him that he needed to follow his gut. In early March, Dokler packed up his stuff and left for Las Vegas. His original plan was to use Las Vegas as a home base of sorts as he travelled the world playing poker. "I was actually planning on travelling for a lot of tournaments. I was going to be in South America for some of the big PokerStars stuff, and I wanted to play the Irish Poker Open, WPT Amsterdam," Dokler said. That’s when Dokler's 2020 story - and everybody else's - really lost the narrative. "I got out here, I had an Airbnb for a couple of days and one of the places I went to go eat after finishing a session, they'd shut down. That's how I found out about the shut down in Vegas," Dokler said, referring to the coronavirus pandemic that shuttered casinos and many Las Vegas businesses. He did not bring many personal belongings with him to Las Vegas, so he quickly ditched the Airbnb and found an apartment to rent and began getting set up to play as much online poker as possible. He had the necessities though, even if he didn't have the essentials. "I didn't have toilet paper for the first month or so, but I had a computer and an internet connection, enough to keep me happy," Dokler said. Happy indeed. In late March, Dokler earned $77,910 and a Circuit ring for winning WSOP Circuit Super Series Event #9 ($500 NLHE Monster Stack) on WSOP.com. That was really just a pre-cursor to last Wednesday when Dokler kicked off the WSOP Online by beating 1,714 other entries to win Event #1 ($500 NLHE Kickoff) for $130,425.75 and a WSOP bracelet. But even as Dokler was grinding his way towards the win, he was multi-tabling events across multiple sites and didn't think anything would come of it. "I was playing a lot of tables so I wasn't even paying super close attention to the bracelet event until it was actually getting kind of close," Dokler said. "I had some more interesting spots that didn't really pan out and I was able to run up a bunch of chips in the bracelet event and make that happen." So inside of six months, Dokler won six figures in a live event, quit his job, moved across the country, quarantined himself in a new apartment, won a WSOP Circuit ring and then became the first WSOP bracelet winner of 2020. He might be relatively new to the scene, but he understands his recent run is thanks to a combination of his skill and some luck. "I have friends who are much better at poker than me that don't have any bracelets and there are also players that are worse than me that have multiple bracelets," Dokler said. "I'm glad I won but the bracelet itself I don't attach any particular significance to it." With three weeks of events left, Dokler plans to continue to grind as much of the WSOP.com schedule as possible and hasn't yet made up his mind about leaving the country to play the GGPoker bracelet events. "I actually haven't decided yet. It's tough because you've gotta get set up in a different country and all that," Dokler said. "And I'm not sure if the borders are going to be open yet. We'll see."
  12. Some 21 years ago, Alan Goehring finished runner-up to Noel Furlong in the 1999 World Series of Poker Main Event. He hadn't made a WSOP final table since - until Wednesday. Early Thursday morning, Goehring conquered a final table that had two WSOP bracelet winners - including the current top player on the WSOP leaderboard - to finally earn his first career WSOP bracelet. Goehring topped the 1,479-player field in Event #8 ($500 NLHE Freezeout) of the 2020 WSOP Online to win $119,399.67 and that bracelet. He adds that bracelet to a resume that includes a pair of World Poker Tour titles, including the inaugural WPT Championship from 2003. Not long after the double elimination of Steve 'gborooo' Gross and Matthew 'MartyCohen' Weiss in 10th and 11th place respectively, a classic race situation led to the first elimination of the final table. Ross 'BlueTang' Gottlieb raised to 360,000 from UTG with [poker card="9d"][poker card="9s"] before Louis 'xILoUieIx' Torres re-raised all in to 1,625,444 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"] and Gottlieb called. The board ran out [poker card="qh"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="jc"][poker card="jh"] to eliminate Torres in ninth. Five minutes later, Event #3 winner and the current #1-player on the WSOP leaderboard, Robert Kuhn began an ascension to the chip lead after sending a player to the rail. From middle position, Kuhn raised to 400,000 with [poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"] and Scott 'miamicane' Davies moved all in for 2,062,092 with [poker card="as"][poker card="qh"] and Kuhn called. The [poker card="jd"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7s"] flop gave Davies no help and neither did the [poker card="5s"] turn or [poker card="th"] river and he was out in eighth place. A battle of the blinds led to the next elimination. Kuhn moved all in from the small blind with [poker card="ks"][poker card="ts"] and 'aceviper' called off their last 1,111,520 with [poker card="kd"][poker card="qs"]. The [poker card="qh"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8h"] flop gave 'aceviper' top pair but gave Kuhn four outs to a straight. The [poker card="4s"] turn gave Kuhn a flush draw. The [poker card="jd"] river completed Kuhn's straight draw and eliminated 'aceviper' in seventh. Just four minutes passed before yet another blind versus blind spot produced another elimination. Goehring called from the small blind with [poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"] and 'dudeguydrew' shoved for 3,803,270 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="8s"] and Goehring called. The board ran out [poker card="kh"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="th"] to give Goehring the pot and end 'dudeguydrew''s run in sixth place. Kuhn then clashed with Gottlieb in a pot that changed the complexion of the final table. Kuhn lost more than 90% of his stack with pocket threes against Gottlieb's pocket queens and was the table short stack with just 3.5 big blinds. Kuhn was a spectator a few hands later when 'clembutt' moved all in for 2,802,760 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="qs"] before Randy 'StayAlive' Ohel moved all in for 5,505,426 with [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"]. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3s"][poker card="ac"][poker card="5d"] runout secured the pot for Ohel and send 'clembutt' out in fifth. Throughout the 20 minutes of four-handed play, Goehring continued to accumulate chips and Kuhn's chip stack rode a roller coaster of ups and downs before finally hitting a hard stop. From the button, Kuhn put his last 2,753,022 at risk with [poker card="qs"][poker card="jc"] and Gottlieb re-raised all in for 8,084,752 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"]. Kuhn wasn't able to improve through the [poker card="9h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="7h"][poker card="ac"] runout and was done in fourth place. Three-handed play lasted just five minutes before the last remaining bracelet winner was eliminated. Ohel, who earned a bracelet in 2012 ($,500 Triple Draw 2-7), raised to 560,000 from the button and Goehring and Gottlieb defended the small and big blinds respectively. After the [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"][poker card="3c"] flop, Goehring and Gottlieb checked, allowing Ohel to bet 800,000. Goehring clicked back with a check-raise to 2,160,000, Gottlieb folded, and Ohel moved all in for 4,083,186 and Goehring called. Ohel turned over [poker card="kd"][poker card="8c"] but was outpipped when Goehring showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="th"]. The [poker card="ah"] turn kept Goehring in front and he completed a Broadway straight on the [poker card="qc"] to earn the pot and eliminate Ohel in third. Goehring started heads-up play with 61.3% of the chips in play and it took less than five minutes for him to capture the rest. Gottlieb raised to 680,000 and Goehring called. The flop came [poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] and Gottlieb bet 860,000. Goehring responded by raising to 1,720,000 and Gottlieb moved all in for 7,996,774. Goehring called and showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="3c"] for a nut flush draw while Gottlieb showed [poker card="kd"][poker card="9c"] for a flopped straight. The [poker card="6c"] turn completed Goehring's flush and Gottlieb could only watch as the [poker card="jd"] completed the board to make his runner-up finish official and award Goehring the first WSOP bracelet of his career. Final Table Payouts Alan 'GladiusIII' Goehring - $119,399 Ross 'BlueTang' Gottlieb - $73,942 Randy 'StayAlive' Ohel - $52,511 Robert 'bustinballs' Kuhn - $37,803 clembutt - $27,620 dudeguydrew - $20,365 aceviper - $15,307 Scott 'miamicane' Davies - $11,580 xILoUieIx - $8,918 Faces in the Crowd Former #1-ranked PocketFiver Steve 'gborooo' Gross's final table bubble finish came with a $6,921.72 payday. He was the only well-known player who finished in the money on Wednesday. Jeff 'NerdrudRelyt' Madsen (14th - $5,457.51), Daniel 'centrfieldr' Lupo (62nd - $1,730.43), Shawn 'Saygoodnight' Daniels (77th - $1,331.10), Kevin 'ImaLuckSac' MacPhee (93rd - $1,064.88) and veterans Phil Hellmuth (109th - $931.77) and Mike Matusow (118th - $931.77) all added to their bankroll.
  13. When World Series of Poker commentator David Tuchman reached out to Nathan 'surfbum' Gamble to provide guest commentary for the final table of Event #6 ($600 Omaha Hi-Lo 8-or-better), Gamble was happy to accept. Hours later, Tuchman had an opening for a PLO8 analyst on his WSOP Twitch broadcast as 30-year-old professional mixed game specialist Gamble was, indeed, at the final table in search of a second career World Series of Poker gold bracelet and the first-place prize of over $89,000. For anyone paying close attention, Gamble’s ascension to the upper echelon of the mixed games could be viewed through his incredible PLO8 resume. Since 2017, the World Series of Poker has held ten PLO8 or PLO8 variant tournaments. Gamble has cashed in six of them, winning two. Gamble won his first WSOP event back in 2017, taking down the $1,500 PLO8 event that year for over $223,000. But back then, for him, it was a very different experience. His final table was shoved into the back of the Amazon Room of the Rio, giving way for the $50K Poker Players Championship to take the main stage. Gamble had one family friend on his rail and when it was over, his "surreal victory" was enjoyed mostly by himself. Plenty has changed in the three years since his first bracelet win. Gamble is a bit of "pros pro", a game starter in the Wynn’s $80/$160 Mixed. In his nearly two years since moving to Las Vegas to pursue playing live poker professionally, he’s evolved into being thought of as a "guy who kinda knows what he’s doing" into a regular in the high limit mixed games community - with what feels like "the full support of the industry" behind him. When you talk to Gamble, it’s clear that his love of mixed games is less about the money, a and more the people he’s met along the way. “I don’t play much No Limit anymore. if you look at my cashes I’ve played the Main Event one time. I made a deep run in it but I never played it again. In mixed games, people are more open, more talkative and it’s more dynamic,” Gamble said. “It’s a lot more of that fun environment that, even if you are winning or losing, people enjoy themselves.” It’s this community that Gamble credits in his continued passion for all facets of poker, not just No Limit Hold’em. “It’s the camaraderie. We’ve built a pretty large community at this point and we’ll have people just stop in and ask ‘What are ya’ll doing? You’re so fun and you’re talkative,’" Gamble says, his Texas roots showing. “We’ve had people sit down simply because we’re having fun and enjoying ourselves. It’s almost like what you would hear about back in the day about Bobby’s Room. People they’re no way they’re playing for real money, they’re so friendly…but half of us literally go out for lunch and we hang out and enjoy each other’s company but at the same time it’s competitive on the felt.” Gamble’s interest strayed from No Limit Hold’em from the get-go. He recalls playing free-to-play online poker when he was 13, looking to build a bigger free chip bankroll. “I noticed that the Pot Limit Omaha side played bigger and you could build up chips faster,” he said, “It was more swingy and more 'gambley'.” Eventually, his dad gave him $11 to play a tournament, which, when it was canceled he was allowed to keep. He took that $11 and found an edge playing in alternate forms of poker. Where people were lacking skill he says he “instantly found a niche.” He honed his mixed game skills in the pre-Black Friday tables of Full Tilt Poker, putting in work in PLO while others were battling in No Limit. “I would get in 100 reps a day of PLO8 Sit & Go’s, and that’s why I think it’s extremely hard to learn the game now because it’s not online, there’s no sit and goes. You have two or three tournaments weekly so it’s very difficult for people to learn,” he recalled. “I just happened to be fortunate enough to learn a game that there’s not a lot of work done on.” And here in the 2020 World Series of Poker, that work is continuing to pay off. On Monday night Gamble found himself in line to add to his PLO accomplishments. “At every single break for the first ten hours of the tournament, I was between first and fifth in chips. And I told people, ‘this is just flowing, I’m on the right trajectory, everything is going as smoothly as can be.” But at the final table, the one he was supposed to be commentating on, he found himself short-stacked, and doubt began to creep in. Was he really going pull of another gold-bracelet moment? Rather than talking to an audience, he spoke to himself. “But then you say, ‘OK, I’ve been here before, I know what to do and if the cards break slightly in my favor - I’m a favorite to win this.’" “When the very last card came off…that’s when it all hit. Up until then, I was just in a zone. And you don’t even realize it, you are just in a complete, absolute zone. I didn’t know what we were playing for, I didn’t really care what we were playing for but as soon as that card hit I instantly realized I won it,” he said. “The adrenaline hit and it took me back to when I won my first bracelet in 2017 where you're in disbelief and it doesn’t feel real.” But there’s a distinct difference this year from 2017, and it’s not due to society’s current pandemic. “This year, through playing mixed games, I’ve met some of the most incredible players in this community. So, on break, I would call Brandon Shack-Harris and we would talk things through. I talked with Ali Nejad…I just had a rail that was really there to support me and that meant a lot,” he said. ”I don’t know if I would have won if it wasn’t for my rail and the people I’ve made friends with since the first one. I really do owe them. The difference between the first and the second was the first was all me, the second was due to the community I’ve grown a part of.” “That, to me, means more than the actual bracelet.”
  14. Starting the final table with the biggest stack, Allen 'Acnyc718' Chang eliminated five of his eight opponents to take down Event #5 ($1,000 NLHE Freezeout) of the 2020 World Series of Poker Online to win his first bracelet and a $161,286 payday. The tournament was the first freezeout on the schedule and attracted 854 runners to create an $811,300 prize pool, the second largest of through the first five events, trailing only Event #2 ($1,000 NLHE). The win was the 12th career WSOP cash for Yang and his first final table. Starting the final table with the second shortest stack at just 8.5 big blinds, Quintin 'AA_QTiP_KK' Trammell moved all-in from the cutoff for 699,132 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="qs"] after 'iseefoodtuna' opened to 120,000 from middle position with [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"]. 'iseefoodtuna' called and then sweated through a [poker card="js"][poker card="9c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6s"] runout to eliminate Trammell in ninth. Two minutes later, Chang put his big stack to work to end the other short stack home. Action folded to 'charliefrog' in the cutoff and they moved all in for 532,132 with [poker card="as"][poker card="jh"] and Chang called from the small blind with [poker card="qs"][poker card="js"]. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"][poker card="7c"] flop gave 'charliefrog' top pair and left Chang drawing to Broadway. The [poker card="5h"] turn changed nothing but the [poker card="kd"] river filled Chang's straight draw and eliminated 'charliefrog' in eighth. Alexander 'ShadowFiend' Condon raised to 200,000 with [poker card="qd"][poker card="qh"] from late position before John 'Slapshot1085' Forlenza moved all in for 790,158 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="qs"] from the cutoff. The board ran out [poker card="8s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"][poker card="qs"][poker card="kc"] to give Condon middle set and eliminate Forlenza in seventh place. Condon got into another all-in preflop situation 15 minutes later that had a very different outcome. Condon raised to 240,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ks"] from late position and Chang moved all in for 6,353,967 from the button with [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"] and Condon called. The [poker card="qh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2d"][poker card="7d"] runout gave Condon no help and he was eliminated in sixth. Chang found another victim just a few minutes later. Down to just 12 big blinds, 'married' moved all in from UTG with [poker card="2c"][poker card="2s"] and action folded to Chang in the big blind who called with [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"]. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6s"] flop kept Chang in front and 'married' was unable to pick up one of their two remaining outs through the [poker card="7s"] turn and [poker card="jd"] river and busted in fifth place. Four-handed play lasted a full 30 minutes. From UTG, 'iseefoodtuna' moved all in for 2,278,039 holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="2c"]. Philip 'tomte' Yeh moved all in for 3,305,205 from the small blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="as"]. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="td"][poker card="2d"] flop gave 'iseefoodtuna' some hope but the [poker card="ks"] turn and [poker card="5c"] river couldn't save them from a fourth place result. Chang continued to use his big stack in optimal spots and earned yet another elimination. Action folded to Chang on the button and he raised to 360,000 and Felipe 'McBain' Leme called from the big blind. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="9s"][poker card="5c"], Leme checked, Chang bet 350,000 and Leme called. The turn was the [poker card="7h"] and Leme moved all in for 2,342,150 and Chang called. Leme showed [poker card="kh"][poker card="9h"] for second pair and the nut flush draw while Chang turned over [poker card="ad"][poker card="ks"] for top pair. The [poker card="2d"] river was a blank and Leme was eliminated in third. Chang started heads-up play with a 2.5-1 chip lead over Yeh. It took 25 minutes before the pair clashed in a hand the resulted in Chang's victory. Yeh moved all in for 2,900,000 with [poker card="8c"][poker card="6c"] and Chang called with [poker card="qh"][poker card="js"]. The board ran out [poker card="jh"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2d"] to give Chang top pair and eliminate Yeh in second place. Final Table Payouts Allen 'Acnyc718' Chang - $161,286 Philip 'tomte' Yeh - $99,709 Felipe 'McBain' Leme - $69,772 iseefoodtuna - $49,570 married - $35,697 Alex 'ShadowFiend1' Condon - $26,124 John 'Slapshot1085' Forlenza - $19,390 charliefrog - $14,603 Quintin 'AA_QTiP_KK' Trammell - $11,196 Faces in the Crowd Ryan 'Protential' Laplante just missed out on the final table, finishing in 11th place for $8,680.91. He wasn't the only familiar face who worked their way into the money. A few well known online grinders and players who have found success early on in the Series also cashed including Michael 'itwasthator0' Gagliano (12th - $8,680.91), Event #2 winner Louis 'PokeThese' Lynch (50th - $2,758.42), Daniel 'redsoxnets5' Sewnig (94th - $1,703.73), Jed 'jchak' Hoffman (110th - $1,622.60), Katie 'katelin' Lindsay (113th - $1,622.60), and fresh off of his fourth place finish in Event #4 on Saturday, Frank 'spaghettiii' snuck into the money with 124th finish worth $1,622.60.
  15. Over the course of the 2020 World Series of Poker, PocketFives will be checking in with Chris Moorman and Katie Lindsay as they chase down WSOP glory. Normally at this time of year, former #1-ranked PocketFiver Chris Moorman and his wife Katie Lindsay are busy making daily runs to and from the Rio Hotel as they grind the World Series of Poker and various other tournaments around town. With the 2020 WSOP postponed and 31 bracelet events available on WSOP.com, the couple is bunkered down inside their Las Vegas home ready to win a bracelet - or two - from the comfort of their kitchen, or bedroom, or sure, even the pool. The No Limit Hold’em-heavy schedule plays into the strong suits of Katie and Chris and they’ll be playing almost daily, save for maybe the Omaha 8-or-better event. While the city was shut down for a while, the pair continued to find ways to keep busy. Along with putting more volume on the virtual felt, Katie has developed an at-home workout routine and Chris has been spending as much time as possible in their backyard with their dog. They’ve also recently started spending time with their newest neighbor, another crusher who moved into the neighborhood. “We are lucky to have a house on a lake so we can go kayaking or hang out by the pool,” Katie says. “We actually started playing the first event from the pool with our neighbor Connor Drinan before eventually moving inside.” The opening day of the WSOP events on WSOP.com couldn’t have gone much better for both players. Chris made two final tables before WSOP Event #1 ($500 NLHE) even started. Katie shined brightest though. She navigated her way through a 371-runner field in the $215 WSOP Summer Special $75,000 Guaranteed event to take home $20,485.80. Then she worked her way into the money of Event #1, finishing 149th for $1,003.27. Chris wasn’t so fortunate in the bracelet event, busting before the money. Not that anybody’s actually keeping score, but that’s Katie 1, Chris 0. The Day 2 narrative felt a lot like the Day 1 narrative. Chris made one final table in a mid-afternoon event while Katie binked a satellite into that night’s bracelet event, Event #2 ($1,000 No Limit Hold’em) and, like she did on Wednesday, worked her way into the money, finishing 122nd for $1,571. Chris bricked again. Katie 2, Chris 0. And yeah, they’re keeping score. They’re both hyper-competitive and have had plenty of run-ins at the tables over the years. They’re not going to take it easy with each other, the pride at stake is too much. “People that think couples might soft-play against each other have never been at a table with Chris and I,” Katie says. “Anybody who has ever played with us knows we’re super competitive.” “She loves to try and bubble me,” Chris jokes. The competition won’t end when the 31 bracelet events do. They’ll be joining a handful of other pros heading down to Mexico the second that last event wraps up and will be immediately jumping into action on GGPoker to play the remainder of that schedule. “I think the first event we’ll play is the Millionaire Maker,” Chris says. “We have to miss a few events that I’d like to play, like the Colossus, because of the overlap.” The Mexico plans include a house with a number of other pros and on on-site chef and concierge so they can focus all of their attention on the poker. That won’t quite me the modus operandi on Saturday, however. The couple will be celebrating July 4th at their house. A few cocktails, some button clicking in the Super Turbo bracelet event on the schedule, and there are lobster rolls on the menu. And maybe, Chris will get rid of the goose egg.
  16. GGPoker’s World Series of Poker Silk Road satellite series is making the dream of competing for a WSOP gold bracelet available to everyone - including micro-stakes grinders. Unprecedented Satellites From July 1 through August 31, the online site is offering a series of satellites to WSOP bracelet events with buy-ins ranging from $1.08 to $21.60 with thousands of dollars in tournament tickets guaranteed. But this is not a step system or a super-satellite, these are direct satellites - win and you’re in. Players that make it to the end of a Silk Road tournament will find themselves playing for a bracelet on GGPoker. The guarantees start at $1,000 worth of tickets and climb all the way to $100,000. During the first week alone, there is more than $289,000 worth of WSOP entries on the line. Silk Road LeaderBoard In addition to having the opportunity to play a bracelet event for a previously inconceivably small buy-in, GGPoker is also giving Silk Road grinders a leaderboard that will award the winner a $5,000 WSOP Main Event ticket. The leaderboard runs from the start of the series on July 1 through August 29, two days before the start of the Main Event. If by chance, the winner of the leaderboard has already locked up a ticket to the $25,000,000 guaranteed Main Event, then they will be paid out in tournament dollars. Every time you play in a Silk Road event, you have the opportunity pick up points for the leaderboard. And calculating those points is easy with GGPoker’s published formula. Leaderboard Point = f * sqrt (Prize pool / k) k is the place of finish f=2.0 (1st place) f=1.5 (Final table) f=1.0 (In the money) f=0.5 (Bubble) An item of note for players is that the first World Series of Poker ticket won during the series is a must-play for any target event. It cannot be exchanged for tournament dollars. If a player wins multiple tickets for the same event, any unused duplicate tickets will be exchanged for GGPoker tournament dollars. GGPoker WSOP Silk Road Series - Week One [table id=71 /]
  17. It was just before midnight when chaos erupted in the basement of Mr. Bode’s Hampton, New Jersey house. You see, his son, 29-year old Matthew Bode, who had just driven all the way from his home in North Carolina to play a little online poker, had just won his first World Series of Poker gold bracelet. “I started screaming and yelling. I was going crazy after the win,” Matt 'Bodeyster' Bode said. “I was freaking out. It was surreal…I ran like hot fire.” Once his father and step-mom ambled down the steps, once the dogs stopped barking, he did his best to explain what had happened. After nearly predicting it just days before, Bode won Event #4 of the 2020 WSOP Online series for just over $97,000. The event which took place on July 4 was designed with fireworks in mind. It took less than six hours from start to finish for Bode to claim the gold bracelet making it one of the fastest gold bracelets won in WSOP history. He was faced with stiff competition at a short-stacked final table including Kevin ‘ImaLuckSac’ MacPhee, Frank ‘spaghettiii’ Marasco, and eventual runner-up Brian ‘XcrazylegsX’ Frasca. Even so, he felt like he was the one with the edge. “I think I had an advantage over a lot of the crushers at the final table because they didn’t know who I was but I knew who they were,” Bode said. “There was no room for mistakes if you messed up in any spot you were out in that tournament. And I knew it too, at that moment. My hands were sweatin’, my balls were sweatin’…you name it and it was sweatin’ on me,” Bode said. “I knew how big of a moment it was.” “I just stuck to my guns and stuck to my charts and kept with it,” he said talking about his final table performance. “I just didn’t make any calls. Just stayed with the all-in button and didn’t hit the call button. Just made all the folds and hit all-in. That was my goal just not to hit call.” While he didn't make any 'calls' at the final table, Bode, who considers himself a part-time pro MTT player who mostly competes on America’s Cardroom, did take to Twitter, to call his own shot. “My goal back in January was to win a bracelet. So I slowly built up enough of a bankroll up. Going into the weekend I had $5,000 to my name to play for the weekend,” he said. “I had $1,500 to my name headed into the Super Turbo.” While those who take bankroll management seriously might shudder at that thought, Bode has never really lacked confidence when it comes to poker. He started playing young, around 12, and came up with a crew of friends, many of which turned into professional poker players. As an eighteen-year-old Bode was playing on Full Tilt and partypoker online and winning the first live tournament he ever played. He was even taken under the win of pro poker player Leif Force who helped him elevate his game. But even though Bode felt like he was just as good as anyone, especially when he was younger, he didn’t take the poker pro path. He found another competitive outlet in Ultimate Frisbee. In 2009, as a high school student, Bode won a National Championship in Ultimate Frisbee, and then in 2013, as a professional, he won a World Championship. At the same time, Bode has another job working with kids with autism, helping non-verbal kids become more verbal and assisting their families through Applied Behavior Analysis Therapy. “The work I do with children, it fills the bucket if that makes sense,” Bode said. “If I didn’t wake up and do something else, work with someone I feel like I’d be a miserable online grinder.” While he was playing poker recreationally from time to time over the last ten years, Bode was more focused on his work. It wasn’t until November 2019 that he decided to give the grind another chance. When he did decide to go for it, he buckled down and put in the work. “I’m super competitive so I just started studying and studying and studying and grinding super hard,” he said. He quickly got back into the scene, playing eight tables at a time, making deep runs online. “Everyone started seeing me on the ACR scene as I was making final table after final table. I was going deep in everything but no big binks.” That’s when he decided to make a run at a bracelet. He started to build a bankroll early in the year. He sold a little to his brother, who plays professionally, and his girlfriend but kept most of himself. Then for the Fourth of July weekend, he packed his car and made the trip to New Jersey to take his shot. “I knew it was going to happen. If you’re a poker player you know, you get that feeling and I had that feeling. I hadn’t won a tournament since January,” he said. “For me to sun run it at that time, I kinda knew I was due. I earned this moment. And a soon as we hit that min-cash, as soon as I saw it, I was like ‘ok, I’m going for the win’.” “This is that moment I’ve been waiting for. When you get to that spot and you have that absolute feeling like ‘This is my tournament, my time to win.’ and I put in all this effort. There’s a reason why I’m up to 4 a.m. every night. And after I’m losing I’m studying why the hell I lost and understanding all my mistakes.” In the end, he says he “ran well and made all the right jams and that’s all that matters.” As for what’s next, Bode can’t be sure. “I haven’t even seen the bracelet yet,” he laughed. After a nearly ten-year detour from poker, Bode is back - now with a bracelet. But he doesn’t regret taking any of that time off. “If I were to have tried to grind my way through at twenty when I knew I was really good at this game, I wouldn’t have been able to have this bracelet now,” he said. “The poker gods wouldn’t have had my back until I had gone and gotten life lessons. They wouldn’t have given me this bracelet, I had to be mature enough to embrace this.” As for what’s next Bode is still basking in the glow of a bracelet. “Leif wants me to fly out to Vegas and go to Mexico with him to finish out the whole series and try to earn a bunch of points. But I don’t know what I’m going to do. I’m in this ‘what the hell just happened??’ kind of moment.”
  18. After five straight days of No Limit Hold'em action in the 2020 World Series of Poker Online, the four-card wizards got their first chance to shine with on Monday night with a Pot Limit Omaha 8-or-better event and Nathan Gamble emerged to win his second career WSOP bracelet in this variant. Event #6 ($600 Pot Limit Omaha 8-or-better) drew 833 runners for a $449,820 prize pool and when the final table began, Gamble sat right in the middle of the chip counts with a less-than-average stack. Ten minutes into the final table, action folded to Simon 'bagelbites' Lam in the cutoff and he raised to 350,000 and 'danish01' called from the button. After the [poker card="qd"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4s"] flop, Lam shoved for 576,136 and 'danish01' called. Lam showed [poker card="kd"][poker card="ks"][poker card="jc"][poker card="th"] for a pair of kings while 'danish01' turned over [poker card="ac"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3h"] for a wrap and the only low draw. The [poker card="ad"] turn actually gave 'danish01' top pair and that held up through the [poker card="4h"] river which gave both players two pair to bust Lam in sixth. From the button, 'rainman3817' raised to 350,000 and 'hansdigalo' and 'SSJTimmy' defended the small and big blinds respectively. After the [poker card="8c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6s"] flop, 'hansdigalo' bet 120,000, 'SSJTimmy' called all in for 43,644, and 'rainman3817' called. The turn was the [poker card="8d"] and 'hansdigalo' bet 771,822 and 'rainman3817' called. The [poker card="9c"] river completed the board and 'hansdigalo' and 'rainman3817' both checked. 'rainman3817' showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="ts"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2h"] for missed flush and low draws, 'SSJTimmy' turned over [poker card="jd"][poker card="jh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3d"] for jacks and eights, while 'hansdigalo' showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"][poker card="js"][poker card="8s"] for trip eights to eliminate 'SSJTimmy' in fifth place. Twenty minutes later Gamble picked up his first elimination of the night on his way to the title. Gamble opened to 320,000 as first to act and 'hansdigalo' replied with a three-bet to 1,120,000 from the small blind. Gamble called to see a [poker card="kh"][poker card="qs"][poker card="ts"] flop. 'hansdigalo' moved all in for 1,799,668 and Gamble called. Gamble showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="qd"][poker card="th"][poker card="2s"] for two pair with multiple straight draws while 'hansdigalo' was behind with [poker card="as"][poker card="ah"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5c"]. The turn was the [poker card="5s"] and the river was the [poker card="7d"] to give Gamble the pot and eliminate 'hansdigalo' in fourth. Just five minutes passed before Gamble went back to work. 'rainman3817' opened to 320,000 and Gamble called. The flop came [poker card="td"][poker card="8d"][poker card="4c"] and Gamble bet 720,000 and 'rainman3817' called. The turn was the [poker card="9d"] and Gamble fired 1,520,000 into the pot and 'rainman3817' called for his last 1,257,760. Gamble showed [poker card="qs"][poker card="th"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2d"] while 'rainman3817' showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="9h"]. The [poker card="3d"] river changed nothing and Gamble's flush was good enough to take down the pot and eliminate 'rainman3817' in third. Gamble held a commanding 87% of the chips in play but still needed another 20 minutes to eliminate his final opponent. 'danish01' battled back during heads-up play to face only a 2-1 deficit but wasn't able to build upon that. On the final hand, 'danish01' raised to 600,000, Gamble re-raised to 1,800,000, and 'danish01' moved all in for 3,368,864 and Gamble called. 'danish01' turned over [poker card="kc"][poker card="kh"][poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"] and Gamble showed [poker card="as"][poker card="td"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3h"]. The [poker card="js"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"] flop kept 'danish01' ahead but left Gamble with a straight draw and multiple low draws. The [poker card="5d"] turn assured Gamble of at least half of the pot but the [poker card="4d"] river gave him a straight to take the high and low pots to eliminate 'danish01' in second place and give Gamble another PLO8 bracelet. Gamble's first bracelet came in 2017 when he beat 829 other entries to win the $1,500 Pot-Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better. Final Table Payouts Nathan 'surfbum' Gamble - $89,424 danish01 - $55,283 rainman3817 - $38,865 hansdigalo - $27,484 SSJTimmy - $19,792 Simon 'bagelbites' Lam - $14,484 Faces in the Crowd One day after making threats against another player on his YouTube live stream, Mike Matusow played his way into the money before going out in 37th for $1,754.29. Other notables who cashed include Jeremy 'Chipchecka' Ausmus (8th - $9,096.76), Max 'MaxSparrow' Pescatori (10th - $4,813.07), Randy 'StayAlive' Ohel (12th - $4,813.07), Shaun 'ddtgg' Deeb (21st - $2,518.99) Robert 'bustinballs' Kuhn (53rd - $1,529.38), and Daniel Negreanu picked up his third cash of the Series, finishing in 59th place for $1,304.47. WSOP commentator Norman Chad drove from Los Angeles to Nevada specifically to play this event and finished 112th for $899.64.
  19. Mike Matusow will not face any discipline from the World Series of Poker after he threatened to assault another player following his elimination from Event #5 ($1,000 NLHE Freezeout) of the 2020 WSOP Online on Sunday night. Matusow, a four-time bracelet winner, was eliminated after playing just two hands of the online tournament and began berating the player who won a key-hand against him leading to his eventual elimination. "We take prevention of abusive behavior at WSOP tournaments or on the WSOP.COM platform extremely seriously. We have a number of preventive measures online including recently disabling our chat entirely," said Ty Stewart, Executive Director of the WSOP. "But the regulation of content on our customer's personal streams and social media accounts is a slippery slope, particularly as each of these third-party platforms have their own escalation procedures. We reserve the right to suspend the account of any individual going forward, but in this case, it appears the player had the perfect response to resolve the situation herself." Matusow's rant included threats of physical and sexual assault and the eventual doxxing of the player in question. "This motherfucker, 'wolverine17', I'm gonna fuck him right in his fucking ass man, right in his fucking ass. Mark that name down, 'wolverine17'," Matusow told those watching his YouTube stream, not realizing the player was a female. Matusow then complained that chat has been turned off in the WSOP.com client, preventing him from telling "these scumbags what you really think of them." Before the 2020 WSOP Online began, tournament organizers made an "operational decision" to turn chat within the game client off for the duration of the series. Asked for comment before the Series began, the personal safety of players was given as a key reason behind that decision. "Chat is currently disabled for everyone," said Danielle Barille, Director for WSOP Online Poker. "We have decided to permanently disable chat, in order to create a safe gaming experience for players." He continued to deride the player and threatened to assault them when they meet in person. "I've got this guy's name written down. I'm going to find out who he is. I'll see him in person, I'll fucking knock him the fuck out. Think I won't? Watch," Matusow said. "I am going to find out who this motherfucker is and I swear to you I'm going to throw him up against the fucking wall and tell him, 'you fucking ever slow roll me again, I'm going to beat your fucking ass'." Speaking directly to those in his YouTube stream chat, Matusow then offered a monetary reward for anybody who could provide him with the real name of 'wolverine17'. "If anybody in here right now can find the name of this guy and the actual truth of this guy, you guys will get an extra $50 bonus if you sign up in my homegame," Matusow said. One user eventually provided Matusow with the name Megan Milburn and Matusow then tweeted directly at her. In a since-deleted tweet, Matusow used a derogatory term when tweeting directly at Milburn. "do you enjoy acting like a fucking c-----t by slowrolling people online where nobody can see you? Learn poker etiquette or your poker career won't last long! Sincerely Mike". Milburn replied to Matusow and appeared to hold no ill-will towards him. Matusow has claimed to have apologized via social media. Note: this story was updated to reflect the streaming platform Matusow uses.
  20. The World Series of Poker Online bracelet events captured the attention of the poker world this weekend but they were by no means the only opportunity for U.S.-based players to take down a big-time tournament. For starters, WSOP.com is running the WSOP.com Online Championships right alongside of the 2020 WSOP. The Online Championships is a month-long series with $6 million in total prize money guaranteed and this weekend the series featured three six-figure prize pools. One of the biggest tournaments of the weekend was the WSOP.com OC #21 ($200,000 Sunday Special Edition) which saw 613 players (384 rebuys) post the $320 buy-in and shatter the guarantee to the tune of a $299,100 prize pool. 2018 World Series of Poker Main Event final tablist Aram ‘X69Podheiser’ Zobian took home the win, adding $43,907.88 to his bankroll. ‘bbqnub1’ finished as the runner-up, earning $32,512.17 while Jason ‘Gunner_Q10’ Gunn shot up to third and walked away with $23,928. Uke ’ooopsmybad’ Dauti took down the $100 buy-in WSOP.com OC#20 ($100,000 Player Appreciation) for a $30,411.99 score. Mike ‘SammyTwizz’ Azzaro captured second place for an $18,750.99 score while ‘betfoldwin’ wrapped up in third place for $13,496.40. The third six-figure prize pool of the day was in the WSOP.com OC #22 ($75,000 Sunday 55). The $75,000 guarantee turned into a $120,500 prize pool as 687 players (1,365 rebuys + 358 add-ons) fired in the $55 buy-in event. Stuart ‘studog’ Gold outlasted the field and banked $28,317.50 with the victory. ‘edypzed’ grabbed $15,062.50 for finishing in second and Francis ‘Specialfx’ Romano grabbed the bronze and $9,881 for their efforts. While WSOP.com was cranking up the prize pools, PokerStars was slashing the buy-ins on their Pennsylvania and New Jersey Sunday Majors to lure in large fields. The PokerStars PA Half Price Sunday Special saw 2,172 entries sieze the opportunity to pay just $50 to take a shot at a five-figure payday. ‘Savant76’ scored the win and took home the $14,730 first-place prize. ‘cowboydollars’ has a few extra bucks thanks to his $10,499.09 score as the runner-up. ‘DaveyJoneLocker’ wrapped up in third place and earned $7,484.12. The PokerStars PA Half Price Sunday High Roller saw a huge boost in attendance this week with 509 players firing the $125 tournament. That’s up from 149 players who played last week with the regular High Roller buy-in of $250. ‘JonCaron215’ took home the bulk of the $58,026 prize pool by claiming the $10,267.58 first-place prize. ‘flipper12x’ finished in second place and took home $7,153.83. And ‘johnnyboat46’ stood on the final step of the podium, earning $4,984.60 for third. In New Jersey, there was a three-way chop in the $100 PokerStars NJ Half Price Sunday Special. Even though ‘zhatka’ was the official winner, earning $6,556.65 it was runner-up ‘HustlersTavern’ who locked up the biggest payday of the tournament, logging off with $7,499.44. Finally, ‘Vote Kanye’ was the third party in the deal, securing $6,841.14 for third place. ‘MyCousinVinny5’ grabbed the gold in the $215 buy-in partypoker NJ Sunday $35K Gtd for $10,280. He was followed by ‘chomeking’, who earned $6,769.38 as the runner-up and ‘Whosyourdoddy’ who fell in third place which was good for $4,883. WSOP.com OC #20 - $100,000 Player Appreciation Buy-in: $100 Entries: 1,184 (772 rebuys) Prize pool: $179,952 ooopsmybad - $30,411.88 SammyTwizz - $18,750.99 betfoldwin - $13,496.40 WSOP.com OC#21 - $200,000 Sunday Special Edition Buy-in: $320 Entries: 613 (384 rebuys) Prize pool: $299,100 Aram ‘X69Podheiser’ Zobian - $43,907.88 bbqnub1 - $32,512.17 Gunner_Q10 - $23,928 WSOP.com OC #22 - $75,000 Sunday 55 Buy-in: $55 Entries: 687 (1365 rebuys, 358 add-ons) Prize pool: $120,500 studog - $28,317.50 edypzed - $15,062.50 specialfx - $9,881 WSOP.com OC #23 - $20,000 NLH Knockout Buy-in: $75 Entries: 594 Prize pool: $43,174 Robotbob47 - $6,557.76 + $350 halama - $3,470.14 + $225 jmzit2u - $2,267.89 + $125 WSOP.com OC #24 - $20,000 NLH Deepstack Buy-in: $10 Entries: 791 (1676 rebuys, 452 add-ons) Prize pool: $26,562.90 DeionSanders - $6,109.46 c0nky - $3,227.39 yourmotsure - $2,125.03 WSOP.com $15,000 Sunday Kick-Off Buy-in: $50 Entries: 197 (209 rebuys, 109 add-ons) Prize pool: $23,432.50 sports247 - $6,326.77 Proteus99 - $3,690.61 UrNextPrez - $2,108.92 WSOP.com $15,000 Bracelet Warm-up Deepstack Buy-in: $100 Entries: 218 (83 rebuys) Prize pool: $27,391 bendtheknee - $5,259.07 luckyleo1980 - $3,925.13 omarcomin - $2,936.31 WSOP.com $15,000 Weekly Sunday Deepstack Buy-in: $50 Entries: 176 (157 rebuys, 138 add-ons) Prize pool: $21,430.50 liter_a_cola - $5,786.23 SammyTwizz - $3,375.30 ithefuture - $1,928.74 WSOP.com $50,000 Weekly Sunday Buy-in: $500 Entries: 151 (115 rebuys) Prize pool: $124,222 WATCHGUY42 - $33,539.94 JefferinoH1 - $19,564.96 hellofriend - $11,179.98 WSOP.com $25,000 WSOP Bracelet Second Chance Deepstack Buy-in: $100 Entries: 401 (235 rebuys) Prize pool: $57,876 dogfacedboy - $9,225.43 Realm - $6,829.36 TIPnTimeBOMB - $5,035.21 PokerStars PA Half Price Sunday Special Buy-in: $50 Entries: 2,172 Prize pool: $98,826 Savant76 - $14,730.96 cowboydollars - $10,499.09 DaveyJoneLocker - $7,484.12 PokerStars PA Half Price Sunday High Roller Buy-in: $125 Entries: 509 Prize pool: $58,026 JonCaron215 - $10,267.58 flipper12x - $7,153.83 johnnyboat46 - $4,984.60 PokerStars PA Nightly Stars Buy-in: $100 Entries: 246 Prize pool: $22,582.80 AFA5671 - $4,357.18 HBGgolfSIM - $3,220.34 5BETCHET - $2,380.22 PokerStars NJ Half Price Sunday Special Buy-in: $100 Entries: 530 Prize pool: $48,654 zhatka - $6,556.65* HustlersTavern - $7,499.44* Vote Kanye - $6,841.14* PokerStars NJ Half Price Sunday High Roller Buy-in: $250 Entries: 70 Prize pool: $16,310 insatiable - $4,893 iFoldN0T - $3,262 monkeyman067 - $2,446.50 partypoker NJ Sunday $35K GTD Buy-in: $215 Entries: 257 Prize pool: $51,400 MyCousinVinny5 - $10,280 chromeking - $6,769.38 Whosyourdoddy - $4,883
  21. The 2020 World Series of Poker Online Main Event was always going to be a big deal. Now it's official - it will have the largest prize pool in the history of online poker. GGPoker released its entire 2020 WSOP online schedule on Friday and the $5,000 Main Event comes with a $25 million guarantee. "We knew GGPoker would go BIG on the WSOP Online Series, but this is ridiculous," said Ty Stewart, Executive Director of the World Series of Poker. "The single biggest guarantee in the history of online poker is exactly what this once-in-a-lifetime event deserves." The Main Event is clearly the highlight of the 54-event schedule, but there is also a $5,000 Pot Limit Omaha, $10,000 Heads-Up No Limit Hold'em event, a $10,000 Short Deck event, and the $25,000 NLHE Players Championship to make up the rest of the marquee events. The Main Event The $25 million guarantee on the Main Event makes it the largest online poker tournament prize pool ever. The previous high was the 2018 partypoker MILLIONS which guaranteed $20 million and ended up at $21,780,000. There are multiple starting flights, each one a freezeout, for the $5,000 buy-in Main Event beginning on August 16. Day 2 runs on August 30 and the final table will be played out on September 6. Players start with 50,000 chips and the event will be played eight-handed throughout. Two Other Eight Figure Guarantees Along with the Main Event, there are two more eight-figure guarantees, one belonging to the $10,000 buy-in WSOP Super MILLION$ and the other is the $25,000 buy-in NLHE Poker Players Championship coming in at $10 million each. The other events with guarantees are the $100 buy-in The Opener ($2 million), $400 Colossus ($3 million), $400 PLOssus ($1 million), $1,500 Millionaire Maker ($5 million - $1 million to first), HK$8,000 NLHE Asia Championship (HK$8 million), $150 GGMasters WSOP Edition ($1 million), $500 Mini Main Event ($5 million), $50 BIG50 ($1 million), and the $100 WSOP Millions ($2 million). Asian Market Focus Taking advantage of GGPoker's strong following in Asia, there are 11 events with a start time that puts it in prime time in most of that market. These events all begin at 8 am ET which puts them at 8 PM in Beijing, China, and 9 PM in Seoul, Korea, and Tokyo, Japan. The highlight of that group is the HK$8,000 buy-in Asia Championship. The No Limit Hold'em event has an HK$8 million guarantee. [table id=66 /] The Great Game of Pot Limit Omaha While Hold'em makes up a bulk of the schedule, there are nine Pot Limit Omaha events on the schedule including the $5,000 buy-in Pot Limit Omaha Championship on July 21. The biggest PLO field is likely to come from the $400 PLOssus. There are 15 starting flights beginning July 19. Players can reenter each flight one time and the event has a $1 million guarantee. There are no Omaha 8-or-better events on the schedule. Familiar Events Throughout It just wouldn't be the WSOP without some of the nicknamed events on the schedule. The 2020 WSOP Online schedule includes the Millionaire Maker, the Marathon, Colossus, PLOssus, and the Monster Stack. The Millionaire Maker has a $1,500 buy-in with $1 million going to the eventual champion. Players can enter the event through the 15 starting flights that begin on July 26 and players can reenter each flight once. Players start that event with 50,000 chips and levels will be 13 minutes long. The $400 buy-in Colossus has a total of 14 starting flights beginning July 20 and players can reenter one time per flight. People's Choice One unique element of the schedule includes four events at the tail-end of the schedule that will be decided by the players through one of three methods. There are two events dubbed "People's Choice - Most Popular", a "People's Choice - Spin the Wheel" event, and a "People's Choice - Pros Vote" event. The manner in which this tournament formats and structures will be determined was not announced. Streaming Schedule Seven final tables, including the Main Event, will be streamed on PokerGO. Other PokerGO events include Event #2 ($1,111 Every 1 for Covid Relief), Event #10 ($400 Colossus), Event #11 ($300 PLOssus), Event #17 ($1,500 Millionaire Maker), Event #25 ($10,000 Heads Up NLHE), and Event #38 ($25,000 NLHE Poker Players Championship). Each of these seven events will be stopped once they reach the final table and broadcast on PokerGO the following Saturday, The remaining 47 final tables will be streamed on GGPoker's Twitch channel GGPoker.TV. 2020 WSOP ONLINE SCHEDULE - GGPOKER [table id=73 /] Note: An earlier version of this article listed the number of Main Event flights. PocketFives is working to confirm this number.
  22. Had this been any other summer under a normal set of circumstances, the poker world would be in the midst of the World Series of Poker at the Rio in Las Vegas. That madness would surely have included some of poker's brightest stars owning the stage for their victories, but it also would have featured a number of lesser-known players finding a way to claim their first gold bracelet and thrusting themselves into poker's biggest and brightest spotlight. As everybody is well aware, there isn't really anything normal about this summer. Wednesday marks the beginning of the 31 2020 World Series of Poker online bracelet events on WSOP.com. The big names will all be battling for bracelets and their share of the glory that comes with yet another title. This year, maybe more than any other in the 51-year history of the WSOP, players who have been flying below the radar will have plenty of opportunities to join the exclusive club of bracelet winners. Here are five American players who could put on a show worthy of a little slice of the poker world's attention over the next 31 days. David Coleman David Coleman gets the advantage of starting off the 2020 WSOP with a marquee win fresh in his rearview. On Sunday, Coleman topped the 868-entry field in the World Poker Tour Online Poker Open on the partypoker US Network for a $56,585.70 score. He's not some kid on a heater though. In January, the 27-year-old Livingston, New Jersey resident took over the #1 spot in the USA Rankings for the first time in his career. In April, he earned a New Jersey Spring Championship of Online Poker title by beating 242 other entries in the $350 Sunday Special SE. Coleman has won the PokerStars NJ Sunday Special a staggering eight times since November 2016. All told, Coleman has earned over $3 million playing online in New Jersey and has picked up 257 wins and a 180 second-place finishes. Coleman has had only a small sampling of WSOP success thanks to nine total cashes with just five of them coming on the live felt. In 2017, he picked up a 726th place finish in the Main Event for $18,693. His next best live result came last summer when he finished 27th out of 1,083 players in the $2,620 Marathon event for $13,780 WSOP.com Screenname: 'dehhhhh' Tenzin Chakdor The #19-ranked player in the United States, Tenzin Chakdor was a relatively well-kept secret on the New Jersey online scene until October when he topped the 373-runner field in the PokerStars NJ New Jersey Championship of Online Poker Main Event to win $19,111.88. He's also managed to pick up three cashes in June that rank in his top five all-time scores. He won the WSOP.com $40,000 Weekly Tuesday and the WSOP.com $50,000 Tuesday Showdown for nearly $30,000. Sandwich in between those was a third-place finish in the WSOP.com Online Finale Circuit High Roller for $25,011. He has one previous WSOP.com online bracelet event result, finishing 141st in Event #46 ($500 Turbo No-Limit Hold'em Deep Stack) in 2019. By choice, Chakdor remains a real mystery on the live scene. The New Jersey grinder has had some live success, most notably at Parx Casino in Pennsylvania, but has chosen to keep his live results private. WSOP.com Screenname: 'tc_ownz' Jed Hoffman Jed Hoffman may be one of the most accomplished online grinders in the state of Nevada and very few casual poker fans have ever heard of him. Hoffman has spent a good chunk of the last four years as the #1-ranked online poker player in Nevada and has over $1.1 million in earnings on WSOP.com alone. On June 1, Hoffman beat 483 of the best online players in Nevada and New Jersey when he won the WSOP.com $100,000 Guaranteed Sunday event for $55,198.50. In 2019, Hoffman won a WSOP Circuit ring online - his fourth ring overall - for $22,170. The Reno native is limited to a single online poker site but has 99 wins from 1,346 cashes on WSOP.com. His three previous WSOP Circuit wins all came in the live arena. His first two came in 2013 (Choctaw and Lake Tahoe) and his third 2019 (Thunder Valley). He has 22 WSOP cashes to his credit and in 2013 made the final table of a $1,500 No Limit Hold'em event where he finished in seventh place. WSOP.com Screename: 'jchak' Ryan Dodd Sitting just outside of the top five ranked players in the country, Ryan Dodd has been piling up online results throughout 2020. Seven of his top eight lifetime online scores have come in the last six months, all of them coming on WSOP.com. In January, he won the WSOP.com $100,000 Guaranteed Sunday event for $29,574. He followed that up with a third-place finish the New Years Kick-off Series Main Event on WSOP.com for $16,368. He won a $20,000 Weekly Monday in March before crushing in April. Dodd picked up three big wins; $20,000 Weekly Monday, WSOP.com Spring Online Championships event #28, and the $40,000 Weekly Tuesday for $45,000 total. He also won the $30,000 Weekly Saturday in early June for $10,765. The Runnemede, New Jersey native has never cashed in a live WSOP event but does have $141,552 live cashes on his Hendon Mob profile. Almost all of his live results are from events in Atlantic City including a pair of wins at the Borgata in the summer of 2019. His biggest live cashes also come from the Borgata. He finished second in a $1,090 Borgata Summer Poker Open event for $24,500 in 2019 and in a WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open in 2020 for $17,431. WSOP.com Screename: 'Whosyourdodd' Tyler Sumrall The #2-ranked player in Nevada, Tyler Sumrall has put in an incredible amount of volume on WSOP.com over the past three months. In June alone, Sumrall has cashed 35 times with four of them being victories. In May he cashed 52 times with two wins. On April 9, the Texas native won a WSOP.com Spring Online Championship and earned $10,870.81 for the largest single cash on the regulated site. His total winnings on WSOP.com of $262,086 might pale in comparison to some of his New Jersey-based colleagues, but most of that has come over the past 12 months alone. He's also eight live cashes at the WSOP including two in the Main Event. In 2011, he finished 304th for $35,492 and last summer he bested that, coming in 280th place for $43,935. His other live WSOP cashes all been in lower buy-in, bigger field No Limit Hold'em events. His only live result that paid more than the Main Event cashes came in 2009 when he finished 11th in the WinStar $2,100 Main Event for $48,000. WSOP.com Screename: 'TIPnTimeBOMB'
  23. In less than a week, the 2020 World Series of Poker gets underway as U.S.-based players in Nevada and New Jersey enjoy a schedule of 31 online gold bracelet events to vie for on WSOP.com beginning on July 1. The lure of winning a WSOP bracelet, even online, is likely to bring out large fields of players who may not play regularly on the site. Some of which will travel in from out of state, looking to get set up for the very first time. While others may be firing up an old account, one they haven’t played on since last year. But with a little planning ahead, players can ensure that their main focus during the WSOP is on the tournaments and not on the details it takes to play. Know Your (Deposit) Limits In both Nevada and New Jersey funding a WSOP.com account is, for the most part, pretty straight forward. Methods such as e-Check ACH, credit cards, and PayPal are routine methods for payment for most poker players. Caesars also offers PayNearMe, a 24/7 method where you can bring cash into any participating 7-11 store, and Play+, a stand-alone Ceasars payment card that acts as a wallet for Ceasars gaming, as additional options to fund your WSOP.com account. “We always encourage larger deposits to deposit through cash at the cage,” said Danielle Barille, Director for WSOP Online Poker. A larger deposit might include tens of thousands of dollars as it will take a minimum bankroll of just over $23,000 for a player who plans on grinding every bracelet event on WSOP.com, not including any reentries. Bringing cash to the cage is only available in Nevada and is limited to either Caesars Palace or Harrah’s Casino. But there’s no limit to the amount that can be put online when doing this and it is credited immediately. “This is the most effective way to deposit large sums of money.” So, a player in Nevada can grab a mask, which is now mandatory in all casinos and public places in Nevada, and in one-stop fund their account for the entire summer. The New Jersey Difference In New Jersey though, there may be some planning ahead that needs to be done. For each of the deposit methods, outside of cash at the cage in Nevada, there are deposit limits. Some of these deposit limits are daily, some are weekly and they vary from method to method and from player to player. The aforementioned PayNearMe has a daily deposit limit of $500 while PayPal’s upper limit can be in the thousands. “There are transaction limits on each deposit method, and these are different for each player, set by payment processors,” Barielle said. “For players in New Jersey, the most effective method for most players will be ACH.” She also added that for players in both states PayPal and Play+ should also be viable options. Test Your Geolocation Another potential stumbling block for players who are making the journey from out of state is geolocation and having a unique IP address form which to play. Geolocation is how an online poker operator ensures that you are inside the boundaries of the regulated state in order to play. For most players, this won’t be an issue. The technology has been refined since U.S.-based online operators began using it back in 2013 making it easy to log on almost anywhere inside the state. However, players who live right on the edge of a state and plan to just cross the border and play some poker should make a test run ahead of their first event to see how deep into the state they’ll need to go in order to safely log on. Caesars Properties Newly Whitelisted The larger issue for traveling players may be sharing an IP address. “Per regulations, multiple players from the same IP are unable to join the same tournament, SNGs, or cash games,” Barielle explained. This can pose problems for players who are all looking to battle for a bracelet while staying in the same house and sharing a wi-fi connection. That also goes for players who opt to stay in a hotel that uses a single IP address for their customers. There is good news for players who plan on staying at a Caesars property on either coast. “We were recently granted approval from the Nevada Gaming Control Board and NJ Department of Gaming Enforcement to whitelist Caesars properties IPs to allow for players from the same IP to join MTTs,” Barille said. That’s big for the WSOP who have, for years, heard complaints about the single IP regulation. While it’s unlikely to solve the issue for their customers entirely, as many players travel and stay in AirBnBs, it should make it so players in Nevada or New Jersey should be able to have no problem logging on and playing from a Caesars hotel room. Create A Hotspot However, for players at non-Caesars properties, they could encounter the shared IP problem. One workaround for this is to use a mobile phone as a hot spot. The phone’s own network will generate an IP for a player to log on to the online site. If the online site does not check the credentials again, a switch to the larger wi-fi network is then possible. A player could also use the phone’s generated wi-fi to play out the tournament however the dangers are the strength of the signal from the phone and, of course, it will tax a phone with a limited data plan. Booking A Win One final thing to keep in mind when it comes to getting money on and off of WSOP.com is how to take your money off the site. The WSOP.com online bracelet events are expected to have some of the largest fields in the site's history, many providing six-figure paydays. U.S. players who dabble in unregulated markets may be used to withdraw limits but that’s not the case for the World Series of Poker. “There are currently no withdrawal limits in place. A player who wishes to withdrawal simply needs to request it through the client,” Barielle said. “We also require document verification when requesting a withdrawal. This includes uploading of documents to verify all accounts used for depositing.” Don’t be surprised when right after a win, it takes a little bit of time to get that money offline. It is mandatory to confirm a player's identification, especially if it is a new account. So, this year, spend the time you would have spent in line registering for your third bullet in the Big 50 to get your online affairs in order so that come July 1 all you need to do is grind.
  24. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters, The Fives Poker Podcast runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. It's time to check out a brand new episode of The FIVES Poker Podcast as Lance and Donnie break down all the news from this week in the world of poker. The World Series of Poker has unveiled the first half of the 85 scheduled online gold bracelet events that will be taking place this summer. With 31 being played every day in July on WSOP.com and another 54 to be contested on GGPoker for the rest of the world, the online poker world is going to see an unprecedented amount of new online bracelet winners. Not to be left out, the World Poker Tour and partypoker have also planned some counter-programming in the form of the $100M Gtd WPT World Online Championships where five players will win Champions Club honors while playing online. Make sure you subscribe to The FIVES - available everywhere you enjoy your favorite podcasts! Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  25. History is made every year at the World Series of Poker. It’s part of what makes the WSOP one of the most enduring and alluring brands in the poker industry to this day. This year, a different type of history has already been made. For the first time since its inception in 1970, the WSOP live events have been postponed. This has forced the WSOP to move in a different, and in some ways, uncharted direction. The WSOP summer series is going to take place entirely online with players battling for gold bracelets by clicking buttons as opposed to shuffling chips. Additionally, the WSOP has selected a partner in GGPoker, to give players outside of the United States their first shots at an online bracelet. Holding their entire gold bracelet series online is a first for the WSOP as is taking on an outside online partner to offer bracelets. But, of course, it’s by no means the first time a bracelet will be won online. The WSOP has five years under their belts of expanding their online poker footprint with a total of 18 bracelets events having already been played out. So, before we push ahead to look at a whole new crop of online bracelet winners, we are taking a look back at how the WSOP Online bracelet events have evolved. 2015 Nearly two years after the launch of WSOP.com in the state of Nevada, officials at the summer series announced the first-ever official online bracelet event. The $1,000 WSOP.com ONLINE Championship was the lone online event on the 68-event 2015 schedule. The prize pool reached $859,750 as 905 entries turned the event into the largest regulated online poker tournament in the U.S. at the time. With all of the players needing to be in Nevada, the final six took their chip stacks offline and batted for the bracelet inside the Rio. The final table included David Tuthill, Craig Varnell, and Anthony ‘casedismissed’ Spinella who went on to win the first online gold bracelet and $197,743. [table id=60 /] 2016 In 2016, the WSOP ran it back. They offered the same $1,000 WSOP.com ONLINE Championship with the same format, bringing the final six players back to a live setting to play it out. The field saw a dramatic increase in year-over-year participants as 1,247 runners, a 38% increase, pushed the prize pool to $1,184,650. Colorado native turned Las Vegas local Clayton ‘SLARKDUCK’ Maguire took down a career-high score of $210,279 from a final table where he was the only local participant. [table id=61 /] 2017 The first expansion of the online schedule took place in 2017. In addition to the $1,000 WSOP.com ONLINE Championship, players were offered a lower buy-in event and the first-ever WSOP.com ONLINE High Roller. It was also the first year that the online events would play out online as opposed to a final table in the Amazon room. Nipun ‘Javatinii’ Java took down the $1,000 WSOP.com ONLINE Championship for his second bracelet of the series and a $237,668 payday. The Championship event again grew in size, however with a more modest increase. The 1,312 runners and a prize pool of $1,246,400 represented a roughly 5% field increase. It was former WSOP Main Event final tablist Thomas ‘FLOATZ’ Cannuli that booked the biggest online win of the year. Cannuli topped the 424 players of the first-ever $3,333 WSOP.com ONLINE High Roller for a $322,815 score, the largest haul of any online to that date and a win that continues to be the third-largest online bracelet payday to date. The online events were also starting to generate a good deal of rake. In 2017, online events raked just over $225,000 as opposed to the $62,350 of the single event of the previous year. [table id=62 /] 2018 Once again, history was made in the online arena in 2018. Thanks to the multi-state online pact that was agreed to just before the start of the WSOP that allows players in Nevada, New Jersey, and Delaware to play against each other, players in New Jersey were able to compete in gold bracelet events without heading to Nevada. The WSOP added a fourth online offering. And with the influx of Garden State online grinders, every online bracelet event of the year turned set a record of some kind. The first online bracelet event, a $365 tournament, drew 2,972 runners, which was far-and-away the largest field ever to battle for an online gold bracelet. In the second event, Matthew ‘mendey’ Mendez then became the first player to ever win a bracelet from outside of Nevada by winning the $565 Online bracelet event for over $135,000. The $1,000 WSOP.com ONLINE Championship again hit a new high for entries when Ryan ‘Toosick’ Tosoc defeated a field of 1,635 entries for over $238,000, a nearly 25% increase in runners from the year before. Finally, Chance ‘BingShui’ Kornuth set a new record for the largest online bracelet event payday by winning the $3,200 High Roller for $341,598. [table id=63 /] 2019 In 2019, there was a worry about the growth of online events as the U.S. Department of Justice issued a new opinion of the Wire Act . The opinion put in jeopardy the ability for players in New Jersey to take part in the upcoming World Series of Poker. However, a New Hampshire judge vacated the newly issued DOJ opinion and cleared New Jersey players to fortify what became a nine-event online bracelet schedule. Some of the biggest names in both the live and online arenas captured bracelets in 2019 including the first for New Jersey-based top-ranked U.S. online pros Yong ‘LuckySpewy1’ Kwon and Daniel ‘centrfieldr’ Lupo. Shawn ‘bucky21’ Buchanan, Taylor 'Galactar' Paur, and Upeshka ‘gomezhamburg' De Silva also booked victories. Well-known pro Brandon ‘DrOctogon’ Adams won the $3,200 High Roller bracelet event for the largest online bracelet score to date of $411,560. In total, the nine online events on the 2019 schedule generated just over $755,000 in rake. [table id=64 /] 2020 The previously scheduled 2020 World Series of Poker was set to have another increase in events, upping the total to 14. Now, the adjustment to an extensive online schedule in the face of the coronavirus pandemic gives players a wealth of opportunities to win some online hardware. With 85 total bracelets up for grabs, every current online bracelet event record should expect to be shattered. More than half of the bracelets will be contested on WSOP’s online partner GGPoker which means that players from all over the world, who never had the opportunity to compete for a bracelet, will all of a sudden be able to grind for one. From prize pools to paydays, the numbers in this year's event should soar as players make plans to be online to add their name to the WSOP history books.
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