Daniel Negreanu Blasts Borgata for Edge-Sorting Lawsuit Against Phil Ivey

13

Daniel Negreanu (pictured) recently made his opinions about Borgata’s lawsuit against Phil Ivey abundantly clear, going on several 140-character-fueled tirades defending his friend on Twitter. The Atlantic City casino is suing the poker legend for $9.6 million, claiming he won the cash using a technique it considers to be illegal.

Negreanu, never afraid to speak his mind, started out by questioning the judgment of the casino staff, who allowed Ivey to allegedly run his “edge-sorting” scheme in the first place: “Been reading up on poker news lately and the people running the Borgata high-limit pit have to be incredibly stupid overall.”

In the Tweet, Negreanu is likely referring to the fact that casino management agreed to allow Ivey to raise his betting limit from $50,000 to $100,000 per hand after he had already won millions of dollars playing baccarat and then continued to allow him to play even though he had been accused of using “edge-sorting” at a London casino.

He had praise for Ivey and reiterated the sentiment of many gamblers, saying, “My hat’s off to any man who can get an edge on a big-time casino. It’s just straight baller and I have zero empathy for the big fish.”

Going back to the mistakes made by management, Negreanu Tweeted, “Big fish sets all the rules, okays all the rules, they need to eat it when they get beat and not be whiny biatches about it.”

The “rules” to which he refers are the conditions for the high-limit session of baccarat set by Ivey (pictured) and approved by the casino. The seemingly strange requests included a dealer who spoke Mandarin Chinese and shuffled using an automatic shuffler, a private pit, the ability to have a guest at the table, and, most importantly, a deck of purple Gemaco playing cards.

It’s appalling to free-roll customers,” Negreanu continued. “Take their money if they lose but don’t pay when they win? Are you for real Borgata? That’s dirty.”

Negreanu continued the mini-tirade and called into question how Borgata’s image could suffer with gamblers after the incident. “Suing customers who crushed your souls is a bad look. You got bent over. Might as well smile and enjoy it,” he ranted. “No one in the world has empathy for Borgata in this. Stop playing victim because your hustle wasn’t as good as Ivey’s.”

The consummate gambler even admitted to having been played in the past, but always settled his debts. “I’ve been hustled before, but the idea of not paying was never even a consideration! Borgata – you got hustled bad. Get over it already,” Negreanu said.

In one of his final Tweets on the matter, Negreanu summed up how many gamblers view the whole situation. “Borgata, you thought Ivey was stupid and you tried to bury him. He hustled you, smoked you, and left you feeling silly. Stand responsible!”

Borgata is suing Ivey, along with his alleged partner in the scheme Cheng Yin Sun and card manufacturer Gemacofor lack of quality control.

Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.

13 COMMENTS

    • agree with Dnegs, casino agrees to all the terms and if they win they would take his $$$. But ivey wins so they take him to court. total BS

    • The one question I had about the situation after reading everything is why did Ivey need a dealer who spoke Chinese and a guest who (have not verified this but I’m assuming based on his name) that also speaks Chinese? That’s the part that worries me and makes me fear that Borgata might find a way to make a case.Overall though, this really feels similar to when a casino catches someone card counting in blackjack. If the stakes and the prestige of the gambler were slightly lower, they’d probably just take him to a back room and kick the crap out of him (or whatever they do these days). But here, that’s not an option, so they sue him because he got an edge. What he did wasn’t illegal, it was just frowned upon by the casinos, just like card counting. But now they are trying to take him to court for, I repeat, something that is not illegal. I hope Ivey wins this one.

    • Borgata have no case , fairness and strictness of the games played out in casinos are always by thier rules ,look at the manipulation done by the roulette dealers ,they know how to stack but its ok when the house rakes in the money..Ivey supremely worked out an edge that casino staff should have noticed the minute he requested the extra settings menu ie card shuffler/extra person/and chinese speaker as well as requesting “gemaco cards” ,Its upon the casino’responsibilty to thus ensure fair play is omitted after those terms were agreed either verbally or in written contract ,doesnt matter which of those holds true.The end of the day the casino couldnt take due are and attention to pay more respect to “gemaco”cards and for what its worth never knew there was any such advantage due the cards flawed design.

      I hope Ivey wins both cases and this serves as an illustration to both operators and casino practices that dont have the stones to tell us as customers about thier illegal practices whether it be dodgy blackjack staff/ roulette dealers that coerce the wheel ,and the fact that these dealers are so well trained it puts into question whether or not its the casino cheating us at the end of the day. I know ive lost substancial amounts at 5 card stud and at blackjack over the years and I dont think i did much wrong in either of those games.I just think the casinos have got a massive edge over the rest of the players .

    • and i guess yes I agree with my D negranue , hes always spot on in his analysis , just like the fulltilt and ap/ub saga. I would only like the facts to come out ,everyone said online gaming was safe yada yada when in fact it wasnt ,and thieves that I wont mention but i know dan n hates with a passion ive shared many a bad word with ,and was hugely discusted with her so called 30k wrk ethic per month role.,I mean where do these fkers get off taking 30k a month for blatantly stealing money off the firm? also got me barred out of a tourney i fairly won on absolute poker frigging cheaters.

      going back to the borgata situation i think putting in fake chips as well should have been easy to spot well easy i mean ! ,how they let players play knowing there was leaded chips in play makes my imagination explobe..its just the same with casino chips ,you can take them anywhere you want ,that isnt against the rules .Ive even got some old casino chips at home with a cash value ,did i steal them err no ,i simply never bothered to cash them in.
      bit differerent to tourney chips I would guess anyway.

      I hope Ivey countersues the casino for negligence and corruption, the only way forward is to obviously countersue, but admitting to cheating using a sorting edge leaves me to wonder if the casinos now think they have a case to answer , Personally i would have never admitted it .by his own admission it looks like he is losing what looks like 10,000,000 plus ,and although my hats off to the guy ,thats a whole lotta cash to lose that i would be really pffed about.

    • I’m no lawyer but I’d love to present the case in court that the casino makes all the rules. They determine which total wins for the player, which total wins for the banker and when there’s a tie. They determine the payouts, the vigorish and the limits. They determine when to open, when to close and who the Dealer is. They determine which cards to use, how many decks and when to shuffle. Finally, they have exclusive rights to determine if any of THEIR RULES can be amended. They had every right to refuse Ivey’s requests. They did not. There is “clear and convincing evidence” that in the normal course of operating their casino as they saw fit they got beat. Just because there was an advantage to the player that allowed the player to prevail that they failed to anticipate (regardless of what it was), they have no legal claim to be made whole. Just as the gambler takes a risk, so too does the casino. Pay up!!!

    • Exactly what I have been saying.

      PS. 5 Million wasn’t reached for WPT CHAMPIONSHIP, hmmmm and to say this Ivey fiasco had nothing to do with it would be ignorant.

      Good Job again Borgata. 3 strikes in a row, that shit must hurt

    • The one question I had about the situation after reading everything is why did Ivey need a dealer who spoke Chinese and a guest who (have not verified this but I’m assuming based on his name) that also speaks Chinese? That’s the part that worries me and makes me fear that Borgata might find a way to make a case.Overall though, this really feels similar to when a casino catches someone card counting in blackjack. If the stakes and the prestige of the gambler were slightly lower, they’d probably just take him to a back room and kick the crap out of him (or whatever they do these days). But here, that’s not an option, so they sue him because he got an edge. What he did wasn’t illegal, it was just frowned upon by the casinos, just like card counting. But now they are trying to take him to court for, I repeat, something that is not illegal. I hope Ivey wins this one.

      Ivey’s Chinese friend (named Sun) would tell the dealer in Mandarin Chinese which way to orient all 6 or 7 or 8 or 9 in the entire shoe. By speaking Mandarin Chinese, security observations from non-Chinese speaking Pit Bosses and security personnel were less liikely to raise red flags because most of these other people did NOT speak Chinese. Eventually the entire shoe would be oriented through edge sorting to identify or exclude the 6,7,8,9 as the first card to be dealt to the player hand. If Ivey knew the first card was a ‘good’ card (6,7,8,9), Ivey would bet the table max on the ‘player’ hand. If the first card was NOT 6,7,8,9 – Ivey would bet the ‘bank’ hand. Merely knowing the range of that first card to come out of the shoe gave Ivey about a 6.5 % edge over the house – and this edge turned into millions in winnings after many hours of play.